Media praise for Mastering Algorithms with Perl

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"Beginner and Intermediate level Perl programmers will find the book's materials information dense but approachable. Advanced programmers will find a well written refresher illustrating familiar concepts in Perl. Given the breadth of the books and the language specific insights, they'll probably learn a thing or two as well... It covers an awful lot in 701 tightly packed pages. Have you ever wondered how regular expressions work? Hashes? Insights into their internal workings are in there. It is an excellent reference and fills a much needed gap. No other Perl book comes close to the breadth and depth coverage of these materials."--Garrett Goebel, Kansas City Perl Mongers, Jan 2003

"A good book to frown and read while your CEO is walking around your department."
-- Brian Hann, Books Every Perl Progammer Should Have, amazon.com

"This part algorithm-textbook, part how-to-manual is loaded with valuable information for programmers."-fatbrain.com

"Excellent book. 5 stars out of 5. As soon as I heard that this book was coming out, I started counting the months until its publication. Because, you see, I had a secret shame. I've always learned best by looking at examples, playing with them, and tweaking them until I knew how they really worked. Pure theory tends to bore me. Either that, or it goes over my head. Pick your excuse. So...I can finally admit it now...I weaseled out of taking the Algorithms class. I graduated from college knowing very little about algorithms other than what I'd picked up in other classes. I wanted to learn all that nifty stuff--efficient sorting algorithms, approximate string matching, graph traversal. All of it was important. I knew that. But pseudo-code just wasn't good enough, and things like algorithms books tend not to be targetted at a specific language. So, I was very excited when 'Mastering Algorithms with Perl' hit the shelves. All the stuff I'd wanted to learn, and in the form from which I learn best. Code! And lots of it! Well worth the price, in my humble opinion." --splinky, Perlmonks.org, Jul 08, 2000

"There hasn't been a book dedicated exclusively to Perl algorithms prior to the publication of this one. In all, Mastering Algorithms in Perl fills a useful niche by compiling a powerful library of Perl algorithms that will be useful for anyone who works with this programming language, whether in business or academic computing." --Richard Dragan, amazon.com

"It's a fun book. Noted Perl hacker Tom Christiansen is quoted on the back cover as saying "This book was so exciting I lost sleep reading it," and that's accurate. I intended to read just the first few chapters before writing this review, but once I started I couldn't bring myself to put it down and pick up the keyboard until I'd at least skimmed every page, and there are almost 700 of them. It's a relatively quick read because many of the pages are filled with diagrams and code examples, but even so, few technical books can hold my interest for so long. The book is exciting because it's full of nifty ideas for things to try with Perl. Every chapter contains something you haven't seen before which you'll find a use for in one of your programs, even if (like me) you already know a fair bit about algorithms and Perl." --Matthew Skala, Big Blue and cousins, The Newsletter of the Greater Victoria PC Users' Association, Oct 2000

"very practical, very useful." --Gregory V. Wilson, Dr. Dobbs, Feb 2000

"..a guided tour of classic data structures and algorithmso rich in code-hardly a page goes by without some Perl or a diagram to illustrate a point-but the authors have kept those snippets short to ensure comprehensibility. They are also careful to write readable Perl (no, that isn't an oxymoron), so that novice or occasional users won't have to flip back and forth between this book and a Perl language reference." --Gregory V. Wilson, Dr. Dobbs, Feb. 2000.

"Reading this book is fun. Here's why. Mastering Algorithms with Perl doesn't assume as much as you might think, and it never loses touch with the fact that much of successful software work depends on saving development time as much as anything else. Before explaining how to calculate the eigenvalue of a matrix, for example, you get an explanation of what eigenvalues are and what they're used for. Then the authors show you a quick way to calculate one, using only the highly refined and freely available Perl Data Language (PDL) module. That's your quick fix. Only after that do they show you how to calculate them on your own. Their code's cool, too... The net result is that you learn an awful lot from this book, and that's why
Mastering Algorithms with Perl is a big winner. It'll hold more appeal for Perl geeks than computer science experts, but a member of either group will close the back cover far wiser than when he or she picked the book up." --David Wall, Enterprise Zone, DEVX.com, Feb 2000

"very interesting if you want to improve the way you go about doing what you do as a programmer. It is written very clearly, and there are loads of examples and things to try. I expect to see it on university-level CS reading lists." --Peter Collinson, EXE, November 1999

"Noted Perl hacker Tom Christiansen is quoted on the back cover as saying "This book was so exciting I lost sleep reading it," and that's accurate. I intended to read just the first few chapters before writing this review, but once I started I couldn't bring myself to put it down and pick up the keyboard until I'd at least skimmed every page, and there are almost 700 of them. It's a relatively quick read because many of the pages are filled with diagrams and code examples, but even so, few technical books can hold my interest for so long. The book is exciting because it's full of nifty ideas for things to try with Perl. Every chapter contains something you haven't seen before which you'll find a use for in one of your programs, even if (like me) you already know a fair bit about algorithms and Perl. Because of the focus on algorithms, everything is considered in terms of the mathematical abstractions: sets, matrices, graphs, and so on. So there's some demand placed on the reader's imagination to see how the concepts could be applied I'm hoping to loan my copy to a friend who's unsure about whether he wants to do a Computer Science degree, and keeps saying foolish things about formal training being unnecessary. If you think that way, the Wolf Book will give you a taste of what you're missing. A strong programming background and at least some Perl skill are necessary prerequisites for this book; but if you have those things, then no matter how advanced you may be, you're sure to learn some new and interesting tricks." --Matthew Skala, Big Blue and Cousins, Dec 2000


I knew right from the first few pages of O'Reilly's "wolf book", published in late 1999, that I'd be getting a lot from it, if it lived up to its own promises of merging the discipline of computer science algorithm study with the practicality of Perl programming. . . in the rush of meeting the next assignment, it becomes far too easy to forsake elegance and efficiency for anything that works for the moment. And that, finally, is the gap which I found
Mastering Algorithms With Perl attempting to fill. In my opinion, its appearance on bookshelves couldn't have waited a moment longer. All in all, this book speaks directly to my type of programmer, teaching concepts that might otherwise lurk out of my reach by cooing gently at me in a language which, while not exactly baby talk, remains one an untrained but somewhat experienced hacker like myself can comfortably grok. To the thirstily curious, I can easily see the path between this book and something like Knuth's 'The Art of Computer Programming' to be a slippery slope (or at the very least, a passable incline). I may take that path later, but for now, I will consider MAWP a real treasure of my bookshelf." --Jason McIntosh, jamc.org, May 2000

"Once, if you wanted to write Perl code that leveraged the efficiency of algorithms and advanced data structures, you'd have to learn with a "traditional" language and then transplant your knowledge to Perl. No longer: Mastering Algorithms with Perl lets you learn right at home, in Perl, from three leaders of the community. And after you're comfortable with the concepts, it'll be an awesome solutions reference. This book has been generating excitement since it was announced: now it's here, and the buzz was entirely well deserved." --barnesandnoble.com Nov 1999

"Mastering Algorithms with Perl takes an unconventional approach to a conventional topic. The book uses the Perl language, instead of the more traditional Pascal or C, to express programming concepts and show examples. It also covers far more than one would expect, delving into areas such as cryptography, linear algebra and statistics. If you have a thorough knowledge of Perl-and aren't put off by a bit of math, this book will provide you with hundreds of code snippets to use in your own work. At no extra charge, you'll get a state-of-the-art course that goes far beyond what you'll get from a typical college class in algorithms. Perhaps this book's greatest asset is its large number of examples, which can be copied directly into real-life programs. It's also an excellent introduction to the wide assortment of ready-made Perl modules, which are available for download from the Internet. These features likely will save you from "recoding the wheel" many times over." --Brett Glass, Smart Reseller, Nov 1999