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Embracing hardware data

By Max Shron
July 11, 2014

Editor’s note: This is part one of a two-part series reflecting on the O’Reilly Solid Conference from the perspective of a data scientist. Normally we wouldn’t publish takeaways from an event held nearly two months ago, but these insights were …

Embracing hardware data

By Max Shron
July 11, 2014

Editor’s note: This is part one of a two-part series reflecting on the O’Reilly Solid Conference from the perspective of a data scientist. Normally we wouldn’t publish takeaways from an event held nearly two months ago, but these insights were …

Embracing hardware data

By Max Shron
July 11, 2014

Editor’s note: This is part one of a two-part series reflecting on the O’Reilly Solid Conference from the perspective of a data scientist. Normally we wouldn’t publish takeaways from an event held nearly two months ago, but these insights were …

Questioning the Lambda Architecture

By Jay Kreps
July 1, 2014

Nathan Marz wrote a popular blog post describing an idea he called the Lambda Architecture (“How to beat the CAP theorem“). The Lambda Architecture is an approach to building stream processing applications on top of MapReduce and Storm or similar …

Questioning the Lambda Architecture

By Jay Kreps
July 1, 2014

Nathan Marz wrote a popular blog post describing an idea he called the Lambda Architecture (“How to beat the CAP theorem“). The Lambda Architecture is an approach to building stream processing applications on top of MapReduce and Storm or similar …

Questioning the Lambda Architecture

By Jay Kreps
July 1, 2014

Nathan Marz wrote a popular blog post describing an idea he called the Lambda Architecture (“How to beat the CAP theorem“). The Lambda Architecture is an approach to building stream processing applications on top of MapReduce and Storm or similar …

Roll-your-own database architecture

By Mike Barlow
June 24, 2014

Two years ago, most of the conversations around big data had a futuristic, theoretical vibe. That vibe has been replaced with a gritty sense of practically. Today, when big data or some surrogate term arises in conversation, the talk is …

Roll-your-own database architecture

By Mike Barlow
June 24, 2014

Two years ago, most of the conversations around big data had a futuristic, theoretical vibe. That vibe has been replaced with a gritty sense of practically. Today, when big data or some surrogate term arises in conversation, the talk is …

Roll-your-own database architecture

By Mike Barlow
June 24, 2014

Two years ago, most of the conversations around big data had a futuristic, theoretical vibe. That vibe has been replaced with a gritty sense of practically. Today, when big data or some surrogate term arises in conversation, the talk is …

It’s the End of the Web As We Knew It

By Simon St. Laurent
May 29, 2014

For the past 15 years, Google has enforced the classic “HTML as foundation” architecture at the heart of the Web. Content creators and the developers who support them had to present content and link information as part of their pages’ …

Venal Sins: Cash, Sex, and IT Infrastructure

By Mike Barlow
April 8, 2014

Yet again, I reveal the base instincts driving my interest in big data. It’s not the science – it’s the cash. And yes, on some level, I find the idea of all that cash sexy. Yes, I know it’s a …

Four short links: 4 April 2014

By Nat Torkington
April 4, 2014

C# Compiler Open Sourced — bit by the bit, the ship of Microsoft turns. The Web’s Declarative Composable Future — this. For the first time since 1993, I feel like the web platform is taking a step towards being a …

Architecting the connected world

By Andy Fitzgerald
February 21, 2014

In the first two posts in this series, I examined the connection between information architecture and user interface design, and then looked closely at the opportunities and constraints inherent in information architecture as we’ve learned to practice it on the …

The lingering seduction of the page

By Andy Fitzgerald
January 24, 2014

In an earlier post in this series, I examined the articulatory relationship between information architecture and user interface design, and argued that the tools that have emerged for constructing information architectures on the web will only get us so far …

Architecture, design, and the connected environment

By Andy Fitzgerald
December 13, 2013

Just when it seems we’re starting to get our heads around the mobile revolution, another design challenge has risen up fiercer and larger right behind it: the Internet of Things. The rise in popularity of “wearables” and the growing activity …

Four short links: 11 December 2013

By Nat Torkington
December 11, 2013

Meet Jack, or What The Government Could Do With All That Location Data (ACLU) — sham slidedeck which helps laypeople see how our data exhaust can be used against us to keep us safe. PirateBay Moves Domains — different ccTLDs …

Four short links: 13 November 2013

By Nat Torkington
November 12, 2013

ISS Enjoys Malware — Kaspersky reveals ISS had XP malware infestation before they shifted to Linux. The Gravity movie would have had more registry editing sessions if the producers had cared about FACTUAL ACCURACY. Big Data Approach to Computational Creativity …

Four short links: 1 October 2013

By Nat Torkington
September 29, 2013

Farmbot Wiki — open-source, scalable, automated precision farming machines. Amazon’s Chaotic Storage — photos from inside an Amazon warehouse. At the heart of the operation is a sophisticated database that tracks and monitors every single product that enters/leaves the warehouse …

The Myth of the Private API

By George Reese
September 6, 2013

A little over a week ago, I wrote about how the authentication model for an unpublished Tesla REST API was architecturally flawed because it failed to take basic precautions against the sharing of credentials with third-parties common to most REST-based …

Doug Hanks on how the MX series is changing the game

By Meghan Blanchette
May 23, 2013

Doug Hanks (@douglashanksjr) is an O’Reilly author (Juniper MX Series) and a data center architect at Juniper Networks. He is currently working on one of Juniper’s most popular devices – the MX Series. The MX is a routing device that’s …

What is probabilistic programming?

By Beau Cronin
April 16, 2013

Probabilistic programming languages are in the spotlight. This is due to the announcement of a new DARPA program to support their fundamental research. But what is probabilistic programming? What can we expect from this research? Will this effort pay off? How long …

Aereo’s copyright solution: intentional inefficiency

By Mac Slocum
April 3, 2013

Aereo, an online service that sends free over-the-air television broadcasts to subscribers, scored a big win in court this week. At first glance, it would seem the service has to violate copyright. Aereo is grabbing TV content without paying for …

On reading Mike Barlow’s “Real-Time Big Data Analytics: Emerging Architecture”

By Ann Spencer
February 26, 2013

During a break in between offsite meetings that Edd and I were attending the other day, he asked me, “did you read the Barlow piece?” “Umm, no.” I replied sheepishly. Insert a sidelong glance from Edd that said much without …

Four short links: 13 February 2013

By Nat Torkington
February 13, 2013

CA Assembly Bill No. 292 — This bill would provide that the full text of the California Code of Regulations shall bear an open access creative commons attribution license, allowing any individual, at no cost, to use, distribute, and create …

Five big data predictions for 2013

By Edd Dumbill
January 16, 2013

Here are some of the key big data themes I expect to dominate 2013, and of course will be covering in Strata. Emergence of a big data architecture The coming year will mark the graduation for many big data pilot …

Four short links: 31 July 2012

By Nat Torkington
July 31, 2012

Christchurch’s Shot at Being Innovation Central (Idealog) — Christchurch, rebuilding a destroyed CBD after earthquakes, has released plans for the new city. I hope there’s budget for architects and city developers to build visible data, sensors, etc. so the Innovation …

How the federal government helps health care standards evolve

By Andy Oram
June 20, 2012

In this interview, Federal Health Architecture director Dr. Lauren Thompson discusses the state of health information exchange.

Understanding Mojito

Understanding Mojito
By Simon St. Laurent
May 10, 2012

O'Reilly editor Simon St. Laurent talked with Yahoo's Bruno Fernandez-Ruiz about the possibilities Node opened and Mojito exploits. Yahoo's Mojito is a different kind of framework: all JavaScript, but running on both the client and the server.

Complexity fails: A lesson from storage simplification

Complexity fails: A lesson from storage simplification
By Randy Bias
April 11, 2012

Simple systems scale effectively, while complex systems struggle to overcome the multiplicative effect of potential failure points. This shows us why the most reliable and scalable clouds are those made up of fewer, simpler parts.

Oracle's NoSQL

By Mike Loukides
October 6, 2011

Oracle's announcement of a NoSQL product isn't just a validation of key-value stores, but of the entire discussion of database architecture.

Oracle's NoSQL

By Mike Loukides
October 6, 2011

Oracle's announcement of a NoSQL product isn't just a validation of key-value stores, but of the entire discussion of database architecture.

News organizations still party like it's 1899

By Jenn Webb
May 31, 2011

Ben Huh, the CEO of Cheezburger, Inc., loves his Cheezburger project but is ready to engage in a fling with news. Huh's new Moby Dick project will address the limitations and frustrations of stagnant news presentation. In this short interview, Huh discusses news outlets that are headed in the right direction.

News organizations still party like it's 1899

News organizations still party like it's 1899
By Jenn Webb
May 31, 2011

Ben Huh, the CEO of Cheezburger, Inc., loves his Cheezburger project but is ready to engage in a fling with news. Huh's new Moby Dick project will address the limitations and frustrations of stagnant news presentation. In this short interview, Huh discusses news outlets that are headed in the right direction.

Four short links: 15 April 2011

By Nat Torkington
April 15, 2011

(the author apologizes for the late publication of this item) Twitter's Biggest Problem: Tweets are Ads -- having just been to my first social media marketing conference, I see what the author's talking about. Would you want to pay for advertising in the middle of a sea of free ads? (via Hacker News) Safari and Do Not Track Support --...

Outliers and coexistence are the new normal for big data

Outliers and coexistence are the new normal for big data
By Brett Sheppard
March 31, 2011

To benefit from advanced analytics and study complete huge data sets, many enterprise architectures are evolving into coexistence environments that combine legacy and new systems.

Heds, deks, and ledes

By Jon Udell
November 4, 2010

Headlines matter. They're always visible to a scan or a search, while other information -- like decks and leads -- are active in far fewer contexts.

Heds, deks, and ledes

By Jon Udell
November 4, 2010

Headlines matter. They're always visible to a scan or a search, while other information -- like decks and leads -- are active in far fewer contexts.

Four short links: 23 August 2010

By Nat Torkington
August 23, 2010

Open Buildings -- crowdsourced database of information about buildings, for architecture geeks. A sign that crowdsourcing is digging deep into niches far far from the world of open source software. (via straup on Delicious) Lego-Based Time Tracking -- clever hack to build physical graphs of where your time goes. (via avgjanecrafter on Twitter) Smoothie Charts -- a charting Javascript...

Four short links: 19 August 2010

By Nat Torkington
August 19, 2010

New Big Brother: Market-Moving Satellite Images -- using satellite images of Wal-Mart and Target parking lots to predict quarterly returns. (via Hacker News) Form and Code -- beautiful book on the intersection of code, design, architecture, form, and function. One of the authors is Casey Reas who was also one of the people behind Processing. (via RandomEtc on Twitter)...

Four short links: 4 August 2010

By Nat Torkington
August 4, 2010

FuXi -- Python-based, bi-directional logical reasoning system for the semantic web from the folks at the Open Knowledge Foundation. (via About Inferencing) Harness the Power of Being an Internet -- I learn by trying to build something, there's no other way I can discover the devils-in-the-details. Unfortunately that's an incredibly inefficient way to gain knowledge. I basically wander around...

Redesigning the New York City subway map

By Julie Steele
July 27, 2010

Sophisticated data acquisition tools give us more geographic data to display than our eyes and minds can easily digest, calling for a careful editing process. In this excerpt from "Beautiful Visualization," Eddie Jabbour explains the trade-offs he made while reinventing one of the most iconic maps in the world.

Swiz Framework nears version 1.0

By RJ Owen
June 18, 2010

The Swiz micro-architecture for Flex development is nearing version 1.0. This is an important milestone for the Swiz team, some of whom have been working on the product for over two years new. If you haven't tried Swiz yet now is a great time to start. If you've been using Swiz for a while, make sure you submit any bugs for 1.0 before it's too late!

Four short links: 5 May 2010

By Nat Torkington
May 5, 2010

Sketch for Processing -- an IDE for Processing based on Mozilla's Bespin. British Election Results to be Broadcast on Big Ben -- the monument is the message. Lovely integration of real-time data and architecture, an early step for urban infrastructure as display. Face.com API -- an alpha API for face recognition. Average Number of Books/Kindle -- short spreadsheet figuring...

The Five Levels of Cloud Computing

By George Reese
March 24, 2010

We're at an immature stage in the development of cloud computing. Today, the cloud represents the exception to way organizations manage technology. As the decade progresses, cloud computing will mature and evolve into the core of all IT systems along the path described in these five levels of cloud computing.

The Sacred Barrier

The Sacred Barrier
By George Reese
February 25, 2010

Should public cloud providers reach into the guest operating system to perform various functions? I've always held that a public cloud provider should treat the border between the hypervisor and guest operating system as a sacred barrier that should never be breached. The fear in public cloud computing is giving up control. When a public cloud provider reaches into your virtual machine, you lose too much control.

Search is the Web's fun and wicked problem

By Mac Slocum
February 19, 2010

We may think of search as static and mature, but it's a tool in flux. Developments in mobile, augmented reality, and social graphs signal big changes ahead. In this Q&A, "Search Patterns" author Peter Morville shows how experiments at the periphery and weird ideas will shape search's future. He also reveals the one semi-recent innovation that unlocked a watershed moment for search (it's not what you'd expect).

Tactical and strategic XML design

By Rick Jelliffe
November 6, 2009

So I guess when we look at a system's architecture, the first thing we can do is ask 'Is this XML here being used strategically or tactically?' A strategic use might be, for example, to allow long-term archiving; a tactical use might be XML in AJAX (where using JSON would be another tactic.) If the answer is tactical, then we can ask 'Is it implemented in a way that allows flexible rearrangement, when a different tactic becomes appropriate?'

Getting Java, C# and Perl to speak the same language (with JSON)

By Andrew Stellman
October 4, 2009

I've been thinking a lot about architecture lately. It's partially because Jenny and I are going to do our Beautiful Teams talk at the ITARC 2009 conference next week. But it's also because I've been writing a lot of code...

Four short links: 30 September 2009

By Nat Torkington
September 30, 2009

Smart Materials in Architecture -- Using thermal bimetals can allow architects to experiment with shape-changing buildings, Ritter said. Thermal bimetals include a combination of materials with different expansion coefficients that can cause a change in. Under changing temperatures this can lead one side of a compound to bend more than the other side, potentially creating an entirely different shape,...

ExternalInterface and Code Injection Part 2

By Tom Barker
September 25, 2009

In a previous article I outlined why I needed to inject JavaScript into a page from ActionScript, now I'd like to show the implementation. Essentially I created a new class called JSInjector. Within JSInjector I created a static function...


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