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Five trends signaling a bright future for ebooks

By Sanders Kleinfeld
July 11, 2014

Editor’s note: this piece originally appeared on Medium; it is cross-posted here with permission. The writer is an O’Reilly employee, but he is expressing his personal views. We love his optimism about the future and wanted to share it with …

Five trends signaling a bright future for ebooks

By Sanders Kleinfeld
July 11, 2014

Editor’s note: this piece originally appeared on Medium; it is cross-posted here with permission. The writer is an O’Reilly employee, but he is expressing his personal views. We love his optimism about the future and wanted to share it with …

Five trends signaling a bright future for ebooks

By Sanders Kleinfeld
July 11, 2014

Editor’s note: this piece originally appeared on Medium; it is cross-posted here with permission. The writer is an O’Reilly employee, but he is expressing his personal views. We love his optimism about the future and wanted to share it with …

8 key attributes of Bluetooth networking

By Mark Pacelle
May 16, 2014

This article is part of a series that began with 3 topologies driving IoT networking standards. Previously, we set out to choose the wireless technology standard that best fits the needs of our hypothetical building monitoring and energy application. Going …

Health IT is a growth area for programmers

By Andy Oram
April 11, 2014

O’Reilly recently released a report I wrote called The Information Technology Fix for Health: Barriers and Pathways to the Use of Information Technology for Better Health Care. Along with our book Hacking Healthcare, I hope this report helps programmers who …

Business models that make the Internet of Things feasible

By Andy Oram
April 8, 2014

For some people, it’s too early to plan mass consumerization of the Internet of Things. Developers are contentedly tinkering with Arduinos and clip cables, demonstrating cool one-off applications. We know that home automation can save energy, keep the elderly and …

3 topologies driving IoT networking standards

By Mark Pacelle
April 4, 2014

There are a lot of moving parts in the networking for the Internet of Things; a lot to sort out between WiFi, WiFi LP, Bluetooth, Bluetooth LE, Zigbee, Z-Wave, EnOcean and others. Some standards are governed by open, independent standards …

Internet of Things in celebration and provocation at MIT

By Andy Oram
February 26, 2014

Last Saturday’s IoT Festival at MIT became a meeting ground for people connecting the physical world. Embedded systems developers, security experts, data scientists, and artists all joined in this event. Although it was called a festival, it had a typical …

Hurdles to the Internet of Things prove more social than technical

By Andy Oram
February 26, 2014

Last Saturday’s IoT Festival at MIT became a meeting-ground for people connecting the physical world. Embedded systems developers, security experts, data scientists, and artists all joined in this event. Although it was called a festival, it had a typical conference …

MathML Forges On

By Peter Krautzberger
November 1, 2013

20 years into the web, math and science are still second class citizens on the web. While MathML is part of HTML 5, its adoption has seen ups and downs but if you look closely you can see there is …

Security After the Death of Trust

By Simon St. Laurent
October 2, 2013

Security has to reboot. What has passed for strong security until now is going to be considered only casual security going forward. As I put it last week, the damage that has become visible over the past few months means …

Obstacles to future proofing home automation

By Matthew Gast
September 25, 2013

When contemplating a home-automation project — as with many other technology decisions — the right place to start is ensuring you’re purchasing something that is future proof. As a veteran of the networking industry, future proofing is a technology decision …

After the NSA Subverted Security Standards

By Simon St. Laurent
September 11, 2013

I was somewhat surprised, despite my paranoia, by the extent of NSA data collection. I was very surprised, though, to find the New York Times reporting that NSA seems to have eased its data collection challenge by weakening security standards …

Toward Responsive Web Programming

By Simon St. Laurent
July 31, 2013

“Expect the unexpected” has long been a maxim of web development. New browsers and devices arrive, technologies change, and things break. The lore of web development isn’t just the technology: it addresses the many challenges of dealing with customers who …

Four short links: 19 June 2013

By Nat Torkington
June 17, 2013

Multithreading is Hard — The compiler and the processor both conspire to defeat your threads by moving your code around! Be warned and wary! You will have to do battle with both. Sample code and explanation of WTF the eieio …

Patients matter most, but technology matters a lot

By Andy Oram
June 4, 2013

Computing practices that used to be religated to experimental outposts are now taking up residence at the center of the health care field. From natural language processing to machine learning to predictive modeling, you see people promising at the health …

Four short links: 24 May 2013

By Nat Torkington
May 24, 2013

Ubiquity — Sears Holdings has formed a new unit to market space from former Sears and Kmart retail stores as a home for data centers, disaster recovery space and wireless towers. Google Abandons Open Standards for Instant Messaging (EFF) — …

Designing resilient communities

By Andy Oram
April 15, 2013

In the open source and free software movement, we always exalt community, and say the people coding and supporting the software are more valuable than the software itself. Few communities have planned and philosophized as much about community-building as ZeroMQ. …

Four short links: 22 March 2013

By Nat Torkington
March 22, 2013

Defend the Open Web: Keep DRM Out of W3C Standards (EFF) — W3C is there to create comprehensible, publicly-implementable standards that will guarantee interoperability, not to facilitate an explosion of new mutually-incompatible software and of sites and services that can …

Four short links: 13 March 2013

By Nat Torkington
March 13, 2013

What Tim Berners-Lee Doesn’t Know About HTML DRM (Guardian) — Cory Doctorow lays it out straight. HTML DRM is a bad idea, no two ways. The future of the Web is the future of the world, because everything we do …

Saint James Infirmary: checking the pulse of health IT at HIMSS

By Andy Oram
March 11, 2013

I spent most of the past week on my annual assessment of the progress that the field of health information technology is making toward culling the benefits offered by computers and Internet connectivity: instant access to data anywhere; a leveling …

The ISBN still has a place in the digital world

By Jenn Webb
March 7, 2013

A recent post at The Economist declared the International Standard Book Number (ISBN) an analog relic that “increasingly hampers new, small and individual publishers,” and an industry shift toward digital is “weakening its monopoly.” The post stated: “Self-published writers are …

Singin’ the Blues: visions deferred at HIMSS health IT conference

By Andy Oram
March 5, 2013

HIMSS, the leading health IT conference in the US, drew over 32,000 people to New Orleans this year (with another thousand or two expected to register by the end of the conference). High as this turn-out sounds, it represents a …

Rich multi-media and a web of devices is driving us to a world of standards

By Jenn Webb
February 28, 2013

At the recent TOC conference in New York, I had the opportunity to sit down with Jeff Jaffe, CEO of the World Wide Web Consortium, to talk about the Open Web Platform and standardization issues. In our video interview (embedded …

Exploring web standards for high data density visualizations

By Nicolas Garcia Belmonte
January 30, 2013

Strata Editor’s Note: Over the next few weeks, the Strata Community Site will be providing sneak peeks of upcoming sessions at the Strata Conference in Santa Clara. Nicolas’ sneak peek is the first in this series.  Last year was a …

Ebook problem areas that need standardisation

By bbjarnason
November 1, 2012

The “best price” phase of TOC NY 2013 registration is about to end. Don’t wait or you’ll end up paying more than you would today. To save even more on your registration, sign up here and use the discount code …

Top Stories: April 30-May 4, 2012

Top Stories: April 30-May 4, 2012
By Mac Slocum
May 4, 2012

This week on O'Reilly: We learned how the U.K. government is facing pressure from all sides as it evaluates open standards, Maximiliano Firtman evaluated two years' worth of mobile web developments, and the utility of functional languages was put in the spotlight.

Four short links: 3 May 2012

By Nat Torkington
May 3, 2012

The History of Key Design (Slate) -- fascinating and educational. I loved the detector lock, which shows you how many times it has been used. Would be lovely to see on my Google account. (via Dave Pell) Why Telcos Don't Grok Open Standards (Simon Phipps) -- Their history is of participants in a market where a legally-constituted cartel of...

The UK's battle for open standards

By Simon Wardley
May 2, 2012

Influence, money, a bit of drama — not things you typically associate with open standards, yet that's what the U.K. government is facing as it evaluates open options.

The give and take between e-publishing standards and innovation

By Jenn Webb
March 20, 2012

In this video interview, Bill McCoy, executive director of the IDPF, says it's important to emphasize and encourage the innovative aspects of building upon EPUB 3, as long as that innovation doesn't lock consumers in to one closed silo.

The give and take between e-publishing standards and innovation

The give and take between e-publishing standards and innovation
By Jenn Webb
March 20, 2012

In this video interview, Bill McCoy, executive director of the IDPF, says it's important to emphasize and encourage the innovative aspects of building upon EPUB 3, as long as that innovation doesn't lock consumers in to one closed silo.

Permission to be horrible and other ways to generate creativity

By Suzanne Axtell
March 1, 2012

Author and web design consultant Denise R. Jacobs reveals lessons she learned about creativity while writing her first book. She also discusses her efforts to give women and people of color more visibility in the tech world.

Joaquín Almunia gets it: "Owners of ... standard essential patents are conferred a power .. that they cannot be allowed to misuse. "

By Rick Jelliffe
February 12, 2012

I think Almunia's speech does not go far enough: it still sees standardization as an escape hatch that a company that finds itself in a market dominating position can use when challenged.

Developer Week in Review: A pause to consider patents

Developer Week in Review: A pause to consider patents
By James Turner
February 10, 2012

We take a look at two major events that rocked the technology intellectual property wars, centered on a courtroom in Texas and a standards body a continent away.

What VMware's Cloud Foundry announcement is about

By Andy Oram
April 13, 2011

By now, the popular APIs for IaaS have been satisfactorily emulated so that you can move your application fairly easily from one vendor to another. But until now, the PaaS situation was much more closed.

4G is a moving target

4G is a moving target
By Bruce Stewart
March 16, 2011

The "4G" mobile companies are touting isn't necessarily in line with the formal specification. The big question is: Do consumers really care?

Four short links: 1 March 2011

By Nat Torkington
March 1, 2011

Implementing Open Standards in Open Source (Larry Rosen) -- Companies try to control specifications because they want to control software that implements those specifications. This is often incompatible with the freedom promised by open source principles that allow anyone to create and distribute copies and derivative works without restriction. This article explores ways that are available to compromise that...

Four short links: 24 February 2011

By Nat Torkington
February 24, 2011

Charles -- a debugging proxy that lets a developer view all HTTP and SSL traffic between their machine and the Internet. (via Andy Baio's excellent "How I Indexed The Daily) The Rise and Rise of Mobile Broadband -- the Blackberry is now the standard measure of traffic, apparently. The outcome is simple - Cisco estimates that global mobile data...

An era in which to curate skills: report from Tools of Change conference

By Andy Oram
February 18, 2011

Three days of intensive discussion about the current state of publishing wrapped up last night in New York City. Research and sales, authoring and curation, are all still important skills.

An era in which to curate skills: report from Tools of Change conference

By Andy Oram
February 18, 2011

Three days of intensive discussion about the current state of publishing wrapped up last night in New York City. Research and sales, authoring and curation, are all still important skills.

An era in which to curate skills: report from Tools of Change conference

By Andy Oram
February 18, 2011

Three days of intensive discussion about the current state of publishing wrapped up last night in New York City. Research and sales, authoring and curation, are all still important skills.

An era in which to curate skills: report from Tools of Change conference

By Andy Oram
February 18, 2011

Three days of intensive discussion about the current state of publishing wrapped up last night in New York City. Research and sales, authoring and curation, are all still important skills.

ePayments Week: Does Apple deserve a bigger bite?

ePayments Week: Does Apple deserve a bigger bite?
By David Sims
February 17, 2011

Apple's plan to charge publishers 30% of in-app subscriptions was undercut by Google's 10% One Pass program the next day. But is Apple's service worth a premium? Plus: Giant companies mull a mobile payment standard and Bling Nation shifts its website to Facebook.

Australian Whole-of-Government Common Operating Environment Policy and OOXML - AGIMO boots OpenOffice but Libre Office reboots OpenOffice?

By Rick Jelliffe
January 28, 2011

Two big stories this week: AGIMO's COE and LibreOffice. AGIMO is the Australian Government Information Management Office. They are the ones who set policies such as requiring govt web page meet the W3C's WCAG 2.0 guidelines for accessibility, or that...

Developer Week in Review

By James Turner
October 20, 2010

This week, Microsoft loses their chief architect, Apple continues to own the news cycle, the BSA tries to put the kibosh on open standards, and a well-known language reaches a milestone.

A Non-Technical Field Guide to the HTML 5 Family

By Jon Reid
September 29, 2010

Part Two: The Newest Family Members In my last entry, I wrote about the HTML 5 family and its history. This entry will be about the latest incarnation of the standards, some of the new features, and why they're important....

A Non-Technical Field Guide to the HTML 5 Family

By Jon Reid
September 14, 2010

HTML 5 is on everyone's mind these days, most notably is the Flash vs. HTML 5 debate which has garnered industry-wide attention. There's a lot of information about HTML 5 out on the web, but much of that information is technical and geared towards developers and their questions...

Deliberate non-conformances in XML Schema implementations - Really, how could it be any other way?

By Rick Jelliffe
August 6, 2010

From SAXON's Michael Kay, on the XML-DEV mail list today: On interoperability, there are at least three reasons why you might get different results from different processors. One is because the specification leaves the behaviour of certain things implementation-defined (for...

OpenStack offered as Rackspace's answer to calls for an open cloud

OpenStack offered as Rackspace's answer to calls for an open cloud
By Andy Oram
July 20, 2010

When Rackspace and NASA announced OpenStack, I thought of it as either a PR or yet another attempt to impose some pet project on the world as a standard. But it may actually a newsworthy intervention into the furiously evolving cloud industry.

Land of long white cloud sees through the fog - An end to embedded software patents

By Rick Jelliffe
July 16, 2010

Dawn comes first in New Zealand! From the New Zealand governments Beehive.govt.nz website: Commerce Minister Simon Power has instructed the Intellectual Property Office of New Zealand (IPONZ) to develop guidelines to allow inventions that contain embedded software to be patented....


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