Tags > programming

Six API predictions for 2012 - In the year to come, APIs will continue to transform into core business tools.

By Anant Jhingran
December 19, 2011

Among the key API trends to watch in 2012: enterprise APIs will go mainstream, data-centric APIs will become common, and APIs will need to be optimized for mobile apps and developers.

Four short links: 19 December 2011 - Version Control, Web-based ID, Mobile Design, and Node.js Tools

By Nat Torkington
December 19, 2011

The History of Version Control (Francis Irving) -- concise history of the key advances in managing source code versions. Worth it just for the delicious apposition of "history" and "version control". BrowserID -- Mozilla's authentication solution. BrowserID aims to provide a secure way of proving your identity to servers across the Internet, without having to create separate usernames and...

Developer Week in Review: HP sets webOS free - HP wraps webOS up with a bow, Oracle lands in court, and one lucky coder escapes justice.

Developer Week in Review: HP sets webOS free - HP wraps webOS up with a bow, Oracle lands in court, and one lucky coder escapes justice.
By James Turner
December 16, 2011

This week, we had heartwarming stories of one corporation's generous donation, one corporation fighting a lawsuit alleging extortion, and one company billing time for the man who wasn't there.

Four short links: 2 December 2011 - Changing Education, Netflix Open Source, LLVM3, and Open Sourced Transcription Tool

By Nat Torkington
December 2, 2011

Challenges in Teaching Biology -- everything that Alison says about teaching biology is true of teaching computer science. Read, learn, evolve. First Open Source Netflix Projects Released -- Curator makes Apache Zookeeper easier to use. (via Ian Kallen) LLVM3 Released -- these are key tools for reliable development of fast systems. I think of it as JVM without the...

Could closed core prove a more robust model than open core?

By Andy Oram
December 1, 2011

The closed core model requires businesses to determine where their unique value lies and to be generous in offering the public extra code that supports their infrastructure but does not drive revenue. This model may prove more robust and lasting than open core, which attracts companies occupying minor positions in their industries.

Four short links: 29 November 2011 - Reconstructing People, Digital Preservation Costs, Open Source Everything, and Coding Education

By Nat Torkington
November 29, 2011

Reconstructing My Grandfather (JP Rangaswami) -- this is how libraries will be used in the future, by ordinary people (i.e., not professional researchers) reconstructing their families. See my library essay for more thoughts on this. Physical Conservation vs Digitisation for Preservation (Leeds) -- they chose deliberately compromised paper materials (acid-riddled paper) and found that it still would take 50...

Four short links: 25 November 2011 - MIND CONTROL COPTERS!, Better Security, Ratings Systems, and Lightweight Reference

By Nat Torkington
November 25, 2011

Continuous Three-Dimensional Control of a Virtual Helicopter Using a Motor Imagery Based Brain-Computer Interface (PLOSone) -- direct brain control is becoming a reality, tiny step by tiny step. Also: HELICOPTERS! Forward Secrecy for HTTPS -- Google contributed a better HTTPS cipher suite to OpenSSL, one that doesn't share keys between conversations. Yay the Goog for giving back. Ratings Systems...

Developer Week in Review: Adobe sends Flex to Apache - Flex goes FLOSS, some cheap Pi, and brain on a chip.

Developer Week in Review: Adobe sends Flex to Apache - Flex goes FLOSS, some cheap Pi, and brain on a chip.
By James Turner
November 18, 2011

Adobe just gave away Flex, a new single-board computer might dethrone Arduino as the tool of choice for makers, and researchers bring us a step closer to our robotic overlords.

Why embedded systems are "terrifyingly important" - Embedded systems engineer Elecia White on race cars, smart dust, and learning on the fly.

Why embedded systems are
By Gretchen Giles
November 16, 2011

Author and embedded systems engineer Elecia White discusses the state of embedded systems and what lies ahead (hint: distributed intelligence and microdots).

Helping educators find the right stuff - The Learning Registry looks to crack the education resource discovery problem.

Helping educators find the right stuff - The Learning Registry looks to crack the education resource discovery problem.
By Marie Bjerede
November 15, 2011

There are countless repositories of high-quality content available to teachers, but it is still nearly impossible to find content to use with a particular lesson plan for a particular grade aligned to particular standards. That's where the Department of Education's new Learning Registry comes in.

Four short links: 15 November 2011 - Internet Asthma Care, C Fulltext, Citizen Science, and Mozilla

By Nat Torkington
November 15, 2011

Cost-Effectiveness of Internet-Based Self-Management Compared with Usual Care in Asthma (PLoSone) -- Internet-based self-management of asthma can be as effective as current asthma care and costs are similar. Apache Lucy -- full-text search engine library written in C and targeted at dynamic languages. It is a "loose C" port of Apache Lucene™, a search engine library for Java. The...

Developer Week in Review: Adobe raises the white flag on mobile Flash - Adobe immobilized mobile Flash, Eclipse joins the vanity language fad, and one man asks if brainteasers really find good program

Developer Week in Review: Adobe raises the white flag on mobile Flash - Adobe immobilized mobile Flash, Eclipse joins the vanity language fad, and one man asks if brainteasers really find good program
By James Turner
November 10, 2011

Flash isn't dead, but Adobe is checking into hospice options. Eclipse adds another language to the list of ones almost but not exactly like Java. And how do you find good programmers? Probably not with brainteasers.

Four short links: 10 November 2011 - Access Over Ownership, Retro Programming, Replaying Writing, and Wearable Sensors

By Nat Torkington
November 10, 2011

Steve Case and His Companies (The Atlantic) -- Maybe you see three random ideas. Case and his team saw three bets that paid off thanks to a new Web economy that promotes power in numbers and access over ownership. "Access over ownership" is a phrase that resonated. (via Walt Mossberg) Back to the Future -- teaching kids to program...

Why developers should enter health IT contests - Developers can make money writing code that makes patients safer.

By Fred Trotter
November 4, 2011

Working on software that addresses patient safety issues is one of the few ways that a software developer can impact quality of life rather than convenience of life. Health contests are fun enough that you might even forget that you're changing the world.

Four short links: 4 November 2011 - Science Repository, Dancing Robots, Retro Jobs, and Bluetooth Bow

By Nat Torkington
November 4, 2011

Beethoven's Open Repository of Research (RocketHub) -- open repository funded in a Kickstarter-type way. First crowdfunding project I've given $$$ to. KeepOff (GitHub) -- open source project built around hacking KeepOn Interactive Dancing Robots. (via Chris Spurgeon) Steve Jobs One-on-One (ComputerWorld) -- interesting glimpse of the man himself in an oral history project recording made during the NeXT years....

Developer Week in Review: The hijacking of an insulin pump - Medical devices are remotely hacked, Google Maps get a price tag, and Linus Torvalds really doesn't like a certain language.

Developer Week in Review: The hijacking of an insulin pump - Medical devices are remotely hacked, Google Maps get a price tag, and Linus Torvalds really doesn't like a certain language.
By James Turner
November 3, 2011

If you own an insulin pump, someone out there might have a hack with your name on it. Google decides to make high-volume Maps API users pony up some cash, and the creator of Linux goes after C++.

How I automated my writing career - A former author uses data and software to take the tedium out of some kinds of writing.

How I automated my writing career - A former author uses data and software to take the tedium out of some kinds of writing.
By Robbie Allen
November 3, 2011

You scale content businesses by increasing the number of people who create the content ... or so conventional wisdom says. Learn how a former author is using software to simulate and expand human-quality writing.

Four short links: 2 November 2011 - Deployment, Image Distribution, Open Source Sharing, and Soulless Programming

By Nat Torkington
November 2, 2011

Thoughts on Web Application Deployment (OmniTI) -- if your web site is your business, this stuff is critical and it's under-taught. Everyone learns it on the job, and there's not a lot of standardization between gigs. Github Enterprise -- GitHub Enterprise is delivered in the industry-standard OVF format, which means you'll be able to run it on virtualization layers...

Four short links: 1 November 2011 - Code Bloat, Chinese Startups, Font Fun, and Businesses Embracing Open Source

By Nat Torkington
November 1, 2011

Things Turbo Pascal is Smaller Than -- next time you're bragging about your efficient code, spare a thought for the Pascal IDE and compiler that lived in 39,731 bytes. This list of more bloated things is hilarious. The China Startup Report (Slideshare) -- interesting to see the low salary comes with expectation of bonuses but little interest in equity...

On Dennis Ritchie: A conversation with Brian Kernighan - Brian Kernighan discusses Dennis Ritchie.

By Andy Oram
October 30, 2011

I talked on Friday with Brian Kernighan about Dennis Ritchie, who sadly passed away two weeks ago at the age of 70. To a large extent, Ritchie completed what he started.

Dennis Ritchie's legacy of elegantly useful tools - We need more people who share Dennis Ritchie's spirit.

By Mike Loukides
October 29, 2011

"UNIX is basically a simple operating system, but you have to be a genius to understand the simplicity," Dennis Ritchie once said. It's true, and we need more geniuses who share his spirit.

What's New in CFEngine 3: Making System Administration Even More Powerful

By Andy Oram
October 28, 2011

CFEngine is a surprisingly flexible and fast tool for distributed configuration management. A new version was released this week.

Four short links: 28 October 2011 - Open Access, Retro Crypto, Open Source Q&A, and Music Visualization

By Nat Torkington
October 28, 2011

Open Access Week -- a global event promoting Open Access as a new norm in scholarship and research. The Copiale Cipher -- cracking a historical code with computers. Details in the paper: The book describes the initiation of "DER CANDIDAT" into a secret society, some functions of which are encoded with logograms. (via Discover Magazine) Coordino -- open source...

Four short links: 27 October 2011 - Javascript Coverage, Cheap Tablets, Open Archive, ACTA vs TPP

By Nat Torkington
October 27, 2011

ScriptCover -- open source Javascript coverage tool. Using the $35 Tablet from India (VentureBeat) -- nice description of the tablet and what it's like to use. What makes the Aakash tablet different is that its creators didn't strive for perfection. Instead, the emphasis was on getting the product into the market quickly so it could be adopted, tinkered with,...

What's on the agenda for Velocity Europe - Steve Souders previews Velocity Europe 2011.

What's on the agenda for Velocity Europe - Steve Souders previews Velocity Europe 2011.
By Steve Souders
October 27, 2011

Velocity co-chair Steve Souders highlights a number of Velocity Europe speakers and sessions that caught his attention.

"Revolution in the Valley," revisited - Andy Hertzfeld on the Macintosh's early days and its long-term legacy.

By Mac Slocum
October 26, 2011

With "Revolution in the Valley" making its paperback debut and the work of Steve Jobs fresh in people's minds, we checked in with Andy Hertzfeld to discuss the legacy of the first Macintosh.

Four short links: 26 October 2011 - CPAN's Sweet 0x10, Social Reading, Questioning Polls, and 3D Manufacturing

By Nat Torkington
October 26, 2011

CPAN Turns 0x10 -- sixteenth anniversary of the creation of the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network. Now holds 480k objects. Subtext -- social bookreading by adding chat, links, etc. to a book. I haven't tried the implementation yet but I've wanted this for years. (Just haven't wanted to jump into the cesspool of rights negotiations enough to actually build it...

Dennis Ritchie Day - On 10/30/11 let's remember the contributions of computing pioneer Dennis Ritchie.

Dennis Ritchie Day - On 10/30/11 let's remember the contributions of computing pioneer Dennis Ritchie.
By Tim O'Reilly
October 26, 2011

I don't have the convening power of a governor, but for those of us around the world who care, I hereby declare this Sunday, October 30 to be Dennis Ritchie Day.

Developer Week in Review: These things always happen in threes - The industry loses a third giant, why the GPL hurts FL/OSS, and Steve Jobs goes to the movies.

Developer Week in Review: These things always happen in threes - The industry loses a third giant, why the GPL hurts FL/OSS, and Steve Jobs goes to the movies.
By James Turner
October 26, 2011

One of the earliest language pioneers, John McCarthy, passed last week. Elsewhere, one developer admits he's using the GPL to force companies to pay him, and the creator of the "West Wing" is on the short list to write the film version of Steve Jobs' life.

Programming Is Fun Again!

By Paul Barry
October 24, 2011

I've been programming in Erlang just for the heck of it!

Four short links: 24 October 2011 - Interactive Web Goodness, Location Based Security, Referer vs https, and Financial Charting

By Nat Torkington
October 24, 2011

Tangle -- open source Javascript library for creating slider-type widgets in web pages, with built-in updating of other web elements. This is fantastic for exploring "what-if" scenarios. Check out the demos. Location-Based Security -- The researchers have created a customized version of Android controlled by a “policy engine” on a server. The Android devices use Bluetooth and near-field communications...

Developer Week in Review: Talking to your phone - Getting serious about Siri, Open Office on the rocks, and Google embraces SQL.

Developer Week in Review: Talking to your phone - Getting serious about Siri, Open Office on the rocks, and Google embraces SQL.
By James Turner
October 21, 2011

This week, we ask if Apple's Siri has more than novelty value, and decide it does. Open Office needs you (or at least your money) to stay afloat, and Google bends to developer pressure and finally adds SQL support to its cloud computing platform.

Developer Week in Review: Two giants fall - Steve Jobs and the App Store, goodbye to Dennis Ritchie, and an internal Google critique goes public.

Developer Week in Review: Two giants fall - Steve Jobs and the App Store, goodbye to Dennis Ritchie, and an internal Google critique goes public.
By James Turner
October 13, 2011

Better late than never, a few thoughts on Steve Jobs. Also, a Unix pioneer leaves us, and Google's dirty laundry is accidentally hung out to dry.

Velocity is coming to Europe - Velocity Europe will be held Nov. 8-9, 2011 in Berlin.

Velocity is coming to Europe - Velocity Europe will be held Nov. 8-9, 2011 in Berlin.
By John Allspaw
October 13, 2011

The Velocity Conference has already turned once exotic topics like database scaling and mobile performance into common knowledge. Now, Velocity is bringing its mix of web ops and performance evangelism to Europe.

Bob Lee on Java references and the state of Java - Square CTO Bob Lee digs into Java's current position.

Bob Lee on Java references and the state of Java - Square CTO Bob Lee digs into Java's current position.
By Timothy M. O'Brien
October 13, 2011

In this short interview from JavaOne, Square CTO Bob Lee discusses Java references and weighs in on the state of Java and the industry.

Four short links: 13 October 2011 - Memorable Indexes, Mobile Sensors, Augmented Reality Toys, and Collaborative Editing

By Nat Torkington
October 13, 2011

Memorable Indexes (Futility Closet) -- Carroll's index also includes entries for "Boots for horizontal weather," "Horizontal rain, boots for," "Rain, horizontal, boots for," and "Weather, horizontal, boots for". They're silly and whimsical, but the underlying problem of making multiple accessible entrypoints into a single corpus of content is with us today and only compounded by the vast growth of...

API Versioning

By George Reese
October 12, 2011

API versioning is something a lot of API designers don't worry about until the second version of their API. API versioning, however, is a controversial subject with strong opinions on both version representation and behavior.

Moneyball for software engineering - How metrics-driven decisions can build better software teams.

Moneyball for software engineering - How metrics-driven decisions can build better software teams.
By Jonathan Alexander
October 10, 2011

Don't dismiss "Moneyball" just because it began in the sports world. Many of the system's metrics-based techniques can also apply to software teams.

Developer Week in Review: Android proves fruitful for Microsoft - More bucks for Microsoft, more horsepower for SPARC, and more votes for ... someone.

Developer Week in Review: Android proves fruitful for Microsoft - More bucks for Microsoft, more horsepower for SPARC, and more votes for ... someone.
By James Turner
September 29, 2011

Samsung agrees to pay Microsoft royalties for Android use. Elsewhere, Oracle keeps the SPARC line alive, and the hackability of voting machines is exposed.

Four short links: 29 September 2011 - Princeton Open Access, Wikipedia Culture, Food for Thought, and Trolled by Sussman

By Nat Torkington
September 29, 2011

Princeton Open Access Report (PDF) -- academics will need written permission to assign copyright of a paper to a journal. Of course, the faculty already had exclusive rights in the scholarly articles they write; the main effect of this new policy is to prevent them from giving away all their rights when they publish in a journal. (via CC...

High voltage music: Behind the scenes with ArcAttack - A look at the technology behind ArcAttack's Tesla coil music show.

High voltage music: Behind the scenes with ArcAttack - A look at the technology behind ArcAttack's Tesla coil music show.
By James Turner
September 27, 2011

ArcAttack creates a maniacal combination of music and mad science that uses half-million-volt Tesla coils to play songs. We caught up with Steve Ward, a recent addition to the ArcAttack crew, at MakerFaire NY and asked him about the technology behind the show.

Four short links: 26 September 2011 - Design and Engineering Culture, Homemade Love, Code Tools, and Cyberbullying

By Nat Torkington
September 26, 2011

BERG London Week 328 -- we're a design company, with a design culture built over 6 years, yet we're having to cultivate a new engineering culture that sits within it and alongside it, and the two have different crystal grains. It's good that they do—engineering through a design process can feel harried and for some projects that does not...

Developer Week in Review: webSOS - HP bails, Oracle fails, and the UK teaches coding (including Wales).

Developer Week in Review: webSOS - HP bails, Oracle fails, and the UK teaches coding (including Wales).
By James Turner
September 23, 2011

WebOS is going to the great operating system repository in the sky, Oracle finds yet another way to peeve developers, and the UK tries to create a new generation of programmers.

Four short links: 22 September 2011 - Feedback, Open Source Marketing, Programming in the Browser, and Twitter's Open Source Realtime Engine

By Nat Torkington
September 22, 2011

Implicit and Explicit Feedback -- for preferences and recommendations, implicit signals (what people clicked on and actually listened to) turn out to be strongly correlated with what they would say if you asked. (via Greg Linden) Pivoting to Monetize Mobile Hyperlocal Social Gamification by Going Viral -- Schuyler Erle's stellar talk at the open source geospatial tools conference. Video,...

Developer Week in Review: iPhone 5 is still on hold - Waiting for iPhone 5, patent madness continues, and the geeks will soon descend on New York.

Developer Week in Review: iPhone 5 is still on hold - Waiting for iPhone 5, patent madness continues, and the geeks will soon descend on New York.
By James Turner
September 9, 2011

We've been waiting for months, but the iPhone 5 is still getting ready. Elsewhere, Google lends HTC some ammo for the patent wars, and the Makers will soon gather in New York.

Four short links: 2 September 2011 - AutoUpdater, Extrapolation Apocalypse, C Compilers, and Authentication

By Nat Torkington
September 2, 2011

Invisible Autoupdater: An App's Best Feature -- Gina Trapani quotes Ben Goodger on Chrome: The idea was to give people a blank window with an autoupdater. If they installed that, over time the blank window would grow into a browser. Crackpot Apocalypse -- analyzing various historical pronouncements of the value of pi, paper author concludes "When πt is 1,...

Developer Week in Review: HP fires up the TouchPad production line one more time - HP's unique take on marketing, James Gosling leaves Google, and Apple continues its tavern distribution program.

Developer Week in Review: HP fires up the TouchPad production line one more time - HP's unique take on marketing, James Gosling leaves Google, and Apple continues its tavern distribution program.
By James Turner
September 1, 2011

The TouchPad's $99 price point proves enticing for consumers and — oddly — HP itself, James Gosling leaves Google, and a possible iPhone 5 leak bears a distinct resemblance to the iPhone 4 leak.

Developer Week in Review: End of an era - Steve Jobs and CmdrTaco resign, iPads and pilots, and a call for Android on the TouchPad

Developer Week in Review: End of an era - Steve Jobs and CmdrTaco resign, iPads and pilots, and a call for Android on the TouchPad
By James Turner
August 26, 2011

This week two major players in geek culture called it quits, more airlines decided to replace dead trees with hot silicon, and the HP TouchPad seeks a new OS for a long-term relationship.

Four short links: 25 August 2011 - Jobs Quotes, Tao of Programming, Distraction, and Canvas Tutorials

By Nat Torkington
August 25, 2011

Steve Jobs's Best Quotes (WSJ Blogs) -- Playboy: We were warned about you: Before this Interview began, someone said we were "about to be snowed by the best."; [Smiling] "We're just enthusiastic about what we do." (via Kevin Rose) The Tao of Programming -- The Tao gave birth to machine language. Machine language gave birth to the assembler. The...

Four short links: 24 August 2011 - STM in Python, Static Web is Back, Cyberwar, and Virtual Language Education

By Nat Torkington
August 24, 2011

STM in PyPy -- a proposal to add software transactional memory to the all-Python Python interpreter as a way of simplifying concurrent programming. I first learned about STM from Haskell's Simon Peyton-Jones at OSCON. (via Nelson Minar) Werner Vogels' Static Web Site on S3 -- nice writeup of the toolchain to publish a web site to static files served...


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