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Innovation requires a new mind-set: The O’Reilly Radar Podcast

By Jenn Webb
September 4, 2014

Editor’s note: you can subscribe to the O’Reilly Radar Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. I recently lamented the lag in innovation in relation to the speed of technological advancements — do we really need a connected …

Innovation requires a new mind-set: The O’Reilly Radar Podcast

By Jenn Webb
September 4, 2014

Editor’s note: you can subscribe to the O’Reilly Radar Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. I recently lamented the lag in innovation in relation to the speed of technological advancements — do we really need a connected …

Innovation requires a new mind-set: The O’Reilly Radar Podcast

By Jenn Webb
September 4, 2014

Editor’s note: you can subscribe to the O’Reilly Radar Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. I recently lamented the lag in innovation in relation to the speed of technological advancements — do we really need a connected …

WOOL author Hugh Howey is a tech optimist: The O’Reilly Radar podcast

By Jenn Webb
August 7, 2014

Editor’s note: you can subscribe to the O’Reilly Radar Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. You can download this individual episode via this link. Science fiction long has fueled the imaginations of scientists and inspired …

WOOL author Hugh Howey is a tech optimist: The O’Reilly Radar podcast

By Jenn Webb
August 7, 2014

Editor’s note: you can subscribe to the O’Reilly Radar Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. You can download this individual episode via this link. Science fiction long has fueled the imaginations of scientists and inspired …

WOOL author Hugh Howey is a tech optimist: The O’Reilly Radar podcast

By Jenn Webb
August 7, 2014

Editor’s note: you can subscribe to the O’Reilly Radar Podcast through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. You can download this individual episode via this link. Science fiction long has fueled the imaginations of scientists and inspired …

Podcast: Design for how the world should work

By Jenn Webb
July 24, 2014

Editor’s note: this podcast episode is the first in our new bi-weekly O’Reilly Radar Podcast series. You can subscribe through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. As the Internet is increasingly embedded into our physical world, it’s …

Podcast: Design for how the world should work

By Jenn Webb
July 24, 2014

Editor’s note: this podcast episode is the first in our new bi-weekly O’Reilly Radar Podcast series. You can subscribe through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. As the Internet is increasingly embedded into our physical world, it’s …

Podcast: Design for how the world should work

By Jenn Webb
July 24, 2014

Editor’s note: this podcast episode is the first in our new bi-weekly O’Reilly Radar Podcast series. You can subscribe through iTunes, SoundCloud, or directly through our podcast’s RSS feed. As the Internet is increasingly embedded into our physical world, it’s …

Podcast: thinking with data

By Jon Bruner
March 18, 2014

Max Shron and Jake Porway spoke with me a few weeks ago about frameworks for making reasoned arguments with data. Max’s recent O’Reilly book, Thinking with Data, outlines the crucial process of developing good questions and creating a plan to answer …

Polyglot Programming: What Is It and Why Should You Be Using It?

By Ally MacDonald
November 21, 2013

  I recently interviewed O’Reilly author Neal Ford (Functional Thinking, The Productive Programmer) on the subject of polyglot programming. In 2006, Neal wrote a blog post which resurrected the term, suggesting that as modern applications become more complex, it is …

Podcast: the democratization of manufacturing

By Jon Bruner
November 15, 2013

Manufacturing is hard, but it’s getting easier. In every stage of the manufacturing process–prototyping, small runs, large runs, marketing, fulfillment–cheap tools and service models have become available, dramatically decreasing the amount of capital required to start building something and the …

Podcast: the democratization of manufacturing

By Jon Bruner
November 5, 2013

Manufacturing is hard, but it’s getting easier. In every stage of the manufacturing process–prototyping, small runs, large runs, marketing, fulfillment–cheap tools and service models have become available, dramatically decreasing the amount of capital required to start building something and the …

Podcast: the Internet of Things should work like the Internet

By Jenn Webb
November 3, 2013

At our OSCON conference this summer, Jon Bruner, Renee DiResta and I sat down with Alasdair Allen, a hardware hacker and O’Reilly author; Josh Marinacci, a researcher with Nokia; and Tony Santos, a user experience designer with Mozilla. Our discussion …

Dealing with Data in the Hadoop Ecosystem

By Rachel Roumeliotis
October 24, 2013

Kathleen Ting (@kate_ting), Technical Account Manager at Cloudera, and our own Andy Oram (@praxagora) sat down to discuss how to work with structured and unstructured data as well as how to keep a system up and running that is crunching …

Podcast: ratings, rankings, and the advantage of being born lucky

By Jon Bruner
August 8, 2013

Is popularity just a matter of simple luck–of some early advantage compounded by human preference for things that are already popular? A paper published today in Science offers some insight into the way that popularity emerges in online ratings. Lev Muchnik, Sinan …

Podcast: quantum computing with Pete Worden and Bob Lee

By Jon Bruner
July 26, 2013

At Sci Foo Camp a few weeks ago we recorded a conversation with Pete Worden, director of NASA’s Ames Research Center, and Bob Lee, CTO of Square. Among our topics on this wide-ranging podcast: quantum computing, which Ames is pursuing …

Where Innovation Lives

By Jim Stogdill
July 20, 2013

I sat down with Jon Bruner in New York City this week to talk about where innovation happens. Concentration still seems to matter, even in a networked world, but concentration of what? Minds, money, markets, or manufacturing know-how? People we …

Enterprise Data Workflows with Cascading

By Rachel Roumeliotis
July 18, 2013

Paco Nathan (@pacoid) is Director of Data Science at Concurrent, O’Reilly Author, and OSCON 2013 Speaker. In this interview we talk about creating enterprise data workflow with Cascading. Be sure to check out Paco’s book on the subject here NOTE: …

Podcast: George Church on genomics

By Jon Bruner
July 12, 2013

A few weeks ago some of my colleagues and I recorded a conversation with George Church, a Harvard University geneticist and one of the founders of modern genomics. In the resulting podcast, you’ll hear Church offer his thoughts on the …

Human-Centered Design May Be What Makes Your App Stand Out

By Rachel Roumeliotis
June 27, 2013

Tony Santos, (@tsmuse) is a User Experience Lead at Mozilla and OSCON 2013 Speaker. We talk about Human-Centered Design and how it can make all the difference. NOTE: If you are interested in attending OSCON to check out Tony’s talk …

Podcast: what makes a scientist?

By Jon Bruner
June 26, 2013

At Sci Foo Camp last weekend we enjoyed sitting down with several thoughtful scientists and thinkers-about-science to record a few podcast episodes. Here we speak with Tom Daniel, a professor of biology, computer science, and neurobiology at the University of …

Radar podcast: the Internet of Things, PRISM, and defense technology that goes civilian

By Jon Bruner
June 14, 2013

On this week’s podcast, Jim Stogdill, Roger Magoulas and I talk about things that have been on our minds lately: the NSA’s surveillance programs, what defense contractors will do with their technology as defense budgets dry up, and a Californian who …

Radar podcast: anthropology, big data, and the importance of context

By Jon Bruner
June 5, 2013

Jim Stogdill, Roger Magoulas and I enjoyed a widely discursive discussion last week, available as a podcast above. Roger, fresh from our Fluent conference on JavaScript, opens by talking about the emergence of JS as a heavyweight computing tool and …

How you can stop trashing PHP code

By Rachel Roumeliotis
April 25, 2013

William Sanders (@williebegoode) is a Professor of Interactive Information Technology at the University of Hartford and author of over 40 technical books! His latest book with us is Learning PHP Design Patterns. We recently sat down to talk about design …

Building native apps from JavaScript using Titanium

By Andy Oram
April 18, 2013

In this interview, the author of Titanium: Up and Running describes how Titanium can be used to generate native mobile apps from JavaScript code. He distinguishes the Titanium platform from native API programming and from other popular JavaScript platforms for …

Distributed resilience with functional programming

By Simon St. Laurent
February 8, 2013

Functional programming has a long and distinguished heritage of great work — that was only used by a small group of programmers. In a world dominated by individual computers running single processors, the extra cost of thinking functionally limited its …

Distributed resilience with functional programming

By Simon St. Laurent
February 8, 2013

Functional programming has a long and distinguished heritage of great work — that was only used by a small group of programmers. In a world dominated by individual computers running single processors, the extra cost of thinking functionally limited its …

Emerging languages spotlight: Elm

By Rachel Roumeliotis
November 30, 2012

Over the next few months I’ll be taking a look at new and emerging programming languages. The following piece is the first in this series. The Elm Programming Language, created by Evan Czaplicki, tackles web interaction and takes on the …

CSS keeps growing

By Simon St. Laurent
October 24, 2012

Eric Meyer, the author of CSS: The Definitive Guide (and much more) has taught thousands of people CSS through his books, his talks, and his articles. I’ve always enjoyed hearing his take on the state of CSS, as he manages …

Tools for test-driven development in Scala

By Andy Oram
October 17, 2012

Scala, a language designed for well-structured and readable programs, is richly provisioned with testing frameworks. The community has adopted test-driven development (TDD) and behavior-driven development (BDD) with zeal. These represent the baseline for trustworthy code development today. TDD and BDD …

The promise of WebGL

By Mary Treseler
October 12, 2012

WebGL (Web Graphics Library) is a JavaScript API maintained by the Khronos group, a standards body responsible for other open standards including OpenGL. WebGL allows developers to display hardware-accelerated interactive 3D graphics in the browser without installing additional software — …

Checking in on Python

By Rachel Roumeliotis
October 4, 2012

Guido van Rossum is the creator of Python. I recently had the opportunity to talk with him about the state of the language. You probably don’t realize it, but Python’s capabilities are pushed every time you use YouTube and Dropbox. …

Why we need Go

By Rachel Roumeliotis
September 13, 2012

The Go programming language was created by Rob Pike, Ken Thompson, and Robert Griesemer. Pike (@rob_pike) recently told me that Go was born while they were waiting a long while for some code to compile — too long. C++ and …

The many sides to shipping a great software project

By Andy Oram
September 9, 2012

Chris Vander Mey, CEO of Scaled Recognition, and author of a new O’Reilly book, Shipping Greatness, lays out in this video some of the deep lessons he learned during his years working on some very high-impact and high-priority projects at …

PowerShell for developers

By Rachel Roumeliotis
September 5, 2012

Doug Finke (@dfinke) is an O’Reilly author and software developer. He moderates a PowerShell for Developers forum at powershell.org. We sat down recently to talk about the PowerShell, which has a new version launching with Windows 8 and Windows Server …

ASP.NET web API rocks

By Rachel Roumeliotis
August 28, 2012

Glenn Block (@gblock) is an O’Reilly author and senior program manager on the Windows Azure Team at Microsoft. We sat down recently to talk about the newly released ASP.NET Web API Framework, which he helped develop, and why it will …

Mastering iOS Development

By Rachel Roumeliotis
August 22, 2012

Matt Neuburg is an O’Reilly author and long-time writer for tidBITS. We sat down recently to talk about iOS development and how best to build solid apps … the secret is take the time to learn the basics. Key points …

Android evolves and so must you

Android evolves and so must you
By Rachel Roumeliotis
August 15, 2012

Christopher Neugebauer (@chrisjrn) is an Android and Python developer at Secret Lab and conference coordinator of PyCon Australia. Key points from our full discussion include: Great features from Jellybean are available for older OSes. [Discussed at the 2:32 mark] Android …

The agency model’s impact on ebook pricing

The agency model’s impact on ebook pricing
By Joe Wikert
August 10, 2012

The agency model has played a key role in ebook pricing models, and the DOJ’s recent ruling has generated a large number of responses from the community. One of the more interesting ones was from Simon Lipskar, President of the …

Data-driven publishing is the future

Data-driven publishing is the future
By Joe Wikert
August 9, 2012

As our industry shifts from print to ebooks we’re discovering a wealth of new data to study. Retailers hold most of the cards for this data, but a startup named Hiptype is looking to change that. In the interview below, …

Damian Conway weighs in on new features, best practices and Perl’s future

Damian Conway weighs in on new features, best practices and Perl’s future
By Rachel Roumeliotis
August 8, 2012

Damian Conway is a prominent member of the Perl community, author and presenter. Key points from the full video of our recent interview include: Perl 6 might not be here yet but it is seeping into Perl 5. [Discussed at …

The agency model’s impact on ebook pricing

The agency model’s impact on ebook pricing
By Joe Wikert
August 6, 2012

The agency model has played a key role in ebook pricing models, and the DOJ’s recent ruling has generated a large number of responses from the community. One of the more interesting ones was from Simon Lipskar, President of the …

Sensors and Arduino: How to glue them together

Sensors and Arduino: How to glue them together
By Brian Jepson
August 1, 2012

Federico Lucifredi (@federico_II) is the maintainer of man(1) and also the author of the upcoming book, Sensor Interfaces for Arduino. We had a chance to sit down recently and talk about how to connect sensors to microcontrollers (in particular Arduino). …

Inside GitHub’s role in community-building and other open source advances

Inside GitHub’s role in community-building and other open source advances
By Andy Oram
July 26, 2012

In this video interview, Matthew McCullough of GitHub discusses what they’ve learned over time as they grow and watch projects develop there. Highlights from the full video interview include: How GitHub builds on Git’s strengths to allow more people to …

The value of free

The value of free
By Joe Wikert
July 25, 2012

In this TOC podcast, Wattpad CEO & co-founder Allen Lau explains the free content foundation of his company.

Objective-C and Cocoa: The core of solid iOS apps

Objective-C and Cocoa: The core of solid iOS apps
By Rachel Roumeliotis
July 19, 2012

Jon Manning (@desplesda) and Paris Buttfield-Addison (@parisba) are co-founders of Secret Lab and authors of the forthcoming Learning Cocoa with Objective-C, 3rd Edition Key points from the full video (below) interview include: Embrace Objective-C’s verbosity [Discussed at the 0:30 mark] Just …

Pricing lessons learned from a publishing startup

By Joe Wikert
July 13, 2012

In this TOC podcast, Demibooks CEO and co-founder Rafiq Ahmed talks about challenges in the ebook tools space and how his startup is handling pricing.

The key web technologies that work together for dynamic web sites

The key web technologies that work together for dynamic web sites
By Andy Oram
July 12, 2012

The technologies that led to an explosion of interactive web sites — PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, and CSS — are still as popular today, and a non-programmer can master them quickly.

A geeky summertime treat

A geeky summertime treat
By Brian Sawyer
July 4, 2012

Got 30 seconds and some liquid nitrogen? In this Code podcast, Cooking for Geeks author Jeff Potter shows how those two ingredients (and a few others) can summon near-instant ice cream.


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