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The Drupal API turns a CMS into a true enterprise application

By William O'Connor
August 19, 2014

Contributing author: Ben Schluter Drupal is well known as a Content Management System (CMS) — famously used by the White House and elsewhere. At the company where I work, Achieve Internet, we view Drupal as more than just a CMS …

The Drupal API turns a CMS into a true enterprise application

By William O'Connor
August 18, 2014

Contributing author: Ben Schluter Drupal is well known as a Content Management System (CMS) — famously used by the White House and elsewhere. At the company where I work, Achieve Internet, we view Drupal as more than just a CMS …

The Drupal API turns a CMS into a true enterprise application

By William O'Connor
August 18, 2014

Contributing author: Ben Schluter Drupal is well known as a Content Management System (CMS) — famously used by the White House and elsewhere. At the company where I work, Achieve Internet, we view Drupal as more than just a CMS …

WOOL author Hugh Howey is a tech optimist: The O’Reilly Radar podcast

By Jenn Webb
August 7, 2014

Editor’s note: you can subscribe to the O’Reilly Radar Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. You can download this individual episode via this link. Science fiction long has fueled the imaginations of scientists and inspired …

WOOL author Hugh Howey is a tech optimist: The O’Reilly Radar podcast

By Jenn Webb
August 7, 2014

Editor’s note: you can subscribe to the O’Reilly Radar Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. You can download this individual episode via this link. Science fiction long has fueled the imaginations of scientists and inspired …

WOOL author Hugh Howey is a tech optimist: The O’Reilly Radar podcast

By Jenn Webb
August 7, 2014

Editor’s note: you can subscribe to the O’Reilly Radar Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. You can download this individual episode via this link. Science fiction long has fueled the imaginations of scientists and inspired …

Four short links: 25 June 2014

By Nat Torkington
June 25, 2014

Researchers Find and Decode the Spy Tools Governments Use to Hijack Phones (Wired) — I’m fascinated to learn there’s an Italian company making (and selling) the mobile phone rootkits that governments use. On the Near Impossibility of Measuring the Returns …

Four short links: 25 June 2014

By Nat Torkington
June 25, 2014

Researchers Find and Decode the Spy Tools Governments Use to Hijack Phones (Wired) — I’m fascinated to learn there’s an Italian company making (and selling) the mobile phone rootkits that governments use. On the Near Impossibility of Measuring the Returns …

Four short links: 25 June 2014

By Nat Torkington
June 25, 2014

Researchers Find and Decode the Spy Tools Governments Use to Hijack Phones (Wired) — I’m fascinated to learn there’s an Italian company making (and selling) the mobile phone rootkits that governments use. On the Near Impossibility of Measuring the Returns …

9 things to consider before deploying sensors

By Mark Pacelle
May 5, 2014

Each networking technology has very different attributes and capabilities. When evaluating protocols and standards for your IoT project, you’ll need to understand all of the technical and financial requirements underlying your application in order to effectively choose a technology to …

Technology that gets under your skin

By Jenn Webb
March 27, 2014

Editor’s note: we’re running a series of five excerpts from our forthcoming book Designing for Emerging Technologies, a compilation of works by industry experts in areas of user experience design related to genomics, robotics, the Internet of Things, and the …

Disrupting health care with Google Glass

By Brian Ahier
March 19, 2014

Editor’s note: this article originally appeared on Advanced Health Information Exchange Resources; this lightly edited version is published here with permission. I joined the Glass Explorer Program and have started using Google Glass with a focus on finding medical uses for this …

Wearables and the immediacy of communication

By Matthew Gast
March 7, 2014

I drown in e-mail, which is a common affliction. With meetings during the day, I need to defer e-mail to breaks between meetings or until the evening, which prevents it from being a real-time communications medium. Everybody builds a communication …

Slo-mo for the masses

By Glen Martin
February 22, 2014

The connectivity of everything isn’t just about objects talking to each other via the Internet. It’s also about the accelerating democratization of formerly elite technology. Yes, it’s about putting powerful devices in touch with each other — but it’s also …

I, Cyborg

By Glen Martin
February 17, 2014

There is an existential unease lying at the root of the Internet of Things — a sense that we may emerge not less than human, certainly, but other than human. Well, not to worry. As Kelsey Breseman, co-founder of Technical Machine, points out, we don’t need to …

Cheese, art, and synthetic biology

By Mike Loukides
January 29, 2014

We’ve published the second issue of BioCoder! In this interview excerpt from the new edition, Christina Agapakis talks with Katherine Liu about the intersection of art and science, and the changes in how we think about biotechnology. It’s one of …

Mediated Visions

By Mike Loukides
December 2, 2013

ImpactLab has posted a nice pair of photos contrasting 2005 and 2013 in St. Peter’s Square. 2005 looks pretty much as you’d expect: lots of people in a crowd. In 2013, though, everyone is holding up a tablet, either photographing or perhaps …

Craig Venter on moving at the speed of light

By Mike Loukides
November 8, 2013

Last week I had the privilege of speaking with J. Craig Venter at the Hillside Club in Berkeley, as part of the Bay Area Science Festival. Dr. Venter is a pioneer in biotech, from sequencing the Human Genome to creating a synthetic …

The biocoding revolution

By Ryan Bethencourt
October 21, 2013

What is biocoding? For those of you who have been following the biotechnology industry, you’ll have heard of the rapid advances in genome sequencing. Our ability to read the language of life has advanced dramatically, but only recently have we …

Semi-automatic method for grading a million homework assignments

By Ben Lorica
October 6, 2013

One of the hardest things about teaching a large class is grading exams and homework assignments. In my teaching days a “large class” was only in the few hundreds (still a challenge for the TAs and instructor). But in the …

Podcast: emerging technology and the coming disruption in design

By Jenn Webb
August 30, 2013

On a recent trip to our company offices in Cambridge, MA, I was fortunate enough to sit down with Jonathan Follett, a principal at Involution Studios and an O’Reilly author, and Mary Treseler, editorial strategist at O’Reilly. Follett currently is …

On Batteries and Innovation

By Mike Loukides
July 31, 2013

Lately there’s been a spate of articles about breakthroughs in battery technology. Better batteries are important, for any of a number of reasons: electric cars, smoothing out variations in the power grid, cell phones, and laptops that don’t need to …

Four short links: 6 June 2013

By Nat Torkington
June 6, 2013

ShareFest — peer-to-peer file sharing in the browser. Source on GitHub. (via Andy Baio) Media for Thinking the Unthinkable (Bret Victor) — “Right now, today, we can’t see the thing, at all, that’s going to be the most important 100 …

Magic

By Jim Stogdill
April 5, 2013

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. – Arthur C. Clarke I spent Wednesday at Penn Medicine’s Connected Health event in Philadelphia. We saw an array of technologies that wouldn’t even have been imaginable when I came into this …

3D printing from your fingertips

By Alasdair Allan
February 21, 2013

The 3Doodler is a 3D printer, but it’s a pen. This takes 3D printing and turns it on its head … In fact the 3Doodler rejects quite a lot of what most people would consider necessary for it to be …

Publishing News: The piracy debate may well be irrelevant in the future of publishing

By Jenn Webb
January 25, 2013

Here are a few stories from the publishing space that caught my attention this week. Authors may leave publishers behind to wallow in piracy concerns The publishing industry’s issues with piracy may become a problem of the past, Damien Walter …

Stacks get hacked: The inevitable rise of data warfare

By Alistair Croll
January 19, 2013

First, technology is good. Then it gets bad. Then it gets stable. This has been going on for a long time, likely since the invention of fire, knives, or the printed word. But I want to focus specifically on computing …

Eyebeam Update: Two months after Sandy

By Julie Steele
January 18, 2013

A couple of months ago, I wrote about the new media and design incubator in NYC, Eyebeam, and the damage they’d suffered in Hurricane Sandy. This week I caught up with Eyebeam executive director Pat Jones to find out what …

Need speed for big data? Think in-memory data management

By Roger Magoulas
January 18, 2013

By Ben Lorica and Roger Magoulas In a forthcoming report we will highlight technologies and solutions that take advantage of the decline in prices of RAM, the popularity of distributed and cloud computing systems, and the need for faster queries …

The inevitability of smart dust

By Alasdair Allan
January 8, 2013

I’ve put forward my opinion that desktop computing is dead on more than one occasion, and been soundly put in my place as a result almost every time. “Of course desktop computing isn’t dead — look at the analogy you’re drawing …

After the storm: Putting Eyebeam back together

By Julie Steele
November 28, 2012

Thanksgiving has come and gone and many of us are busy preparing for the winter holidays. For most of us, Hurricane Sandy is about to become a footnote to a crazy series of news cycles around the 2012 presidential election. …

Printing ourselves

By Julie Steele
November 27, 2012

Tim O’Reilly recently asked me and some other colleagues which technology seems most like magic to us. There was a thoughtful pause as we each considered the amazing innovations we read about and interact with every day. I didn’t have …

Two crucial questions for the smart grid

By Jon Bruner
October 31, 2012

In a lively panel discussion at last week’s IEEE Industrial Electronics Society meeting in Montreal, two questions related to the smart grid (the prospective electrical distribution system that will set prices dynamically and let consumers sell electricity to other users …

Publishing News: Consequences and questions from the Twitter kerfuffle

Publishing News: Consequences and questions from the Twitter kerfuffle
By Jenn Webb
August 3, 2012

Here are a few stories that caught my attention in the publishing space this week. 20-20 hindsight On Sunday, Twitter suspended British journalist Guy Adams’ account after he tweeted NBC executive Gary Zenkel’s email address. Much kerfuffle ensued, Adams wrote …

Publishing News: Self-publishing to be the option of first resort?

Publishing News: Self-publishing to be the option of first resort?
By Jenn Webb
July 27, 2012

Smashwords' founder Mark Coker discusses the future of publishing in a series of interviews, the DOJ says its antitrust lawsuit "is in the public interest," Robin Sloan writes a book review in JavaScript, and Razorfish makes an NFC Gumball Machine.

Data journalism research at Columbia aims to close data science skills gap

By Alex Howard
May 22, 2012

In this interview, the director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University talks about the challenges and opportunities that face those who would practice data journalism in the 21st century. In particular, Emily Bell discusses the skills and mindset that are needed, including how a $2 million research grant will help support developing them.

Data journalism research at Columbia aims to close data science skills gap

By Alex Howard
May 22, 2012

In this interview, the director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University talks about the challenges and opportunities that face those who would practice data journalism in the 21st century. In particular, Emily Bell discusses the skills and mindset that are needed, including how a $2 million research grant will help support developing them.

Data journalism research at Columbia aims to close data science skills gap

By Alex Howard
May 22, 2012

In this interview, the director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University talks about the challenges and opportunities that face those who would practice data journalism in the 21st century. In particular, Emily Bell discusses the skills and mindset that are needed, including how a $2 million research grant will help support developing them.

Cloud Music: The Zombie Dinosaur Report

By Peter Drescher
May 20, 2012

Last year, a bunch of really smart people got together at a haunted mansion outside of San Antonio, Texas, to discuss audio trends and mobile technologies. Our group wrote a report describing a Utopian vision of what cloud music might look like.

Automatic Grading Misses the Mark

By Josh Nutzman
April 6, 2012

Can mentors be replaced by robo-readers? Josh Nutzman talks about the possibility in automated grading programs.

Editorial Radar with Mike Loukides & Mike Hendrickson

By Laurie Petrycki
April 5, 2012

In this first episode of "Editorial Radar," O'Reilly editors Mike Loukides and Mike Hendrickson discuss the important technologies they're tracking.

The Falling Man and a center that cannot hold

By Doug Hill
February 16, 2012

Doug Hill on how we celebrate exponential technological advance while looking for ways to escape it.

Four short links: 13 January 2012

By Nat Torkington
January 13, 2012

How The Internet Gets Inside Us (The New Yorker) -- at any given moment, our most complicated machine will be taken as a model of human intelligence, and whatever media kids favor will be identified as the cause of our stupidity. When there were automatic looms, the mind was like an automatic loom; and, since young people in the...

A sensible look at HTML5 and publishing

By Jenn Webb
December 7, 2011

Everyone in the publishing world seems to be boasting about HTML5, but what does HTML5 actually address and how should it be used? In this interview, "HTML5 for Publishers" author Sanders Kleinfeld discusses the technology's practical application.

A sensible look at HTML5 and publishing

By Jenn Webb
December 7, 2011

Everyone in the publishing world seems to be boasting about HTML5, but what does HTML5 actually address and how should it be used? In this interview, "HTML5 for Publishers" author Sanders Kleinfeld discusses the technology's practical application.

Steve Jobs, the Unabomber, and America's love/hate relationship with technology

Steve Jobs, the Unabomber, and America's love/hate relationship with technology
By Doug Hill
November 14, 2011

Steve Jobs and Ted Kaczynski represent the extreme poles of a deep-seated ambivalence in our attitudes toward technology. It's an ambivalence that's been a part of American history, and part of the American psyche, since the beginning.

Three game characteristics that can be applied to education

By Marie Bjerede
November 7, 2011

Cloud technologies and thoughtful roadmapping of digital technology can ensure that authenticity, social interaction, and play remain central components of education.

Three game characteristics that can be applied to education

By Marie Bjerede
November 7, 2011

Cloud technologies and thoughtful roadmapping of digital technology can ensure that authenticity, social interaction, and play remain central components of education.

The maker movement's potential for education, jobs and innovation is growing

The maker movement's potential for education, jobs and innovation is growing
By Alex Howard
November 4, 2011

Dale Dougherty, one of the co-founders of O'Reilly Media, was honored by the White House as a "Champion of Change" for his work on "MAKE" Magazine, MakerFaire and the broader DIY movement.

On the media reaction to the death of Steve Jobs

By Alex Howard
October 9, 2011

In the context of worldwide reactions to the impact of Steve Jobs on the arc of history, recognizing the complexity of his life and offering a balanced assessment of the impact of his legacy on this earth matters. In that context, O'Reilly editors share their reflections on the passing of one of the technology industry's iconic figures.


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