Media praise for Windows XP Professional: The Missing Manual

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"One of the beauties of the Missing Manuals is that there is always something new to discover and the research is quite thorough...I kept finding snippets of information, in the way of Tips or Notes, that would give just that bit extra."
-- Graham K. Rogers, Bangkok Post

"Pogue, the New York Times computer columnist, is among the world's best explainers."
-- Kevin Kelly, co-founder of Wired

"I have reviewed quite a number of Missing Manual books and I am always impressed with them. David Pogue is a Mac master and the depth of his knowledge shines through."
-- Roger Bernau, ACT Apple User Group Incorporated

"Even if you've used every version of Microsoft Windows since 3.0, you're still likely to be foxed once in a while. You can't turn to the manual because there isn't one--or there hasn't been until now. O'Reilly's excellent range of Missing Manuals includes a thorough guide to Windows XP Professional, which describes just about every aspect of the OS from basics such as using Outlook Express to more complicated troubleshooting techniques and obscure utilities. This title fills the gap between the woefully inadequate leaflet you get with Windows and Microsoft's expensive and technical Resource Kit."
--Simon Edwards, Computer Shopper, October 2003

"This is a thorough and remakably comprehensive text with numerous notes, tips, troubleshotting advice and infrequently asked questions. Where there is cause to criticise Winxp the authors are on the consumer's side-and offer work-arounds to oversome some of its obstinate features...I could not detect any aspect of the WinXP Pro operating system that has been missed. A thorough, padding-free coverage that should be part of every end-user's resources."
--Major Keary, Book News, 2003 No. 4

"Touted as being the true manual that Microsoft should have bundled with its last OS release, this title is a great introductory tool to the world of Windows XP Professional...This book achieves its objectives of making Windows XP easier to use and allowing PC users from all walks of life to harness the full working power of Windows XP Professional. The jargon-free text was a joy to read and use when dealing with a problem within XP."
--Ryan Shaw, "Australian PC World," June 2003

"The latest in the 'Missing Manual' series from O'Reilly. These fill in the blanks found, or rather 'not found,' in the manuals provided by software companies. They add a lot more than that, explaining what's happening and how to change it or delete it, in language that's much clearer than the manuals that come with the products."--Bob Schwabach, On Computer, February, 2003

"If you want to be a master, then O'Reilly missing manuals book is what you want! 'Windows XP Pro: The Missing Manual' wasn't written for system administrators or OS theory geeks, but for the novice or budding power user who wants to master the machine and get down to work. Yet, anyone who uses XP Pro (including hardcore techies) will find this new system much easier--and more fun--to digest with this new Missing Manual. This is the crystal-clear, jargon-free book that should have been in the box."
--Richard Brill, Computer Forum, Jan 2003

"A witty and jargon-free guide to what works, what doesn't and what you can and perhaps should do after getting XP Pro...pair it with 'Windows XP Annoyances' and you've got all you need to get the most out of your system."
--Netsurfer Digest, Jan 23, 2003

"The earth clarity, numerous and appropriate illustrations, light-hearted delivery, and comprehensive coverage all coalesce into a welcome--even necessary--addition to the library of any XP user."
--Jim Morrison, North Orange County Computer Club, August 2003

"I would rather go without food for three days than miss any of the Missing Manual books."
--Al Fasodt of "The Post-Standard," June 5, 2003


"One of the beauties of the Missing Manuals is that there is always something new to discover and the research is quite thorough...I kept finding snippets of information, in the way of Tips or Notes, that would give just that bit extra."
--Graham K. Rogers, Bangkok Post