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Governments can bridge costs and services gaps with sensor networks

By Anni Ylagan
July 15, 2014

Contributing authors: Andre Bierzynski and Kevin Chrapaty. It’s not news to anyone who works in government that we live in a time of ever-tighter budgets and ever-increasing needs. The 2013 federal shutdown only highlighted this precarious situation: government finds it …

Governments can bridge costs and services gaps with sensor networks

By Anni Ylagan
July 15, 2014

Contributing authors: Andre Bierzynski and Kevin Chrapaty. It’s not news to anyone who works in government that we live in a time of ever-tighter budgets and ever-increasing needs. The 2013 federal shutdown only highlighted this precarious situation: government finds it …

Governments can bridge costs and services gaps with sensor networks

By Anni Ylagan
July 11, 2014

Contributing authors: Andre Bierzynski and Kevin Chrapaty. It’s not news to anyone who works in government that we live in a time of ever-tighter budgets and ever-increasing needs. The 2013 federal shutdown only highlighted this precarious situation: government finds it …

What is deep learning, and why should you care?

By Pete Warden
July 10, 2014

Editor’s note: this post is part of our Intelligence Matters investigation. When I first ran across the results in the Kaggle image-recognition competitions, I didn’t believe them. I’ve spent years working with machine vision, and the reported accuracy on tricky …

What is deep learning, and why should you care?

By Pete Warden
July 10, 2014

Editor’s note: this post is part of our Intelligence Matters investigation. When I first ran across the results in the Kaggle image-recognition competitions, I didn’t believe them. I’ve spent years working with machine vision, and the reported accuracy on tricky …

What is deep learning, and why should you care?

By Pete Warden
July 10, 2014

Editor’s note: this post is part of our Intelligence Matters investigation. When I first ran across the results in the Kaggle image-recognition competitions, I didn’t believe them. I’ve spent years working with machine vision, and the reported accuracy on tricky …

Citizens as partners in the use of clinical data

By John Wilbanks
May 5, 2014

This article was written together with Mike Kellen, Director of Technology at Sage Bionetworks, and Christine Suver, Senior Scientist at Sage Bionetworks. The current push towards patient engagement, when clinical researchers trace the outcomes of using pharmaceuticals or other treatments, …

#IoTH: The Internet of Things and Humans

By Tim O'Reilly
April 15, 2014

Rod Smith of IBM and I had a call the other day to prepare for our onstage conversation at O’Reilly’s upcoming Solid Conference, and I was surprised to find how much we were in agreement about one idea: so many of the …

Four short links: 10 April 2014

By Nat Torkington
April 10, 2014

Rise of the Patent Troll: Everything is a Remix (YouTube) — primer on patent trolls, in language anyone can follow. Part of the fixpatents.org campaign. (via BoingBoing) Petabytes of Field Data (GigaOm) — Farm Intelligence using sensors and computer vision …

Four short links: 31 March 2014

By Nat Torkington
March 31, 2014

Game Programming Patterns — a book in progress. Search for the Next Platform (Fred Wilson) — Mobile is now the last thing. And all of these big tech companies are looking for the next thing to make sure they don’t …

Four short links: 28 March 2014

By Nat Torkington
March 28, 2014

WearScript — open source project putting Javascript on Glass. See story on it. (via Slashdot) Mining the World’s Data by Selling Street Lights and Farm Drones (Quartz) — Depending on what kinds of sensors the light’s owners choose to install, …

iBeacon basics

By Matthew Gast
March 21, 2014

As any programmer knows, writing the “hello, world” program is the canonical elementary exercise in any new programming language. Getting devices to interact with the world is the foundation of the Internet of Things, and enabling devices to learn about …

Why deep belief matters so much

By Pete Warden
March 19, 2014

If you’re a programmer who reads the Internet, you’ll have heard of deep belief networks. Google loves them, Facebook just hired one of the pioneers to lead a new group, and they win Kaggle competitions. I’ve been using deep belief …

Internet of Things in celebration and provocation at MIT

By Andy Oram
February 26, 2014

Last Saturday’s IoT Festival at MIT became a meeting ground for people connecting the physical world. Embedded systems developers, security experts, data scientists, and artists all joined in this event. Although it was called a festival, it had a typical …

Hurdles to the Internet of Things prove more social than technical

By Andy Oram
February 26, 2014

Last Saturday’s IoT Festival at MIT became a meeting-ground for people connecting the physical world. Embedded systems developers, security experts, data scientists, and artists all joined in this event. Although it was called a festival, it had a typical conference …

Four short links: 3 January 2014

By Nat Torkington
January 2, 2014

Commotion — open source mesh networks. WriteLaTeX — online collaborative LaTeX editor. No, really. This exists. In 2014. Distributed Systems — free book for download, goal is to bring together the ideas behind many of the more recent distributed systems …

Who will upgrade the telecom foundation of the Internet?

By Andy Oram
December 9, 2013

Although readers of this blog know quite well the role that the Internet can play in our lives, we may forget that its most promising contributions — telemedicine, the smart electrical grid, distance education, etc. — depend on a rock-solid …

Investigating the Twitter Interest Graph

By Matthew Russell
October 14, 2013

Tomorrow, I’ll be presenting a short webcast entitled Why Twitter Is All the Rage: A Data Miner’s Perspective that is loosely adapted from material that appears early in Mining the Social Web (2nd Ed). Given that the webcast is almost here, I wanted …

The Role of Big Data in Personalizing the Healthcare Experience: Mobile

By Bonnie Feldman
September 1, 2013

This article was written with Ellen M. Martin and Tobi Skotnes. Dr. Feldman will deliver a webinar on this topic on September 18 and will speak about it at the Strata Rx conference. Cheaper, faster, better technology is enabling nearly …

Four short links: 16 July 2013

By Nat Torkington
July 16, 2013

Pete Warden on Sensors — We’re all carrying little networked laboratories in our pockets. You see a photo. I see millions of light-sensor readings at an exact coordinate on the earth’s surface with a time resolution down to the millisecond. …

Data sharing drives diagnoses and cures, if we can get there (part 2)

By Andy Oram
April 29, 2013

Editor’s note: Earlier this week, Part 1 of this article described Sage Bionetworks, a recent Congress they held, and their way of promoting data sharing through a challenge. Data sharing is not an unfamiliar practice in genetics. Plenty of cell …

Data sharing drives diagnoses and cures, if we can get there (part 1)

By Andy Oram
April 29, 2013

The glowing reports we read of biotech advances almost cause one’s brain to ache. They leave us thinking that medical researchers must command the latest in all technological tools. But the engines of genetic and pharmaceutical innovation are stuttering for …

Four short links: 10 April 2013

By Nat Torkington
April 10, 2013

HyperLapse — this won the Internet for April. Everyone else can go home. Check out this unbelievable video and source is available. Housing Simulator — NZ’s largest city is consulting on its growth plan, and includes a simulator so you …

The coming of the industrial internet

By Jon Bruner
March 27, 2013

Download this free report(PDF, Mobi, EPUB) The big machines that define modern life — cars, airplanes, furnaces, and so forth — have become exquisitely efficient, safe, and responsive over the last century through constant mechanical refinement. But mechanical refinement has …

Four short links: 26 Feb 2013

By Nat Torkington
February 26, 2013

School of Data — free online courses around data science and visualization. libshorttext — classify and analyse short-text of things like titles, questions, sentences, and short messages. MIT-style open source license, Python and C++ source. Letterboxd — a site for …

Four short links: 20 February 2013

By Nat Torkington
February 20, 2013

The Network of Global Control (PLoS One) — We find that transnational corporations form a giant bow-tie structure and that a large portion of control flows to a small tightly-knit core of financial institutions. [...] From an empirical point of …

The inevitability of smart dust

By Alasdair Allan
January 8, 2013

I’ve put forward my opinion that desktop computing is dead on more than one occasion, and been soundly put in my place as a result almost every time. “Of course desktop computing isn’t dead — look at the analogy you’re drawing …

Open source software as a model for health care

By Andy Oram
October 9, 2012

(The following article sprang from a collaboration between Andy Oram and Brigitte Piniewski to cover open source concepts in an upcoming book on health care. This book, titled “Wireless Health: Remaking of Medicine by Pervasive Technologies,” is edited by Professor …

Four short links: 2 October 2012

By Nat Torkington
October 2, 2012

Print Your Own 3D Parts (Wired) — Teenage Engineering, makers of a popular synthesizer known as the OP-1, posted the 3-D design files of various components on digital object repository Shapeways, and is instructing 3-D printer-equipped users to print them …

Four short links: 24 September 2012

By Nat Torkington
September 24, 2012

Open Monograph Press — an open source software platform for managing the editorial workflow required to see monographs, edited volumes and, scholarly editions through internal and external review, editing, cataloguing, production, and publication. OMP will operate, as well, as a …

Four short links: 29 June 2012

By Nat Torkington
June 29, 2012

Personalization (Chris Lehmann) -- We should be careful about how we use that term, and we should be very skeptical of how well computerized programs can really personalize for kids. Most of what I see - especially from curriculum and assessment vendors - involves personalization of pace while still maintaining standardization of content. This. Unveiling Quadrigram (Near Future Laboratory)...

Recombinant Research: Breaking open rewards and incentives

By Andy Oram
May 2, 2012

To move from a hothouse environment of experimentation to the mainstream of one of the world's most lucrative and tradition-bound industries, Sage Bionetworks must aim for its nucleus: rewards and incentives. Comparisons to open source software and a summary of tasks for Sage Congress.

Recombinant Research: Breaking open rewards and incentives

By Andy Oram
May 2, 2012

To move from a hothouse environment of experimentation to the mainstream of one of the world's most lucrative and tradition-bound industries, Sage Bionetworks must aim for its nucleus: rewards and incentives. Comparisons to open source software and a summary of tasks for Sage Congress.

Recombinant Research: Sage Congress plans for patient engagement

By Andy Oram
May 1, 2012

The Vioxx problem is just one instance of the wider malaise afflicting the drug industry. Managers from major pharma companies expressed confidence that they could expand public or "pre-competitive" research in the direction Sage Congress proposed. The sector left to engage is the one that's central to all this work--the public.

Recombinant Research: Sage Congress plans for patient engagement

By Andy Oram
May 1, 2012

The Vioxx problem is just one instance of the wider malaise afflicting the drug industry. Managers from major pharma companies expressed confidence that they could expand public or "pre-competitive" research in the direction Sage Congress proposed. The sector left to engage is the one that's central to all this work--the public.

Recombinant Research: Sage Congress promotes data sharing in genetics

By Andy Oram
April 30, 2012

Through two days of demos, keynotes, panels, and breakout sessions, Sage Congress brought its vision to a high-level cohort of 230 attendees from universities, pharmaceutical companies, government health agencies, and others who can make change in the field.

Recombinant Research: Sage Congress promotes data sharing in genetics

By Andy Oram
April 30, 2012

Through two days of demos, keynotes, panels, and breakout sessions, Sage Congress brought its vision to a high-level cohort of 230 attendees from universities, pharmaceutical companies, government health agencies, and others who can make change in the field.

Sage Congress: The synthesis of open source with genetics

By Andy Oram
April 19, 2012

A conversation with Sage Bionetworks founder Stephen Friend about how open source can support a business model in drug development, the progress of current data sharing projects, and more.

Steep climb for National Cancer Institute toward open source collaboration

By Andy Oram
April 5, 2012

Although a lot of government agencies produce open source software, hardly any develop relationships with a community of outside programmers, testers, and other contributors. NCI sees the advantages of a give-and-take.

Documentation strategy for a small software project: launching VoIP Drupal introductions

By Andy Oram
February 17, 2012

VoIP Drupal is a window onto the promises and challenges faced by a new open source project, including its documentation. A meeting at at MIT this week worked out some long-term plans for firming up VoIP Drupal's documentation and other training materials.

Documentation strategy for a small software project: launching VoIP Drupal introductions

By Andy Oram
February 17, 2012

VoIP Drupal is a window onto the promises and challenges faced by a new open source project, including its documentation. A meeting at at MIT this week worked out some long-term plans for firming up VoIP Drupal's documentation and other training materials.

Intellectual Property Strategy: a book, a panel, and a movement

By Andy Oram
November 23, 2011

The speakers, who included household names of the free culture movement such as Lawrence Lessig and Eric von Hippel, emphasized the culture shift that is breaking the seemingly iron grip of current policies that favor wealthy companies with portfolios of patents and copyrights. But I think even these speakers failed to convey how huge a sea change in underway.

Intellectual Property Strategy: a book, a panel, and a movement

By Andy Oram
November 23, 2011

The speakers, who included household names of the free culture movement such as Lawrence Lessig and Eric von Hippel, emphasized the culture shift that is breaking the seemingly iron grip of current policies that favor wealthy companies with portfolios of patents and copyrights. But I think even these speakers failed to convey how huge a sea change in underway.

Four short links: 16 November 2011

By Nat Torkington
November 16, 2011

Q&A with Rob O'Callahan (ComputerWorld) -- an excellent insight into how Mozilla sees the world. In particular how proprietary mobile ecosystems are the new proprietary desktop ecosystems, and how the risks for the web are the same (writing for one device, not for all). Bikes That Charge USB Devices -- German bicycle maker Silverback has recently launched two bikes...

Wrap-up from FLOSS Manuals book sprint at Google

By Andy Oram
October 21, 2011

Mixtures of grassroots content generation and unique expertise have existed, and more models will be found. Understanding the points of commonality between the systems will help us develop such models.

Wrap-up from FLOSS Manuals book sprint at Google

By Andy Oram
October 21, 2011

Mixtures of grassroots content generation and unique expertise have existed, and more models will be found. Understanding the points of commonality between the systems will help us develop such models.

FLOSS Manuals books published after three-day sprint

By Andy Oram
October 21, 2011

Joining the pilgrimage that all institutions are making toward wider data use, FLOSS Manuals is exposing more and more of the writing process.

FLOSS Manuals books published after three-day sprint

By Andy Oram
October 21, 2011

Joining the pilgrimage that all institutions are making toward wider data use, FLOSS Manuals is exposing more and more of the writing process.

Day two of FLOSS Manuals book sprint at Google Summer of Code summit

By Andy Oram
October 20, 2011

As a relatively conventional book, the KDE manual was probably a little easier to write (but also probably less fun) than the more high-level approaches taken by some other teams that were trying to demonstrate to potential customers that their projects were worth adopting.

Day two of FLOSS Manuals book sprint at Google Summer of Code summit

By Andy Oram
October 20, 2011

As a relatively conventional book, the KDE manual was probably a little easier to write (but also probably less fun) than the more high-level approaches taken by some other teams that were trying to demonstrate to potential customers that their projects were worth adopting.


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