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XProc: XML Pipelines and RESTful Services

By Kurt Cagle
March 11, 2009

Anyone who has used languages such as XSLT should have a pretty fair idea about the complexities involved in treating XML as a programming language itself - it's verbose, forces thinking into a declarative model that can be at odds with the C-based languages currently used by most programmers, can be difficult to read, and as a syntax it doesn't always fit well with the requirements in establishing parameter signatures and related structures.

XProc: XML Pipelines and RESTful Services

By Kurt Cagle
March 11, 2009

Anyone who has used languages such as XSLT should have a pretty fair idea about the complexities involved in treating XML as a programming language itself - it's verbose, forces thinking into a declarative model that can be at odds with the C-based languages currently used by most programmers, can be difficult to read, and as a syntax it doesn't always fit well with the requirements in establishing parameter signatures and related structures.

Towards a Plugin Architecture for XRX Web Applications

By Dan McCreary
February 24, 2009

The growth of XRX web application architectures is driving the need for a new generation of web applications standards beyond the scope of the current XQuery specification. These standards promise to allow non-programmers to quickly assemble new web sites from libraries of pre-built XRX applications.

Building RESTful Services with XQuery and XRX

By Kurt Cagle
January 24, 2009

I've been banging on the RESTful services/XRX bandwagon for a while now, and the good folks at O'Reilly have kindly consented to let me get out the entire trap drum set for an O'Reilly Webinar entitled "Building RESTful Services with XQuery and XRX".

Is It Time for an EXQuery.org?

By Kurt Cagle
January 7, 2009

For the most part, new EXQuery functions would simply represent wrappers around existing XQuery extension functionality in order to provide a consistent interface between databases. It would also set a bar that determines the minimal expectation of such databases and data systems and provides a way for new entrants into the field to be able to XQuery scripts without having to refactor code.

Analysis 2009: The Web Services Era Begins in Earnest

By Kurt Cagle
January 6, 2009

(Warning, this gets technical). This may seem a rather odd statement - after all, "web services" in the traditional SOA sense have been around for the last decade, give or take a few years. I believe, however, that while...

Analysis 2009: XForms and XML-enabled clients gain traction with XQuery databases

By Kurt Cagle
January 6, 2009

I'm beginning to despair about XForms, which is perhaps a good sign. XForms is perhaps the oldest of the W3C technologies that has yet to either die completely or really dramatically take off, and for all that it has...

Through A Glass (Very) Darkly: XML 2009 (Part 1 of 2)

By Kurt Cagle
December 22, 2008

A year later, the IT industry was in the worst recession that it had faced in fifteen years, a time that became known as the Tech Nuclear Winter. Senior programmers with thirty years of experience and post graduate degrees - people who sat on standards committees boards and often served to shape the industry - could be found at coffee shops "working on their next projects" while waiting for a job to open up.

Test Driving MarkLogic 4.0 XML Server

Test Driving MarkLogic 4.0 XML Server
By Kurt Cagle
November 23, 2008

XML databases have long been something of a niche category in the database world, trying with varying degrees of success to provide the level of ease and accessibility for semi-structured content that is a hallmark of SQL databases, while at the same time providing as much of the sophisticated processing that XPath enables for stand-alone documents. The need is certainly there – a significant amount of the total "data" in the world does not necessarily fall neatly into Ted Codd's relational table structures without significant shredding – yet XML databases have had a hard road to acceptance, in great part because each one offered their own (typically very distinct) mechanism for getting at that data.

Warning: x = x + 1 May Be Hazardous to Your Brain

By Dan McCreary
November 17, 2008

Many people that are just starting in their software career have not been exposed to the contrast between two very different approaches to solving server side scalability issues. And although efficiently using 100 CPUs is not critical today, in the next five years it will become critical for a projects success. In this article we look at how the cognitive styles of functional and imperative software will shape the computing industry.

Creating Bullet Bars with Google Charts

By Dan McCreary
November 9, 2008

Using Google Charts REST interface it easy to create bullet bar dashboard indicators without using excessive screen area.

XRX and Context Delivery Architecture

By Dan McCreary
November 6, 2008

What if your web applications could all be quickly customized based on needs of a specific person, role or group? What if you could start out with one general form but it could be easly customized for different roles, groups or class of users? We call these forms CoDA (for Context Delivery Architecture) forms because they can take advantage of the context aware features of the XRX architecture.

Metaphorical Web and XRX

Metaphorical Web and XRX
By Kurt Cagle
October 1, 2008

Contrary to popular opinion, anger is not in fact all that good for a writer - you write, but what you write usually falls into the kind of political diatribes favored by more radical members of fringe parties.

Poor Man's XQuery Update

By Erik Wilde
September 12, 2008

The IETF just published RFC 5261, an XML patch update framework. It's not a complete diff utility for XML, but it's somewhere between the obsolete XUpdate and the complex XQuery Update Facility.


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