Blogs

BROWSE: Most Recent | Popular Tags |

Tags > music

Programming in concert mode

By Simon St. Laurent
August 1, 2014

Music and programming share deep mathematical roots, but have very different senses of “performance”. At OSCON, Andrew Sorensen reunited those two branches to give a live “concert” performance as a keynote. Sorensen brought his decade of “live coding musical concerts …

Programming in concert mode

By Simon St. Laurent
August 1, 2014

Music and programming share deep mathematical roots, but have very different senses of “performance”. At OSCON, Andrew Sorensen reunited those two branches to give a live “concert” performance as a keynote. Sorensen brought his decade of “live coding musical concerts …

Programming in concert mode

By Simon St. Laurent
August 1, 2014

Music and programming share deep mathematical roots, but have very different senses of “performance”. At OSCON, Andrew Sorensen reunited those two branches to give a live “concert” performance as a keynote. Sorensen brought his decade of “live coding musical concerts …

Four short links: 15 October 2013

By Nat Torkington
October 14, 2013

BF Skinner’s Baby Make Project (BoingBoing) — I got to read some of Skinner’s original writing on the Air-Crib recently and couple of things stuck out to me. First, it cracked me up. The article, published in 1959 in Cumulative …

Four short links: 27 September 2013

By Nat Torkington
September 24, 2013

The Amen Break (YouTube) — fascinating 20m history of the amen break, a handful of bars of drum solo from a forgotten 1969 song which became the origin of a huge amount of popular music from rap to jungle and …

Four short links: 24 June 2013

By Nat Torkington
June 24, 2013

Reading Runes in Animal Movement (YouTube) — accessible TEDxRiverTawe 2013 talk by Professor Rory Wilson, on his work tracking movements of animals in time and space. The value comes from high-resolution time series data: many samples/second, very granular. Best Science …

Four short links: 2 May 2013

By Nat Torkington
April 24, 2013

Metrico — puzzle game for Playstation centered around infographics (charts and graphs). (via Flowing Data) The Lease They Can Do (Business Week) — excellent Paul Ford piece on money, law, and music streaming services. So this is not about technology. …

Four short links: 22 February 2013

By Nat Torkington
February 22, 2013

Indiepocalypse: Harlem Shake Edition (Andy Baio) — After four weeks topping the Billboard Hot 100, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’s “Thrift Shop” was replaced this week by Baauer’s “Harlem Shake,” the song that inspired the Internet meme. SplinterNet — an Android …

Four short links: 30 January 2013

By Nat Torkington
January 30, 2013

Chinese Attack UAV (Alibaba) — Small attack UAV is characterized with small size, light weight, convenient carrying, rapid outfield expansion procedure, easy operation and maintenance; the system only needs 2-3 operators to operate, can be carried by surveillance personnel to …

Length and spine width in a digital-first world

By Joe Wikert
January 8, 2013

I’m still working through this extremely long exchange between Nicholas Carr and Clay Shirky about containers and contents but one point keeps jumping out at me: We have got to get away from thinking every “book” has to be at …

Four short links: 28 December 2012

By Nat Torkington
December 26, 2012

Kenyan Women Create Their Own Geek Culture (NPR) — Oguya started spending some Saturday mornings with Colaco and other women, snipping code and poring through hacker cookbooks. These informal gatherings became the Akirachix. Oguya graduated and turned her mobile phone …

Four short links: 20 April 2012

By Nat Torkington
April 20, 2012

Tupac Coachella Behind the Technology (CBS) -- interesting to me is Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg were considering taking Shakur with them on tour. Just as Hobbit, Tintin, etc. are CG-ing characters to look normal, is the future of "live" spectacle to be this kind of CG show? Will new acts be competing against the Rolling Stones forever? Javascript...

Four short links: 27 March 2012

By Nat Torkington
March 27, 2012

Five Tough Lessons I Had To Learn About Healthcare (Andy Oram) -- I don't normally link to things from Radar but this gels 110% with my limited experience with the healthcare industry. Makematics: Math for Makers -- I want the hardware hackers who are building the next generation of DIY 3D printers to be able to turn topological algorithms...

Visualization of the Week: How dance music travels

Visualization of the Week: How dance music travels
By Audrey Watters
November 4, 2011

A visualization traces 100 years of Western dance music, showing how genres are seamlessly imported and exported across continents.

Visualization of the Week: How dance music travels

By Audrey Watters
November 4, 2011

A visualization traces 100 years of Western dance music, showing how genres are seamlessly imported and exported across continents.

Four short links: 28 October 2011

By Nat Torkington
October 28, 2011

Open Access Week -- a global event promoting Open Access as a new norm in scholarship and research. The Copiale Cipher -- cracking a historical code with computers. Details in the paper: The book describes the initiation of "DER CANDIDAT" into a secret society, some functions of which are encoded with logograms. (via Discover Magazine) Coordino -- open source...

Four short links: 3 August 2011

By Nat Torkington
August 3, 2011

Just Say No To Freegal -- an interesting view from the inside, speaking out against a music licensing system called Freegal which is selling to libraries. Libraries typically buy one copy of something, and then lend it out to multiple users sequentially, in order to get a good return on investment. Participating in a product like Freegal means that...

Music and lyrics and code

Music and lyrics and code
By Jenn Webb
July 1, 2011

Coding is an art, says Michael Brewer, application programmer specialist at the University of Georgia. In this interview, Brewer discusses the philosophy behind Geek Choir and how it relates to coding and open source.

Four short links: 24 June 2011

By Nat Torkington
June 24, 2011

Eliza pt 3 -- delightful recapitulation of the reaction to Eliza and Weizenbaum's reaction to that reaction, including his despair over the students he taught at MIT. Weizenbaum wrote therein of his students at MIT, which was of course all about science and technology. He said that they "have already rejected all ways but the scientific to come to...

Four short links: 23 May 2011

By Nat Torkington
May 23, 2011

PC Emulator in Javascript -- days later and it's mindboggling. US Home Prices as Opera (Flowing Data) -- reminded me of Douglas Adams's "Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency" which has software that turns your company's performance numbers into music. The yearly accounts of most British companies emerged sounding like the Dead March from "Saul", but in Japan they went...

Can open source reinvent the music business?

Can open source reinvent the music business?
By Jono Bacon
January 18, 2011

Chart success would be nice, but Severed Fifth has a loftier goal than most bands. They want to use hallmarks of the open source movement — specifically, community involvement and free distribution — to change the music business.

Four short links: 25 October 2010

By Nat Torkington
October 25, 2010

Pirate Verbatim -- artists, in their own words, talking about piracy. The mix of opinions, attitudes, and nuance shows that there's far from any single consistent view out there. (via Graham Linehan) What Rapleaf Knows About You -- aggregating information from various sites, and your ad clickthroughs, to build a dossier about you that relates your email address to...

Four short links: 23 September 2010

By Nat Torkington
September 23, 2010

Universal Location Service -- API access to location information from mobiles on Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint, and AT&T. "Universe" here is defined, naturally, to be "United States of America". The Bubble Cursor in Javascript -- Javascript implementation of a circular cursor that grows and shrinks in size depending on proximity to something interesting. The Revenge of the Intuitive (Brian Eno,...

Musopen sets classical music free

By James Turner
September 14, 2010

The music of Beethoven and Brahms isn't covered by copyright, but performances and sheet music are. With an assist from KickStarter, MusOpen has raised more than enough money to right that wrong by recording and releasing classics into the public domain.

Musopen sets classical music free

Musopen sets classical music free
By James Turner
September 14, 2010

The music of Beethoven and Brahms isn't covered by copyright, but performances and sheet music are. With an assist from KickStarter, MusOpen has raised more than enough money to right that wrong by recording and releasing classics into the public domain.

Four short links: 18 August 2010

By Nat Torkington
August 18, 2010

BBC Dimensions -- brilliant work, a fun site that lets you overlay familiar plcaes with famous and notable things so you can get a better sense of how large they are. Example: the Colossus of Rhodes straddling O'Reilly HQ, the Library of Alexandria vs the Google campus, and New Orleans Mardi Gras began at the headquarters of Fred Phelps's...

Four short links: 27 July 2010

By Nat Torkington
July 27, 2010

Digital Continuity Conference Proceedings -- proceedings from a New Zealand conference on digital archiving, preservation, and access for archives, museums, libraries, etc. What Are The Scaling Issues to Keep in Mind While Developing a Social Network Feed? (Quora) -- insight into why you see the failwhale. (via kellan on Twitter) Fan Feeding Frenzy -- Amanda Palmer sells $15k in...

Four short links: 26 July 2010

By Nat Torkington
July 26, 2010

Is Wikileaks Growing Up? -- I linked earlier to FAS commentator Steven Aftergood, who had ripped Wikileaks as irresponsible and dangerous. The latest leaks, however, get grudging respect. "the latest dump deals with a perfectly newsworthy topic and -- judging from my initial glances at the news coverage -- Wikileaks itself has acknowledged the necessity of withholding certain portions...

Four short links: 15 July 2010

By Nat Torkington
July 15, 2010

How Will You Measure Your Life? (HBR) -- Clayton Christenson's advice to the Harvard Business School's graduating class, every section a gem. If you study the root causes of business disasters, over and over you’ll find this predisposition toward endeavors that offer immediate gratification. If you look at personal lives through that lens, you’ll see the same stunning and...

My Credo

By Peter Drescher
June 19, 2010

"I Promise Never To Program A Computer To Play Something I Can't"

RIA Review: Roc brings beats to Aviary

By RJ Owen
June 16, 2010

Aviary is an amazingly powerful suite of free online content creation tools, many of which provide all the base line functionality of much more expensive commercial tools. Today Aviary released a beta version of their new simple music creation tool named Roc. I took Roc for a test drive and this is what I found.

Four short links: 14 April 2010

By Nat Torkington
April 14, 2010

Designing for Social Interaction -- useful and thoughtful advice for designers of social applications. Some people believe that this is changing, that the web is making us closer to more people. On the contrary, research studies have shown that the vast majority of usage on social networks is between strong ties. As we saw earlier, on Facebook it’s with...

The Great Flicktubeo - Between Schumacher and von Clausewitz

By Rick Jelliffe
February 24, 2010

There is so much focus on Social Computing but it strikes me that much of what goes on with YouTube/Vimeo/Flickr content is not personal but very impersonal, in the same way that a private diary is actually very impersonal (man being a social animal): someone documents or declares to the world at large "I did this" or "I liked this". The same goes with much blogging and twittering. The content posted on the Flicktubeos are not MacGuffins designed to merely provoke conversation, and where they are (such as attempts at viral marketing) we feel cheated or that the social contract has somehow not been honoured: the conversation and comments afterwards are the pleasant fallout from the bomb, not the bomb itself. The content is there to fill the universe, to make the external reflect our internal life more: it is a form of cave decoration. All an excuse to link to some great performances.

R.I.P. -- Doug Fieger (The Knack)

By Kelli Richards
February 19, 2010

It's been awhile since I posted my last blog entry. You might say I took a sabbatical from it during this past year in light of all the flux with the economy and several other challenges. But I've got my...

The Best and the Worst Tech of the Decade

By James Turner
December 17, 2009

With only a few weeks left until we close out the 'naughts and move into the teens, it's almost obligatory to take a look back at the best and not-so-best of the last decade. With that in mind, I polled the O'Reilly editors, authors, Friends, and a number of industry movers and shakers to gather nominations. I then tossed them in the trash and made up my own compiled them together and looked for trends and common threads. So here then, in no particular order, are the best and the worst that the decade had to offer.

Four short links: 27 August 2009

By Nat Torkington
August 27, 2009

Second Degree Murder and Six Other Crimes Cheaper Than Pirating Music -- I'm outraged that the Obama administration is supporting the RIAA on the case against Jammie Thomas, a single mother of four who has to pay them $1.92 million for downloading songs. That's more expensive than murder and six other crimes... (via Br3nda) Bill Drummond Talk (MP3) --...

Old Media, New Media and Where the Rubber Meets the Road

By Mark Sigal
July 29, 2009

My once-beloved San Francisco Chronicle has been “hollowed out,” reduced to a thin pamphlet, thereby accelerating their subscriber attrition. Do you even know anyone who actually uses the Yellow Pages? Remember record stores? Whither Blockbuster? When analog media collides with digital media, “creative destruction” occurs with brutal efficiency…unless you can truly differentiate your offering, a tall task, but not an insurmountable one. Read on

Four short links: 25 June 2009

By Nat Torkington
June 25, 2009

How an Indie Musician Can Make $19,000 in 10 Hours Using Twitter -- as Zoe Keating pointed out: "cash made by @amandapalmer in one month on Twitter = $19,000; cash made by @amandapalmer from 30,000 record sales = $0". The Nike Experiment: How the Shoe Giant Unleashed the Power of Personal Metrics (Wired) -- And not only can we...

NiN's Rob Sheridan on iPhone Application Rejection

NiN's Rob Sheridan on iPhone Application Rejection
By Timothy M. O'Brien
May 5, 2009

In this interview with Rob Sheridan (@rob_sheridan), Nine Inch Nails' Artistic Director, Rob discusses the experience of getting the rejection letter from Apple, and what effect it has on the band's plans to build community applications on the iPhone platform. You'll hear Sheridan express an uneasiness that Apple can act as judge and jury without providing any transparency into the approval process.

Four short links: 8 Apr 2009

By Nat Torkington
April 8, 2009

Bias, RFCs, virus batteries, and a glimpse at life beyond record labels (the last item features profanity, beware): Bias We Can Believe In (Mind Hacks) -- Vaughn asks the tricky question about the current enthusiasm for Behavioural Economics in government: where are the sceptical voices? As he points out, It's perhaps no accident that almost all the articles cite a...

From Open Source Software to Open Culture: Three Misunderstandings

From Open Source Software to Open Culture: Three Misunderstandings
By Andy Oram
March 22, 2009

The original practice and promise of open source software is unique. The software experience cannot be ported whole-hog into other areas such as sharing songs or organizing public forums.

Web Radio for *Listeners*

Web Radio for *Listeners*
By David Battino
March 4, 2009

The visionary Lucas Gonze just launched Fresh Hot Radio.com, a smart new twist on Web radio. His mission is to connect mainstream listeners to Web-native music, so the site draws from band communities, musicians' own blogs, and bulletin boards where musicians go to get advice on their mixes. I like his choices.

The Sizzling Sound of Music

By Dale Dougherty
March 2, 2009

Are iPods changing our perception of music? Are the sounds of MP3s the music we like to hear most? Jonathan Berger, professor of music at Stanford, was on a panel with me at a meeting of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in Mountain View, CA on Saturday. Berger's presentation had a slide titled: "Live, Memorex or MP3." He...

The Beatles of Programming Languages

By Eric Larson
December 18, 2008

As a musician and a programmer, I'm constantly drawing relationships between the two activities. My wife, who I play music with, has been the recipient of the the vast majority of these comparisons and asked me the other day, "Is...

Creative Commons needs your donations

Creative Commons needs your donations
By Andy Oram
December 13, 2008

Creative Commons is more dependent than ever before on the funds of individuals. More and more people these days are grabbing pictures, text, and other random goods they find online and using them in their own presentations or creative efforts; some of us even build businesses on open contributions. All of us should be promoting the Creative Commons, which has provided licenses to support such sharing in 50 countries and is working with people in many more.

Revenge of the 3D Pumpkin

Revenge of the 3D Pumpkin
By David Battino
October 29, 2008

It's Halloween again, and what better way to set the mood than with a new soundscape album from Mark Greenfield, aka Darwin Chamber? Thanks to intelligent, computer-aided composition, it's much more immersive than the standard serving of ghost moans, melodramatic laughter, and werewolf howls.

Paper Case: Music and Video Meet Origami

By David Battino
October 21, 2008

Here's a clever Web service: Find a CD or DVD online, click the Paper Case link, and it will print the cover image and details. Then you fold the paper, tuck your disc inside, and slide the package into a binder, saving lots of space.

Numbers for Digital's Rise

By Nat Torkington
October 6, 2008

I talk a lot to people who don't quite understand the scale of the media shift from bits to atoms, so I always have my eyes open for numbers and anecdotes that illustrate the point. The latest I found are from an article on Apple's threat to shut the iTunes store if it has to pay more to songwriters: Digital...

Audio Performance at 120 MPH!!!

By David Javelosa
September 30, 2008

Ok, it’s been 11 months since I’ve written in this blog. But guess what? I’m a new dad! If that isn’t life changing enough I’m not sure what is; except the following techno tale I have to tell. Through a strange intersection of factors, I was personally involved with a pretty interesting audio experiment, digital or otherwise. Let me crank...

I Am Trying To Believe (that Rock Stars aren't Dead)

By Jim Stogdill
September 7, 2008

Trent Reznor says "Steal my music" as he recognizes the future of the music business is him monetizing his talent through touring. The rock star made from highly leveraged disc sales is dead.


1 to 50 of 56 Next
The Watering Hole