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Jeremy Rifkin unveils a return to the local in an interconnected future

By Andy Oram
July 18, 2014

Jeremy Rifkin is always predicting an avalanche of change: substitutes for human labor in The End of Work, pervasive genetic engineering in Algeny, and so on. Several interlocking themes run through his latest book, The Zero Marginal Cost Society. Behind …

Jeremy Rifkin unveils a return to the local in an interconnected future

By Andy Oram
July 18, 2014

Jeremy Rifkin is always predicting an avalanche of change: substitutes for human labor in The End of Work, pervasive genetic engineering in Algeny, and so on. Several interlocking themes run through his latest book, The Zero Marginal Cost Society. Behind …

Jeremy Rifkin unveils a return to the local in an interconnected future

By Andy Oram
July 18, 2014

Jeremy Rifkin is always predicting an avalanche of change: substitutes for human labor in The End of Work, pervasive genetic engineering in Algeny, and so on. Several interlocking themes run through his latest book, The Zero Marginal Cost Society. Behind …

Four short links: 14 July 2014

By Nat Torkington
July 14, 2014

Handheld Scanners Attack — shipping and logistics operations compromised by handheld scanners running malware-infested Windows XP. Adventures in Cognitive Biases (MIT) — web adventure to build your cognitive defences against biases. Quoc Le’s Lectures on Deep Learning — Machine Learning …

Four short links: 14 July 2014

By Nat Torkington
July 14, 2014

Handheld Scanners Attack — shipping and logistics operations compromised by handheld scanners running malware-infested Windows XP. Adventures in Cognitive Biases (MIT) — web adventure to build your cognitive defences against biases. Quoc Le’s Lectures on Deep Learning — Machine Learning …

Four short links: 14 July 2014

By Nat Torkington
July 14, 2014

Handheld Scanners Attack — shipping and logistics operations compromised by handheld scanners running malware-infested Windows XP. Adventures in Cognitive Biases (MIT) — web adventure to build your cognitive defences against biases. Quoc Le’s Lectures on Deep Learning — Machine Learning …

Open teaching stacks help us teach at scale

By Elliott Hauser
June 19, 2014

Elliott Hauser is CEO of Trinket, a startup focused on creating open sourced teaching materials. He is also a Python instructor at UNC Chapel Hill. Well-developed tools for teaching are crucial to the spread of open source software and programming …

Open teaching stacks help us teach at scale

By Elliott Hauser
June 19, 2014

Elliott Hauser is CEO of Trinket, a startup focused on creating open sourced teaching materials. He is also a Python instructor at UNC Chapel Hill. Well-developed tools for teaching are crucial to the spread of open source software and programming …

Open teaching stacks help us teach at scale

By Elliott Hauser
June 19, 2014

Elliott Hauser is CEO of Trinket, a startup focused on creating open sourced teaching materials. He is also a Python instructor at UNC Chapel Hill. Well-developed tools for teaching are crucial to the spread of open source software and programming …

Open teaching stacks help us teach at scale

By Elliott Hauser
June 13, 2014

Elliott Hauser is CEO of Trinket, a startup focused on creating open sourced teaching materials. He is also a Python instructor at UNC Chapel Hill. Well-developed tools for teaching are crucial to the spread of open source software and programming …

The book sprint

By Anne Gentle
May 1, 2014

Do you really want a technical book for your project? Does your community need to provide more helpful docs to support even more users? Does your community have a lot of knowledge they need to get out of heads and …

CPAN’s social continuity of code

By brian d foy
February 21, 2014

I contribute heavily in the Perl community, and I’m consistently impressed by the pains we take with code and assets that we personally have no interest in. There’s a group of Perl people who shepherd (camelherd?) code and projects that …

CPAN’s social continuity of code

By brian d foy
February 21, 2014

I contribute heavily in the Perl community, and I’m consistently impressed by the pains we take with code and assets that we personally have no interest in. There’s a group of Perl people who shepherd (camelherd?) code and projects that …

Puerto Rico Python User Group Celebrates First Anniversary

Puerto Rico Python User Group Celebrates First Anniversary
By Kevin Shockey
January 31, 2014

On February 20, 2014 prPIG will celebrate our first anniversary with an open format meeting with lightning talks from the community. The meeting will be held at 7:00pm in the Puerto Rico Science, Research, & Technology Trust. More details www.prpig.org.

Who will upgrade the telecom foundation of the Internet?

By Andy Oram
December 9, 2013

Although readers of this blog know quite well the role that the Internet can play in our lives, we may forget that its most promising contributions — telemedicine, the smart electrical grid, distance education, etc. — depend on a rock-solid …

The Programming Industry: Not a Woman’s World – Yet

By Rachel Roumeliotis
October 3, 2013

Rupa Dachere (@rdachere), Founder and President of CodeChix, and I had a chance to talk programming and open source community culture at OSCON 2013. She brings up some great points about the specific problems that arise for women, talks about …

Will Developers Move to Sputnik?

By Meghan Blanchette
August 22, 2013

Barton George (@barton808) is the Director of Development Programs at Dell, and the lead on Project Sputnik—Dell’s Ubuntu-based developer laptop (and its accompanying software). He sat down with me at OSCON to talk about what’s happened in the past year …

Survey on the Future of Open Source, and Lessons from the Past

By Andy Oram
May 15, 2013

I recently talked to two managers of Black Duck, the first company formed to help organizations deal with the licensing issues involved in adopting open source software. With Tim Yeaton, President and CEO, and Peter Vescuso, Executive Vice President of …

We need incognito book purchasing

By François Joseph de Kermadec
April 18, 2013

In the physical realm, purchasing a book without revealing one’s identity involves little effort beyond proceeding to a store one does not usually patronise and paying in cash. Unless one is seeking illegal volumes, which are unlikely to be obtained …

Velocity Report: Building a DevOps culture

By Mandi Walls
April 16, 2013

Operations professionals live in a wind tunnel. If you can imagine one of those game show glass boxes, where a contestant stands inside, the door shuts, and money blows around in a whirlwind, you’ve got a good idea of what …

Designing resilient communities

By Andy Oram
April 15, 2013

In the open source and free software movement, we always exalt community, and say the people coding and supporting the software are more valuable than the software itself. Few communities have planned and philosophized as much about community-building as ZeroMQ. …

Digital publishing and the loss of intimacy

By François Joseph de Kermadec
April 9, 2013

Reading used to be an intimate experience. Even Amazon, the pioneer in digital publishing, branded its Kindle with a child reading alone under a tree. Books were specially designed to disappear into the background as much as possible, helped by …

How crowdfunding and the JOBS Act will shape open source companies

By Fred Trotter
March 28, 2013

Currently, anyone can crowdfund products, projects, causes, and sometimes debt. Current U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulations make crowdfunding companies (i.e. selling stocks rather than products on crowdfund platforms) illegal. The only way to sell stocks to the public at large …

The book as a standard of quality

By François Joseph de Kermadec
March 13, 2013

Publishers have long commandeered respect for the quality of their work. Traditional processes may be cumbersome, reliant as they are on an infinity of minute, specialised steps, but they have helped maintain consistently high standards, at ever-lower prices. Authors may …

Learning from a video game publisher’s demise

By Paul Rhodes
February 22, 2013

So, it’s done. After years of speculation, THQ went under the Chapter 11 auction hammer, most of it going to rival publishers, with the majority of the remaining employees losing their jobs. (THQ’s letter to its employees, along with who …

Author platforms and the Black Box Effect

By Anne Hill
February 20, 2013

If you’ve spent as much time reading author blogs as I have, you may have noticed a disturbing pattern. In nearly every “here’s how I did it” post in which the author explains her route to greater visibility and sales, …

Five key takeaways from TOC NY 2013

By Joe Wikert
February 18, 2013

TOC NY 2013 is a wrap and based on the feedback I’ve received so far I think it was one of our best. When Kat and I closed the event Thursday afternoon we both shared thoughts on the most important …

The 7 key features of an online community

By Travis Alber
December 18, 2012

Here’s something about the user experience of online communities that you’ve probably never considered: everyone in an online community is having a unique, individualized experience, even though they’re all doing it together. Think about that for a second. Your activity …

Open source developers combine efforts in the health care field

By Andy Oram
December 13, 2012

I had a chance to listen in a recent meeting of Open Health Tools, a trade association bringing together companies, academics, and standards bodies who create open source software tools for all stages of the health care field. Open Health …

Open source software as a model for health care

By Andy Oram
October 9, 2012

(The following article sprang from a collaboration between Andy Oram and Brigitte Piniewski to cover open source concepts in an upcoming book on health care. This book, titled “Wireless Health: Remaking of Medicine by Pervasive Technologies,” is edited by Professor …

Open source won

By Roger Magoulas
July 30, 2012

I heard the comments a few times at the 14th OSCON: The conference has lost its edge. The comments resonated with my own experience — a shift in demeanor, a more purposeful, optimistic attitude, less itching for a fight. Yes, …

Inside GitHub’s role in community-building and other open source advances

Inside GitHub’s role in community-building and other open source advances
By Andy Oram
July 26, 2012

In this video interview, Matthew McCullough of GitHub discusses what they’ve learned over time as they grow and watch projects develop there. Highlights from the full video interview include: How GitHub builds on Git’s strengths to allow more people to …

Top Stories: July 9-13, 2012

Top Stories: July 9-13, 2012
By Mac Slocum
July 13, 2012

This week on O'Reilly: Jim Stogdill said data is getting heavier relative to the networks that carry it around the data center; Simon Phipps revealed open source community strategies relevant to the enterprise; and Team Geek authors Brian Fitzpatrick and Ben Collins-Sussman discussed the importance of developer collaboration.

Open source community collaboration strategies for the enterprise

By Simon Phipps
July 13, 2012

This report examines the strategies and caveats businesses must consider before adopting open source software, including: the layers and needs of open source communities, the relationship between transparency and privacy, the problems with "open core," and why control should be traded for influence.

Learning from Pixar

By Matt Roberts
July 10, 2012

Matt Roberts finds useful parallels between fiction writing and software development amid the tweets of a Pixar staff writer.

Promoting and documenting a small software project: VoIP Drupal update

By Andy Oram
April 6, 2012

Part of a series about efforts by VoIP Drupal collaborators to find the right media and tools with which to promote a small, little known software project.

Promoting and documenting a small software project: VoIP Drupal update

By Andy Oram
April 6, 2012

Part of a series about efforts by VoIP Drupal collaborators to find the right media and tools with which to promote a small, little known software project.

The core of the author platform is unchanged — it's the tools that are rapidly changing

By Jenn Webb
March 6, 2012

"Cooking for Geeks" author Jeff Potter offers lessons learned while writing, marketing and selling his book. "The book is no longer the product," Potter says. "The product is now the conversations and community that grow around the book."

The core of the author platform is unchanged — it's the tools that are rapidly changing

The core of the author platform is unchanged — it's the tools that are rapidly changing
By Jenn Webb
March 6, 2012

"Cooking for Geeks" author Jeff Potter offers lessons learned while writing, marketing and selling his book. "The book is no longer the product," Potter says. "The product is now the conversations and community that grow around the book."

Permission to be horrible and other ways to generate creativity

By Suzanne Axtell
March 1, 2012

Author and web design consultant Denise R. Jacobs reveals lessons she learned about creativity while writing her first book. She also discusses her efforts to give women and people of color more visibility in the tech world.

Documentation strategy for a small software project: launching VoIP Drupal introductions

By Andy Oram
February 17, 2012

VoIP Drupal is a window onto the promises and challenges faced by a new open source project, including its documentation. A meeting at at MIT this week worked out some long-term plans for firming up VoIP Drupal's documentation and other training materials.

Documentation strategy for a small software project: launching VoIP Drupal introductions

By Andy Oram
February 17, 2012

VoIP Drupal is a window onto the promises and challenges faced by a new open source project, including its documentation. A meeting at at MIT this week worked out some long-term plans for firming up VoIP Drupal's documentation and other training materials.

Four short links: 3 February 2012

By Nat Torkington
February 3, 2012

Page Speed (Google Code) -- an open-source project started at Google to help developers optimize their web pages by applying web performance best practices. Page Speed started as an open-source browser extension, and is now deployed in third-party products such as Webpagetest.org, Show Slow and Google Webmaster Tools. What Commons Do We Wish For? (John Battelle) -- trying to...

Four short links: 31 January 2012

By Nat Torkington
January 31, 2012

The Sky is Rising -- TechDirt's Mike Masnick has written (and made available for free download) an excellent report on the entertainment industry's numbers and business models. Must read if you have an opinion on SOPA et al. Tennis Australia Exposes Match Analytics -- Served from IBM's US-based private cloud, the updated SlamTracker web application pulls together 39 million...

Radar is now on Google+ (officially this time)

Radar is now on Google+ (officially this time)
By Mac Slocum
November 8, 2011

We've got big ideas for Radar's new Google+ page. For starters, we see it as a two-way channel, an experimentation hub, and a place to surface intriguing content.

Radar is now on Google+ (officially this time)

By Mac Slocum
November 8, 2011

We've got big ideas for Radar's new Google+ page. For starters, we see it as a two-way channel, an experimentation hub, and a place to surface intriguing content.

Radar is now on Google+ (officially this time)

Radar is now on Google+ (officially this time)
By Mac Slocum
November 8, 2011

We've got big ideas for Radar's new Google+ page. For starters, we see it as a two-way channel, an experimentation hub, and a place to surface intriguing content.

Wrap-up from FLOSS Manuals book sprint at Google

By Andy Oram
October 21, 2011

Mixtures of grassroots content generation and unique expertise have existed, and more models will be found. Understanding the points of commonality between the systems will help us develop such models.

Wrap-up from FLOSS Manuals book sprint at Google

By Andy Oram
October 21, 2011

Mixtures of grassroots content generation and unique expertise have existed, and more models will be found. Understanding the points of commonality between the systems will help us develop such models.

FLOSS Manuals books published after three-day sprint

By Andy Oram
October 21, 2011

Joining the pilgrimage that all institutions are making toward wider data use, FLOSS Manuals is exposing more and more of the writing process.


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