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Four short links: 16 April 2014

By Nat Torkington
April 17, 2014

morris.js — pretty time-series line graphs. Open Source CT Scanner — all the awesome. Alan Kay’s Reading List — in case you’re wondering what to add to the pile beside your bed. (via Alex Dong) Foldscope — origami optical microscope, …

Health IT is a growth area for programmers

By Andy Oram
April 11, 2014

O’Reilly recently released a report I wrote called The Information Technology Fix for Health: Barriers and Pathways to the Use of Information Technology for Better Health Care. Along with our book Hacking Healthcare, I hope this report helps programmers who …

Business models that make the Internet of Things feasible

By Andy Oram
April 8, 2014

For some people, it’s too early to plan mass consumerization of the Internet of Things. Developers are contentedly tinkering with Arduinos and clip cables, demonstrating cool one-off applications. We know that home automation can save energy, keep the elderly and …

Advances in health IT must be viewed as a whole

By Andy Oram
April 7, 2014

Reformers in health care claim gigantic disruption on the horizon: devices that track our movements, new treatments through massive data crunching, fluid electronic records that reflect the patient’s status wherever she goes, and even the end of the doctor’s role. …

Visualizing Health IT: A holistic overview

By Andy Oram
April 1, 2014

If visualization is key to comprehending data, the field of health IT calls for better visualization. I am not talking here of pretty charts and animations. I am talking, rather, of a holistic, unified understanding of the bustle taking place …

Internet of Things in celebration and provocation at MIT

By Andy Oram
February 26, 2014

Last Saturday’s IoT Festival at MIT became a meeting ground for people connecting the physical world. Embedded systems developers, security experts, data scientists, and artists all joined in this event. Although it was called a festival, it had a typical …

Hurdles to the Internet of Things prove more social than technical

By Andy Oram
February 26, 2014

Last Saturday’s IoT Festival at MIT became a meeting-ground for people connecting the physical world. Embedded systems developers, security experts, data scientists, and artists all joined in this event. Although it was called a festival, it had a typical conference …

How does the medical device tax affect innovation and the health/medical startup scene?

By Shahid Shah
February 1, 2014

When the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed on a party line vote several years ago, it included a somewhat controversial provision to tax, at 2.3% starting in 2013, the sale of any medical device classified by the IRS as …

Four short links: 6 January 2014

By Nat Torkington
January 6, 2014

4043-byte 8086 Emulator — manages to implement most of the hardware in a 1980’s era IBM-PC using a few hundred fewer bits than the total number of transistors used to implement the original 8086 CPU. Entry in the obfuscated C …

Four short links: 20 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 20, 2013

A History of the Future in 100 Objects — is out! It’s design fiction, describing the future of technology in faux Wired-like product writeups. Amazon already beating the timeline. Projects and Priorities Without Managers (Ryan Carson) — love what he’s …

Four short links: 19 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 19, 2013

RSA Key Extraction via Low-Bandwidth Acoustic Cryptanalysis (PDF) — research uses audio from CPU to break GnuPG’s implementation of RSA. The attack can extract full 4096-bit RSA decryption keys from laptop computers (of various models), within an hour, using the …

Four short links: 18 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 18, 2013

Cyberpunk 2013 — a roleplaying game shows a Gibsonian view of 2013 from 1988. (via Ben Hammersley) The Future Computer Utility — 1967 prediction of the current state. There are several reasons why some form of regulation may be required. …

Software, hardware, everywhere

By Jon Bruner
November 6, 2013

Real and virtual are crashing together. On one side is hardware that acts like software: IP-addressable, controllable with JavaScript APIs, able to be stitched into loosely-coupled systems—the mashups of a new era. On the other is software that’s newly capable of …

Software, hardware, everywhere

By Jon Bruner
November 4, 2013

Real and virtual are crashing together. On one side is hardware that acts like software: IP-addressable, controllable with JavaScript APIs, able to be stitched into loosely-coupled systems—the mashups of a new era. On the other is software that’s newly capable …

Networked Things?

By Mike Loukides
June 14, 2013

Well over a decade ago, Bill Joy was mocked for talking about a future that included network-enabled refrigerators. That was both unfair and unproductive, and since then, I’ve been interested in a related game: take the most unlikely household product …

Rich multi-media and a web of devices is driving us to a world of standards

By Jenn Webb
February 28, 2013

At the recent TOC conference in New York, I had the opportunity to sit down with Jeff Jaffe, CEO of the World Wide Web Consortium, to talk about the Open Web Platform and standardization issues. In our video interview (embedded …

Four short links: 19 February 2013

By Nat Torkington
February 19, 2013

Using Silk Road — exploring the transactions, probability of being busted, and more. Had me at the heading Silk Road as Cyphernomicon’s black markets. Estimates of risk of participating in the underground economy. Travis CI — a hosted continuous integration …

Four short links: 7 February 2013

By Nat Torkington
February 7, 2013

Tridium Niagara (Wired) — A critical vulnerability discovered in an industrial control system used widely by the military, hospitals and others would allow attackers to remotely control electronic door locks, lighting systems, elevators, electricity and boiler systems, video surveillance cameras, …

Defining the industrial Internet

By Jon Bruner
January 11, 2013

We’ve been collecting threads on what the industrial Internet means since last fall. More case studies, company profiles and interviews will follow, but here’s how I’m thinking about the framework of the industrial Internet concept. This will undoubtedly continue to …

Four short links: 25 December 2012

By Nat Torkington
December 24, 2012

RebelMouse — aggregates FB, Twitter, Instagram, G+ content w/Pinboard-like aesthetics. It’s like aggregators we’ve had since 2004, but in this Brave New World we have to authenticate to a blogging service to get our own public posts out in a …

Printing ourselves

By Julie Steele
November 27, 2012

Tim O’Reilly recently asked me and some other colleagues which technology seems most like magic to us. There was a thoughtful pause as we each considered the amazing innovations we read about and interact with every day. I didn’t have …

Industrial Internet links

By Jon Bruner
October 24, 2012

By mayoral proclamation this is NYC Data Week, featuring lots of events that bring together innovators who work with data in any capacity. To see the industrial Internet as it’s being approached by entrepreneurs and hackers, be sure to stop …

Four short links: 19 October 2012

By Nat Torkington
October 19, 2012

Home-made 3D-Printed Drones — if only they used computer-vision to sequence DNA, they’d be the perfect storm of O’Reilly memes :-) Hacking Pacemakers For Death — IOActive researcher Barnaby Jack has reverse-engineered a pacemaker transmitter to make it possible to …

Sensor-laden glove brings medical examination to the masses

By Andy Oram
October 11, 2012

Recently a group of three young entrepreneurs showed off a prototype of a glove that contained sensors useful for medical examinations. Their goals were not merely to make diagnosis easier, but to save the doctor/patient relationship from the alienation of …

Four short links: 21 September 2012

By Nat Torkington
September 21, 2012

Business Intelligence on Farms — Machines keep track of all kinds of data about each cow, including the chemical properties of its milk, and flag when a particular cow is having problems or could be sick. The software can compare …

The future of medicine relies on massive collection of real-life data

By Andy Oram
September 5, 2012

Health care costs rise as doctors try batches of treatments that don’t work in search of one that does. Meanwhile, drug companies spend billions on developing each drug and increasingly end up with nothing to show for their pains. This …

Android evolves and so must you

Android evolves and so must you
By Rachel Roumeliotis
August 15, 2012

Christopher Neugebauer (@chrisjrn) is an Android and Python developer at Secret Lab and conference coordinator of PyCon Australia. Key points from our full discussion include: Great features from Jellybean are available for older OSes. [Discussed at the 2:32 mark] Android …

Four short links: 7 August 2012

By Nat Torkington
August 7, 2012

Why Toys Make Good Medical Devices (YouTube) — Jose Gomez-Marquez profiled by CNN. His group at MIT is Little Devices. 3D Printed Exoskeletal Arms for Little Girl — researchers at a Delaware hospital 3D printed a durable custom device with …

Democratizing data, and other notes from the Open Source convention

By Andy Oram
July 25, 2012

There has been enormous talk over the past few years of open data and what it can do for society, but proponents have largely come to admit: data is not democratizing in itself. This topic is hotly debated, and a …

Why health IT systems integrate poorly today, and what future EHRs can do about it

By Shahid Shah
June 19, 2012

New Internet-centric approaches to health IT systems are needed, and the government should be mandating a more modern open style of data exchange that breaks through monolithic systems.

Why health IT systems integrate poorly today, and what future EHRs can do about it

By Shahid Shah
June 19, 2012

New Internet-centric approaches to health IT systems are needed, and the government should be mandating a more modern open style of data exchange that breaks through monolithic systems.

Four short links: 11 June 2012

By Nat Torkington
June 11, 2012

When Code Can Kill or Cure (The Economist) -- I've linked to the dangers of closed source devices before, but this caught my eye: "In the 1990s we developed an excellent radiation-therapy treatment-planning system and tried to give it away to other clinics," says Dr Mackie. "But when we were told by the FDA that we should get our...

Why I can't shake my ereader

By Joe Wikert
May 14, 2012

Ereaders are now commodities — improvements are incremental at best — but the fundamental qualities of these devices still make them compelling.

Why I can't shake my ereader

By Joe Wikert
May 14, 2012

Ereaders are now commodities — improvements are incremental at best — but the fundamental qualities of these devices still make them compelling.

Editorial Radar with Mike Loukides & Mike Hendrickson

By Laurie Petrycki
April 5, 2012

In this first episode of "Editorial Radar," O'Reilly editors Mike Loukides and Mike Hendrickson discuss the important technologies they're tracking.

It's time for a unified ebook format and the end of DRM

By Joe Wikert
February 9, 2012

The music industry has shown that you need to offer consumers a universal format and content without rights restrictions. So when will publishers pay attention?

It's time for a unified ebook format and the end of DRM

It's time for a unified ebook format and the end of DRM
By Joe Wikert
February 9, 2012

The music industry has shown that you need to offer consumers a universal format and content without rights restrictions. So when will publishers pay attention?

Four short links: 23 January 2012

By Nat Torkington
January 23, 2012

Adafruit Flora -- wearable electronics and accessories platform. (via Tim O'Reilly) Killed by Code -- paper on software vulnerabilities in implantable medical devices. Discovered via Karen Sandler's wow-generating keynote at linux.conf.au (covered here). (via Selena Deckelmann) DIY London -- fun little Budget-Hero game to make apparent the trade-offs facing politicians. Kids should play Sim* and Civilization games: you get...

Don't expect the end of electronics obsolescence anytime soon

Don't expect the end of electronics obsolescence anytime soon
By Mike Loukides
January 20, 2012

Software updates for consumer electronics sound great in theory. But over time, the discrepancy between what the software is supposed to do and what your devices are capable of will rub obsolescence in your face.

Mobile interfaces: Mistakes to avoid and trends to watch

Mobile interfaces: Mistakes to avoid and trends to watch
By Howard Wen
January 17, 2012

In this interview, "Designing Mobile Interfaces" co-author Steven Hoober discusses common mobile interface mistakes, and he offers his thoughts on the latest mobile device trends — including why the addition of gestures and sensors isn't wholly positive.

A study confirms what we've all sensed: Readers are embracing ereading

By Jenn Webb
January 13, 2012

In this interview, Angela Bole of the Book Industry Study Group reviews results from the "Consumer Attitudes Toward E-Book Reading" study. She says the data looks good for publishers, assuming they can develop the right business models.

A study confirms what we've all sensed: Readers are embracing ereading

A study confirms what we've all sensed: Readers are embracing ereading
By Jenn Webb
January 13, 2012

In this interview, Angela Bole of the Book Industry Study Group reviews results from the "Consumer Attitudes Toward E-Book Reading" study. She says the data looks good for publishers, assuming they can develop the right business models.

Visualization of the Week: AntiMap

Visualization of the Week: AntiMap
By Audrey Watters
January 6, 2012

The DIY mapping tool AntiMap lets users capture their movements via their mobile devices, then visualize and analyze their movements.

Visualization of the Week: AntiMap

By Audrey Watters
January 6, 2012

The DIY mapping tool AntiMap lets users capture their movements via their mobile devices, then visualize and analyze their movements.

Top Stories: November 14-18, 2011

Top Stories: November 14-18, 2011
By Mac Slocum
November 18, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: Doug Hill used Steve Jobs and Ted Kaczynski to examine America's love/hate relationship with technology, Mike Loukides criticized mobile carriers for messing with Android's UI, and engineer Elecia White shared her enthusiasm for embedded systems.

Why we needed EPUB 3

Why we needed EPUB 3
By Matt Garrish
November 17, 2011

EPUB3 is more than just bug fixes and tweaks from the last version. It represents a major change in what an ebook can be. (This is an excerpt from the Tools of Change for Publishing report, "What is EPUB3

Why we needed EPUB 3

By Matt Garrish
November 17, 2011

EPUB3 is more than just bug fixes and tweaks from the last version. It represents a major change in what an ebook can be. (This is an excerpt from the Tools of Change for Publishing report, "What is EPUB3

Why embedded systems are "terrifyingly important"

Why embedded systems are
By Gretchen Giles
November 16, 2011

Author and embedded systems engineer Elecia White discusses the state of embedded systems and what lies ahead (hint: distributed intelligence and microdots).

Developer Week in Review: The hijacking of an insulin pump

Developer Week in Review: The hijacking of an insulin pump
By James Turner
November 3, 2011

If you own an insulin pump, someone out there might have a hack with your name on it. Google decides to make high-volume Maps API users pony up some cash, and the creator of Linux goes after C++.

Wearing Android on your sleeve

Wearing Android on your sleeve
By Bruce Stewart
September 30, 2011

WIMM Labs believes that wearable technology and at-a-glance moments — things like looking at a thermometer and checking the clock — can create powerful combinations.


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