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Four short links: 3 April 2014

By Nat Torkington
April 3, 2014

dat — github-like tool for data, still v. early. It’s overdue. (via Nelson Minar) Novena Open Laptop — Bunnie Huang’s laptop goes on sale. Crowd Forecasting (NPR) — How is it possible that a group of average citizens doing Google …

Crowdsourcing Feature discovery

By Ben Lorica
March 15, 2014

Data scientists were among the earliest and most enthusiastic users of crowdsourcing services. Lukas Biewald noted in a recent talk that one of the reasons he started CrowdFlower was that as a data scientist he got frustrated with having to …

9 branding trends for startups in 2014

By Amy Jollymore
January 31, 2014

Your code can be clean as a whistle and your software deployment on-time, but if you’re a startup, branding is as vital to your success as any non-crashing app. The following trends are discussed through a frame of Lean Startup …

Four short links: 16 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 16, 2013

Suro (Github) — Netflix data pipeline service for large volumes of event data. (via Ben Lorica) NIPS Workshop on Data Driven Education — lots of research papers around machine learning, MOOC data, etc. Proofist — crowdsourced proofreading game. 3D-Printed Shoes …

Four short links: 6 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 6, 2013

Society of Mind — Marvin Minsky’s book now Creative-Commons licensed. Collaboration, Stars, and the Changing Organization of Science: Evidence from Evolutionary Biology — The concentration of research output is declining at the department level but increasing at the individual level. …

Four short links: 4 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 4, 2013

Skyjack — drone that takes over other drones. Welcome to the Malware of Things. Bootstrap World — a curricular module for students ages 12-16, which teaches algebraic and geometric concepts through computer programming. (via Esther Wojicki) Harvest — open source …

Four short links: 29 November 2013

By Nat Torkington
November 29, 2013

Huaqiang Bei Map for Makers — excellent resource for visitors to an iconic huge electronics market in Shenzhen. (via Bunnie Huang) A 16th Century Dutchman Can Tell us Everything We Need to Know about GMO Patents — There’s nothing wrong …

The emergence of Crowdsourcing specialists

By Ben Lorica
October 25, 2013

A little over four years ago, I attended the first Crowdsourcing meetup at the offices of Crowdflower (then called Dolores Labs). The crowdsourcing community has grown explosively since that initial gathering, and there are now conference tracks and conferences devoted …

Four short links: 20 August 2013

By Nat Torkington
August 20, 2013

pineapple.io — attempt to crowdsource rankings for tutorials for important products, so you’re not picking your way through Google search results littered with tutorials written by incompetent illiterates for past versions of the software. BBC Forum — American social psychologist …

Four short links: 24 July 2013

By Nat Torkington
July 24, 2013

What to Look For in Software Dev (Pamela Fox) — It’s important to find a job where you get to work on a product you love or problems that challenge you, but it’s also important to find a job where …

Four short links: 6 June 2013

By Nat Torkington
June 6, 2013

ShareFest — peer-to-peer file sharing in the browser. Source on GitHub. (via Andy Baio) Media for Thinking the Unthinkable (Bret Victor) — “Right now, today, we can’t see the thing, at all, that’s going to be the most important 100 …

Survey on the Future of Open Source, and Lessons from the Past

By Andy Oram
May 15, 2013

I recently talked to two managers of Black Duck, the first company formed to help organizations deal with the licensing issues involved in adopting open source software. With Tim Yeaton, President and CEO, and Peter Vescuso, Executive Vice President of …

Publishing News: Crowdfunding, the new way to raise money for news

By Jenn Webb
April 19, 2013

Fundraising for news Mathew Ingram reports this week on one entrepreneurial blogger and journalist who, finding local news coverage of his home town lacking, crowdfunded his own hyper-local news blog. Ingram notes that Joey Coleman does not have a journalism …

Four short links: 15 April 2013

By Nat Torkington
April 15, 2013

Know Your HTTP Posters (GitHub) — A0-posters about the HTTP protocol. Crowdserfing — when a large corp uses crowd-sourced volunteering for its own financial gain, without giving back. It offends my sense of reciprocity as well, but nobody is coerced …

Four short links: 6 February 2013

By Nat Torkington
February 6, 2013

Manipulating Google Scholar Citations and Google Scholar Metrics: simple, easy and tempting (PDF) — scholarly paper on how to citespam your paper up Google Scholar’s results list. Fortunately calling your paper “AAAAAA In-vitro Qualia of …” isn’t one of the …

Four short links: 11 January 2013

By Nat Torkington
January 11, 2013

How to Redesign Your App Without Pissing Everybody Off (Anil Dash) — the basic straightforward stuff that gets your users on-side. Anil’s making a career out of being an adult. Clockwork Raven (Twitter) — open source project to send data …

Publishing News: Trailblazing experiments in publishing

By Jenn Webb
January 4, 2013

Here are a few stories from the publishing space that caught my attention recently. Publishing trailblazers tinker with serials, crowdsourcing and subscriptions Ron Miller took a look this week at two trailblazing authors who are experimenting with new publishing strategies …

The MOOC movement is not an indicator of educational evolution

By Andy Oram
December 3, 2012

Somehow, recently, a lot of people have taken an interest in the broadcast of canned educational materials, and this practice — under a term that proponents and detractors have settled on, massive open online course (MOOC) — is getting a …

Four short links: 13 November 2012

By Nat Torkington
November 13, 2012

3D Printing Photobooth Opening in Japan (io9) — A technician at the lab will scan your body (much like with early photography, you’ll need to be able to hold a certain pose for 15 minutes) and print out an impressively …

Open source software as a model for health care

By Andy Oram
October 9, 2012

(The following article sprang from a collaboration between Andy Oram and Brigitte Piniewski to cover open source concepts in an upcoming book on health care. This book, titled “Wireless Health: Remaking of Medicine by Pervasive Technologies,” is edited by Professor …

Four short links: 1 October 2012

By Nat Torkington
October 1, 2012

Flightfox — Real people compete to find you the best flights. Crowdsourcing beating algorithms …. (via NY Times) Code Monster (Crunchzilla) — a fun site for parents to learn to program with their kids. Loving seeing so much activity around …

Four short links: 3 September 2012

By Nat Torkington
September 3, 2012

The Seductive Allure of Edu-Tech Reform (Chris Lehmann) — While it may be seductive to think that rooms of children on computers, each following some computerized instruction at their pace, monitored by school aides, with a handful of teachers around …

Seeking prior art where it most often is found in software

By Andy Oram
August 28, 2012

Patent ambushes are on the rise again, and cases such as Apple/Samsung shows that prior art really has to swing the decision–obviousness or novelty is not a strong enough defense. Obviousness and novelty are subjective decisions made by a patent …

Four short links: 15 August 2012

By Nat Torkington
August 15, 2012

Reproducibility Initiative (Science Exchange) — a service offering researchers who will attempt to reproduce your work. Validated studies will receive a Certificate of Reproducibility acknowledging that their results have been independently reproduced as part of the Reproducibility Initiative. Researchers have …

On co-creation, contests and crowdsourcing

By Mark Sigal
August 2, 2012

I had decided to update the branding at one of my companies, and that meant re-thinking my logo. Here’s the old logo: The creative exercise started with a logo design contest posting at 99designs, an online marketplace for crowdsourced graphic …

Four short links: 3 July 2012

By Nat Torkington
July 3, 2012

OpenROV Funded in 1 Day (Kickstarter) -- an open source robotic submarine designed to make underwater exploration possible for everyone. (via BoingBoing) McAfee Digital Divide Study (PDF) -- lots of numbers showing parents are unaware of what their kids do. (via Julie Starr) Herdict -- crowdsourced transparency to reveal who is censoring what online. (via Twitter) You Really Really...

Four short links: 12 June 2012

By Nat Torkington
June 12, 2012

Amazon's Insanely Crap Royalties (Andrew Hyde) -- Amazon offers high royalty rate to you, but that's before a grim hidden "delivery fee". Check out Andrew's graph of the different pay rates to the author from each medium. SparkFun Education -- learn electronics from the good folks at SparkFun. TaskRabbit -- connects you with friendly, reliable people right in your...

Four short links: 11 June 2012

By Nat Torkington
June 11, 2012

When Code Can Kill or Cure (The Economist) -- I've linked to the dangers of closed source devices before, but this caught my eye: "In the 1990s we developed an excellent radiation-therapy treatment-planning system and tried to give it away to other clinics," says Dr Mackie. "But when we were told by the FDA that we should get our...

Four short links: 7 May 2012

By Nat Torkington
May 7, 2012

Liquid Feedback -- MIT-licensed voting software from the Pirate Party. See this Spiegel Online piece about how it is used for more details. (via Tim O'Reilly) Putting Gestures Into Objects (Ars Technica) -- Disney and CMU have a system called Touché, where objects can tell whether they're being clasped, swiped, pinched, etc. and by how many fingers. (via BoingBoing)...

Recombinant Research: Breaking open rewards and incentives

By Andy Oram
May 2, 2012

To move from a hothouse environment of experimentation to the mainstream of one of the world's most lucrative and tradition-bound industries, Sage Bionetworks must aim for its nucleus: rewards and incentives. Comparisons to open source software and a summary of tasks for Sage Congress.

Recombinant Research: Breaking open rewards and incentives

By Andy Oram
May 2, 2012

To move from a hothouse environment of experimentation to the mainstream of one of the world's most lucrative and tradition-bound industries, Sage Bionetworks must aim for its nucleus: rewards and incentives. Comparisons to open source software and a summary of tasks for Sage Congress.

Recombinant Research: Sage Congress plans for patient engagement

By Andy Oram
May 1, 2012

The Vioxx problem is just one instance of the wider malaise afflicting the drug industry. Managers from major pharma companies expressed confidence that they could expand public or "pre-competitive" research in the direction Sage Congress proposed. The sector left to engage is the one that's central to all this work--the public.

Recombinant Research: Sage Congress plans for patient engagement

By Andy Oram
May 1, 2012

The Vioxx problem is just one instance of the wider malaise afflicting the drug industry. Managers from major pharma companies expressed confidence that they could expand public or "pre-competitive" research in the direction Sage Congress proposed. The sector left to engage is the one that's central to all this work--the public.

Recombinant Research: Sage Congress promotes data sharing in genetics

By Andy Oram
April 30, 2012

Through two days of demos, keynotes, panels, and breakout sessions, Sage Congress brought its vision to a high-level cohort of 230 attendees from universities, pharmaceutical companies, government health agencies, and others who can make change in the field.

Recombinant Research: Sage Congress promotes data sharing in genetics

By Andy Oram
April 30, 2012

Through two days of demos, keynotes, panels, and breakout sessions, Sage Congress brought its vision to a high-level cohort of 230 attendees from universities, pharmaceutical companies, government health agencies, and others who can make change in the field.

Steep climb for National Cancer Institute toward open source collaboration

By Andy Oram
April 5, 2012

Although a lot of government agencies produce open source software, hardly any develop relationships with a community of outside programmers, testers, and other contributors. NCI sees the advantages of a give-and-take.

Four short links: 20 March 2012

By Nat Torkington
March 20, 2012

jPlayer -- jQuery plugin for audio and video in HTML5. Dual-licensed MIT and GPL. Tesseract (Github) -- Square has open sourced (Apache license) their Javascript library for filtering large multidimensional datasets in the browser. Tesseract supports extremely fast ( QR Code Madness -- I recently received an MMS (multimedia text message) with a picture to a QR code. First,...

Developer Week in Review: When game development met Kickstarter

By James Turner
March 15, 2012

Crowdsourcing is changing how software development gets funded. It's also driving one of the great reference guides of the 20th century out of print.

Developer Week in Review: When game development met Kickstarter

Developer Week in Review: When game development met Kickstarter
By James Turner
March 15, 2012

Crowdsourcing is changing how software development gets funded. It's also driving one of the great reference guides of the 20th century out of print.

Understanding place and space in a decreasingly English world

By David Sims
March 12, 2012

Robert Munro, a computational linguist and speaker at Where 2012, says the subtleties of spatial distinctions are growing in importance as more of the world's digital information takes the form of non-English, unstructured text.

Understanding place and space in a decreasingly English world

Understanding place and space in a decreasingly English world
By David Sims
March 12, 2012

Robert Munro, a computational linguist and speaker at Where 2012, says the subtleties of spatial distinctions are growing in importance as more of the world's digital information takes the form of non-English, unstructured text.

Four short links: 1 March 2012

By Nat Torkington
March 1, 2012

Crowdsourcing Radiation Data in Japan (Freaklabs) -- wardriving pollution detection. Backyard Brains -- measuring electrical activity of a neuron in a cockroach leg. Astonishing how much science is within the reach of backyard hackers now. (via BoingBoing) Cotton Candy Stick Pre-Orders -- a $200 Android computer on a USB stick, with HDMI out etc. Raspberry Pi Launches -- $35...

Practical applications of data in publishing

By Jenn Webb
February 24, 2012

Several overriding themes permeated this year's Tools of Change for Publishing conference. The second in a series looking at five of the major themes, here we take a look at data in publishing — how publishers can benefit, practical applications, and innovative ways it can be used.

Practical applications of data in publishing

By Jenn Webb
February 24, 2012

Several overriding themes permeated this year's Tools of Change for Publishing conference. The second in a series looking at five of the major themes, here we take a look at data in publishing — how publishers can benefit, practical applications, and innovative ways it can be used.

Practical applications of data in publishing

Practical applications of data in publishing
By Jenn Webb
February 24, 2012

Several overriding themes permeated this year's Tools of Change for Publishing conference. The second in a series looking at five of the major themes, here we take a look at data in publishing — how publishers can benefit, practical applications, and innovative ways it can be used.

Four short links: 22 February 2012

By Nat Torkington
February 22, 2012

Hashbangs (Dan Webb) -- why those terrible #! URLs are a bad idea. Looks like they're going away with pushState coming to browsers. As Dan says, "URLs are forever". Let's get them right. I'm fascinated by how URLs are changing meaning and use over time. DNA Sequencing on a USB Stick -- this has been going the rounds, but...

Documentation strategy for a small software project: launching VoIP Drupal introductions

By Andy Oram
February 17, 2012

VoIP Drupal is a window onto the promises and challenges faced by a new open source project, including its documentation. A meeting at at MIT this week worked out some long-term plans for firming up VoIP Drupal's documentation and other training materials.

Documentation strategy for a small software project: launching VoIP Drupal introductions

By Andy Oram
February 17, 2012

VoIP Drupal is a window onto the promises and challenges faced by a new open source project, including its documentation. A meeting at at MIT this week worked out some long-term plans for firming up VoIP Drupal's documentation and other training materials.

Can Maryland's other "CIO" cultivate innovation in government?

By Alex Howard
January 11, 2012

Maryland's first chief innovation officer, Bryan Sivak, is looking for the levers that will help state government to be smarter, not bigger. From embracing collective intelligence to data-driven policy, Sivak is defining what it means to be innovative in government.

Can Maryland's other "CIO" cultivate innovation in government?

Can Maryland's other
By Alex Howard
January 11, 2012

Maryland's first chief innovation officer, Bryan Sivak, is looking for the levers that will help state government to be smarter, not bigger. From embracing collective intelligence to data-driven policy, Sivak is defining what it means to be innovative in government.


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