Blogs

BROWSE: Most Recent | Popular Tags |

Tags > blogging

Four short links: 26 September 2014

By Nat Torkington
September 29, 2014

15 Lessons from 15 Years of Blogging (Anil Dash) — If your comments are full of assholes, it’s your fault. Good communities don’t just happen by accident. Replicating DeepMind — open source attempt to build deep learning network that can …

Four short links: 26 September 2014

By Nat Torkington
September 26, 2014

15 Lessons from 15 Years of Blogging (Anil Dash) — If your comments are full of assholes, it’s your fault. Good communities don’t just happen by accident. Replicating DeepMind — open source attempt to build deep learning network that can …

Four short links: 26 September 2014

By Nat Torkington
September 26, 2014

15 Lessons from 15 Years of Blogging (Anil Dash) — If your comments are full of assholes, it’s your fault. Good communities don’t just happen by accident. Replicating DeepMind — open source attempt to build deep learning network that can …

Four short links: 7 April 2014

By Nat Torkington
April 7, 2014

Can We Design Systems to Automate Ethics — code in self-driving cars will implement a solution to the trolley problem. But which solution? My First Post on Medium (Andy Baio) — one or two glitches but otherwise fine demonstration of …

Investigating the Twitter Interest Graph

By Matthew Russell
October 14, 2013

Tomorrow, I’ll be presenting a short webcast entitled Why Twitter Is All the Rage: A Data Miner’s Perspective that is loosely adapted from material that appears early in Mining the Social Web (2nd Ed). Given that the webcast is almost here, I wanted …

Four short link: 27 November 2012

By Nat Torkington
November 27, 2012

Statistical Misdirection Master Class — examples from Fox News. The further through the list you go, the more horrifying^Wedifying they are. Some are clearly classics from the literature, but some are (as far as I can tell) newly developed graphical …

A venture into self-publishing

By Joe Wikert
January 9, 2012

Scott Berkun turned to self-publishing with his latest book, "Mindfire." In this TOC podcast, Berkun discusses the experience and says the biggest surprise was the required PR effort. He also says traditional and self-publishing don't need to be polarized options, for authors or for publishers and editors.

A venture into self-publishing

A venture into self-publishing
By Joe Wikert
January 9, 2012

Scott Berkun turned to self-publishing with his latest book, "Mindfire." In this TOC podcast, Berkun discusses the experience and says the biggest surprise was the required PR effort. He also says traditional and self-publishing don't need to be polarized options, for authors or for publishers and editors.

Publishing News: Blogging and the law

By Jenn Webb
June 17, 2011

In the latest Publishing News: Bloggers get tips on avoiding lawsuits, magazine publishers are building clunky apps, and Open Road outlines its aggressive marketing techniques.

Publishing News: Blogging and the law

Publishing News: Blogging and the law
By Jenn Webb
June 17, 2011

In the latest Publishing News: Bloggers get tips on avoiding lawsuits, magazine publishers are building clunky apps, and Open Road outlines its aggressive marketing techniques.

Four short links: 24 December 2010

By Nat Torkington
December 24, 2010

Holiday Carbon Offsets -- buy carbon offsets against Santa's trip, a stockingful of coal, or this year's Reindeer Games. (via Val Aurora on Twitter) Sad Story of the Snowman -- the best use of Internationalized Domain Names yet. Katie, Starwars Geek (CNN) -- best use of the Internet this year. Everything The Internet Knows About Me Because I Asked...

Four short links: 15 November 2010

By Nat Torkington
November 15, 2010

Between the Bars -- snail-mail-to-blogs transcription service for prisoners, to make visible stories that would otherwise be missed. there is a religous program here called Kairo's in the program inmates are given letters and drawings made by small children not one in that program did not cry, after reading the words of incouragement from those kids. An unmissable reminder...

Four short links: 12 November 2010

By Nat Torkington
November 12, 2010

Evaluating Extraordinary Claims -- science isn't easy, and the most difficult part of science is experimental design. Peter Norvig takes us through a handful of studies that claim to have found prayers to be effective, and critiques their experimental design. Lest you think scientists only criticize prayer experiments, read the Atlantic's profile of John Ioannidis. Thimbl -- decentralized microblogging...

Why blogging still matters

By Mac Slocum
October 12, 2010

During an interview at Web 2.0 Expo NY, Anil Dash's response to an offhand question hit at the heart of blogging's continued importance.

Why blogging still matters

Why blogging still matters
By Mac Slocum
October 12, 2010

During an interview at Web 2.0 Expo NY, Anil Dash's response to an offhand question hit at the heart of blogging's continued importance.

Form Validation with jQuery

By Matthew David
October 1, 2010

Form validation using jQuery

QOW: Has your blog reading/writing decreased?

By Rich Tretola
August 24, 2010

The rise of social networks has changed the flow of information in my daily life from a pull of data by actively searching for it to a new metaphor where information is being pushed to me constantly. The rise of...

Four short links: 31 March 2010

By Nat Torkington
March 31, 2010

ZeroMQ -- bold claim of "Fastest. Messaging. Ever." LGPL, C++ with bindings for many languages, past version 2 already. (via edd on Twitter) Prediction Market News (David Pennock) -- HSX is going to be a real marketplace with real $. The real HSX will of course say goodbye to the virtual specialist and the opening weekend adjust, two facets...

Four short links: 29 March 2010

By Nat Torkington
March 29, 2010

Salmon Protocol -- protocol to unite comments and annotations with original web pages. A distributed solution to the problem that Disqus tackles in a centralised fashion. Important because we'll all be historians of our earlier lives and dissipated prolific micro-content is a historian's nightmare. Gephi -- open source (GPLv3) interactive visualization and exploration platform for all kinds of networks...

Four short links: 23 March 2010

By Nat Torkington
March 23, 2010

British Prime Minister's Speech -- a huge amount of the speech is given to digital issues, including the funding and founding of an "Institute for Web Science" headed by Sir Tim Berners-Lee. (via Rchards on Twitter) Periodic Table of Science Bloggers -- a great way to explore the universe of science blogging. (via sciblogs) For All The Tea in...

Four short links: 15 January 2010

By Nat Torkington
January 15, 2010

The Open Laboratory -- collection of the best science writing on blogs from the last year. For more, see an interview with the author. Part of a growing trend where online comes first and feeds offline. (via sciblogs) Nat Friedman Leaving Novell -- one of the original Ximian founders, with interests in many directions and the coding chops to...

What Company Will Be the eHarmony of Microblogging?

By Mark Drapeau
January 5, 2010

A New York Times article by David Carr rehashing common knowledge on "why Twitter will endure" got me thinking about the ways in which it will not endure, or the ways in which it may endure via which no one will really care about it. So, what does it mean to "endure"? To stay in business? So what - Lord...

Four short links: 23 December 2009

By Nat Torkington
December 23, 2009

Blippy -- Automatically share your favorite purchases from iTunes, Amazon, Zappos, Visa, MasterCard, and more. See what your friends are buying. Interesting premise, and interesting possibilities for buyers to influence each other. Thousands of lost Durham health records spark probe -- not remarkable in itself but rather indicative that the lost USB key is the new vector for data...

Four short links: 17 November 2009

By Nat Torkington
November 17, 2009

Digital Natives (Ze Frank) -- digital natives have grown up in a landscape where access to information and influence has been flattened. they have watched media distribution bottlenecks in the form of networks and studios lose influence to youtube and independent production houses. They have watched companies bow down to viral video critiques, and watched political systems get hacked...

Four short links: 22 October 2009

By Nat Torkington
October 22, 2009

Eight Billion Minutes Spent on Facebook Daily -- you weren't using that cognitive surplus, were you? How We Made Github Fast -- high-level summary is that the new "fast, good, cheap--pick any two" is "fast, new, easy--pick any two". (via Simon Willison) Isaac Mao, China, 40M Blogs and Counting -- Today, there are 40 million bloggers in China and...

Why Posterous Is a Smart Tool For Informal Government Blogging

By Mark Drapeau
October 19, 2009

For a few weeks, I've been testing a tool called Posterous, and I've come to like it a lot. You can see my account here. If you're not familiar with Posterous, it is essentially a very simple blogging platform. It may in fact be the most simple one; yet it is very feature-laden. And it has one relatively unique feature...

As the Internet Rewires Our Brains

By Kurt Cagle
March 1, 2009

The Internet, ironically, has been abuzz this week with dire news about how the Social Media and the Internet itself is stunting our mental growth, is turning us into idiot savants, Aspergers and reverting our brains to a more primitive state. The first such statement came from Lady Greenfield, an Oxford University neurologist, baroness, and director of the Royal Institution in England, who warned that sites such as Facebook and Twitter were contributing to the decline of critical skills in children who used them heavily, claiming that repeated exposure could effectively rewire the brain.

Four short links: 10 Feb 2009

By Nat Torkington
February 9, 2009

Happy Monday! Kid coding and web-powered political transparency form the artisanal wholewheat organic bread slices around a sandwich filling of meaty (or tofuy) web travel APIs and blogly angst: Art and Code -- conference on programming environments for "artists, young people, and the rest of us". Alice! Hackety Hack! Scratch! Processing! And more! March 7-9 at CMU. Want! (I've written...

Four short links: 19 Jan 2009

By Nat Torkington
January 22, 2009

Hello from Whakapapa, a ski resort in New Zealand. These four links come to you via the wifi at the "highest hotel in New Zealand", which serves as a useful reminder that no matter how unremarkable one might seem, anyone can have a claim to fame if only they work at it. Apple Show Us DRM's True Colors - the...

Zine: Python Blogging Software by Armin Ronacher

Zine:  Python Blogging Software by Armin Ronacher
By Noah Gift
January 12, 2009

Attention, users of Blogging Software, like Word Press, there is now a serious Python competitor, Zine. The lead developer is Armin Ronacher, a wunderkind Python developer it seems, he is still in college, yet has written an amazing slew of...

How Terrorists May Abuse Micro-Blogging Channels Like Twitter

By Nitesh Dhanjani
December 18, 2008

In this article, I want to further the discussion on how micro-blogging channels may be leveraged by terrorist organizations to obtain real time surveillance and intelligence of their efforts.

Blogging on the QT

By Kurt Cagle
September 4, 2008

To me, though this is one of the journalistic quandaries of the twenty-first century. Where is the dividing line between news and opinion, between the article and the blog, because objective reporting and subjective editorializing? Is one better than the other? Is one more ethical than the other?

Lessons on Blogging from Jon Stewart

By Tim O'Reilly
August 27, 2008

Why the NY Times profile of Jon Stewart holds lessons for bloggers and journalists about the future (and heart) of their medium.

Twitter: Tweeting from your Mac

By Todd Ogasawara
May 28, 2008

Twitter is probably the most beloved unreliable web-service on the net. That said, if it is running (even with some features turned off), I tend to be using it. Here are some Mac clients I've been using with it instead of the default web interface.

How I Used Flickr To Power My Blog and Got 1,496,603 Visits

By Harold Davis
January 27, 2008

Why do I show my work on Flickr? There are a number of reasons, but they boil down to 1,496,603. Let me explain my affair with Flickr. When I started Photoblog 2.0 in May 2005, I made the decision to serve my photos out of Flickr. This means that the several thousand photos in my blog are sitting on Flickr's...


1 to 35 of 35
The Watering Hole