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Four short links: 11 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 11, 2013

Meet Jack, or What The Government Could Do With All That Location Data (ACLU) — sham slidedeck which helps laypeople see how our data exhaust can be used against us to keep us safe. PirateBay Moves Domains — different ccTLDs …

Build Reusable Widgets for the Web with Polymer and Dart

By Seth Ladd
September 24, 2013

Web Components, the family of new web specifications for reusable and encapsulated widgets, are coming to a browser near you. Thanks to Polymer, a new type of library for the web built on top of Web Components, and Dart, a …

Four short links: 19 September 2013

By Nat Torkington
September 19, 2013

How Jim Henson Turned His Art Into a Business (Longreads) — When Henson joined on to the experimental PBS show Sesame Street in 1968, he was underpaid for his services creating Big Bird and Oscar. Yet he spent his free …

Four short links: 4 July 2013

By Nat Torkington
July 4, 2013

ansible — Model-driven configuration management, multi-node deployment/orchestration, and remote task execution system. Uses SSH by default, so no special software has to be installed on the nodes you manage. Ansible can be extended in any language. The Golden Age of …

Really Understanding Computation

By Mike Loukides
June 14, 2013

It’s great to see that Tom Stuart’s Understanding Computation has made it out. I’ve been excited about this book ever since we signed it. Understanding Computation started from Tom’s talk Programming with Nothing, which he presented at Ruby Manor in …

Really Understanding Computation

By Mike Loukides
June 4, 2013

It’s great to see that Tom Stuart’s Understanding Computation has made it out. I’ve been excited about this book ever since we signed it. Understanding Computation started from Tom’s talk Programming with Nothing, which he presented at Ruby Manor in …

8 Dart Features Those Fat Cats Don’t Want You to Know

By Seth Ladd
May 30, 2013

In this article, I’ll show you eight more features that help Dart stand on its own as a productive, ceremony-free language. Remember, Dart compiles to JavaScript, so everything you see here works across the modern Web. Dart makes fluent APIs …

In-Memory Databases, Burning Silos, Reintroducing Dart, and Google Glass Gatherings

By Adam Flaherty
May 24, 2013

In-memory Databases: A discussion of near real-time manipulation of massive datasets Burning the Silos: Minimize boundaries to reduce product cycle times. Dart Is Not the Language You Think It Is: Seth Ladd’s enthusiastic reintroduction of Dart prompts a voluminous discussion …

Dart Is Not the Language You Think It Is

By Seth Ladd
May 21, 2013

When Dart was originally launched, many developers mistook it for some sort of Java clone. In truth, Dart is inspired by a range of languages such as Smalltalk, Strongtalk, Erlang, C#, and JavaScript. Get past the semicolons and curly braces, …

What Kind of JavaScript Developer Are You?

By Simon St. Laurent
May 14, 2013

“JavaScript developer” is a description that hides tremendous diversity. While every language has a range of user skill levels, JavaScript has a remarkably fragmented community. People come to JavaScript for different reasons from different places, and this can make communication …

Four short links: 23 April 2013

By Nat Torkington
April 23, 2013

Drawscript — Processing for Illustrator. (via BERG London) Archive Team Warrior — a virtual archiving appliance. You can run it to help with the ArchiveTeam archiving efforts. It will download sites and upload them to our archive. (via Ed Vielmetti) …

Four short links: 12 April 2013

By Nat Torkington
April 12, 2013

Wikileaks ProjectK Code (Github) — open-sourced map and graph modules behind the Wikileaks code serving Kissinger-era cables. (via Journalism++) Plan Your Digital Afterlife With Inactive Account Manager — you can choose to have your data deleted — after three, six, …

Commerce Weekly: Wal-Mart looks outside the (big) box to battle Amazon

By Jenn Webb
April 4, 2013

Wal-Mart wants to crowdsource delivery, while Google chases same-day On the heels of launching its in-store delivery locker program to compete with Amazon Locker, Wal-Mart has announced it’s toying with the idea of having in-store customers deliver online orders to …

Four short links: 11 December 2012

By Nat Torkington
December 11, 2012

Burrito Bomber — drone that delivers burritos. (via BoingBoing) Copyright Hardliners Adopt the Language of Reform — Sadly, in the end, Barnier’s “copyright fit for the Internet age” looks depressingly like the current, dysfunctional version: one based on a non-existent …

Commerce Weekly: Same-day delivery war heats up

By Jenn Webb
December 6, 2012

Here are a few stories that caught my attention in the commerce space this week. The high price of instant gratification The Wall Street Journal’s Greg Bensinger took a look this week at the e-commerce same-day delivery trend, a service …

TOC’s Global Ebook Market report

By Joe Wikert
November 8, 2012

One year ago that we published the first edition of our Global Ebook Market report. We focused on the major English language territories but also featured coverage of several other popular languages as well. A lot has changed in the …

Strata Week: Real-time Hadoop

By Jenn Webb
October 26, 2012

Here are a few stories from the data space that caught my attention this week. Cloudera’s Impala takes Hadoop queries into real-time Cloudera ventured into real-time Hadoop querying this week, opening up its Impala software platform. As Derrick Harris reports …

Four short links: 22 October 2012

By Nat Torkington
October 22, 2012

jq — command-line tool for JSON data. GAFFTA — Gray Area Foundation For The Arts. Non-profit running workshops and building projects around technology-driven arts. (via Roger Dennis) Power Pwn — looks like a power strip, is actually chock-full of pen-testing …

Growth of SMART health care apps may be slow, but inevitable

By Andy Oram
September 13, 2012

This week has been teaming with health care conferences, particularly in Boston, and was declared by President Obama to be National Health IT Week as well. I chose to spend my time at the second ITdotHealth conference, where I enjoyed …

Four short links: 11 September 2012

By Nat Torkington
September 10, 2012

Liz Neely Talks 3D Digitisation, 3D Printing (Seb Chan) — On July 19th, Tom and Mike Moceri arrived at the Art Institute dock in a shiny black SUV with a BATMAN license plate and a trunk packed with a couple …

Commerce Weekly: Mainstream mobile payment a decade out?

By Jenn Webb
September 6, 2012

Here are a few stories that caught my attention this week in the commerce space. Gimmick to mainstream — the difference a decade can make With Square teaming up with Starbucks, PayPal partnering with major chains like Home Depot and …

Seeking prior art where it most often is found in software

By Andy Oram
August 28, 2012

Patent ambushes are on the rise again, and cases such as Apple/Samsung shows that prior art really has to swing the decision–obviousness or novelty is not a strong enough defense. Obviousness and novelty are subjective decisions made by a patent …

Four short links: 20 August 2012

By Nat Torkington
August 20, 2012

Uncertain Rainbow — Chris McDowall’s artistic Twitter experiment. Just how important are people to your social software? Described in this blog post. 8 Weeks Until BitCoin Debit/Credit Card — with an option to hold the value in BitCoins until it’s …

Top Stories: June 18-22, 2012

Top Stories: June 18-22, 2012
By Mac Slocum
June 22, 2012

This week on O'Reilly: Artist Nina Paley explained her "intellectual disobedience" stance on copyright, Shahid Shah looked at the future of health IT integration, and illustrator Laura Maaske discussed the next generation of digital imagery.

Clinician, researcher, and patients working together: progress aired at Indivo conference

By Andy Oram
June 21, 2012

SMART and Indivo offer a far-reaching platform for giving patients access to data and working seemlessly with other cooperating institutions.

Clinician, researcher, and patients working together: progress aired at Indivo conference

By Andy Oram
June 21, 2012

SMART and Indivo offer a far-reaching platform for giving patients access to data and working seemlessly with other cooperating institutions.

JavaScript and Dart: Can we do better?

JavaScript and Dart: Can we do better?
By Simon St. Laurent
May 17, 2012

O'Reilly editor Simon St. Laurent talked with Google's Seth Ladd about the challenges of improving the web.  How can we build on JavaScript's ubiquity while addressing performance, team, and scale issues?

Four short links: 30 April 2012

By Nat Torkington
April 30, 2012

Chanko (Github) -- trivial A/B testing from within Rails. OpenMeetings -- Apache project for audio/video conferencing, screen sharing, whiteboard, calendar, and other groupware features. Low Innovation Internet (Wired) -- I disagree, I think this is a Louis CK Nobody's Happy moment. We renormalize after change and become blind to the amazing things we're surrounded by. Hundreds of thousands (millions?)...

Top Stories: March 19-23, 2012

Top Stories: March 19-23, 2012
By Mac Slocum
March 23, 2012

This week on O'Reilly: StreetEasy's Sebastian Delmont explained why his team left Google Maps behind, we looked at the ins and outs of the Dart programming platform, and Jim Stogdill considered the alternatives to always-on living.

Four short links: 22 March 2012

By Nat Torkington
March 22, 2012

Stamen Watercolour Maps -- I saw a preview of this a week or two ago and was in awe. It is truly the most beautiful thing I've seen a computer do. It's not just a clever hack, it's art. Genius. And they're CC-licensed. Screens Up Close -- gorgeous microscope pictures of screens, showing how great the iPad's retina display...

What is Dart?

What is Dart?
By Kathy Walrath
March 21, 2012

Dart is a new structured web programming platform designed to enable complex, high-performance apps for the modern web. Kathy Walrath and Seth Ladd, members of Google's developer relations team, explain Dart's purpose and its applications.

Developer Week in Review: NASA says goodbye to big iron

Developer Week in Review: NASA says goodbye to big iron
By James Turner
February 16, 2012

This week, NASA marked the end of an era, as the last of its big iron is retired. Microsoft continues to signal that its forays into open source are legitimate. And a new open source gaming project has a little extra horse-power, thanks to the fans behind it.

Developer Year in Review: 2011 Edition

By James Turner
December 22, 2011

It's time for our annual look back at the year that was, when mobile ruled the world, HTML5 PWNED Flash, Drupal and Hadoop were the hot buzzwords for your resume, and a new batch of languages tried to become stars.

Four short links: 11 October 2011

By Nat Torkington
October 11, 2011

Personal Best (New Yorker) -- excellent Atul Gawande column on coaching which has me wondering how to open up different aspects of my life to improvement. Interesting to me because, behind every continuous- or self-improvement technique are the questions: "do you want to get better?" and "if so, how far will you go in pursuit of that goal?". CyberTracker...

On the media reaction to the death of Steve Jobs

By Alex Howard
October 9, 2011

In the context of worldwide reactions to the impact of Steve Jobs on the arc of history, recognizing the complexity of his life and offering a balanced assessment of the impact of his legacy on this earth matters. In that context, O'Reilly editors share their reflections on the passing of one of the technology industry's iconic figures.

Top Stories: September 5-9, 2011

Top Stories: September 5-9, 2011
By Mac Slocum
September 9, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: Christopher Groskopf explained how he's going to hack a Texas city, Nat Torkington said goodbye to Project Gutenberg founder Michael S. Hart, and the value of government data visualizations reached a new standard thanks to LookatCook.com.

Top Stories: August 22-26, 2011

Top Stories: August 22-26, 2011
By Mac Slocum
August 26, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: Mark Sigal examined the legacy of Steve Jobs, we talked with New York Times data artist Jer Thorp about the commingling of data, art and science, and Tim O'Reilly and Google VP of Product Bradley Horowitz discussed Google+, data portability and more.

The nexus of data, art and science is where the interesting stuff happens

By Audrey Watters
August 23, 2011

Jer Thorp, data artist in residence at the New York Time, sits at the crossroads of data, art and science. Here he discusses his work at the Times and, more broadly, how aesthetics shape our understanding of data.

The nexus of data, art and science is where the interesting stuff happens

The nexus of data, art and science is where the interesting stuff happens
By Audrey Watters
August 23, 2011

Jer Thorp, data artist in residence at the New York Time, sits at the crossroads of data, art and science. Here he discusses his work at the Times and, more broadly, how aesthetics shape our understanding of data.

The nexus of data, art and science is where the interesting stuff happens

By Audrey Watters
August 23, 2011

Jer Thorp, data artist in residence at the New York Time, sits at the crossroads of data, art and science. Here he discusses his work at the Times and, more broadly, how aesthetics shape our understanding of data.

Four short links: 23 August 2011

By Nat Torkington
August 23, 2011

Late to Hulu Means More Piracy -- more evidence that price isn't the main reason people pirate. If they can get it legally online in a convenient fashion, they will. If you delay online release, or make it inconvenient, your erstwhile customers will turn to piracy because "it's illegal" is less important than "it's convenient". Welcome to the modern...

There's no such thing as big data

By Alistair Croll
August 9, 2011

Having a lot of data is not the same as using it well. Today's big companies are losing to small upstarts simply because those firms ask better questions. To compete, large enterprises need to learn how to harvest the data they have on customers, markets, competitors, and products.

There's no such thing as big data

By Alistair Croll
August 9, 2011

Having a lot of data is not the same as using it well. Today's big companies are losing to small upstarts simply because those firms ask better questions. To compete, large enterprises need to learn how to harvest the data they have on customers, markets, competitors, and products.

Software patents, prior art, and revelations of the Peer to Patent review

By Andy Oram
March 2, 2011

Besides the greater openness that Peer to Patent promotes in evaluating individual patent applications, it is creating a new transparency and understanding of the functioning of the patent system as a whole. Problems with prior art disproportionately affect software.

A Darwinian Theory of Beauty

By Nat Torkington
November 17, 2010

I love this TED talk by Denis Dutton of Arts & Letters Daily fame. He uses evolution to explain beauty, and it's illustrated in the same style (by the same person) as the RSA talks. I'm particularly drawn to the scientific approach to art, a crossover that positively reeks of the kind of cross-discipline thinking that I encounter at Sci...

@RIARadio: Flashbelt Day 1 Interviews

By Garth Braithwaite
June 22, 2010

Day one of Flashbelt we were able to grab quite a few good interviews. More to come.

@RIARadio: Flashbelt Day 1 Interviews

By Garth Braithwaite
June 22, 2010

Day one of Flashbelt we were able to grab quite a few good interviews. More to come.

Four short links: 11 June 2010

By Nat Torkington
June 11, 2010

Joshua at Seven on Seven -- Delicious creator Joshua Schachter participated in a Rhizome "Seven on Seven" recently. He was paired with artist Monica Narula and together they explored guilt and absolution with the help of the Mechanical Turk. Check out the presentation PDF for the quick summary. How to Align Researcher Incentives with Outcomes (Cameron Neylon) -- the...

Comparing Apples To Oranges with Flex

By Andrew Trice
March 12, 2010

Occasionally you might find the need to compare completely unrelated data in your applications. This may sound a bit odd, but it does happen, especially in cases where you may want to observe and compare trends within your data sets. This could include completely different data sets, using different value ranges on both axes, with variable numbers of data points. Hence: comparing apples to oranges. At first thought, you might think that you have to compare data in separate charts placed side-by-side for visual comparison. However, with Flex it is actually not difficult to to create multi-scale visualizations on the same component. In this post, we will examine the application of Flex charting components to view multiple data sets with multiple scales, and multiple collection sizes.

Fourt short links: 16 Feb 2010

By Nat Torkington
February 16, 2010

Of Tandoori and Epicuration (JP Rangaswami) -- Curation is the process by which aggregate data is imbued with personalised trust. Siri -- a personal assistant iPhone app, like IWantSandy but with voice recognition. Evaluating the Reasons for Non-use of Cornell University's Institutional Repository -- great lessons for all open data projects. The reward structure established by each discipline largely...


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