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A Different Kind of Quantified Self

By Edie Freedman
February 18, 2014

I just got a personal tracking device that tells me how many calories I’ve burned, how much sleep I got last night, and how many more steps I need to take to meet my daily goal. Lots of people I …

The post A Different Kind of Quantified Self appeared first on Animals.

Sustainability

By Jon Bruner
November 19, 2013

Tim O’Reilly gave some sobering remarks last week at Techonomy about the things that might halt the sort of technological progress that has come to feel inexorable: war, fundamentalism, anti-science sentiment, etc. Human progress has practically stopped over many long …

Four short links: 9 October 2013

By Nat Torkington
October 7, 2013

Android Malware Numbers — (Quartz) less than an estimated 0.001% of app installations on Android are able to evade the system’s multi-layered defenses and cause harm to users, based on Google’s analysis of 1.5B downloads and installs. Facebook Operations Chief …

Four short links: 22 July 2013

By Nat Torkington
July 22, 2013

The Anti-Virus Age is Over — for every analyst that an AV company hires, the bad guys can hire 10 developers. 3D Printing’s 2014 Renaissance (Quartz) — patents on sintering about to expire which will open up hi-res production. Happened …

Why ebooks & why green e-publishing?

By Deborah Emin
May 2, 2013

Perhaps you’ve also wondered why the publishing industry produces and distributes all the major climate science information available but doesn’t read it. If it did, publishing could become the standard bearer for global reduction of carbon footprints. This business challenge …

Four short links: 28 February 2013

By Nat Torkington
February 28, 2013

Myth of the Free Internet (The Atlantic) — equity of access is an important issue, but this good point is marred by hanging it off the problematic (beer? speech? downloads?) “free”. I’m on the council of InternetNZ whose mission is …

Four short links: 22 August 2012

By Nat Torkington
August 22, 2012

Minecraft Experiment Devolves into Devastating Resource War — life imitates art, but artificial life imitates, well, Haiti. Finding Unity in the Math Wars — I recently heard a quote about constructive dialog: “Don’t argue the exact point a person made. …

Four short links: 17 April 2012

By Nat Torkington
April 17, 2012

Penguins Counted From Space (Reuters) -- I love the unintended flow-on effects of technological progress. Nobody funded satellites because they'd help us get an accurate picture of wildlife in the Antarctic, but yet here we are. The street finds a use ... What Makes a Super-Spreader? -- A super-spreader is a person who transmits an infection to a significantly...

Four short links: 3 August 2011

By Nat Torkington
August 3, 2011

Just Say No To Freegal -- an interesting view from the inside, speaking out against a music licensing system called Freegal which is selling to libraries. Libraries typically buy one copy of something, and then lend it out to multiple users sequentially, in order to get a good return on investment. Participating in a product like Freegal means that...

Sustainable publishing is a mindset, not a format

By Jenn Webb
July 15, 2011

Dennis Stovall, director of the Publishing Program at Portland State University, discusses the state of sustainable publishing and who's doing it right.

Sustainable publishing is a mindset, not a format

Sustainable publishing is a mindset, not a format
By Jenn Webb
July 15, 2011

Dennis Stovall, director of the Publishing Program at Portland State University, discusses the state of sustainable publishing and who's doing it right.

The smart grid data deluge

By Ciara Byrne
June 22, 2011

The smart grid is an information revolution for utilities, and the first line of the information the grid uses will come from smart meters. EMeter's Aaron DeYonker discusses meter use and data applications in this interview.

The smart grid data deluge

The smart grid data deluge
By Ciara Byrne
June 22, 2011

The smart grid is an information revolution for utilities, and the first line of the information the grid uses will come from smart meters. EMeter's Aaron DeYonker discusses meter use and data applications in this interview.

Can we capture all the world's carbon emissions?

Can we capture all the world's carbon emissions?
By Ramez Naam
May 20, 2011

Capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere has major challenges, but it can be done at a price that would not destroy our economy. Doing so would give us more time to find ways to switch to inherently zero-carbon methods of powering our civilization.

The Moore's Law of solar energy

The Moore's Law of solar energy
By Ramez Naam
April 19, 2011

If humanity could capture one tenth of one percent of the solar energy striking the Earth, we would have access to 6X as much energy as we consume in all forms today, with almost no greenhouse gas emissions.

Industrial ecology and big data

By Michael Ferrari
March 10, 2011

Because companies are tracking their inputs and byproducts carefully, there has been an exponential increase in the amout of efficiency/environmental data available for primary stakeholders and investors.

The Watering Hole - Batteries BETTER Be Included

The Watering Hole - Batteries BETTER Be Included
By James Turner
February 8, 2011

EE 101 pop quiz question of the day: Can you replace 10,000 AA batteries in less time than it takes to recharge one of the new EVs off a 120V outlet?

Four short links: 24 December 2010

By Nat Torkington
December 24, 2010

Holiday Carbon Offsets -- buy carbon offsets against Santa's trip, a stockingful of coal, or this year's Reindeer Games. (via Val Aurora on Twitter) Sad Story of the Snowman -- the best use of Internationalized Domain Names yet. Katie, Starwars Geek (CNN) -- best use of the Internet this year. Everything The Internet Knows About Me Because I Asked...

The Watering Hole - Not My Problem...

By James Turner
October 1, 2010

The day that Ted Kennedy announced his opposition to the Cape Wind project because it spoiled the view of Cape Cod, I officially declared a pox on both (Democratic and Republican) their houses. There are no good guys, only competing special interests. Who, me, cynical?

Sensor networks and the future of forecasting

Sensor networks and the future of forecasting
By Michael Ferrari
September 8, 2010

Identifying extreme weather patterns can minimize impact when that weather arrives. But to improve long-range forecasts, we'll need to create environmental sensor networks out of phones, satellites and other technology.

How ICT Can Improve the Environmental Performance of Educational Institutions

By Sarah Sorensen
July 14, 2010

I would like to talk about some of the ways in which schools are driving the use of technology to improve the environmental performance of their institutions...

Four short links: 1 July 2010

By Nat Torkington
July 1, 2010

Conflict Minerals and Blood Tech (Joey Devilla) -- electronic components have a human and environmental cost. I remember Saul Griffith asking me, "do you want to kill gorillas or dolphins?" for one component. Now we can add child militias and horrific rape to the list. (via Simon Willison) Meteor -- an open source HTTP server that serves streaming data...

The Network Continues to Support Sustainability

By Sarah Sorensen
May 26, 2010

The use of ICT to tackle climate issues is growing in sophistication, as well as the methods for tracking and measuring their effectiveness...

The Watering Hole - What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

By James Turner
May 22, 2010

Haven't we learned anything from Japanese monster movies, folks?

Four short links: 4 September 2009

By Nat Torkington
September 3, 2009

Flood Maps -- what the world will look like when the oceans rise. Interactive, so you can dial up your preferred level of environmental horror. (via Hans Nowak) Citability -- making government accessible, reliable, and transparent with advanced permalinks, as Government websites are ever changing and cannot be cited. Content changes without notice or accountability. Bootstrapping EC2 Images as...

Greener typesetting

By Rick Jelliffe
May 3, 2009

Consider that there may be one hundred million word processing documents printed every day (anyone know the real number?) That could mean a million extra pages per day generated because of page-profligate settings or algorithms. Now, paper is usually made from estate timber, so there probably is no SAVE THE TREES deforestation angle. But paper production takes energy, toxic bleaches are used, power is used to make it, fuel is used to transport it, if it is disposed by burning the carbon gets released, and more toner cartridges are used. A tiny effect for individuals, but a decent effect when aggregated. So can we green typesetting? Can word processing standards lead the way here?

Four short links: 27 Mar 2009

By Nat Torkington
March 27, 2009

Design, Perl, Heresy, and Ephemera: Product Panic: 2009 -- Bruce Sterling essay on design for recession-panicked consumers. As is usual with Bruce, I can't tell whether he's wryly tongue-in-cheek or literally advocating what he says. Great panic products are like Roosevelt’s fireside chats. They’re cheery bluff. The standard virtues of fine industrial design—safety, convenience, serviceability, utility, solid construction … well,...

Four short links: 26 Mar 2009

By Nat Torkington
March 26, 2009

Books, Money, Collective Despair, and a Dashboard of Doom: Will The Real iPod For Reading Please Stand Up -- Sebastian Mary argues eloquently that we're too focused on long-term writing because of the requirements and constraints imposed upon us by a mass-market paper book, whereas text online is basically an experiment in different lengths and sizes to find new balances...

ETech: Priorities for a Greener World: If You Could Design Anything, What Should You Do?

By Robert Kaye
March 11, 2009

The second session today I'd like to share with you was presented by a personal friend of mine, Jeremy Faludi. Jer started his session entitled "Priorities for a Greener World: If You Could Design Anything, What Should You Do?" by pointing out that if we want to change the world, we ought to know what the most important issues...

Four short links: 11.5 Feb 2009

By Nat Torkington
February 11, 2009

This second Feb 11 post was brought to you by the intersection of timezones and technology. If there's a third Feb 11 post, I'm changing my name to Bill Murray. Hacking the Earth -- an environmental futurist looks at "geoengineering", deliberately interfering with the Earth's systems to terraform the planet. Radical solution to global warming, unwise hubris and immoral act...

Four short links: 4 Feb 2009

By Nat Torkington
February 4, 2009

Data, climate change, and location: Details on Yahoo's Distributed Database (Greg Linden) -- summary of Yahoo!'s PNUTS, "a massively parallel and geographically distributed database system for Yahoo!'s web applications." Greg keeps up with the papers from the search engine companies, and the insights he offers are great. For example, "Second, as figures 3 and 4 show, the average latency of...

Help! The Polar Bears Have Fallen Down the Well!

By James Turner
November 24, 2008

This is an essay about human nature, and the way that the global warming (or global climate change) problem is encountering a "perfect storm" of human shortcomings. It is unabashedly an advocacy piece, and I'm equally unabashed in my support...

What good is collective intelligence if it doesn't make us smarter?

By Tim O'Reilly
July 7, 2008

Two stories I read yesterday morning are worth sharing. The first, an editorial by science-fiction writer Robert Silverberg, was entitled The Death of Gallium, a meditation on the increasing scarcity of valuable elements like gallium, used in flat panel TVs and computer displays, which is estimated to be used up by 2017. Other less rare but equally important minerals are...


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The Watering Hole