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Network Science Dashboards

By Ben Lorica
April 26, 2014

With Network Science well on its way to being an established academic discipline, we’re beginning to see tools that leverage it. Applications that draw heavily from this discipline make heavy use of visual representations and come with interfaces aimed at …

Financial analytics as a service

By Ben Lorica
December 22, 2013

In relatively short order Amazon’s internal computing services has become the world’s most successful cloud computing platform. Conceived in 2003 and launched in 2006, AWS grew quickly and is now the largest web hosting company in the world. With the …

On Being a Data Skeptic

By Cathy O'Neil
October 3, 2013

People come to data science in all sorts of ways. I happen to be someone who came via finance. Trained as a mathematician, I worked first at a hedge fund and then a financial risk software company, each for about …

The re-emergence of time-series

By Ben Lorica
April 9, 2013

My first job after leaving academia was as a quant 1 for a hedge fund, where I performed (what are now referred to as) data science tasks on financial time-series. I primarily used techniques from probability & statistics, econometrics, and …

Personal data ownership drives market transparency and empowers consumers

By Alex Howard
February 13, 2013

On Monday morning, the Obama administration launched a new community focused on consumer data at Data.gov. While there was no new data to be found among the 507 datasets listed there, it was the first time that smart disclosure has …

Nate Silver confuses cause and effect, ends up defending corruption

By Cathy O'Neil
December 21, 2012

This piece originally appeared on Mathbabe. It’s republished with permission. I just finished reading Nate Silver’s newish book, The Signal and the Noise: Why so many predictions fail – but some don’t. The good news First off, let me say this: …

Four short links: 1 October 2012

By Nat Torkington
October 1, 2012

Flightfox — Real people compete to find you the best flights. Crowdsourcing beating algorithms …. (via NY Times) Code Monster (Crunchzilla) — a fun site for parents to learn to program with their kids. Loving seeing so much activity around …

What caused New York’s startup boom?

By Jon Bruner
September 24, 2012

Since the crisis of 2008 New York City’s massive financial sector — the city’s richest economic engine, once seen to have unlimited potential for growth — has languished. In the meantime, attention has turned to its nascent startup sector, home …

Wall Street’s robots are not out to get you

By Renee DiResta
August 17, 2012

Technology is critical to today’s financial markets. It’s also surprisingly controversial. In most industries, increasing technological involvement is progress, not a problem. And yet, people who believe that computers should drive cars suddenly become Luddites when they talk about computers …

Some sideways thinking about cyberwarfare

By Tim O'Reilly
July 16, 2012

Foreign policy, including the possibility of cyberwarfare, is no longer just between nations, but between nations and individuals, between nations and big companies, and between companies and industries.

Four short links: 12 June 2012

By Nat Torkington
June 12, 2012

Amazon's Insanely Crap Royalties (Andrew Hyde) -- Amazon offers high royalty rate to you, but that's before a grim hidden "delivery fee". Check out Andrew's graph of the different pay rates to the author from each medium. SparkFun Education -- learn electronics from the good folks at SparkFun. TaskRabbit -- connects you with friendly, reliable people right in your...

Visualization of the Week: 30 years of tech IPOs

Visualization of the Week: 30 years of tech IPOs
By Audrey Watters
May 25, 2012

This week's visualization comes from The New York Times and compares the last 30 years of tech IPOs (hint: watch for the big blue dot).

Visualization of the Week: 30 years of tech IPOs

By Audrey Watters
May 25, 2012

This week's visualization comes from The New York Times and compares the last 30 years of tech IPOs (hint: watch for the big blue dot).

Four short links: 21 May 2012

By Nat Torkington
May 21, 2012

Objectivist C -- very clever. In Objectivist-C, each program is free to acquire as many resources as it can, without interference from the operating system. (via Tim O'Reilly) Zynga and Facebook Stock Oddities (The Atlantic) -- signs of robotrading, a reminder that we're surrounded by algorithms and only notice them when they go awry. The Final ROFLcon and Mobile's...

Four short links: 13 April 2012

By Nat Torkington
April 13, 2012

Change the Game (Video) -- Amy Hoy's talk from Webstock '12, on being contrary and being successful. Was one of the standout talks for me. Rise4Fun -- software engineering tools from Microsoft Research. (via Hacker News) Why Obama's JOBS Act Couldn't Suck Worse (Rolling Stone) -- get ready for an avalanche of shareholder suits ten years from now, since...

Four short links: 12 April 2012

By Nat Torkington
April 12, 2012

Big Data in Finance (PDF, 9M) -- Algo trading systems have begun to resemble an arms race. Competition, data, and the race for real-time. A Parent's Guide to 21st Century Learning (Edutopia, free registration required to download) -- What should collaboration, creativity, communication, and critical thinking look like in a modern classroom? How can parents help educators accomplish their...

What is smart disclosure?

By Alex Howard
April 1, 2012

Smart disclosure is when a private company or government agency provides a person with periodic access to his or her own data in open formats that enable them to easily put the data to use. There are now over a dozen smart disclosure initiatives across the federal government and more in the private sector. When consumers gain access to data and can put it to work through the innovation entrepreneurs, citizens can tap it to make better choices about from finance, healthcare, travel, energy, education, real estate and more.

What is smart disclosure?

By Alex Howard
April 1, 2012

Smart disclosure is when a private company or government agency provides a person with periodic access to his or her own data in open formats that enable them to easily put the data to use. There are now over a dozen smart disclosure initiatives across the federal government and more in the private sector. When consumers gain access to data and can put it to work through the innovation entrepreneurs, citizens can tap it to make better choices about from finance, healthcare, travel, energy, education, real estate and more.

Profile of the Data Journalist: The Elections Developer

By Alex Howard
March 1, 2012

To learn more about the people who are redefining the practice computer-assisted reporting, in some cases, building the newsroom stack for the 21st century, Radar conducted a series of email interviews with data journalists during the 2012 NICAR Conference.

Profile of the Data Journalist: The Elections Developer

By Alex Howard
March 1, 2012

To learn more about the people who are redefining the practice computer-assisted reporting, in some cases, building the newsroom stack for the 21st century, Radar conducted a series of email interviews with data journalists during the 2012 NICAR Conference.

Profile of the Data Journalist: The Elections Developer

By Alex Howard
March 1, 2012

To learn more about the people who are redefining the practice computer-assisted reporting, in some cases, building the newsroom stack for the 21st century, Radar conducted a series of email interviews with data journalists during the 2012 NICAR Conference.

Data for the public good

By Alex Howard
February 22, 2012

The explosion of big data, open data and social data offers new opportunities to address humanity's biggest challenges. The open question is no longer if data can be used for the public good, but how.

Data for the public good

Data for the public good
By Alex Howard
February 22, 2012

The explosion of big data, open data and social data offers new opportunities to address humanity's biggest challenges. The open question is no longer if data can be used for the public good, but how.

Strata Week: The Megaupload seizure and user data

Strata Week: The Megaupload seizure and user data
By Audrey Watters
February 2, 2012

In this week's data news, Megaupload users face data deletion, Bloomberg opens its market data interface and Pentaho changes its licensing for Kettle.

Strata Week: The Megaupload seizure and user data

By Audrey Watters
February 2, 2012

In this week's data news, Megaupload users face data deletion, Bloomberg opens its market data interface and Pentaho changes its licensing for Kettle.

Visualization of the Week: The big chart of money

Visualization of the Week: The big chart of money
By Audrey Watters
November 25, 2011

In an audacious new visualization, Randall Monroe of xkcd takes on money — where it comes from, where it goes and what it buys.

Visualization of the Week: The big chart of money

By Audrey Watters
November 25, 2011

In an audacious new visualization, Randall Monroe of xkcd takes on money — where it comes from, where it goes and what it buys.

Strata Week: 4.74 degrees of Kevin Bacon

Strata Week: 4.74 degrees of Kevin Bacon
By Audrey Watters
November 22, 2011

Facebook research questions the "six degrees of separation" rule, Gnip gets into the real-time financial data business, and eBay looks to put Hunch's recommendation engine to use.

Strata Week: 4.74 degrees of Kevin Bacon

By Audrey Watters
November 22, 2011

Facebook research questions the "six degrees of separation" rule, Gnip gets into the real-time financial data business, and eBay looks to put Hunch's recommendation engine to use.

Four short links: 7 November 2011

By Nat Torkington
November 7, 2011

California and Bust (Vanity Fair) -- Michael Lewis digs into city and state finances, and the news ain't good. Tonido Plug 2 -- with only watts a day, you could have your own low-cost compute farm that runs off a car battery and a cheap solar panel. William Gibson Interview (The Paris Review) -- It's harder to imagine the...

Four short links: 24 October 2011

By Nat Torkington
October 24, 2011

Tangle -- open source Javascript library for creating slider-type widgets in web pages, with built-in updating of other web elements. This is fantastic for exploring "what-if" scenarios. Check out the demos. Location-Based Security -- The researchers have created a customized version of Android controlled by a “policy engine” on a server. The Android devices use Bluetooth and near-field communications...

Why the finance world should care about big data and data science

By Mac Slocum
August 31, 2011

O'Reilly director of market research Roger Magoulas discusses the intersection of big data and finance, and the opportunities this pairing creates for financial experts.

Why the finance world should care about big data and data science

Why the finance world should care about big data and data science
By Mac Slocum
August 31, 2011

O'Reilly director of market research Roger Magoulas discusses the intersection of big data and finance, and the opportunities this pairing creates for financial experts.

Four short links: 3 June 2011

By Nat Torkington
June 3, 2011

Silk Road (Gawker) -- Tor-delivered "web" site that is like an eBay for drugs, currency is Bitcoins. Jeff Garzik, a member of the Bitcoin core development team, says in an email that bitcoin is not as anonymous as the denizens of Silk Road would like to believe. He explains that because all Bitcoin transactions are recorded in a public...

Strata Week: Will data make stock exchanges unnecessary?

Strata Week: Will data make stock exchanges unnecessary?
By Audrey Watters
May 5, 2011

Will big data kill the stock exchange? That question was recently explored by Andy Kessler. Plus: How recent security breaches could shape the black market and a look at how "island biogeography" predicted Osama Bin Laden's location.

Trading on sentiment

Trading on sentiment
By Ciara Byrne
May 4, 2011

Sorting through thousands of news stories and categorizing information based on mood and tone creates useful data points for financial systems.

Quantum trading! And tunnels through the Earth!

By Jim Stogdill
April 17, 2011

Remember when we used to place data centers in whatever cheap abandoned warehouse was nearby? That's a quaint notion in an era where trading advantage and arbitrage depend more and more on the speed of light and link distance.

The ecology of risk

By Michael Ferrari
March 29, 2011

Large-scale events that have disrupted supply chains underscore the importance of viewing the world through a spatial lens.

Strata Week: Statistically speaking

Strata Week: Statistically speaking
By Julie Steele
October 21, 2010

In this edition of Strata Week: The London Stock Exchange moves from .Net to open source; learn how graphical scales can lie; the Euroean Central Bank president calls for better financial statistics; and we bid farewell to the father of fractals.

Four short links: 20 September 2010

By Nat Torkington
September 20, 2010

The Tracks of Bizarre Robot Traders (The Atlantic) -- I love the idea that these mysterious effect-less trades might simply be there to slow down competitors' analytic systems because every millisecond matters. MS Paint Adventures -- a weird mashup of MS Paint and text adventure games. tablib -- a format-agnostic tabular dataset library for Python. (via joshua on delicious)...

Four short links: 19 August 2010

By Nat Torkington
August 19, 2010

New Big Brother: Market-Moving Satellite Images -- using satellite images of Wal-Mart and Target parking lots to predict quarterly returns. (via Hacker News) Form and Code -- beautiful book on the intersection of code, design, architecture, form, and function. One of the authors is Casey Reas who was also one of the people behind Processing. (via RandomEtc on Twitter)...

Four short links: 20 April 2010

By Nat Torkington
April 20, 2010

Epigrams in Programming -- all from the remarkable Alan Perlis. By the time I learned that he was responsible for such gems as "Syntactic sugar causes cancer of the semicolon", "A language that doesn't affect the way you think about programming, is not worth knowing", and "Around computers it is difficult to find the correct unit of time to...

Four short links: 31 March 2010

By Nat Torkington
March 31, 2010

ZeroMQ -- bold claim of "Fastest. Messaging. Ever." LGPL, C++ with bindings for many languages, past version 2 already. (via edd on Twitter) Prediction Market News (David Pennock) -- HSX is going to be a real marketplace with real $. The real HSX will of course say goodbye to the virtual specialist and the opening weekend adjust, two facets...

Four short links: 24 March 2010

By Nat Torkington
March 24, 2010

The Great Hargeisa Goat Bubble -- hilarious economics parable. The ZenPad -- look for more Android-powered tablets. (via azaaza on Twitter) Diigo -- browser plugin to archive, highlight, and annotate web pages, then share and collaborate on those augmentations. (via an annotation of Zittrain's Future of the Internet and How to Stop It) So Long, And No Thanks for...

Four short links: 22 March 2010

By Nat Torkington
March 22, 2010

Marketcetera -- open source trading platform. Google Code University: Programming Languages -- video-based classes on C++, Python, Java, and Go. Skipfish -- open sourced web application security scanner, from Google. Professor Swaps Grades for XP -- divided class into guilds, awarded XP for achieving various solo, guild, and pickup quests. (via johnny723 on Twitter)...

How Much Is the Fear of Cloud Security Worth?

How Much Is the Fear of Cloud Security Worth?
By George Reese
February 21, 2010

It's absurd to talk about the cloud as being "more secure" or "less secure" than an internal data center. In fact, for most needs, a cloud infrastructure can be secured appropriately to an organization's risk profile. Even if you are concerned about the security issues with cloud computing, it's highly unlikely those concerns justify the extra costs associated with internal data centers and managed service providers over the cloud.

Four short links: 8 January 2010

By Nat Torkington
January 8, 2010

Testing, Testing -- at the end of an interesting article on health care reform comes this: The poverty of our health-care information is an embarrassment. At the end of each month, we have county-by-county data on unemployment, and we have prompt and detailed data on the price of goods and commodities; we can use these indicators to guide our...

Four short links: 12 November 2009

By Nat Torkington
November 12, 2009

Fat Free CRM -- open source (Affero GPL) Ruby on Rails CRM system. Bixo -- open source data mining toolkit that runs as a series of pipes on top of Hadoop. Built on Cascading workflow system for Hadoop that hides MapReduce. (via kdnuggets) Andy Kessler's Keynote at Defrag Stank (Pete Warden) -- I'm sorry to hear it, because I...

Four short links: 12 October 2009

By Nat Torkington
October 12, 2009

Snowball -- a small string processing language designed for creating stemming algorithms for use in Information Retrieval. (via straup on delicious) Insider Trades -- a Yahoo! Hack Day app that turned out to be worth continuing. Scans SEC systems every 30 seconds and alerts you if the stock you track has been traded by an insider. (via straup on...

Four Tips for Avoiding VM Sprawl in the Public Cloud

Four Tips for Avoiding VM Sprawl in the Public Cloud
By George Reese
October 3, 2009

You moved into the cloud to save some money. Now it's the first of the month and you're looking at your latest cloud provider bill. It's not at all what you planned. Welcome to the world of VM sprawl, the dark side of cloud computing.


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