Media praise for Understanding the Linux Kernel

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"Would I buy the book? Undoubtedly, although I don't need it. However if you need to understand Linux source code, then this is the essential guide." - Jan Wysocki, news@UK, June 2001

"Despite the lucid and knowledgeable writing, you'll come up against some brain-stretching complexity. Nevertheless, this book is an important addition to the Linux canon." --Steve Patient, Amazon.co.uk

"Fortunately, times have changed, and now there are several good overviews of the Linux Kernel. Perhaps the most lucid is "Understanding the Linux Kernel" --John Lombardo, Embedded Linux Journal, June 2001

"Online documentation is prolific, but tends to be terse. Fortunately a growing body of literature is developing, a prime example of which is O'Reilly's
Understanding the Linux Kernel Readers will find much of interest in the well-written text." --Major Kearny, Book News, April 2001


"...covers a difficult-to-rasp and technical subject matter, but does it clearly and concisely...a solid grounding in the operation of the Linux Kernel. Rating 9/10." --Richard Drummond, Linux Format, March 2001

"So, taking it as a given the a book about Linux internals is a good thing, how good is this one? Happily, it's very good --better than any previous such book that I've seen. This is a good book. The authors have cracked open a large collection of code that's currently very relevant. If they are in for the long haul and release revised books in a timely way, then this will likely become and remain the definitive explanation of Linux internals." --John Regehr, slashdot.org, January 23, 2001

"O'Reilly continues its tradition of exhaustive and thoroughly lucid guides to all things technical with this thick guided tour of the Linux Kernal. What makes this book stand out among other guides to the Linux operating system is that it takes the time to explain why certain features of the kernal are good or bad for specific applications.It's only a matter of time before this becomes a textbook for advanced college course on operating systems. Highly recommended for serious programmers and application developers." --Netsurfer Digest, Dec 6, 2000


"An outstanding explanation of the kernel that should benefit almost any C/C++ programmer working on Linux. Any programmer who has jumped into the kernal knows there is a real need or a book that takes a reader by the hand and steps through all the major (and sometime minor) internal components and processes of the Linux kernel. Luckily "Understanding the Linux Kernel" not only does that , but it does it very well...the presentation of the material is very well executed, even by O'Reilly's normally high standards...a must-read for anyone doing non-trivial programming on Linux." --Lou Grinzo, internet.com, Dec 22, 2000

"a practical introduction to kernel internals for those who are new to the subject, and I strongly recommend it for any programmer who's competent in C." --www.kuro5hin.org, Feb 14th, 2001

"If you have reached the point where you have learned a few simple ideas about programming in Linux and you would like to know more about kernels then this book is probably for you." --Richard Ibbotson, Sheffield Linux User's Group, Feb 2001 "I am impressed both by the depth of coverage and by the readability of the text, especially bearing in mind the somewhat geek-like nature of the subject that's being discussed. Is the best explanation of Linux kernel internals that I've seen so far. This one's sure to be a classic, buy it if you can." --Developers Review, Feb 2001

"This is a good book. The authors have cracked open a large collection of code that's currently very relevant. If they are in for the long haul and release revised books in a timely way, then this will likely become and remain the definitive explanation of Linux internals." --John Regehr, slashdot.com, January 2001


"After reading this book, you should be able to find your way through the code, distinguishing between crucial data structures and secondary ones"--in short, you'll become a true Linux hacker." --Software World, January 2001