Media praise for 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know

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"...anyone at the novice to intermediate levels would certainly benefit from what the book contains. I’ve enjoyed reading it."
-- Matthew Helmke, MatthewHelmke.net

"This book’s nicely balanced between highly technical concepts (avoiding Singleton patterns, code metrics) and more general topics (education, scheduling). It’s a great addition to your bookshelf."
-- Jim Holmes, FrazzledDad

"This is definitely an exquisitely valuable collections of "Programming Pearls" and "From The Trenches Advice" valuable to anyone joining the profession from an academic environment, or newly finding themselves in another programming domain. "
-- Ira Laefsky, Amazon.com

"A fascinating book I just could not put down! This is an excellent book for all levels of developers, from those just starting out in programming to those who have been programming for a lifetime already."
-- Kawal Banga, BCS

"Read this book and heed the advice; one will become a better programmer for doing so."
-- M. B. DuBois, Illinois Central College, CHOICE, February 2011 Vol. 48 No. 06

"There is a ton of good information in this book, from general "learn how to talk to the people you work with", to hints at common programming issues, to deeper more complex topics like "yes you can store larger numbers in this data type, but it won't be as accurate"." Full Review >
-- Josh Gunderson, blog.kverke.com

"The book 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know was edited by Kevlin Henney and has no single author. Instead of a typical book with one, two or three authors, this book has almost 1 author per topic covered. The book does re-use some authors across topics, so naturally there are not quite 97 contributors." Full Review >
-- Brian Bondy, brianbondy.com

"The book 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know is basically a collection of essays by a variety of skilled programmers who are each offering their personal view on the topic of what all programmers should know. As you’d expect from such a large collection of authors, the value of the… " Full Review >
-- Bobbie Eicher, bobbielynn.net

"97 Things is a collection of essays spanning a wide range of programming topics. While I found most of the topics interesting, and generally a well written, I took exception to the title. I understand the need for a catchy title, as O'Reilly has to capture the interest of the reader. That being said, I think it would have been better titled something more like "97 Software Essays" or something similar. " Full Review >
-- Ron Ifferte, thoughtsynthesis.com

"Imagine you asked 97 people who have had some experience in the software industry what they think every programmer should know. That is precisely what you get with this crowd sourced collection of tips from O'Reilly. I received a free copy of the e-book as a part of the O'Reilly blogger review program and here is my take on it." Full Review >
-- Matt Hulse, matt-hulse.com

"97 Things Every Programmer Should Know is a collection of advices from programming or software gurus. Each topic is only two pages long and easy to read. If you are a programmer, then you are very likely to find at least a handful of pages that are useful to you. I always have a few principles about programming practices and a couple of them in this book reinforces my opinion." Full Review >
-- Marvin Lee, marvinlee.net

"The book is full of great advices for developpers although some of them are quite obvious for those with experience. Therefore, the book address more to beginners willing to improve their skills." Full Review >
-- David Paccoud, davidpaccoud.com/

"97 Things Every Programmer Should Know is a collection of general tips for all programmers. Edited by Kevlin Henney, it includes 97 tips to help improve yourself as a programmer. The tips try not to be specific to a particular language so that all programers can gain something out of it.… " Full Review >
-- Hector Lee, hector-lee.com

"This book contains a collection of 97 very useful tips about development, system architecture and some about behavior. These tips ware collected from many sources, but all very trustworthy, like Martin Fowler, Dan North, Uncle Bob, Petter Sommerland among others, but all well known and active contributors to application development, most of them with published books. Most of the tips from the book, I would love to hear when I started working with software development, many of them I needed and missed, some are already well known in the agile development community, and all of them should be in the heads of every software developer." Full Review >
-- Rodrigo Jardim, www.urubatan.com.br

"I describe this book as one of the kind "Developer, did you know ...?" because it highlights the best practices that every programmer must keep in mind for a software engineering project." Full Review >
-- Eder Andres Avila Nino, ederandresan.blogspot.com/

"In summation I would say this book presents a number of must knows for all software developers and would a good reference for anyone starting out or just into the beginning of their careers. This of course is based on the assumption that more experienced developers have learned these very… " Full Review >
-- Keith Davidson, www.davincirocks.com

"97 Things Every Programmer Should Know, by Kevlin Henny is a collection of CC-Licensed essays containing... well, you read the title! Topics range from beautiful code, to testing and automating tasks, to interacting with customers/clients. Just about every facet of the professional life of a programmer is covered in this… " Full Review >
-- Wayne Werner, waynewerner.com/blag/

"What I have liked from the very beginning of the book, was the way the content description was organized. There are two tables of content--first one, regular one, second one divides book into different categories, thus you can read just essays related to particular topic." Full Review >
-- Michal Konrad Owsiak, www.owsiak.org

"I think a better title for "97 Things Every Programmer Should Know" would have been "General Advice on Mitigating Inevitable Failure in The Field of Software Engineering". As the title suggests the book consists of 97 short to medium sized essays about programming and software engineering in general. Most of the… " Full Review >
-- David Karapetyan, articulationstudy.posterous.com