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Four short links: 1 September 2014

By Nat Torkington
September 1, 2014

Sibyl: Google’s System for Large Scale Machine Learning (YouTube) — keynote at DSN2014 acting as an intro to Sibyl. (via KD Nuggets) Bitrot from 1997 — That’s 205 failures, an actual link rot figure of 91%, not 57%. That leaves …

Four short links: 1 September 2014

By Nat Torkington
September 1, 2014

Sibyl: Google’s System for Large Scale Machine Learning (YouTube) — keynote at DSN2014 acting as an intro to Sibyl. (via KD Nuggets) Bitrot from 1997 — That’s 205 failures, an actual link rot figure of 91%, not 57%. That leaves …

Four short links: 1 September 2014

By Nat Torkington
September 1, 2014

Sibyl: Google’s System for Large Scale Machine Learning (YouTube) — keynote at DSN2014 acting as an intro to Sibyl. (via KD Nuggets) Bitrot from 1997 — That’s 205 failures, an actual link rot figure of 91%, not 57%. That leaves …

OpenStack creates a structure for managing change without a benevolent dictator

By Andy Oram
July 24, 2014

When does a software project grow to the point where one must explicitly think about governance? The term “governance” is stiff and gawky, but doing it well can carry a project through many a storm. Over the past couple years, …

OpenStack creates a structure for managing change without a benevolent dictator

By Andy Oram
July 24, 2014

When does a software project grow to the point where one must explicitly think about governance? The term “governance” is stiff and gawky, but doing it well can carry a project through many a storm. Over the past couple years, …

OpenStack creates a structure for managing change without a benevolent dictator

By Andy Oram
July 24, 2014

When does a software project grow to the point where one must explicitly think about governance? The term “governance” is stiff and gawky, but doing it well can carry a project through many a storm. Over the past couple years, …

Four short links: 26 June 2014

By Nat Torkington
June 26, 2014

Charlie Stross on 2034 — every object in the real world is going to be providing a constant stream of metadata about its environment — and I mean every object. The frameworks used for channeling this firehose of environment data …

Four short links: 26 June 2014

By Nat Torkington
June 26, 2014

Charlie Stross on 2034 — every object in the real world is going to be providing a constant stream of metadata about its environment — and I mean every object. The frameworks used for channeling this firehose of environment data …

Four short links: 26 June 2014

By Nat Torkington
June 26, 2014

Charlie Stross on 2034 — every object in the real world is going to be providing a constant stream of metadata about its environment — and I mean every object. The frameworks used for channeling this firehose of environment data …

Everything is distributed

By Courtney Nash
May 19, 2014

“What is surprising is not that there are so many accidents. It is that there are so few. The thing that amazes you is not that your system goes down sometimes, it’s that it is up at all.”—Richard Cook In …

How to get a designer's best work for a logo, website, ad - anything

How to get a designer's best work for a logo, website, ad - anything
0 May 12, 2014

A long time ago, I had to learn from scratch how to manage visual designers, after having started out as a composer and audio producer, with no training in graphic arts -- back then I thought of it as "the blind leading the deaf." Luckily, I found that most of the skills I'd developed while working with sound carried over to other disciplines, too. There's one skill above all that I believe managers need to master in order to get the best work from a designer, or any creative professional: Talk about why, not how.

Four short links: 20 March 2014

By Nat Torkington
March 20, 2014

Smart Interaction Lab — some interesting prototyping work designing for smart objects. Crypto 101 — self-directory crypto instruction. (via BoingBoing) Chipotle Culture — interesting piece on Chipotle’s approach to building positive feedback loops around training. Reminded me of Ben Horowitz’s …

Four short links: 18 March 2014

By Nat Torkington
March 18, 2014

On Managers (Mike Migurski) — Managers might be difficult, hostile, or useless, but because they are parts of an explicit power structure they can be evaluated explicitly. Big Data: Humans Required (Sherri Hammons) — the heart of the problem with …

Big data and privacy: an uneasy face-off for government to face

By Andy Oram
March 5, 2014

Thrust into controversy by Edward Snowden’s first revelations last year, President Obama belatedly welcomed a “conversation” about privacy. As cynical as you may feel about US spying, that conversation with the federal government has now begun. In particular, the first …

The technical aspects of privacy

By Andy Oram
March 5, 2014

Thrust into controversy by Edward Snowden’s first revelations last year, President Obama belatedly welcomed a “conversation” about privacy. As cynical as you may feel about US spying, that conversation with the federal government has now begun. In particular, the first …

Prefer goals over controls

By Matthew McCullough
February 21, 2014

  Bruce Eckel is well known for his books in the field of programming, such as Thinking in Java, Thinking in C++, and Atomic Scala as well as his co-leadership of the Java Posse. And yet, on top of his …

Prefer goals over controls

By Matthew McCullough
February 21, 2014

Bruce Eckel is well known for his books in the field of programming, such as Thinking in Java, Thinking in C++, and Atomic Scala as well as his co-leadership of the Java Posse. And yet, on top of his work …

Four short links: 20 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 20, 2013

A History of the Future in 100 Objects — is out! It’s design fiction, describing the future of technology in faux Wired-like product writeups. Amazon already beating the timeline. Projects and Priorities Without Managers (Ryan Carson) — love what he’s …

How I failed

By Tim O'Reilly
September 15, 2013

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn. When you start out as an entrepreneur, it’s just you and your idea, or you and your co-founder’s and your idea. Then you add customers, and they shape and mold you and that idea …

Building Great Tech Company Culture

By Eli Goodman
September 4, 2013

I was lucky enough to have a chance to talk with Greg Leppert, co-founder of the awesome website Svpply. He’s always had a unique and eloquent perspective on what makes organizations stay grounded and do good work, so I was …

Let Decisions Be Your Guide

By Joy Beatty
September 2, 2013

Most normal people don’t look at data sets just for fun. They study views of the data to make decisions about what to do, be it a decision to take some specific action or a decision to do nothing at …

Automation Myths

By Courtney Nash
August 19, 2013

In the aftermath of Edward Snowden’s revelations about NSA’s domestic surveillance activities, the NSA has recently announced that they plan to get rid of 90% of their system administrators via software automation in order to “improve security.” So far, I’ve mostly …

Just What Does an Architect Do?

By James Turner
July 15, 2013

When computers were small and programs short, writing programs for them was pretty much a solo enterprise. But as computers became more powerful, and importantly, interconnected, you started to see software development in teams, and with teams came the most …

Four Qualities of Successful In-House Innovation Teams

By Jeff Gothelf
July 2, 2013

One of the most common questions I get about applying lean ideas to product design and development is, “How can I make this happen in my organization?” Between entrenched corporate silos and existing team management structures, it can seem impossible …

Four short links: 13 June 2013

By Nat Torkington
June 13, 2013

The Unengageables (Dan Meyer) — They signed their “didactic contract” years and years ago. They signed it. Their math teachers signed it. The agreement says that the teacher comes into class, tells them what they’re going to learn, and shows …

Beyond Puppet and Chef: Managing PostgreSQL with Ansible

By Courtney Nash
May 28, 2013

Think configuration management is simply a decision between Chef or Puppet? PalaminoDB CTO (and Lead DB Engineer for Obama’s 2012 campaign) Jay Edwards (@meangrape) discusses his upcoming Velocity talk about Ansible, an alternative configuration management offering that is quick and easy …

Sascha Bates on Configuration Management: It’s Not about the Tool

By Courtney Nash
May 15, 2013

“Puppet and Chef are completely different, and yet exactly the same,” admits Sascha Bates. In this interview about her talk at the upcoming Velocity Conference, she discusses common pitfalls that people can avoid when getting started with configuration management. And …

Drupal for Designers

By Meghan Blanchette
April 30, 2013

Dani Nordin (@danigrrl) is an O’Reilly author (Drupal for Designers) and UX designer. We sat down recently to catch up on her current projects and her predictions for the future of Drupal design. She shared some best practices for designing, …

Code Simplicity: The science of software design

By Max Kanat-Alexander
April 10, 2013

If you want to be a better programmer, a good first step would be to choose an area of software development to take additional responsibility for. Now, when we say “responsibility,” we don’t mean the sort of “you’re to blame …

Need speed for big data? Think in-memory data management

By Ben Lorica
January 18, 2013

By Ben Lorica and Roger Magoulas In a forthcoming report we will highlight technologies and solutions that take advantage of the decline in prices of RAM, the popularity of distributed and cloud computing systems, and the need for faster queries …

Need speed for big data? Think in-memory data management

By Roger Magoulas
January 18, 2013

By Ben Lorica and Roger Magoulas In a forthcoming report we will highlight technologies and solutions that take advantage of the decline in prices of RAM, the popularity of distributed and cloud computing systems, and the need for faster queries …

Doctors rate doctors in HealthTap’s medical quality project

By Andy Oram
November 1, 2012

HealthTap, a network of physicians and patients, routinely breaks new ground and tries bold experiments in the area of generating trust. I remember how, in my first posting about the company, I questioned whether the company could sign up both …

Four short links: 1 November 2012

By Nat Torkington
October 31, 2012

Selfstarter (Github) — open source roll-your-own crowdfunding platform. (Kickstarter has its own audience, of course, which why they could release their source-code and still be top of the heap) 100 Year Business Plan (Unlimited) — New Zealand Maori tribe has …

Three Strategies for Content Monetization: Part 2 of 3

By David Marlin
October 17, 2012

In my last post about content monetization for book publishers, I introduced the strategy of “chunking” in which a publisher takes its licensed content and breaks it up into resellable, reusable pieces. Today I examine the model of Credo Reference, …

The many sides to shipping a great software project

By Andy Oram
September 9, 2012

Chris Vander Mey, CEO of Scaled Recognition, and author of a new O’Reilly book, Shipping Greatness, lays out in this video some of the deep lessons he learned during his years working on some very high-impact and high-priority projects at …

Why microchips in pills matter

By Fred Trotter
August 2, 2012

Earlier this week, Proteus announced that they have been approved by the FDA to market their ingestible microchips for pills. Generally, the FDA approval process for devices that are totally new like this is a painful one, with much suffering. So …

Heavy data and architectural convergence

By Jim Stogdill
July 9, 2012

Imagine a future where large clusters of like machines dynamically adapt between programming paradigms depending on a combination of the resident data and the required processing.

Heavy data and architectural convergence

By Jim Stogdill
July 9, 2012

Imagine a future where large clusters of like machines dynamically adapt between programming paradigms depending on a combination of the resident data and the required processing.

"Lightweight" DRM isn't the answer

By Joe Wikert
June 27, 2012

In this open letter to the IDPF's Executive Director, Bill McCoy, O'Reilly GM & Publisher Joe Wikert explains why a DRM-free approach is far better than any "lightweight" DRM option.

"Lightweight" DRM isn't the answer

By Joe Wikert
June 27, 2012

In this open letter to the IDPF's Executive Director, Bill McCoy, O'Reilly GM & Publisher Joe Wikert explains why a DRM-free approach is far better than any "lightweight" DRM option.

The State of Open Source

By Kevin Shockey
June 26, 2012

Look at Pepsi and Coke. Do you think that they are willing to accept a decline in any aspect of their brand? No, they keep pushing, making sure everyone knows what they are drinking. I propose a similar campaign for open source. Let us make sure that users of cloud computing, for example, know what they are using. They are using free and open source software. Google Drive anyone?

DRM-Free Day, forever.

By Mike Hendrickson
May 4, 2012

Mike Hendrickson: "Adding DRM to content to deter theft ... are you kidding me? Seriously, think about that. It will take a good programmer about an hour to get past most DRM, or a manual shop somewhere in the world will cut and scan the physical book and away it goes."

DRM-Free Day, forever.

DRM-Free Day, forever.
By Mike Hendrickson
May 4, 2012

Mike Hendrickson: "Adding DRM to content to deter theft ... are you kidding me? Seriously, think about that. It will take a good programmer about an hour to get past most DRM, or a manual shop somewhere in the world will cut and scan the physical book and away it goes."

Four short links: 27 April 2012

By Nat Torkington
April 27, 2012

The Third Industrial Revolution (The Economist) -- A number of remarkable technologies are converging: clever software, novel materials, more dexterous robots, new processes (notably three-dimensional printing) and a whole range of web-based services. The factory of the past was based on cranking out zillions of identical products: Ford famously said that car-buyers could have any colour they liked, as...

My Paleo Media Diet

My Paleo Media Diet
By Jim Stogdill
March 23, 2012

Jim Stogdill is tired of running on the info treadmill, so he's changing his media habits. His new approach: "Where I can, adapt to my surroundings, where I can't, adapt my surroundings to me."

Four short links: 1 February 2012

By Nat Torkington
February 1, 2012

Cycles of Invention and Commoditisation (Simon Wardley) -- Explosions of industrial creativity rarely follow the invention or discovery of a technology but instead its commoditisation i.e. it wasn't the discovery of electricity but Edison's introduction of utility services for electricity that produced the creative boom that led to recorded music, modern movies, consumer electronics and even Silicon Valley. However,...

Developer Week in Review: Sometimes, form does need to follow function

Developer Week in Review: Sometimes, form does need to follow function
By James Turner
January 27, 2012

The latest rumors have Apple eyeing the remote control market, but does minimalistic design work for remotes? Australia wants to impose requirements on ISPs, but at what infrastructure cost? And would you let closed-source software keep you alive?

Don't blame the information for your bad habits

Don't blame the information for your bad habits
By Mac Slocum
November 29, 2011

Clay Johnson, author of "The Information Diet," says information consumption, not the information itself, is what needs to be managed.

Publishers need broader and broader shoulders

By Joe Wikert
November 16, 2011

It's more challenging than ever to handle all aspects of content management internally. In this podcast, Firebrand Technologies founder and president Fran Toolan addresses a myriad of content management issues.

Publishers need broader and broader shoulders

Publishers need broader and broader shoulders
By Joe Wikert
November 16, 2011

It's more challenging than ever to handle all aspects of content management internally. In this podcast, Firebrand Technologies founder and president Fran Toolan addresses a myriad of content management issues.


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