Blogs

BROWSE: Most Recent | Popular Tags |

Tags > infrastructure

Four short links: 30 May 2014

By Nat Torkington
May 30, 2014

Video Quality Report — transparency is a great way to indirectly exert leverage. Control Your Traffic Flows with Software — using BGP to balance traffic. Will be interesting to see how the more extreme traffic managers deploy SDN in the …

Venal Sins: Cash, Sex, and IT Infrastructure

By Mike Barlow
April 8, 2014

Yet again, I reveal the base instincts driving my interest in big data. It’s not the science – it’s the cash. And yes, on some level, I find the idea of all that cash sexy. Yes, I know it’s a …

Four short links: 19 November 2013

By Nat Torkington
November 19, 2013

Why The Banner Ad is Heroic — enough to make Dave Eggers cry. Advertising triumphalism rampant. Udacity/Thrun Profile — A student taking college algebra in person was 52% more likely to pass than one taking a Udacity class, making the …

The Rise of Infrastructure as Data

By Michael DeHaan
August 6, 2013

IT infrastructure should be simpler to automate. A new method of describing IT configurations and policy as data formats can help us get there. To understand this conclusion, it helps to understand how the existing tool chains of automation software …

Tracking Salesforce’s push toward developers

By Timothy M. O'Brien
October 9, 2012

Have you ever seen Salesforce’s “no software” graphic? It’s the word “software” surrounded by a circle with a red line through it. Here’s a picture of the related (and dancing) “no software” mascot. Now, if you consider yourself a developer, …

Four short links: 23 August 2012

By Nat Torkington
August 23, 2012

Computational Social Science (Nature) — Facebook and Twitter data drives social science analysis. (via Vaughan Bell) The Single Most Important Object in the Global Economy (Slate) — Companies like Ikea have literally designed products around pallets: Its “Bang” mug, notes …

What is DevOps?

What is DevOps?
By Mike Loukides
June 7, 2012

NoOps, DevOps — no matter what you call it, operations won't go away. Ops experts and development teams will jointly evolve to meet the challenges of delivering reliable software to customers.

A crazy awesome gaming infrastructure

A crazy awesome gaming infrastructure
By Mike Hendrickson
June 6, 2012

How do you bridge the gap between IT and business while building a gaming infrastructure that scales? Sarah Novotny addresses that question in this Velocity podcast.

The software professional vs the software artist

By Mike Loukides
June 5, 2012

Developer "artists" who think they're too good to address vulnerabilities in operating systems and applications must shoulder blame for insecure systems.

Developer Week in Review: The overhead of insecure infrastructure

Developer Week in Review: The overhead of insecure infrastructure
By James Turner
June 1, 2012

The news is constantly full of companies and organizations falling victim to exploits. Software developers spend a great deal of our time defending against them. But why should they have to bother at all?

Jesse Robbins on the state of infrastructure automation

By Timothy M. O'Brien
May 11, 2012

OpsCode chief community officer Jesse Robbins discusses cloud infrastructure automation and the most surprising use of Chef he's seen so far.

Business-government ties complicate cyber security

By Howard Wen
February 6, 2012

Is an attack on a U.S. business' network an attack on the U.S. itself? "Inside Cyber Warfare" author Jeffrey Carr discusses the intermingling of corporate and government interests in this interview.

Four short links: 12 January 2012

By Nat Torkington
January 12, 2012

Smart Hacking for Privacy -- can mine smart power meter data (or even snoop it) to learn what's on the TV. Wow. (You can also watch the talk). (via Rob Inskeep) Conditioning Company Culture (Bryce Roberts) -- a short read but thought-provoking. It's easy to create mindless mantras, but I've seen the technique that Bryce describes and (when done...

How the cloud helps Netflix

How the cloud helps Netflix
By Jenn Webb
May 11, 2011

Netflix moved some of its services into Amazon's cloud last year. In this interview, Netflix cloud architect Adrian Cockcroft says the move was about building a scalable product and paying down technical debt.

Developing countries and Open Compute

Developing countries and Open Compute
By Jenn Webb
April 21, 2011

The potential for Open Compute to benefit developing countries was mentioned during a panel discussion that followed the project's announcement. Intrigued, I turned to Benetech CEO Jim Fruchterman for more on Open Compute's utility in developing nations.

What Facebook's Open Compute Project means

What Facebook's Open Compute Project means
By Jesse Robbins
April 7, 2011

Jesse Robbins says Facebook's Open Compute Project represents a giant step for open source hardware, for the evolution of the web and cloud computing, and for infrastructure and operations in general.

Four short links: 9 December 2010

By Nat Torkington
December 9, 2010

Lowersrc -- simple dynamic image placeholders for wireframing. Open source Javascript. (via Lachlan Hardy on Twitter) In Praise of the Long Form (Julie Starr) -- It can be time consuming sifting through the daily wall of news stories and blogposts to find the handful of gems that genuinely interest or move you. These services, which recommend only a handful...

Four short links: 16 July 2010

By Nat Torkington
July 16, 2010

GPL WordPress Theme Angst -- a podcaster brought together Matt Mullenweg (creator of WordPress), and Chris Pearson (creator of the Thesis theme). Chris doesn't believe WordPress's GPL should be inherited by themes. Matt does, and the SFLC and others agree. The conversation is interesting because (a) they and the podcaster do a great job of keeping it civil and...

Understanding the Cloud Landscape

Understanding the Cloud Landscape
By George Reese
April 29, 2010

Making sense out of all of the components of cloud computing confuses even many of the major analysts. It's easy to understand how Google, Amazon, or SalesForce.com fit into the picture. But who is Eucalyptus and what do they do? Does CohesiveFT compete with enStratus or does it complement enStratus? And what is this vCloud thing anyway?

The Watering Hole - There But For the Grace of the FSM...

The Watering Hole - There But For the Grace of the FSM...
By James Turner
January 21, 2010

When it comes to recovering from natural disasters, the track record in the US isn't all that wonderful either...

Four short links: 22 October 2009

By Nat Torkington
October 22, 2009

Eight Billion Minutes Spent on Facebook Daily -- you weren't using that cognitive surplus, were you? How We Made Github Fast -- high-level summary is that the new "fast, good, cheap--pick any two" is "fast, new, easy--pick any two". (via Simon Willison) Isaac Mao, China, 40M Blogs and Counting -- Today, there are 40 million bloggers in China and...

Four Tips for Avoiding VM Sprawl in the Public Cloud

Four Tips for Avoiding VM Sprawl in the Public Cloud
By George Reese
October 3, 2009

You moved into the cloud to save some money. Now it's the first of the month and you're looking at your latest cloud provider bill. It's not at all what you planned. Welcome to the world of VM sprawl, the dark side of cloud computing.

Four short links: 7 September 2009

By Nat Torkington
September 7, 2009

App Engine Now Supports XMPP (Jabber) -- messaging servers, whether XMPP or PubSubHubBub, are becoming an increasingly important way to loosely join the small pieces. Google's incorporation of XMPP into GAE reflects this (and the fact that Wave is built on XMPP). (via StPeter on Twitter) Snakes on the Web (Jacob Kaplan-Moss) -- The best way to predict the...

John Adams on Fixing Twitter: Improving the Performance and Scalability of the World's Most Popular Micro-blogging Site

By Jesse Robbins
August 6, 2009

Twitter is suffering outages today as they fend off a Denial of Service attack, and so I thought it would be helpful to post John Adams’ exceptional Velocity session about Operations at Twitter. Good luck today John & team… I know it’s going to be a long day!...

Four short links: 9 July 2009

By Nat Torkington
July 8, 2009

Ten Rules That Govern Groups -- valuable lessons for all who would create or use social software, each backed up with pointers to the social science study about that lesson. Groups breed competition: While co-operation within group members is generally not so much of a problem, co-operation between groups can be hellish. People may be individually co-operative, but once...

Announcing: Spike Night at Velocity

Announcing: Spike Night at Velocity
By Scott Ruthfield
June 19, 2009

Guest blogger Scott Ruthfield is a Program Committee member of the O'Reilly Velocity: Web Performance & Operations Conference.  Web Operations is not for the casual observer: it's for a particular kind of adrenaline junkie that's motivated by graphs and servers spinning out of control.  Jumping in, on-your-feet analysis, and experience-based-experimentation are all part of solving new problems caused by unexpected user and machine behavior,...

Four short links: 9 June 2009

By Nat Torkington
June 9, 2009

Drawing Inspiration From Nature To Build A Better Radio -- based on the design of the cochlear, this MIT-built RF chip is faster than others out there, and consumes 1/100th the power. Biomimicry and UWB radio are on our radar. Why the Smart Grid Won’t Have the Innovations of the Internet Any Time Soon -- While it’s significant that...

Velocity 2009 - Big Ideas (early registration deadline)

Velocity 2009 - Big Ideas (early registration deadline)
By Jesse Robbins
May 8, 2009

(tag cloud created from Velocity session & speaker information using wordle.net) My favorite interview question to ask candidates is: "What happens when you type www.(amazon|google|yahoo).com in your browser and press return?" While the actual process of serving and rendering a page takes seconds to complete, describing it in real detail can take an hour. A good answer spans every part...

Four short links: 13 Apr 2009

By Nat Torkington
April 13, 2009

Worms, sorting, languages, and infrastructure: Twitter XSS Attacks (Lynne Pope) -- several incarnations of a worm spread quickly across Twitter this weekend. Twitter profiles are generated by themes, whose parameters users can change. The user-supplied value for the colour was used directly in the CSS color field without filtering, which the original worm strain used to end the CSS and...

AT&T Fiber cuts remind us: Location is a Basket too!

By Jesse Robbins
April 10, 2009

The fiber cuts affecting much of the San Francisco Bay Area this week are similar to the outages in the Middle East last year (radar post), although far more limited in scope and impact.   What I said last year still holds true and is repeated below: From an operations perspective these kinds of outages are nothing new, and underscore why...

It's Really Just a Series of Tubes

It's Really Just a Series of Tubes
By Jesse Robbins
April 7, 2009

Molly Wright Steenson hit the Ignite jackpot at Etech this year with her explanation of the steam powered network of pneumatic tubes of the 1800s. If you're someone that, like me, has a [somewhat obsessive relationship with Internet Infrastructure](http://conferences.oreilly.com/velocity), you must watch this talk.

Four short links: 30 Jan 2009

By Nat Torkington
January 30, 2009

Two serious links and two fun today, thanks to Waxy and BoingBoing: EveryBlock Business Model Brainstorming -- Adrian Holovaty's project was funded by a Knight Foundation grant that's about to run out. The software will be open sourced but he's inviting suggestions of business models that would enable the project team to continue working on it full-time. Having used and...

Trains, Planes and Automobiles: Or why Infrastructure IS an IT issue

By Kurt Cagle
January 30, 2009

Before we load up on more highway projects, more unnecessary bridges, and more downtown renovation projects, it may behove us as a society to ask the question about whether it will be more beneficial in the long run to use our brains (real and virtual) and the marvellous networks that we have created with our brains to solve these pressing problems in a way that will benefit not only ourselves but our children's children.

Analysis 2009: Government Gets Into the Software Business

By Kurt Cagle
January 6, 2009

The incoming Obama administration has, even before taking office formally, pledged between $650 and $800 billion dollars worth of public works initiatives, a massive shift away from the laissez faire approach of the outgoing Bush administration. Of that, it...

Hawaii Power Blackout Emergency Preparedness Tech Grades: Is There an F-?

By Todd Ogasawara
December 28, 2008

I gave a tech scorecard for emergency infrastructure after a major earthquake here two years ago. I return to that scorecard for the island-wide power blackout we had over the weekend. The results aren't good. The only bright spot was Twitter.

Service Monitoring Dashboards are mandatory for production services!

By Jesse Robbins
June 18, 2008

Google App Engine went down earlier today. GAE is still a developer preview release, and currently lacks a public monitoring dashboard. Unfortunately this means that many people either found out from their app and/or admin consoles being unavailable or from Mike Arrington's post on TechCrunch. Google has a strong Web Operations culture, and there are numerous internal monitoring tools in...

Structure and Velocity

By Jesse Robbins
May 10, 2008

Several people have asked me about the differences between Om Malik's Structure conference and our Velocity Web Performance & Operations conference.  Velocity is on June 23 & 24th at the SFO Mariott, and Structure follows on June 25th in San Francisco.  The conferences are complimentary: Structure discusses what is changing in internet infrastructure, and Velocity teaches how to make...

What is Web Operations?

By Jesse Robbins
March 30, 2008

Theo Schlossnagle wrote a brilliant summary of one of the biggest challenges we discussed at the Velocity Summit in January:What is this Velocity Summit thing? It was a bunch of web architects from highly trafficked sites sitting around talkin' smack. It was operated in Foo style. However, one thing that made me really appreciate this meet-up was the lack of...

Steve Souders asks: "How green is your web page?"

By Jesse Robbins
March 8, 2008

Steve Souders, my Velocity conference Co-Chair and author of High Performance Websites, gave me permission to repost this great analysis: How green is your web page? Writing faster web pages is great for your users, which in turn is great...


1 to 39 of 39
The Watering Hole