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Four short links: 11 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 11, 2013

Meet Jack, or What The Government Could Do With All That Location Data (ACLU) — sham slidedeck which helps laypeople see how our data exhaust can be used against us to keep us safe. PirateBay Moves Domains — different ccTLDs …

Four short links: 12 June 2013

By Nat Torkington
June 12, 2013

geogit — opengeo project exploring the use of distributed management of spatial data. [...] adapts [git's] core concepts to handle versioning of geospatial data. Shapefiles, PostGIS or SpatiaLite data stored in a change-tracking repository, with all the fun gut features …

Geolocation in MongoDB at the Silicon Valley MongoDB User Group

By Shashank Tiwari
January 19, 2013

Thanks to all of you, who were able to join me at the session on January 15, 2013. Thanks much for the kind remarks some of you left behind on the meetup message board, post the session.  Its very rewarding...

Four short links: 5 December 2012

By Nat Torkington
December 5, 2012

The Benefits of Poetry for Professionals (HBR) — Harman Industries founder Sidney Harman once told The New York Times, “I used to tell my senior staff to get me poets as managers. Poets are our original systems thinkers. They look …

The Transportation Security Administration's QR code flub

The Transportation Security Administration's QR code flub
By Fred Trotter
January 3, 2012

Fred Trotter discovers that a QR code embedded in a TSA poster at the Orlando airport links to justinsomnia.org, which is about as far as you can get from a government website.

Strata Week: IBM puts Hadoop in the cloud

Strata Week: IBM puts Hadoop in the cloud
By Audrey Watters
October 27, 2011

IBM targets businesses with a cloud-based Hadoop product, Factual tackles incomplete geo records, and Google embraces transparency by publishing and explaining the data requests it gets from governments.

Strata Week: IBM puts Hadoop in the cloud

By Audrey Watters
October 27, 2011

IBM targets businesses with a cloud-based Hadoop product, Factual tackles incomplete geo records, and Google embraces transparency by publishing and explaining the data requests it gets from governments.

Top Stories: October 17-21, 2011

Top Stories: October 17-21, 2011
By Mac Slocum
October 21, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: Andy Kirk explained why data, maps and animation work so well together, we discovered the connection between a game-playing robot and the future of mobile app testing, and we learned how The Guardian develops its data journalism.

Visualization deconstructed: Why animated geospatial data works

By Andy Kirk
October 19, 2011

When you plot geographic data onto the scenery of a map and then create a shifting window into that scene through the sequence of time, you create a deep, data-driven story.

Visualization deconstructed: Why animated geospatial data works

Visualization deconstructed: Why animated geospatial data works
By Andy Kirk
October 19, 2011

When you plot geographic data onto the scenery of a map and then create a shifting window into that scene through the sequence of time, you create a deep, data-driven story.

Why indoor navigation is so hard

Why indoor navigation is so hard
By Nick Farina
October 11, 2011

The mapping applications built into smartphones are fantastic ... until you arrive at your destination. Here, Nick Farina explains how indoor navigation apps can and should work.

ePayments Week: Financial Times bets on its web app

ePayments Week: Financial Times bets on its web app
By David Sims
September 1, 2011

The Financial Times says subscriber data trumps Apple's reach, Flickr introduces geofencing to keep things private, and the cracks in the daily deal world start to show.

Strata Week: What happens when 200,000 hard drives work together?

Strata Week: What happens when 200,000 hard drives work together?
By Audrey Watters
September 1, 2011

IBM takes data storage to a whole new level (120 petabytes, to be exact), Infochimps' new API tries to make life easier for geo developers, and the "Internet of people" keeps an eye on Hurricane Irene.

Strata Week: What happens when 200,000 hard drives work together?

By Audrey Watters
September 1, 2011

IBM takes data storage to a whole new level (120 petabytes, to be exact), Infochimps' new API tries to make life easier for geo developers, and the "Internet of people" keeps an eye on Hurricane Irene.

ePayments Week: Financial Times bets on its web app

By David Sims
September 1, 2011

The Financial Times says subscriber data trumps Apple's reach, Flickr introduces geofencing to keep things private, and the cracks in the daily deal world start to show.

ePayments Week: The rise of location-triggered offers

ePayments Week: The rise of location-triggered offers
By David Sims
August 25, 2011

Placecast offers merchants a geofence to corral customers. Also, UK researcher YouGov says iPhone users are more willing to buy with their phones, and telecoms bury Androids with crapware.

Four short links: 18 July 2011

By Nat Torkington
July 18, 2011

Organisational Warfare (Simon Wardley) -- notes on the commoditisation of software, with interesting analyses of the positions of some large players. On closer inspection, Salesforce seems to be doing more than just commoditisation with an ILC pattern, as can be clearly seen from Radian's 6 acquisition. They also seem to be operating a tower and moat strategy, i.e. creating...

3 big challenges in location development

3 big challenges in location development
By Bruce Stewart
April 14, 2011

With the goal of indexing the entire web by location, Fwix founder Darian Shirazi has had to dig in deep to location-based development issues. In this interview, Shirazi discusses challenges he sees in location and how Fwix is addressing them.

Four short links: 8 February 2011

By Nat Torkington
February 8, 2011

Erase and Rewind -- the BBC are planning to close (delete) 172 websites on some kind of cost-cutting measure. i’m very saddened to see the BBC join the ranks of online services that don’t give a damn for posterity. As Simon Willison points out, the British Library will have archived some of the sites (and Internet Archive others, possibly)....

The "dying craft" of data on discs

By David Sims
January 27, 2011

Urban Mapping CEO Ian White discusses the changing way that data is being sold, and the move to providing data as a service.

Big data faster: A conversation with Bradford Stephens

Big data faster: A conversation with Bradford Stephens
By David Sims
January 6, 2011

Bradford Stephens, founder of of Drawn to Scale, discusses big data systems that work in "user time."

Four short links: 17 June 2010

By Nat Torkington
June 17, 2010

What is IBM's Watson? (NY Times) -- IBM joining the big data machine learning race, and hatching a Blue Gene system that can answer Jeopardy questions. Does good, not great, and is getting better. Google Lays Out its Mobile Strategy (InformationWeek) -- notable to me for Rechis said that Google breaks down mobile users into three behavior groups: A....

Four short links: 21 April 2010

By Nat Torkington
April 21, 2010

Akihabara -- toolkit for writing 8-bit style games in Javascript using HTML5. (via waxy) Google Government Requests Tool --moving services into the cloud loses you control and privacy (see my presentation on the subject), and one way is by making your mail/browser history/etc. easier for law enforcement to get their hands on. There's new moral ground here for service...

Brian Aker on post-Oracle MySQL

By James Turner
April 8, 2010

In time for next week's MySQL Conference & Expo, Brian Aker discussed a number of topics with us, including Oracle's motivations for buying Sun and the rise of NoSQL.

Four short links: 25 March 2010

By Nat Torkington
March 25, 2010

Aren't You Being a Little Hasty in Making This Data Free? -- very nice deconstruction of a letter sent by ESRI and competitors to the British Government, alarmed at the announcement that various small- and mid-sized datasets would no longer be charged for. In short, companies that make money reselling datasets hate the idea of free datasets. The arguments...

When it Comes to Tweets, the Key is Location, Location, Location!

When it Comes to Tweets, the Key is Location, Location, Location!
By James Turner
February 23, 2010

When you only have 140 characters to get your message across, you have to depend a lot on context. For Twitter, a big part of that context has become location. Knowing where someone is tweeting from can add a lot of value to the experience, and it's Raffi Krikorian's job to integrate location into Twitter. Raffi will be talking about this and other location-related topics at the upcoming Where 2.0 conference. We began by asking him how Twitter determines location, and whether it will always be an opt-in option.

Four short links: 18 November 2009

By Nat Torkington
November 18, 2009

Memento: Time Travel for the Web -- clever versioning hack that uses HTTP's content negotiation to negotiate about the date! Ordnance Survey Maps to Go Online -- The prime minister said that by April he hoped a consultation would be completed on the free provision of Ordnance Survey maps down to a scale of 1:10,000, (not the scale of...

Snow Leopard Is Location-Aware

Snow Leopard Is Location-Aware
By Brady Forrest
October 15, 2009

Shortly after installing Snow Leopard I saw the first evidence of the new location services built into the operating system. I got the new version of Clarke, a Fire Eagle updater. After the install a window appeared that asked me if I wanted to share my location with an application. Finally! So how is Apple doing it? The same they do on the iPhone.

Four short links: 17 September 2009

By Nat Torkington
September 16, 2009

Wikileaks Now Holds UK Postcode Database -- the UK does not have open geodata in the way that we know it. A state-owned enterprise, Ordnance Survey, is responsible for maintaining all sorts of baseline data and they charge (through the nose) for that data. This is the release of 1,841,177 post codes, geographic boundaries, and more. Postcodes in the...

Four short links: 14 September 2009

By Nat Torkington
September 14, 2009

WTF Is A Supercolumn? -- Cassandra is a NoSQL database, a triplestore that scales superwell. Because it's not the usual relational thing we're accustomed to, the language can be a barrier to learning: ColumnFamily, SuperColumns, and more. This post explains what's what, with examples. (via joshua on Delicious) Gov 2.0 Summit Videos -- When I grow up, I want...

Four short links: 10 September 2009

By Nat Torkington
September 10, 2009

A Political Startup (Aaron Swartz) -- inside account of his grassroots activism efforts, with clever strategies he used to get the outcomes he wanted. A couple months later, frustrated that Norm Coleman wouldn’t drop his spurious legal challenges against Al Franken being named a Senator, we started NormDollar.com. We asked people to donate a dollar each day Norm Coleman...

Four short links: 17 August 2009

By Nat Torkington
August 16, 2009

How Twitter Works in Theory (Kevin Marks) -- very nice summary about the conceptual properties of Twitter that let it work. Both Google and Twitter have little boxes for you to type into, but on Google you're looking for information, and expecting a machine response, whereas on Twitter you're declaring an emotion and expecting a human response. This is...

Four short links: 24 June 2009

By Nat Torkington
June 24, 2009

The Digital Open -- The Digital Open is an online technology community and competition for youth around the world, age 17 and under. Building a community of young open source hackers. Four Crowdsoucing Lessons from the Guardian's Spectacular Expenses Scandal Experiment -- Your workers are unpaid, so make it fun. How to lure them? By making it feel like...

Before and After Shots of Google's Iran Maps

By Brady Forrest
June 22, 2009

There many places in the world where it is not possible for larger companies to map them. These can be for economic reasons as is the case for Black Rock City (the temporary 40,000 person home for Burning Man). Or for political reasons as is the case for Iran and countries such as China. As I mentioned the other...

Four short links: 18 June 2009

By Nat Torkington
June 18, 2009

Harvard Study Finds Weaker Copyright Protection Has Benefited Society (Michael Geist) -- Given the increase in artistic production along with the greater public access conclude that "weaker copyright protection, it seems, has benefited society." This is consistent with the authors' view that weaker copyright is "uambiguously desirable if it does not lessen the incentives of artists and entertainment companies...

A Spate of Excellent Photo Apps for the iPhone

A Spate of Excellent Photo Apps for the iPhone
By Derrick Story
April 2, 2009

Photography on the iPhone can be more than just snapping 2-megapixel pictures. You can also process and transfer the images from the same device that you used to record. For this to work reasonable well, you need a basic...

GeoData Explorations: Google's Ever-Expanding Geo Investment

By Brady Forrest
December 16, 2008

Google has been investing lots of money in geodata acquisition. Some of the money is being spent externally: they've inked an exclusive satellite imagery deal with GeoEye (Radar post) and a data sharing deal Tele Atlas (Radar post). And some is being spent internally with Mapmaker, Street View and the web. Over the past week Google has been sharing...


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