Tags > microsoft

Developer Week in Review: Talking to your phone - Getting serious about Siri, Open Office on the rocks, and Google embraces SQL.

Developer Week in Review: Talking to your phone - Getting serious about Siri, Open Office on the rocks, and Google embraces SQL.
By James Turner
October 21, 2011

This week, we ask if Apple's Siri has more than novelty value, and decide it does. Open Office needs you (or at least your money) to stay afloat, and Google bends to developer pressure and finally adds SQL support to its cloud computing platform.

Developer Week in Review: Android proves fruitful for Microsoft - More bucks for Microsoft, more horsepower for SPARC, and more votes for ... someone.

Developer Week in Review: Android proves fruitful for Microsoft - More bucks for Microsoft, more horsepower for SPARC, and more votes for ... someone.
By James Turner
September 29, 2011

Samsung agrees to pay Microsoft royalties for Android use. Elsewhere, Oracle keeps the SPARC line alive, and the hackability of voting machines is exposed.

Five digital design ideas from Windows 8 - With Metro, it's clear Microsoft has put a lot of thought into touchscreen design.

Five digital design ideas from Windows 8 - With Metro, it's clear Microsoft has put a lot of thought into touchscreen design.
By Peter Meyers
September 20, 2011

Microsoft's Metro interface offers plenty for digital book designers to study. The best part? Whether or not Microsoft actually ships something that matches their demo, designers can benefit from the great thinking they've done.

Four short links: 31 August 2011 - Maps on Android, Security Laws, Trough of Potential, and Enterprise Gamification

By Nat Torkington
August 31, 2011

OSMdroid -- The OpenStreetMapView is a (almost) full/free replacement for Android's MapView class. Also see this tutorial. (via Simon Gianoutsos) 10 Immutable Laws of Security (Microsoft) -- an oldie but a goodie. Law #1: If a bad guy can persuade you to run his program on your computer, it's not your computer anymore. What's in The Trough? (BERG London)...

Developer Week in Review: Mobile's embedded irony - Who really profits from Android sales? And does the world need another source control system?

Developer Week in Review: Mobile's embedded irony - Who really profits from Android sales? And does the world need another source control system?
By James Turner
July 20, 2011

Microsoft profits from Google's toils, why you shouldn't put older developers out to pasture, and a new source control system enters the fray.

Four short links: 18 July 2011 - Organisational Warfare, RTFM, Timezone Shapefile, Microsoft Adventure

By Nat Torkington
July 18, 2011

Organisational Warfare (Simon Wardley) -- notes on the commoditisation of software, with interesting analyses of the positions of some large players. On closer inspection, Salesforce seems to be doing more than just commoditisation with an ILC pattern, as can be clearly seen from Radian's 6 acquisition. They also seem to be operating a tower and moat strategy, i.e. creating...

Developer Week in Review: Start your lawyers! - If the lawsuit fits, the Kinect SDK for Windows arrives, and IPv6 day fails to excite.

Developer Week in Review: Start your lawyers! - If the lawsuit fits, the Kinect SDK for Windows arrives, and IPv6 day fails to excite.
By James Turner
June 22, 2011

The legal community continued to feed off IP disputes among software giants, Microsoft brings the Kinect SDK to Windows, and the web switches IPv6 on for a day, but did anyone notice?

Developer Week in Review: Are .NET programmers going extinct? - Microsoft embraces HTML5, selling a startup at 15, and a new version of Java looms.

Developer Week in Review: Are .NET programmers going extinct? - Microsoft embraces HTML5, selling a startup at 15, and a new version of Java looms.
By James Turner
June 15, 2011

For Microsoft programmers, the week brought fear, uncertainty and doubt regarding their future as an elite class of developers. For a lucky teen, it brought a big paycheck. And for fans of Java, it brought a new version of the popular language one step closer to release.

Four short links: 2 June 2011 - Windows 8, CC YouTube, Corporate Innovation, and Crypto Lifetimes

By Nat Torkington
June 2, 2011

Building Windows 8 - Video #1 (YouTube) -- lovely to see Microsoft's operating system finally leaping past a 2002 look and feel. YouTube Offers Creative Commons Licensing (BoingBoing) -- bravo! Redefiners Capturing Media Growth Dollars -- Anil Dash's corporate presentation about innovating within large (media) companies. The initial slides are money posturing to get the attention of the audience,...

What did Microsoft get for $8.5 billion? - Microsoft shelled out a lot of cash for Skype. Here's what they'll get in return.

What did Microsoft get for $8.5 billion? - Microsoft shelled out a lot of cash for Skype. Here's what they'll get in return.
By Bruce Stewart
May 12, 2011

Why would Microsoft pay so much for a company that doesn't have vastly superior technology or great financials? Here's five reasons.

Four short links: 14 April 2011 - HTML5 Demos, Resilience Engineering, Kinect SDK, and London Nerd Daytrips

By Nat Torkington
April 14, 2011

Chrome Experiment: ArcadeFire -- choreographed windows, interactive flocking, custom rendered maps, real-time compositing, procedural drawing, 3D canvas rendering in HTML5. I have to say that "Built for Google Chrome" at the bottom does turn my stomach, a "this page looks best in Microsoft Internet Explorer" for the 2010s. Resilience Engineering, Part 1 (John Allspaw) -- listing human error as...

Functions are values: explore C# lambda types in Visual Studio

By Andrew Stellman
April 9, 2011

I love that a college professor of mine from long ago, Bob Harper, is tackling the tricky issue of how to teach students about the nature of functions in his new Existential Type blog. His post got me thinking about how you'd go about teaching this concept to a learner—specifically, in my case, a C# learner. I've given it a bit of thought, and here's what I've come up with.

Developer Week in Review - WWDC tickets are here and gone, Gosling goes to Google, and irony at MySQL.

Developer Week in Review - WWDC tickets are here and gone, Gosling goes to Google, and irony at MySQL.
By James Turner
March 30, 2011

If you wanted WWDC tickets, you better have had a fast mouse finger. But if James Gosling wants to go to Google I/O, he'll have an inside track next year. Meanwhile, MySQL needs to practice what they preach, security-wise.

Developer Week in Review - Amazon buys itself a lawsuit, a setting Sun.com, and the new name in databases

Developer Week in Review - Amazon buys itself a lawsuit, a setting Sun.com, and the new name in databases
By James Turner
March 23, 2011

What's in a name? For Amazon's new Appstore, it was a lawsuit. For Oracle's sun.com domain, big money. And would MySQL by any other name smell as sweet?

Inside the e-wars: Barnes & Noble Woes and the Digital Marketplace: A 1-2 Punch

By William Stanek
March 7, 2011

Borders and Barnes & Noble used to be great. The #1 and #2 booksellers in the U.S., building out new superstores like they were going to grow forever. Three years ago, a new Borders was built in Olympia. It's...

Developer Week in Review - Special Jeopardy edition featuring Nokia, MacBook Pro rumors, and Google's Public Data Explorer.

Developer Week in Review - Special Jeopardy edition featuring Nokia, MacBook Pro rumors, and Google's Public Data Explorer.
By James Turner
February 17, 2011

Tired of everyone making "Terminator" or "Matrix" references to Watson's domination of its pitiful human rivals? Well, we go old school with our media references, as we look at Nokia's fickleness, new toys for geeks, and Google's campaign for pretty data.

Four short links: 14 February 2011 - Vesting Incentives, Camera Hacks, iPad Longform Saviour?, and Bogus Science

By Nat Torkington
February 14, 2011

Stephen Elop is a Flight Risk (Silicon Beat) -- a foresight-filled 2008 article that doesn't make Nokia's new CEO look good. A reminder to boards and CEOs that option vesting schedules matter. (via Hacker News) CHDK -- Canon Hack Development Kit gives point-and-shoot Canon digital camera new features like RAW images, motion detection, a USB remote, full control over...

In Google's "glass house," a battle with Bing looms - Commentary: Copy or theft? How Google set themselves up to get Bing’d.

By Mark Sigal
February 3, 2011

Is Google's recent war of words with Microsoft a case of calling a thief out by name, or a matter of pot calling kettle black?

Developer Week in Review - iOS and Android kick out new SDKs, Microsoft head count decreases by one, and the Today Show struggles with the @ symbol

Developer Week in Review - iOS and Android kick out new SDKs, Microsoft head count decreases by one, and the Today Show struggles with the @ symbol
By James Turner
February 2, 2011

Snowed in, we look at new mobile SDKs, old Microsoft employees, and really old video about the Internet.

Adventures in Windows 7 Troubleshooting: Browser-run Apps

By William Stanek
January 20, 2011

Ever had a problem with an app run via a browser window? You're not alone. Here's an entry related to troubleshooting these types of problems using the Sirius XM media player app as an example. The Sirius XM media player...

Chrome's lack of support for H.264 is meaningless for the open web

By RJ Owen
January 14, 2011

Yesterday Google announced that future versions of its Chrome browser would not support the H.264 video codec. This codec is seen by many as the only viable alternative to Flash, and support for it in browsers as the default implementation for the <video> tag was thought to be the future of the web. Google's decision to drop H.264 in favor of WebM yesterday has left many feeling upset, decrying the decision as bad for the open web and a sign that Flash Player will not actually die in the near future, but live on. Yet Google's decision is ultimately unimportant to the open web. There is one simple reason for this: Firefox doesn't support H.264 either.

Developer Week in Review - Unix IP on the block, AT&T can't keep a secret, and take one tablet and call me in the morning

Developer Week in Review - Unix IP on the block, AT&T can't keep a secret, and take one tablet and call me in the morning
By James Turner
January 12, 2011

This week, Unix was for sale, then it wasn't, then it was again. AT&T announced the most poorly kept secret in the history of secrets. And the tablet was all the rage at CES.

Four short links: 11 January 2011 - Microsoft and the Web, URL Library, Optimism, and NoSQL Instruction

By Nat Torkington
January 11, 2011

Dive Into 2010 (Mark Pilgrim) -- Mark wrote a hugely popular guide to HTML5 which was available online and published by O'Reilly. 6% of visitors used some version of Internet Explorer. That is not a typo. The site works fine in Internet Explorer — the site practices what it preaches, and the live examples use a variety of fallbacks...

Developer Year in Review: Operating Systems - Windows 7 outshines Vista (not hard), Linux still in peril (hard luck), and the Mac App Store launches (hard sell)

Developer Year in Review: Operating Systems - Windows 7 outshines Vista (not hard), Linux still in peril (hard luck), and the Mac App Store launches (hard sell)
By James Turner
January 5, 2011

Last year saw Linux fight free of one legal morass, and perhaps right into another; Microsoft take another swing at replacing XP; and Apple bring the App Store model to the desktop.

Four short links: 21 December 2010 - Big Companyitis, Spyware Apps, Maturing Cloud, and Mobile Sync

By Nat Torkington
December 21, 2010

Cash Cow Disease -- quite harsh on Google and Microsoft for "ingesting not investing" in promising startups, then disconnecting them from market signals. Like pixie dust, potential future advertising revenues can be sprinkled on any revenue-negative scheme to make it look brilliant. (via Dan Martell) Your Apps Are Watching You (Wall Street Journal) -- the iPhone apps transmitted more...

Developer Year in Review: Mobile - Our look back at 2010 starts with the year in mobile.

Developer Year in Review: Mobile - Our look back at 2010 starts with the year in mobile.
By James Turner
December 15, 2010

The past year brought new success for Apple, a breakout for Android, a windfall for lawyers, and app stores galore.

7 areas beyond gaming where Kinect could play a role - How Kinect could apply to art, education, health and other domains.

7 areas beyond gaming where Kinect could play a role - How Kinect could apply to art, education, health and other domains.
By Alex Howard
December 3, 2010

Microsoft's Kinect has implications that go beyond gaming. From medicine to learning to participatory art, Alex Howard considers ways Kinect's interface could shift our computing-based interactions.

Developer Week in Review - What's missing from Java's upcoming release, Novell sells out, and injection protection

Developer Week in Review - What's missing from Java's upcoming release, Novell sells out, and injection protection
By James Turner
November 24, 2010

In the latest Developer Week in Review: A look at Java's divide and conquer approach to upcoming releases, the end of an era for Novell, and a common programming shortcut that can end up cutting your throat.

Four short links: 24 November 2010 - Android, Cellphone Photos, Long-Exposure iPhone Apps, and Open Street Map

By Nat Torkington
November 24, 2010

What Android Is (Tim Bray) -- a good explanation of the different bits and their relationship. Cell Phone Photo Helped in Oil Spill (LA Times) -- a lone scientist working from a cell phone photo who saved the day by convincing the government that a cap it considered removing was actually working as designed. (via BoingBoing) Penki -- iPhone...

Four short links: 11 November 2010 - Bounty Paid, C Archived, Blind Queried, and Links Shared

By Nat Torkington
November 11, 2010

Open Kinect -- less than a week after the bounty for developing an open source driver for Microsoft's Kinect controller was announced, it is claimed. libfreenect is the software. CCAN -- the Comprehensive C Archive Network. TextCAPTCHAs -- simple questions, written in English, that are accessible to blind users. F1 -- Mozilla browser extension for sharing links via Twitter,...

Developer Week in Review - Intel opens an app store, Apache fumes over Java, old software Microsoft should open source, Apple updates on the way

By James Turner
November 10, 2010

In this edition of Developer Week in Review: Intel opens an app store, Apache is peeved at Oracle, Microsoft open sources a language you've probably never heard of, and Radar detects an incoming salvo of point-releases from Apple.

Understanding C#: Nullable Types

By Andrew Stellman
November 7, 2010

Every C# developer knows how to work with value types like int, double, boolean, char, and DateTime. They're really useful, but they have one flaw: they can't be set to null. Luckily, C# and .NET give you a very useful tool to for this: nullable types. You can use a nullable type any place that you need a variable that can either have a value or be null. This seems like a simple thing, but it turns out to be a highly flexible tool that can help make your programs more robust. In this tutorial, I'll show you the basics of nullable types, and give you a quick example of a program that uses them to handle unpredictable user input.

Developer Week in Review - Apple's iOS 4.2 approaches, OpenOffice loses contributors, IE's share drops slowly, and here come the Chrome netbooks

By James Turner
November 3, 2010

This week, Apple readies iOS 4.2, OpenOffice loses 33 contributors, competitors chip away at IE's browser share, and soon you'll have a Chrome option for netbooks.

Windows 7 Inside Track: Printer, Scanner, and Fax Installation

By William Stanek
October 27, 2010

Let's embark on what I'd like to call "Adventures in Printer, Scanner, and Fax Installation." Last Thanksgiving, I did something I rarely do: I went shopping on Black Friday. Picked up some great buys on USB flash drives, SDHC cards and a fantastic deal on a HP Officejet All-in-one. By now installing new devices, hardware and even entire systems is old hat around my house.

Developer Week in Review - Apple deprecates, Microsoft assassinates, Adobe infiltrates, and Linux obfuscates.

By James Turner
October 27, 2010

Heading up developer news this week: Is XP really dead this time? Linux release notes are an exercise in futility. Apple pulls the rug out from two development environments on the Mac. And Adobe gives tablet programmers more options.

Developer Week in Review - Ozzie architects a departure, Apple earnings and rumors, the BSA meddles, and C++ is 15.

By James Turner
October 20, 2010

This week, Microsoft loses their chief architect, Apple continues to own the news cycle, the BSA tries to put the kibosh on open standards, and a well-known language reaches a milestone.

Understanding C#: Simple LINQ to XML examples (tutorial)

By Andrew Stellman
October 16, 2010

XML is one of the most popular formats for files and data streams that need to represent complex data. The .NET Framework gives you some really powerful tools for creating, loading, and saving XML files. And once you've got your hands on XML data, you can use LINQ to query anything from data that you created to an RSS feed. In this post, I'll show you two simple LINQ to XML tutorial style examples that highlight basic patterns that you can use to create or query XML data using LINQ to XML.

Understanding C#: Equality, IEquatable, and Equals()

By Andrew Stellman
September 29, 2010

What does it really mean for two objects to be equal? How can you tell if object #1 is equal to object #2? Do you compare all of their properties? What about private properties or fields? Is it possible for two objects to have exactly the same state, but to not be equal? It's more complex than it seems. In this post, I'll detangle some of those ideas, and show you how to use IEquatable, the Equals() and GetHashCode() methods, and overloading the == and =! operators so that you can compare objects in your own code.

Flex vs Silverlight: Versioning in the eyes of the coder

By Justin J. Moses
September 28, 2010

In this topsy turvy world of RIA development, both Adobe and Microsoft are guilty of version inflation. Don't let complacency fool you into believing the marketers and their arbitrary numerbering systems.

Microsoft Releases IE9 Beta

Microsoft Releases IE9 Beta
By Andrew Trice
September 17, 2010

Yesterday, Microsoft released the beta candidate for IE9. An interesting change in direction from Microsoft, as HTML5 is now a first class citizen (amongst other new features). In fact, HTML5 rendering is even hardware accelerated.

Understanding C#: Raising events using a temporary variable

By Andrew Stellman
September 10, 2010

A lot of C# developers notice that there's something odd about how we normally raise events in C#. We're always told to set a temporary variable equal to the event first, and then raise the event using that variable. It looks very strange—how could that variable do anything at all? But it turns out that there's a very good reason for using the temporary variable, and understanding that reason can help you become a better C# developer. This post shows a quick example of why you need that variable.

Build HTML documentation for your C# code with Sandcastle in under 5 minutes

By Andrew Stellman
September 3, 2010

If you've ever used a library that has accurate MSDN-style API documentation, you know how useful it can be. There are lots of ways to create HTML documentation. But the easiest way that I've found is to use Sandcastle. It's an open source documentation generator from Microsoft that reads your assemblies (DLL or EXE files) and their XML Comments and automatically generates HTML documentation. Sandcastle is a very flexible tool, which means it's also a very complex tool. Luckily, there's a companion tool, Sandcastle Help File Builder, that makes it really easy to get up and running with Sandcastle in minutes.

Lessons learned building the elmcity service - Jon Udell's reflections on mashing up software cultures and calendar data.

By Jon Udell
August 3, 2010

What happens when you mix open source goals, styles, and attitudes with Microsoft tools, languages, and frameworks? You get a cultural mashup. That's what the elmcity project is, and what this series will explore.

Four short links: 20 July 2010 - Hardware Hacking, BI Reporting Tool, Book Recommendations, and Winning the Futurist Lottery

By Nat Torkington
July 20, 2010

Dangerous Prototypes -- "a new open source hardware project every month". Sample project: Flash Destroyer, which writes and verifies EEPROM chips until they blow out. Wabit -- GPLv3 reporting tool. Because No Respectable MBA Programme Would Admit Me (Mike Shaver) -- excellent book recommendations. The Most Prescient Footnote Ever (David Pennock) -- In footnote 14 of Chapter 5 (p....

Windows 7 Inside Track: 64-bit and Beyond

By William Stanek
June 22, 2010

(pdf download) Know the classic rock song that says "I did a bad, bad thing, a real bad thing"? Well, Tunnel Vision is a bad, bad thing, and this article hopefully will help you avoid it when you deploy and...


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