Blogs

BROWSE: Most Recent | Popular Tags |

Tags > hacking

Synthetic biology on the cusp

By Glen Martin
September 4, 2014

Whither thou goest, synthetic biology? First, let’s put aside the dystopian scenarios of nasty modified viruses escaping from the fermentor Junior has jury-rigged in his bedroom lab. Designing virulent microbes is well beyond the expertise and budgets of homegrown biocoders. …

Synthetic biology on the cusp

By Glen Martin
September 4, 2014

Whither thou goest, synthetic biology? First, let’s put aside the dystopian scenarios of nasty modified viruses escaping from the fermentor Junior has jury-rigged in his bedroom lab. Designing virulent microbes is well beyond the expertise and budgets of homegrown biocoders. …

Synthetic biology on the cusp

By Glen Martin
September 4, 2014

Whither thou goest, synthetic biology? First, let’s put aside the dystopian scenarios of nasty modified viruses escaping from the fermentor Junior has jury-rigged in his bedroom lab. Designing virulent microbes is well beyond the expertise and budgets of homegrown biocoders. …

Announcing BioCoder issue 3

By Mike Loukides
April 15, 2014

We’re excited about the third issue ofBioCoder, O’Reilly’s newsletter about therevolution in biology and biotechnology. In the first article of our new issue, Ryan Bethencourt asks the question “What does Biotechnology Want?” Playing withKevin Kelly’s ideasabout how technological development drives …

Distributed science

By Mike Loukides
April 11, 2014

In my post onbiohacking and bioterrorism, I briefly mentioned the possibility of vaccines and other treatments developed outside of institutional research. That may be far-fetched, and I certainly hope we’re never in a situation where DIY treatments are the only …

Four short links: 26 March 2014

By Nat Torkington
March 25, 2014

brick — uncompressed versions of popular web fonts. The difference between compressed and uncompressed is noticeable. Speaking Javascript — free online version of the new O’Reilly book by Axel Rauschmayer. micio.js — clever hack to communicate between Arduino and mobile …

Four short links: 3 March 2014

By Nat Torkington
March 3, 2014

The Programming Error That Cost Mt Gox 2609 Bitcoins — in the unforgiving world of crypto-currency, it’s easy to miscode and vanish your money. Ford Invites Open-Source Community to Tinker Away — One example: Nelson has re-tasked the motor from …

DIYbio and the hacking metaphor

By Michael Scroggins
February 23, 2014

The following is from the second issue of BioCoder, the quarterly newsletter for synthetic biologists, DIY biologists, neurobiologists, and more. Download your free copy today. Within DIYbio, one cannot escape the hacking metaphor. The metaphor is ubiquitous and, to a …

DIYbio and the hacking metaphor

By Michael Scroggins
February 23, 2014

The following is from the second issue of BioCoder, the quarterly newsletter for synthetic biologists, DIY biologists, neurobiologists, and more. Download your free copy today. Within DIYbio, one cannot escape the hacking metaphor. The metaphor is ubiquitous and, to a …

The Snapchat Leak

By Alasdair Allan
January 2, 2014

While the sitecrumbled quickly under the weight of so many people trying to get to the leaked data—and has now been suspended—there isn’t really such a thing as putting the genie back in the bottle on the Internet. Just before …

Four short links: 28 November 2013

By Nat Torkington
November 28, 2013

OpenRefine — Google abandoned the excellent Refine tool for working with data sets, now picked up and developed by open source community. Intel’s Arduino-Compatible Board — launched at MakerFaire Rome. (via Wired UK) Game Maven — learn to code by …

Four short links: 11 November 2013

By Nat Torkington
November 11, 2013

Living Light — 3D printed cephalopods filled with bioluminescent bacteria. PAGING CORY DOCTOROW, YOUR ORGASMATRON HAS ARRIVED. (via Sci Blogs) Repacking Lego Batteries with a CNC Mill — check out the video. Patrick programmed a CNC machine to drill out …

The biocoding revolution

By Ryan Bethencourt
October 21, 2013

What is biocoding? For those of you who have been following the biotechnology industry, you’ll have heard of the rapid advances in genome sequencing. Our ability to read the language of life has advanced dramatically, but only recently have we …

Four short links: 18 October 2013

By Nat Torkington
October 18, 2013

Science Not as Self-Correcting As It Thinks (Economist) — REALLY good discussion of the shortcomings in statistical practice by scientists, peer-review failures, and the complexities of experimental procedure and fuzziness of what reproducibility might actually mean. Reproducibility Initiative Receives Grant …

Four short links: 8 May 2013

By Nat Torkington
May 8, 2013

How to Build a Working Digital Computer Out of Paperclips (Evil Mad Scientist) — from a 1967 popular science book showing how to build everything from parts that you might find at a hardware store: items like paper clips, little …

Four Short Links: 7 May 2013

By Nat Torkington
May 7, 2013

Raspberry Pi Wireless Attack Toolkit — A collection of pre-configured or automatically-configured tools that automate and ease the process of creating robust Man-in-the-middle attacks. The toolkit allows your to easily select between several attack modes and is specifically designed to …

Glowing Plants

By Mike Loukides
April 26, 2013

I just invested in BioCurious’ Glowing Plants project on Kickstarter. I don’t watch Kickstarter closely, but this is about as fast as I’ve ever seen a project get funded. It went live on Wednesday; in the afternoon, I was backer …

Masking the complexity of the machine

By Jon Bruner
February 15, 2013

The Internet has thrived on abstraction and modularity. Web services hide their complexity behind APIs and standardized protocols, and these clean interfaces make it easy to turn them into modules of larger systems that can take advantage of the most …

NASA launches second International Space Apps Challenge

By Alex Howard
January 31, 2013

From April 20 to April 21, on Earth Day, the second international Space Apps Challenge will invite developers on all seven continents to the bridge to contribute code to NASA projects. Given longstanding concerns about the sustainability of apps contests, …

The bicycle barometer, SCADA security, the smart city in a disaster (industrial Internet links)

By Jon Bruner
January 24, 2013

The Bicycle Barometer(@richardjpope) — Richard Pope, a project manager at Gov.uk, built what he calls a barometer for his bike commute: it uses weather and transit data to compute a single value that expresses the relative comfort of a bike …

Four short links: 24 January 2013

By Nat Torkington
January 24, 2013

Google’s Driverless Car is Worth Trillions (Forbes) — Much of the reporting about Google’s driverless car has mistakenly focused on its science-fiction feel. [...] In fact, the driverless car has broad implications for society, for the economy and for individual …

Stacks get hacked: The inevitable rise of data warfare

By Alistair Croll
January 18, 2013

First, technology is good. Then it gets bad. Then it gets stable. This has been going on for a long time, likely since the invention of fire, knives, or the printed word. But I want to focus specifically on computing …

DARPA and Defense Department look to a more open source future

By Alex Howard
December 18, 2012

As the United States military marches further into the age of networked warfare, data networks and the mobile platforms to distribute and access them will become even more important. This fall, the (retired) eighth Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs …

To eat or be eaten?

By Mike Loukides
November 30, 2012

One of Marc Andreessen’s many accomplishments was the seminal essay “Why Software is Eating the World.” In it, the creator of Mosaic and Netscape argues for his investment thesis: everything is becoming software. Music and movies led the way, Skype …

George Church and the potential of synthetic biology

By Mike Loukides
November 9, 2012

A few weeks ago, I explained why I thought biohacking was one of the most important new trends in technology. If I didn’t convince you, Derek Jacoby’s review (below) of George Church’s new book, Regenesis, will. Church is no stranger …

Charging up: Networking resources and recovery after Hurricane Sandy

By Alex Howard
November 2, 2012

Even though the direct danger from Hurricane Sandy has passed, lower Manhattan and many parts of Connecticut and New Jersey remain a disaster zone, with millions of people still without power, reduced access to food and gas, and widespread damage …

Biohacking: The next great wave of innovation

By Mike Loukides
October 3, 2012

I’ve been following synthetic biology for the past year or so, and we’re about to see some big changes. Synthetic bio seems to be now where the computer industry was in the late 1970s: still nascent, but about to explode. …

Four short links: 27 August 2012

By Nat Torkington
August 27, 2012

International Broadband Pricing Study Dataset for Reuse — 3,655 fixed and mobile broadband retail price observations, with fixed broadband pricing data for 93 countries and mobile broadband pricing data for 106 countries. The Dictator’s Practical Internet Guide to Power Retention …

Four short links: 4 July 2012

By Nat Torkington
July 4, 2012

How Anonymous Works (Wired) -- Quinn Norton explains how the decentralized Anonymous operates, and how the transition to political activism happened. Required reading to understand post-state post-structure organisations, and to make sense of this chaotic unpredictable entity. Kanban For 1 -- very nice progress board for tasks, for the lifehackers who want to apply agile software tools to the...

Announcing Make's Hardware Innovation Workshop

Announcing Make's Hardware Innovation Workshop
By Dale Dougherty
April 6, 2012

We're announcing the Hardware Innovation Workshop, a new business conference being held during the week of Maker Faire.

Developer Week in Review: The hijacking of an insulin pump

Developer Week in Review: The hijacking of an insulin pump
By James Turner
November 3, 2011

If you own an insulin pump, someone out there might have a hack with your name on it. Google decides to make high-volume Maps API users pony up some cash, and the creator of Linux goes after C++.

Developer Week in Review: Android proves fruitful for Microsoft

Developer Week in Review: Android proves fruitful for Microsoft
By James Turner
September 29, 2011

Samsung agrees to pay Microsoft royalties for Android use. Elsewhere, Oracle keeps the SPARC line alive, and the hackability of voting machines is exposed.

Fighting the next mobile war

By Alasdair Allan
September 28, 2011

While you'll likely interact with your smartphone tomorrow in much the same way you interacted with it today, it's quite possible that your smartphone will interact with the world in a very different way. The next mobile war has already begun.

Top Stories: September 5-9, 2011

Top Stories: September 5-9, 2011
By Mac Slocum
September 9, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: Christopher Groskopf explained how he's going to hack a Texas city, Nat Torkington said goodbye to Project Gutenberg founder Michael S. Hart, and the value of government data visualizations reached a new standard thanks to LookatCook.com.

3 Android predictions: In your home, in your clothes, in your car

3 Android predictions: In your home, in your clothes, in your car
By Mac Slocum
July 7, 2011

"Learning Android" author Marko Gargenta believes Android will soon be a fixture in our homes, in our clothes and in our vehicles. Here he explains why and how this will happen.

Four short links: 28 January 2011

By Nat Torkington
January 28, 2011

NiftyUrls -- open source elegant wee RSS dashboard. I haven't looked into the source yet, but I'm already thinking of applications. The PirateBox -- small piece of hardware that creates a wifi network for local filesharing. Not connected to the Internet. (via BoingBoing) More Hammer, Less Yammer (Julian Bleecker) -- If you’re not also making — you’re sort of,...

Four short links: 23 November 2010

By Nat Torkington
November 23, 2010

Goodbye App Engine -- clear explanation of the reasons why Google AppEngine isn't the right thing to build your startup on. Don't read the comments unless you want to lose faith in humanity. (via Michael Koziarski on Twitter) Neato Robotics XV-11 Tear-down -- the start of hackable LIDAR, which would enable cheap and easy 3D mapping, via a Roomba-like...

Four short links: 16 November 2010

By Nat Torkington
November 16, 2010

A Room to Let in Old Aldgate -- a lovely collection of photographs of lost buildings from The Society for Photographing Relics of Old London. Think of them as the Wayback Machine of their day. (via Fiona Rigby on Twitter) Wikipedia Fundraising A/B Tests -- get a glimpse into the science that resulted in Jimmy Wales's hollow haunted gaze...

Four short links: 21 October 2010

By Nat Torkington
October 21, 2010

Using MysQL as NoSQL -- 750,000+ qps on a commodity MySQL/InnoDB 5.1 server from remote web clients. Making an SLR Camera from Scratch -- amazing piece of hardware devotion. (via hackaday.com) Mac App Store Guidelines -- Apple announce an app store for the Macintosh, similar to its app store for iPhones and iPads. "Mac App" no longer means generic...

Four short links: 18 August 2010

By Nat Torkington
August 18, 2010

BBC Dimensions -- brilliant work, a fun site that lets you overlay familiar plcaes with famous and notable things so you can get a better sense of how large they are. Example: the Colossus of Rhodes straddling O'Reilly HQ, the Library of Alexandria vs the Google campus, and New Orleans Mardi Gras began at the headquarters of Fred Phelps's...

Four short links: 2 August 2010

By Nat Torkington
August 2, 2010

Hidden Features of Google (StackExchange) -- rather than Google's list of search features, here are the features that real (sophisticated) users find useful. My new favourite: the ~ operator for approximate searching. (via Hacker News) Natural Language Parsing for the Web -- JSON API to the Stanford Natural Language Parser. I wonder why the API to the library isn't...

The Watering Hole - A Little Social Engineering

The Watering Hole - A Little Social Engineering
By James Turner
July 27, 2010

In any organization, your most vulnerable security assets are the ones standing around the water cooler...

Four short links: 20 July 2010

By Nat Torkington
July 20, 2010

Dangerous Prototypes -- "a new open source hardware project every month". Sample project: Flash Destroyer, which writes and verifies EEPROM chips until they blow out. Wabit -- GPLv3 reporting tool. Because No Respectable MBA Programme Would Admit Me (Mike Shaver) -- excellent book recommendations. The Most Prescient Footnote Ever (David Pennock) -- In footnote 14 of Chapter 5 (p....

Hardware hacking heaven

Hardware hacking heaven
By Edd Dumbill
July 9, 2010

Hacking isn't just for software anymore. A full range of open source hardware hacks -- everything from Arduino to parallel programming to small-form computing -- will be discussed at OSCON this year. With the current slate of tools, it's never been easier to write code that runs on low-power, small-format devices. And many of these tools are familiar to conventional software developers.

Four short links: 7 June 2010

By Nat Torkington
June 7, 2010

UKI: Simple UI Kit for Complex Web Apps -- Uki is a fast and simple JavaScript user interface toolkit for desktop-like web applications. It comes with a rich view-component library ranging from Slider to List and SplitPane. Includes the now-ubiquitous Mail.app mockup, which has become to UI library webpages what the bucket of grease and dirt is to household...

Four short links: 4 June 2010

By Nat Torkington
June 4, 2010

HomeSense -- an open user-centered research project investigating the use of smart and networked technologies in the home, with uber-Arduino-rockstar Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino. (via titine on Twitter) Kelvin's Thunderstorm (Instructables) -- "create lightning from water and gravity". Simple and impressive science. (via Paul Fenwick) Graph Visualization Code in Javascript (Stack Overflow) -- good pointers to interesting libraries. ChEMBL - Neglected...

"Hackers" at 25

By Mac Slocum
June 3, 2010

In mid-1980s, Steven Levy wrote a book that introduced the term "hacker" to a wide audience. In the ensuing 25 years, that word and its accompanying community have gone through tremendous change. In this Q&A, Levy discusses the book's genesis, its influence and the role hackers continue to play.

Four short links: 24 May 2010

By Nat Torkington
May 24, 2010

Google Documents API -- permissions, revisions, search, export, upload, and file. Somehow I had missed that this existed. Profile of Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange (Sydney Morning Herald) -- he draws no salary, is constantly on the move, lived for a while in a compound in Nairobi with other NGOs, and cowrote the rubberhose filesystem which offers deniable encryption. OpenPCR...

Four short links: 3 May 2010

By Nat Torkington
May 3, 2010

Science Hack Day -- Saturday, June 19th and Sunday, June 20th, 2010, in the Guardian offices in London. A meeting place for the designer/coder class and scientists, with datasets as the common language. (via timoreilly on Twitter) Facebook's Evil Interface (EFF) -- Facebook's new M.O. is to say "to better help you, we took away your privacy. If you...

Four short links: 28 April 2010

By Nat Torkington
April 28, 2010

Fair Use in the US Economy (PDF) -- prepared by IT lobby in the US, it's the counterpart to Big 's fictitious billions of dollars of losses due to file sharing. Take each with a grain of salt, but this is interesting because it talks about the industries and businesses that the fair use laws make possible. Disassembled Household...


1 to 50 of 64 Next
The Watering Hole