Tags > science

Four short links: 15 November 2011 - Internet Asthma Care, C Fulltext, Citizen Science, and Mozilla

By Nat Torkington
November 15, 2011

Cost-Effectiveness of Internet-Based Self-Management Compared with Usual Care in Asthma (PLoSone) -- Internet-based self-management of asthma can be as effective as current asthma care and costs are similar. Apache Lucy -- full-text search engine library written in C and targeted at dynamic languages. It is a "loose C" port of Apache Lucene™, a search engine library for Java. The...

Four short links: 14 November 2011 - Science Hack Days, YouTube Doggy Science, Antisocial Software, and Mind Reading with Wikipedia

By Nat Torkington
November 14, 2011

Science Hack Day SF Videos (justin.tv) -- the demos from Science Hack Day SF. The journey of a thousand miles starts with a Hack Day. A Cross-Sectional Study of Canine Tail-Chasing and Human Responses to It, Using a Free Video-Sharing Website (PLoSone) -- Approximately one third of tail-chasing dogs showed clinical signs, including habitual (daily or "all the time")...

Visualization of the Week: 138 Years of Popular Science - Data artist Jer Thorp visualized the Popular Science archive.

Visualization of the Week: 138 Years of Popular Science - Data artist Jer Thorp visualized the Popular Science archive.
By Audrey Watters
November 11, 2011

This week's visualization shows how data artist Jer Thorp depicted more than a century's worth of content from Popular Science.

Four short links: 9 November 2011 - Social Graph Dismissed, Anonymous Explained, Resistance Explored, and Android Improved

By Nat Torkington
November 9, 2011

The Social Graph is Neither -- Maciej Ceglowski nails it. Imagine the U.S. Census as conducted by direct marketers - that's the social graph. Social networks exist to sell you crap. The icky feeling you get when your friend starts to talk to you about Amway, or when you spot someone passing out business cards at a birthday party,...

Four short links: 4 November 2011 - Science Repository, Dancing Robots, Retro Jobs, and Bluetooth Bow

By Nat Torkington
November 4, 2011

Beethoven's Open Repository of Research (RocketHub) -- open repository funded in a Kickstarter-type way. First crowdfunding project I've given $$$ to. KeepOff (GitHub) -- open source project built around hacking KeepOn Interactive Dancing Robots. (via Chris Spurgeon) Steve Jobs One-on-One (ComputerWorld) -- interesting glimpse of the man himself in an oral history project recording made during the NeXT years....

The number one trait you want in a data scientist - DJ Patil on the traits of data scientists and how data science will evolve within companies.

The number one trait you want in a data scientist - DJ Patil on the traits of data scientists and how data science will evolve within companies.
By Audrey Watters
November 3, 2011

DJ Patil, data scientist in residence at Greylock Partners, discusses the key trait data scientists need and the obstacles data scientists face within organizations.

Four short links: 31 October 2011 - Solitude and Leadership, Data Repository, Copyright History, and Open Source Audio

By Nat Torkington
October 31, 2011

Solitude and Leadership -- an amazing essay on the value of managing one's information diet. Far more than yet another Carr/Morozov "the Internet is making us dumb!!" hate on short-form content, this is an eloquent exposition of the need for long-form thoughts. I find for myself that my first thought is never my best thought. My first thought is...

Four short links: 28 October 2011 - Open Access, Retro Crypto, Open Source Q&A, and Music Visualization

By Nat Torkington
October 28, 2011

Open Access Week -- a global event promoting Open Access as a new norm in scholarship and research. The Copiale Cipher -- cracking a historical code with computers. Details in the paper: The book describes the initiation of "DER CANDIDAT" into a secret society, some functions of which are encoded with logograms. (via Discover Magazine) Coordino -- open source...

Four short links: 27 October 2011 - Javascript Coverage, Cheap Tablets, Open Archive, ACTA vs TPP

By Nat Torkington
October 27, 2011

ScriptCover -- open source Javascript coverage tool. Using the $35 Tablet from India (VentureBeat) -- nice description of the tablet and what it's like to use. What makes the Aakash tablet different is that its creators didn't strive for perfection. Instead, the emphasis was on getting the product into the market quickly so it could be adopted, tinkered with,...

Four short links: 26 October 2011 - CPAN's Sweet 0x10, Social Reading, Questioning Polls, and 3D Manufacturing

By Nat Torkington
October 26, 2011

CPAN Turns 0x10 -- sixteenth anniversary of the creation of the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network. Now holds 480k objects. Subtext -- social bookreading by adding chat, links, etc. to a book. I haven't tried the implementation yet but I've wanted this for years. (Just haven't wanted to jump into the cesspool of rights negotiations enough to actually build it...

BioCurious opens its lab in Sunnyvale, CA - Inside a new DIY bio lab.

BioCurious opens its lab in Sunnyvale, CA - Inside a new DIY bio lab.
By Andy Oram
October 16, 2011

BioCurious has officially opened its first lab, with a mission of involving ordinary people off the street in biological experiments, using hands-on learning, and promoting open source hardware and software.

Four short links: 14 October 2011 - Relativity in Short Words, Set Math, Design Inspiration, and Internet of Things

By Nat Torkington
October 14, 2011

Theory of Relativity in Words of Four Letters or Less -- this does just what it says, and well too. I like it, as you may too. At the end, you may even know more than you do now. Effective Set Reconciliation Without Prior Context (PDF) -- paper on using Bloom filters to do set union (deduplication) efficiently. Useful...

Four short links: 26 September 2011 - Design and Engineering Culture, Homemade Love, Code Tools, and Cyberbullying

By Nat Torkington
September 26, 2011

BERG London Week 328 -- we're a design company, with a design culture built over 6 years, yet we're having to cultivate a new engineering culture that sits within it and alongside it, and the two have different crystal grains. It's good that they do—engineering through a design process can feel harried and for some projects that does not...

Strata Week: Crowdsourcing and gaming spur a scientific breakthrough - Fold.it users make a scientific breakthrough, Twitter open sources real-time processing tool, Google faces a senate hearing.

Strata Week: Crowdsourcing and gaming spur a scientific breakthrough - Fold.it users make a scientific breakthrough, Twitter open sources real-time processing tool, Google faces a senate hearing.
By Audrey Watters
September 22, 2011

In this week's data news: Fold.it gamers help with HIV research, Twitter eyes data analytics, and Google testifies before the Senate.

Top Stories: September 5-9, 2011 - Hacking a Texas city, RIP Michael S. Hart, and the bar is raised for open gov visualizations.

Top Stories: September 5-9, 2011 - Hacking a Texas city, RIP Michael S. Hart, and the bar is raised for open gov visualizations.
By Mac Slocum
September 9, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: Christopher Groskopf explained how he's going to hack a Texas city, Nat Torkington said goodbye to Project Gutenberg founder Michael S. Hart, and the value of government data visualizations reached a new standard thanks to LookatCook.com.

The boffins and the luvvies - The names may change, but the friction between science and art goes back centuries.

The boffins and the luvvies - The names may change, but the friction between science and art goes back centuries.
By Doug Hill
September 8, 2011

Whether we're discussing ancients vs. moderns, scientists vs. poets, or the latest variant, computer science vs. humanities, the debate between science and art is persistent and quite old.

Just published: "Big Data Now" - "Big Data Now" is a free collection of Radar's data coverage.

Just published:
By Mac Slocum
September 1, 2011

O'Reilly has released "Big Data Now," a free anthology that taps into the data themes and coverage featured on Radar over the last year.

Four short links: 1 September 2011 - Android Charting, Illusion of Insight, Mapping API, and Science Storytelling

By Nat Torkington
September 1, 2011

A Chart Engine -- Android charting engine. The Illusion of Asymmetric Insight -- we are driven to create and form groups and then believe others are wrong just because they are others. Urban Mapping API -- add rich geographic data to web and non-web applications. Tell Us A Story, Victoria -- a university science story-telling contest....

New tools and techniques for applying climate data - A workshop shows early signs of climate scientists and data scientists coming together.

By Michael Ferrari
August 31, 2011

Climate cycles, machine learning and improved models were all part of the discussions at the first New York Academy of Sciences Workshop on Climate Informatics.

Why the finance world should care about big data and data science - Roger Magoulas on data's potential to improve finance systems and create new businesses.

Why the finance world should care about big data and data science - Roger Magoulas on data's potential to improve finance systems and create new businesses.
By Mac Slocum
August 31, 2011

O'Reilly director of market research Roger Magoulas discusses the intersection of big data and finance, and the opportunities this pairing creates for financial experts.

The application of real-time data - Hilary Mason on how Bitly applies the Internet's real-time data.

By Audrey Watters
August 29, 2011

In this interview, Bitly chief scientist and Strata speaker Hilary Mason discusses the application of real-time data and the difference between analytics and data science.

Top Stories: August 22-26, 2011 - The legacy of Steve Jobs, the sweet spot between data and art, and a deep dive into Google+

Top Stories: August 22-26, 2011 - The legacy of Steve Jobs, the sweet spot between data and art, and a deep dive into Google+
By Mac Slocum
August 26, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: Mark Sigal examined the legacy of Steve Jobs, we talked with New York Times data artist Jer Thorp about the commingling of data, art and science, and Tim O'Reilly and Google VP of Product Bradley Horowitz discussed Google+, data portability and more.

A student interview gives insight into how OST works.

By Trish Gray
August 26, 2011

Having enrolled in a whopping 19 courses and completed 12 so far, Student of the Month Charles Daly knows a thing or two about the O'Reilly School of Technology. Read on to get a feel of what it's like to be an OST student:

The nexus of data, art and science is where the interesting stuff happens - Data artist Jer Thorpe on working at the New York Times and the aesthetics of data.

The nexus of data, art and science is where the interesting stuff happens - Data artist Jer Thorpe on working at the New York Times and the aesthetics of data.
By Audrey Watters
August 23, 2011

Jer Thorp, data artist in residence at the New York Time, sits at the crossroads of data, art and science. Here he discusses his work at the Times and, more broadly, how aesthetics shape our understanding of data.

Top Stories: August 15-19, 2011 - The meat-to-math ratio, Chicago embraces open government, and data science influences social science.

Top Stories: August 15-19, 2011 - The meat-to-math ratio, Chicago embraces open government, and data science influences social science.
By Mac Slocum
August 19, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: We learned how smart companies apply the "meat-to-math ratio," Chicago's commitment to open data and open government was explored, and we looked at how data science is shaping social science.

Four short links: 19 August 2011 - Javascript Scraping, Molecular Visualization, Document Conversion, and Humanities Digitization

By Nat Torkington
August 19, 2011

pjscrape -- Javascript scraping framework. (via Joshua Schachter) CanvasMol -- molecular visualization in HTML5. (via Aimee Whitcroft) Docvert 1.5 -- new version of the code to convert Office files to DocBook and HTML. Seven Important Digitization Projects in the Humanities (BrainPickings) -- check out The Republic of Letters from Stanford, a very nifty visualization of relationships between Enlightenment thinkers....

Opening government, the Chicago way - Chicago looks to use its data, developers and citizens to become a smarter city.

Opening government, the Chicago way - Chicago looks to use its data, developers and citizens to become a smarter city.
By Alex Howard
August 17, 2011

Sustainability and analytics are guiding Chicago's open data and app contest efforts. The city's approach offers important insights to governments at all levels.

Data science is a pipeline between academic disciplines - Drew Conway on how data science intersects with research and the social sciences.

Data science is a pipeline between academic disciplines - Drew Conway on how data science intersects with research and the social sciences.
By Audrey Watters
August 16, 2011

Strata speaker and PhD candidate Drew Conway discusses how data science is influencing the processes and outcomes of academic research in the social sciences.

Four short links: 16 August 2011 - Doctorovian Keynote, Bagcheck Tech, Render Webpages, and Science Reading

By Nat Torkington
August 16, 2011

Cory Doctorow's SIGGRAPH Keynote (BoingBoing) -- the latest from Cory on reforming copyright. Bagcheck Technology -- great list of services and systems used by the Bagcheck folks. Berkelium -- library to render webpages via Google's Chromium web browser. (via Joshua Schachter) Sci Foo Reading List -- Edd Dumbill shared his reading list from Science Foo Camp....

Four short links: 15 August 2011 - Illusions, Crowdsourcing, Translations, and Favourite Numbers

By Nat Torkington
August 15, 2011

Illusion Contest -- every year they run an open contest for optical illusions. Every year new perceptual illusions are discovered, exploiting hitherto unresearched areas of our brain's functioning. Citizen Science Alliance -- the team behind GalaxyZoo, who help other researchers in need of crowdsourcing support. Ancient Lives -- crowdsourced translation and reconstruction of ancient papyri from Oxyrhyncus, already found...

Strata Week: Twitter's coming Storm, data and maps from the London riots - Twitter plans to open source its Hadoop-like data processing tool, Storm.

By Audrey Watters
August 11, 2011

This week's data news includes Twitter's plans to open-source its Hadoop-like data processing tool and some of the various mapping and real-time data efforts tracking the London riots.

Top Stories: August 1-5, 2011 - Our fragile modern systems, the G+ Effect, and science gets democratized.

By Mac Slocum
August 5, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: The fragility of our modern systems was made clear to Tim O'Reilly during a recent trip, Jonathan Reichental defined the G+ Effect, and we learned what can happen when the barriers to scientific exploration come down.

Four short links: 4 August 2011 - Personal Video, Open Source Sensors, Bad Science No Biscuit, and Playing the Odds

By Nat Torkington
August 4, 2011

Skate Through NYC With A GoPro -- this is the first I've seen of the GoPro cameras, which are two dimensions of clever. First, it's video instrumentation for activities where we haven't had this before. Second, it's clever specialization of the Flip-style solid-state recording videocameras. (via Infovore) Pulse Sensor -- open source heart rate sensor project on Kickstarter. DIY...

Data and the human-machine connection - Opera Solutions CEO Arnab Gupta says human plus machine has always trumped human vs machine.

Data and the human-machine connection - Opera Solutions CEO Arnab Gupta says human plus machine has always trumped human vs machine.
By Julie Steele
August 2, 2011

Managing data and extracting meaning require new approaches, new education, and even a new language. Opera Solutions CEO Arnab Gupta discusses each of these areas in the following interview.

Four short links: 2 August 2011 - UAV Sniffing, Wicked Problems, Online Classes, and Whisky Science

By Nat Torkington
August 2, 2011

DIY UAVs for Cyber-Warface -- aerial drone that poses as celltower, sniffs wifi, cracks passwords, and looks badass. The photo should be captioned "IM IN UR SKIES, SNIFFIN UR GMAIL SESSION COOKIEZ." (via Bryan O'Sullivan) Wicked Problems (Karl Schroeder) -- a category of problem which, once you read the definition, you recognize everywhere. 5. Every solution to a wicked...

Science hacks chip away at the old barriers to entry - Access to data and tools is putting scientific exploration into anyone's hands.

Science hacks chip away at the old barriers to entry - Access to data and tools is putting scientific exploration into anyone's hands.
By Audrey Watters
August 1, 2011

How can opening access to scientific data, equipment and lab space spur innovation? BioCurious' Eri Gentry and Ariel Waldman from Spacehack.org share a few ideas.

Science Hack Day goes global - A new grant will help Science Hack Day set up shop around the world.

Science Hack Day goes global - A new grant will help Science Hack Day set up shop around the world.
By Mac Slocum
July 27, 2011

The just-announced Science Hack Day Ambassador program will bring 10 people to Science Hack Day San Francisco 2011. The idea is to spread the model to more cities and countries.

Four short links: 14 July 2011 - Microchip Archaeology, OSM Map Library, Feedback Loops for Public Expenditure, and Mind-reading Big Data

By Nat Torkington
July 14, 2011

Digging into Technology's Past -- stories of the amazing work behind the visual 6502 project and how they reconstructed and simulated the legendary 6502 chip. To analyze and then preserve the 6502, James treated it like the site of an excavation. First, he needed to expose the actual chip by removing its packaging of essentially “billiard-ball plastic.” He eroded...

Who are the OSCON data geeks? - OSCON's co-chairs dig into the OSCON Data program.

Who are the OSCON data geeks? - OSCON's co-chairs dig into the OSCON Data program.
By Sarah Novotny
July 13, 2011

OSCON's co-chairs discuss sessions in the OSCON Data conference and the people who might be interested in the associated topics.

Four short links: 11 July 2011 - Scammers Banks, DX, Scientific MTurk, and Teaching CS in Javascript

By Nat Torkington
July 11, 2011

Which Banks are Enabling Fake AV Scams? -- some nice detective work to reveal the mechanisms and actors who take money from the marks in AV scams. (via BoingBoing) Developer Experience -- new site from ex-Google developer evangelist Pamela Fox, talking about the experience that API- and software-offering companies give to the developers they're wooing. Pros and Cons of...

Four short links: 8 July 2011 - DIY Bio Hardware, App Store Numbers, Open Hardware Repository, and Science Startups

By Nat Torkington
July 8, 2011

OpenPCR Shipping -- A PCR machine is basically a copy machine for DNA. It is essential for most work with DNA, things like exposing fraud at a sushi restaurant, diagnosing diseases including HIV and H1N1, or exploring your own genome. The guy who discovered the PCR process earned a Nobel Prize in 1993, and OpenPCR is now the first...

Four short links: 15 June 2011 - Hacker Fun, GameBoy in Javascript, Global Mobile Data Prices, and Shackled Science

By Nat Torkington
June 15, 2011

HackerTyper -- finally, a way to type like they do in the movies. (via Mark Jason Dominus) GameBoy Emulator in Javascript -- I continue to be astonished at what can now be emulated/written in Javascript. GameBoys are classics for retro game programming and there are plenty of toolkits for creating games for desktop systems. I wonder how long until...

Four short links: 3 June 2011 - Distributed Drug Money, Science Game, Beautiful Machine Learning, and Stream Event Processing

By Nat Torkington
June 3, 2011

Silk Road (Gawker) -- Tor-delivered "web" site that is like an eBay for drugs, currency is Bitcoins. Jeff Garzik, a member of the Bitcoin core development team, says in an email that bitcoin is not as anonymous as the denizens of Silk Road would like to believe. He explains that because all Bitcoin transactions are recorded in a public...

Strata Week: A call for open science data - Science needs to open up, the murky ownership of UK train data, hacking a Texas town.

Strata Week: A call for open science data - Science needs to open up, the murky ownership of UK train data, hacking a Texas town.
By Audrey Watters
May 19, 2011

In the latest Strata Week: London's Royal Society wants scientists need to improve their data sharing habits, UK train data is limited by murky ownership, a man is on a mission to hack a Texas town, and a few suggestions for your summer reading list.

Four short links: 17 May 2011 - Sorting Out 9/11, Tagging Text, Unlocking Scientific Publishing, and Internet Archive's Meatspace Branch

By Nat Torkington
May 17, 2011

Sorting Out 9/11 (New Yorker) -- the thorniest problem for the 9/11 memorial was the ordering of the names. Computer science to the rescue! Tagger -- Python library for extracting tags (statistically significant words or phrases) from a piece of text. Free Science, One Paper at a Time (Wired) -- Jonathan Eisen's attempt to collect and distribute his father's...

Why you can't really anonymize your data - It's time to accept and work within the limits of data anonymization.

By Pete Warden
May 17, 2011

Because we now have so much data at our disposal, any dataset with a decent amount of information can be matched against identifiable public records. To keep datasets available, we must acknowledge that foolproof anonymization is an illusion.

Four short links: 13 May 2011 - Bogus Analysis x 2, API Classifications, and Expansive Text

By Nat Torkington
May 13, 2011

Mathematical Intimidation: Driven by the Data (PDF) -- excellent article from Notices of the American Mathematical Society about the flaws in "value-added modelling", the latest fad whereby data about students' results in different classes are analysed to identify the effect of each teacher. People recognize that tests are an imperfect measure of educational success, but when sophisticated mathematics is...

Why the term "data science" is flawed but useful - Counterpoints to four common data science criticisms.

By Pete Warden
May 9, 2011

While formal boundaries and professional criteria for "data science" remain undefined, here's why we should keep using the term.

Four short links: 3 May 2011 - Sentiment Analysis, Word Frequency, Design Process, and Plant Recognition

By Nat Torkington
May 3, 2011

SentiWordNet -- WordNet with hints as to sentiment of particular terms, for use in sentiment analysis. (via Matt Biddulph) Word Frequency Lists and Dictionaries -- also for text analysis. This site contains what we believe is the most accurate frequency data of English. It contains word frequency lists of the top 60,000 words (lemmas) in English, collocates lists (looking...

Four short links: 28 April 2011 - Mobile Gambling, Science Copyright, Failure of Advertising, and Data Businesses

By Nat Torkington
April 28, 2011

Mobile Gaming Device -- Cantor Gaming (division of Wall St's Cantor Fitzgerald) has released a Windows Mobile device to make live bets during a game. Real-time isn't just for trading, it's also for sports gambling too. Copyright Isn't Just Hurting Creativity, It's Killing Science (Video) -- Larry Lessig tackles science. I've been grappling with technology transfer and the commercialization...


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