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Speeding Up Firefox
How to make Firefox load faster

Contributed by:
Ferraridude
[05/31/05 | Discuss (1) | Link to this hack]

The whole point of this is to speed up Firefox, and for me, it worked great. Normally when you first install Firefox, the loading time is slow, even for broadband. Remember, this is a hack for those broadband users. Sorry 56k'ers, you'll have to sit this one out. Another great thing about this is that it takes only a few minutes to tweak your browser.

Tweaking the Browser

Step One: Altering
Open Firefox and type "about:config" into the address bar. Now, scroll down and search for the following entry: network.http.pipelining. Now, set the value to "true". Next, search for network.http.proxy.pipelining and also set that to true. Then find network.http.pipelining.maxrequests and set the value to whatever you want. The number you enter means the number of requests it will take at one time. Personally, 30 is what I use.

Step Two: Creating
Still in the about:config file, right-click. Now select New, and from New, select Integer. Name the new integer to nglayout.initialpaint.delay and put the value to "0". This value is the time that Firefox waits before it acts apon the information it recieves.

Now, your browser should load much faster! Enjoy using Firefox and your broadband to it's full potential.

How It Works

The altering and creating you did in the hack is very simple and is self-explanatory. The first three values you edited(network.http.pipelining, network.http.proxy.pipelining, and network.http.pipelining.maxrequests) have to deal with the requests would make at a time. When you enable pipelining, it allows Firefox to make more requests at once. Thus, speeding up page loading.

Then, the second step(nglayout.initialpaint.delay). As I hinted earlier, this value is the time that Firefox waits before it acts apon the information it recieves. By setting the value to "0", it makes firefox wait "0"(milliseconds probably) before it starts acting on the information it just recived. In other terms, no waiting time.


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