Media praise for Dreamweaver CS3: The Missing Manual

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"David McFarland has written a comprehensive how-to and reference manual that not only has value as a 'read-a-chapter and experiment' book, but will function as an invaluable reference tool as Dreamweaver users get further into site development...I fully expect to be referring to this book on a regular basis, so it will be in the book case right beside my computer. It is an excellent reference work for web developers of any skill level as well as for libraries interested in providing highly useful resources to tech-savvy patrons."
-- John R. Clark, TCM Reviews

"One of the beauties of the Missing Manuals is that there is always something new to discover and the research is quite thorough...I kept finding snippets of information, in the way of Tips or Notes, that would give just that bit extra."
-- Graham K. Rogers, Bangkok Post

"What I like about this book is that it takes its time and goes from step a to step z with out rushing. If you work through the lessons, you will find yourself really picking up a lot of information and insight into web development. As promised, Dreamweaver CS3: The Missing Manual is engaging, clearly written, and sometimes funny. If you want to learn Dreamweaver and you don't want the pain of learning it on your own, then Dreamweaver CS3: The Missing Manual is a must have."
-- T. Michael Testi, Blogcritics Magazine

"McFarland's Dreamweaver CS3: The Missing Manual is a powerful all-inclusive reference which is simply a 'must' for any computer collection strong in Dreamweaver patronage."
-- James Cox, The Bookwatch: The Computer Shelf

"Creating your own web site also means learning a software program and this is probably the best book to utilize in order to accomplish the task. The 995 pages of DreamWeaver CS3: The Missing Manual means that this is a BIG book and that also means that you will be obtaining all the knowledge you need in order to design and build your web site. This book covers everything from start to finish with 140 pages of step-by-step tutorials, plus pages of design info, tips & tricks of the trade, forms, and all around professional guidance. With what you can learn from this one book you could even start your own web design business - it is that good."
-- Paul Faust, Apogee Photo Magazine

"As one who derives at least some income from web site design and maintenance I understand the need to start the process of migrating to the new mainstream product. The question then becomes, "What do I use to help me ascend the learning curve?" Time and budget constraints preclude formal classes, workshops or personal trainers. Enter Dreamweaver CS3 from the highly acclaimed "Missing Manual" series...This book is an excellent self tutoring guide opening much of the common, real world web design experience to the Dreamweaver novice. It is what I need at this time."
-- Bob Wood, Tuscon Macintosh User Group

"The strength of the book is the actual missing manual cd. Or I guess I should say the websites that replace this cd. It is terrific to have websites dedicated to the updating, error corrections, and step-by-step tutorial materials and finished products. I spent many an hour working through the tutorials all the while referencing the websites in the projects. The only improvement I could see was to clone David S. McFarland to sit beside me while I worked."
-- Linda McNeil, Macintosh Business Users Society, Philadelphia, PA

"I have reviewed quite a number of Missing Manual books and I am always impressed with them. David Pogue is a Mac master and the depth of his knowledge shines through."
-- Roger Bernau, ACT Apple User Group Incorporated

"I thoroughly recommend this book for all, especially the beginner Dreamweaver user."
-- Randy Southers, Austin Adobe User Group (AAUG)



"One of the beauties of the Missing Manuals is that there is always something new to discover and the research is quite thorough...I kept finding snippets of information, in the way of Tips or Notes, that would give just that bit extra."
--Graham K. Rogers, Bangkok Post