Linux Command Directory


Linux in a Nutshell

This directory of Linux commands is from Linux in a Nutshell, 5th Edition.

Click on any of the 687 commands below to get a description and list of available options. All links in the command summaries point to the online version of the book on Safari Bookshelf.

Buy it now, or read it online on Safari Bookshelf.



telnet

telnet [options] [host [port] ]

Access remote systems. telnet is the user interface that communicates with another host using the Telnet protocol. If telnet is invoked without host, it enters command mode, indicated by its prompt, telnet>, and accepts and executes commands. Type ? at the command prompt to see the available commands. If invoked with arguments, telnet performs an open command (shown in the following list) with those arguments. host indicates the host's official name, alias, or Internet address. port indicates a port number (default is the Telnet port).

The Telnet protocol is often criticized because it uses no encryption and makes it easy for snoopers to pick up user passwords. Most sites now use ssh instead.

Options

-a

Automatic login to the remote system.

-b hostalias

Use bind to bind the local socket to an aliased address or the address of an interface other than the one that would be chosen by connect.

-c

Disable reading of the user's .telnetrc file.

-d

Turn on socket-level debugging.

-e [escape_char]

Set initial telnet escape character to escape_char. If escape_char is omitted, no escape character is predefined.

-f

With Kerberos V5 authentication, allow forwarding of the local credentials to the remote system.

-k realm

With Kerberos authentication, obtain tickets for the remote host in realm, instead of in the remote host's realm.

-l user

When connecting to remote system and if remote system understands ENVIRON, send user to the remote system as the value for variable USER. Implies the -a option.

-n tracefile

Open tracefile for recording the trace information.

-r

Emulate rlogin. The default escape character for this mode is a tilde (~); an escape character followed by a dot causes telnet to disconnect from the remote host; a ^Z instead of a dot suspends telnet; and a ^] (the default telnet escape character) generates a normal telnet prompt. These codes are accepted only at the beginning of a line.

-x

Turn on data-stream encryption if possible.

-8

Request 8-bit operation.

-E

Disable the escape character functionality.

-F

With Kerberos V5 authentication, allow local credentials to be forwarded to the remote system, including any that were already forwarded to the local environment.

-K

Do not allow automatic login to the remote system.

-L

Specify an 8-bit data path on output.

-X atype

Disable the atype type of authentication.


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