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Four short links: 27 October 2011 - Javascript Coverage, Cheap Tablets, Open Archive, ACTA vs TPP

By Nat Torkington
October 27, 2011

ScriptCover -- open source Javascript coverage tool. Using the $35 Tablet from India (VentureBeat) -- nice description of the tablet and what it's like to use. What makes the Aakash tablet different is that its creators didn't strive for perfection. Instead, the emphasis was on getting the product into the market quickly so it could be adopted, tinkered with,...

Strata Week: Simplifying MapReduce through Java - MapReduce gets easier, a new search engine for data, and now you can monitor the universe's forces on your phone.

Strata Week: Simplifying MapReduce through Java - MapReduce gets easier, a new search engine for data, and now you can monitor the universe's forces on your phone.
By Audrey Watters
October 13, 2011

Cloudera's Crunch hopes to make MapReduce easier, Datafiniti launches a search engine for data, and the University of Oxford releases an Android app for monitoring CERN data.

Bob Lee on Java references and the state of Java - Square CTO Bob Lee digs into Java's current position.

Bob Lee on Java references and the state of Java - Square CTO Bob Lee digs into Java's current position.
By Timothy M. O'Brien
October 13, 2011

In this short interview from JavaOne, Square CTO Bob Lee discusses Java references and weighs in on the state of Java and the industry.

Four short links: 13 October 2011 - Memorable Indexes, Mobile Sensors, Augmented Reality Toys, and Collaborative Editing

By Nat Torkington
October 13, 2011

Memorable Indexes (Futility Closet) -- Carroll's index also includes entries for "Boots for horizontal weather," "Horizontal rain, boots for," "Rain, horizontal, boots for," and "Weather, horizontal, boots for". They're silly and whimsical, but the underlying problem of making multiple accessible entrypoints into a single corpus of content is with us today and only compounded by the vast growth of...

Four short links: 23 September 2011 - Visualizing Populations, Hardware Futures, Radio Different, and Kooky Javascript

By Nat Torkington
September 23, 2011

How Many Really? -- project by BERG and BBC to help make sense of large numbers of people, in the context of your social network. Clever! (via BERG London) Why the Best Days of Open Hardware Are Yet To Come (Bunnie Huang) -- as Moore’s law decelerates, there is a potential for greater standardization of platforms. A provocative picture...

Developer Week in Review: webSOS - HP bails, Oracle fails, and the UK teaches coding (including Wales).

Developer Week in Review: webSOS - HP bails, Oracle fails, and the UK teaches coding (including Wales).
By James Turner
September 23, 2011

WebOS is going to the great operating system repository in the sky, Oracle finds yet another way to peeve developers, and the UK tries to create a new generation of programmers.

Four short links: 22 September 2011 - Feedback, Open Source Marketing, Programming in the Browser, and Twitter's Open Source Realtime Engine

By Nat Torkington
September 22, 2011

Implicit and Explicit Feedback -- for preferences and recommendations, implicit signals (what people clicked on and actually listened to) turn out to be strongly correlated with what they would say if you asked. (via Greg Linden) Pivoting to Monetize Mobile Hyperlocal Social Gamification by Going Viral -- Schuyler Erle's stellar talk at the open source geospatial tools conference. Video,...

Four short links: 13 September 2011 - Lie with Research, Learning as You Teach, 3D Printing, and Future of Javascript

By Nat Torkington
September 13, 2011

Dan Saffer: How To Lie with Design Research (Google Video) -- Experience shows that, especially with qualitative research like the type designers often do, two researchers can look at the same set of data and draw dramatically different findings from them. As William Blake said, "Both read the Bible day and night, But thou read'st black where I read...

Developer Week in Review: HP fires up the TouchPad production line one more time - HP's unique take on marketing, James Gosling leaves Google, and Apple continues its tavern distribution program.

Developer Week in Review: HP fires up the TouchPad production line one more time - HP's unique take on marketing, James Gosling leaves Google, and Apple continues its tavern distribution program.
By James Turner
September 1, 2011

The TouchPad's $99 price point proves enticing for consumers and — oddly — HP itself, James Gosling leaves Google, and a possible iPhone 5 leak bears a distinct resemblance to the iPhone 4 leak.

Four short links: 26 August 2011 - 9/11 Footage, Finland's Schools, Javascript Presentations, and Hollowed-Out Manufacturing

By Nat Torkington
August 26, 2011

911 Footage -- the Internet Archive has published a great collection of video from Sep 11 2001. A tremendous boon to researchers. Why Are Finland's Schools Successful? (Smithsonian Magazine) -- not sure if why they're successful is ever definitively anointed, but the article is fascinating reading. deck.js -- Javascript presentation library. Why Amazon Can't Make a Kindle in the...

Four short links: 19 August 2011 - Javascript Scraping, Molecular Visualization, Document Conversion, and Humanities Digitization

By Nat Torkington
August 19, 2011

pjscrape -- Javascript scraping framework. (via Joshua Schachter) CanvasMol -- molecular visualization in HTML5. (via Aimee Whitcroft) Docvert 1.5 -- new version of the code to convert Office files to DocBook and HTML. Seven Important Digitization Projects in the Humanities (BrainPickings) -- check out The Republic of Letters from Stanford, a very nifty visualization of relationships between Enlightenment thinkers....

Four short links: 11 August 2011 - Bad Web Sites, Gold Farming for Evil, Sensing Bicyclists, and Javascript Statistics

By Nat Torkington
August 11, 2011

Why Restaurant Web Sites Are So Bad -- The rest of the Web long ago did away with auto-playing music, Flash buttons and menus, and elaborate intro pages, but restaurant sites seem stuck in 1999. North Korean Government Partly Funded by Gold Farming (Gamasutra) -- alleges a special group of hackers built automation software for MMOs and sent part...

Developer Week in Review: Lion drops pre-installed MySQL - MySQL is missing from Lion Server, and Apple gets a slap on the wrist from South Korea.

Developer Week in Review: Lion drops pre-installed MySQL - MySQL is missing from Lion Server, and Apple gets a slap on the wrist from South Korea.
By James Turner
August 3, 2011

A pre-installed version of MySQL is noticeably absent from Lion Server, South Korea penalizes Apple for the location brouhaha, and Java 7's compiler injects a bit of randomness into software development.

Developer Week in Review: Linux turns the big 3.0 - The Linux kernel gets to 3.0, Oracle is bitten by the Internet's long memory, and more lawsuit fever.

Developer Week in Review: Linux turns the big 3.0 - The Linux kernel gets to 3.0, Oracle is bitten by the Internet's long memory, and more lawsuit fever.
By James Turner
July 28, 2011

The Linux kernel gets to version 3.0. Meanwhile, Oracle doesn't seem to remember the warm reception that Sun gave Android, and big players get lawsuits on their doorsteps.

Four short links: 27 July 2011 - Coverflow Javascript, Voice APIs, Liberal Acceptance Ruins Everything, and Mobile HTTP Pipelining

By Nat Torkington
July 27, 2011

ContentFlow -- Javascript library to provide CoverFlow-like behaviour. Twilio Client SDK -- 1/4 cent/minute API-to-API calls, embeddable in browser apps. Postel's Principle Reconsidered (ACM) -- The Robustness Principle was formulated in an Internet of cooperators. The world has changed a lot since then. Everything, even services that you may think you control, is suspect. Excellent explanation of how interoperability...

Four short links: 26 July 2011 - Advertising Keywords, Javascript Koans, Etsy Open Source Testing, Wieldy Selections

By Nat Torkington
July 26, 2011

Google Keyword Advertising -- interesting infographic about the most lucrative advertising categories for Google. #20 is an eye-opener! Javascript Koans (GitHub) -- an interactive learning environment that uses failing tests to introduce students to aspects of JavaScript in a logical sequence. (via Javascript Weekly) Etsy AB (GitHub) -- Etsy's framework for A/B testing, feature ramp up, and more. (via...

What's happening at OSCON Java ? - OSCON co-chairs discuss the OSCON Java program.

What's happening at OSCON Java ? - OSCON co-chairs discuss the OSCON Java program.
By Sarah Novotny
July 24, 2011

OSCON's co-chairs preview sessions in the OSCON Java conference and they dig into the discussion generated by Edd Dumbill's "Seven reasons to use Java again" post.

Four short links: 21 July 2011 - Javascript Helpers, 3D DOM, Hadoop Graph Optimizations, and Future Scenarios

By Nat Torkington
July 21, 2011

Sugar -- a Javascript library that fixes inconsistencies in built-in classes (Strings, Arrays, etc.) and extends them with much-needed time-saving functionality (e.g., automatic iterators over regular expressions; Date creation from strings; binding scopes to functions). Tilt -- clever Firefox plugin that lets you view the DOM on your page in 3D. Excellent for visually understanding the structure and layout...

Ruby is for Java - Bob McWhirter on Ruby, Java and TorqueBox.

By Timothy M. O'Brien
July 19, 2011

Bob McWhirter, JBoss Fellow, Codehaus Despot, and creator of TorqueBox, discusses the boundary between Java and Ruby and his efforts to make Torquebox "a real first-class Ruby platform that works the way Rubyists expect".

Four short links: 19 July 2011 - Async Javascript, PDF Malware, 2D Games, and Reinventing Textbooks

By Nat Torkington
July 19, 2011

Tame.js -- async programming library for use with node.js and other V8 projects. (via Hacker News) The Rise of PDF Malware (Symantec) -- detailed whitepaper showing the incident rate, techniques, and evasion techniques of PDF malware. Despite the fact that the number of PDF CVEs [Common Vulnerability/Exposure] are close to Microsoft Office’s numbers, the amount of nonunique PDF attacks...

Top stories: July 11-15, 2011 - The HTML5 paradigm shift, Java's missing community leader, and the "programmable self"

Top stories: July 11-15, 2011 - The HTML5 paradigm shift, Java's missing community leader, and the
By Mac Slocum
July 15, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: We took a deep dive into HTML5, Mike Loukides looked for Java's next community leader, and we learned that quantifying the self is a step toward programming the self.

The Java parade: What about IBM and Apache? - It's unlikely IBM or Apache will lead the Java community.

The Java parade: What about IBM and Apache? - It's unlikely IBM or Apache will lead the Java community.
By Mike Loukides
July 15, 2011

Why did Mike Loukides leave IBM and Apache out of his recent piece, "Who leads the Java Parade?" Because — despite good reasons — they both opted out.

Four short links: 14 July 2011 - Microchip Archaeology, OSM Map Library, Feedback Loops for Public Expenditure, and Mind-reading Big Data

By Nat Torkington
July 14, 2011

Digging into Technology's Past -- stories of the amazing work behind the visual 6502 project and how they reconstructed and simulated the legendary 6502 chip. To analyze and then preserve the 6502, James treated it like the site of an excavation. First, he needed to expose the actual chip by removing its packaging of essentially “billiard-ball plastic.” He eroded...

Who leads the Java parade? - Oracle, Google, and VMware are all Java players, but a clear leader has yet to emerge.

Who leads the Java parade? - Oracle, Google, and VMware are all Java players, but a clear leader has yet to emerge.
By Mike Loukides
July 13, 2011

Are any of the companies in the Java community willing to exercise technical leadership? Are there organizations willing to bring the features Java needs to fruition? It's time for the real leader to stand up and address these questions.

Getting started with HTML5 apps - Zachary Kessin on the skills you need to build apps with HTML5 and JavaScript.

Getting started with HTML5 apps - Zachary Kessin on the skills you need to build apps with HTML5 and JavaScript.
By Howard Wen
July 12, 2011

"Programming HTML5 Applications" author Zachary Kessin discusses the tools, technologies, and knowledge that help developers build HTML5 apps. Plus: Learn the most common app development mistakes and how to avoid them.

JavaFX 2.0: Making RIA with Java - JavaFX 2.0 looks to make rich Java web applications easier

JavaFX 2.0: Making RIA with Java - JavaFX 2.0 looks to make rich Java web applications easier
By James Turner
July 11, 2011

Jim Weaver, founder of JMentor, explains why JavaFX could become a viable contender in the Rich Internet Applications world.

Four short links: 11 July 2011 - Scammers Banks, DX, Scientific MTurk, and Teaching CS in Javascript

By Nat Torkington
July 11, 2011

Which Banks are Enabling Fake AV Scams? -- some nice detective work to reveal the mechanisms and actors who take money from the marks in AV scams. (via BoingBoing) Developer Experience -- new site from ex-Google developer evangelist Pamela Fox, talking about the experience that API- and software-offering companies give to the developers they're wooing. Pros and Cons of...

Top stories: July 4-8, 2011 - Why Java matters, inside Node.js, predicting Android's ubiquity

Top stories: July 4-8, 2011 - Why Java matters, inside Node.js, predicting Android's ubiquity
By Mac Slocum
July 8, 2011

This week on O'Reilly: We offered seven reasons why Java is worth your time, the utility of Node.js was duly noted, and Marko Gargenta offered three Android predictions that have nothing to do with mobile phones.

Seven reasons you should use Java again - Java deserves another look. Here's why.

Seven reasons you should use Java again - Java deserves another look. Here's why.
By Edd Dumbill
July 7, 2011

Sixteen years on, this ain't your father's Java. Here's seven reasons why Java is worth your time.

A rough guide to JVM languages - Java is as much about the JVM as it is the language.

A rough guide to JVM languages - Java is as much about the JVM as it is the language.
By Edd Dumbill
July 7, 2011

This overview of JVM-based programming compares the relative strengths of the major languages.

Seven Java projects that changed the world - Celebrating a decade of game-changing Java software.

Seven Java projects that changed the world - Celebrating a decade of game-changing Java software.
By Edd Dumbill
July 7, 2011

Reaching beyond mere adoption, these seven projects have had a profound effect on the Java world, software development in general, and even our daily lives.

What is Node.js? - Node isn't always the solution, but it does solve some important problems.

What is Node.js? - Node isn't always the solution, but it does solve some important problems.
By Brett McLaughlin
July 6, 2011

Learning Node might take a little effort, but it's going to pay off. Why? Because you're afforded solutions to your web application problems that require only JavaScript to solve.

Four short links: 4 July 2011 - God Games, Digitised History, git Database, and App Framework

By Nat Torkington
July 4, 2011

Let There Be Smite (Pippin Barr) -- simple diversion for the 4th of July. It won't be easy for God to save America. (via Pippin's blog) Basel Wear -- to answer the question I know was burning on your lips: "what *did* the Swiss wear in 1634?" Impressively detailed pictures from a 1634 book that is now online. One...

Four short links: 1 July 2011 - Vector Graphics, Processing Maps, Augemented Senses, and Graph Analysis

By Nat Torkington
July 1, 2011

paper.js -- The Swiss Army Knife of Vector Graphics Scripting. MIT-licensed Javascript library that gives great demo. TileMill for Processing -- gorgeous custom maps in Processing. (via FlowingData) Research Assistant Wanted -- working with one of the authors of Mind Hacks on augmenting our existing senses with a form of "remote touch" generated by using artificial distance sensors, such...

Four short links: 30 June 2011 - Buying a Micro, Education Entrepreneurship, Faceted Search, Vector-Graphics Scripting

By Nat Torkington
June 30, 2011

Electric Dreams - The 1980s 'The Micro Home Computer Of 1982' (YouTube) -- from a reality show where a gadget-using family are forced to relive 30 years of technology invention, one year each day. This clip is where they're forced to choose a microcomputer from the rush of early hobbyist machines in the 80s: Spectrum, Dragon-32, etc. (via Skud)...

Clojure: Lisp meets Java, with a side of Erlang - Stuart Sierra on why Clojure is catching on.

Clojure: Lisp meets Java, with a side of Erlang - Stuart Sierra on why Clojure is catching on.
By James Turner
June 28, 2011

OSCON speaker Stuart Sierra digs into Clojure: what it is, how it works, and why it's attracting Java developers.

Radar's top stories: June 20-24, 2011 - HTML5's influence on web development, data and genetic secrets, and how to build big JavaScript apps with big teams

Radar's top stories: June 20-24, 2011 - HTML5's influence on web development, data and genetic secrets, and how to build big JavaScript apps with big teams
By Mac Slocum
June 24, 2011

This week on Radar: We looked at the how HTML5 is shaping web development, scientist Charlie Quinn revealed how open source and big data are advancing life sciences, and Nicholas Zakas explained how big teams can build big JavaScript apps.

Scale your JavaScript, scale your team - The challenges of building big JavaScript apps with big teams.

Scale your JavaScript, scale your team - The challenges of building big JavaScript apps with big teams.
By Audrey Watters
June 23, 2011

"High Performance JavaScript" author Nicholas Zakas discusses the issues that pop up when you build big JavaScript apps with big teams.

How is HTML 5 changing web development? - Remy Sharp on whether HTML is ready for prime-time production.

How is HTML 5 changing web development? - Remy Sharp on whether HTML is ready for prime-time production.
By Audrey Watters
June 21, 2011

In this interview, OSCON speaker Remy Sharp discusses HTML5's current usage and how it could influence the future of web apps and browsers (hint: in time, we may not notice browsers at all.)

Developer Week in Review: Are .NET programmers going extinct? - Microsoft embraces HTML5, selling a startup at 15, and a new version of Java looms.

Developer Week in Review: Are .NET programmers going extinct? - Microsoft embraces HTML5, selling a startup at 15, and a new version of Java looms.
By James Turner
June 15, 2011

For Microsoft programmers, the week brought fear, uncertainty and doubt regarding their future as an elite class of developers. For a lucky teen, it brought a big paycheck. And for fans of Java, it brought a new version of the popular language one step closer to release.

Four short links: 15 June 2011 - Hacker Fun, GameBoy in Javascript, Global Mobile Data Prices, and Shackled Science

By Nat Torkington
June 15, 2011

HackerTyper -- finally, a way to type like they do in the movies. (via Mark Jason Dominus) GameBoy Emulator in Javascript -- I continue to be astonished at what can now be emulated/written in Javascript. GameBoys are classics for retro game programming and there are plenty of toolkits for creating games for desktop systems. I wonder how long until...

Radar's top stories: June 6-10, 2011 - Face recognition is here to stay, why everyone needs to learn JavaScript, and the secrets of Node's success

Radar's top stories: June 6-10, 2011 - Face recognition is here to stay, why everyone needs to learn JavaScript, and the secrets of Node's success
By Mac Slocum
June 10, 2011

This week on Radar: Tim O'Reilly offered a different take on Facebook's face recognition technology, a self-described JavaScript "hater" explained why everyone now needs to learn the language, and the secrets of Node's success were revealed.

Why data and Java deserved OSCON sub-conferences - OSCON's co-chairs discuss the event's evolution and what to expect at this year's show.

Why data and Java deserved OSCON sub-conferences - OSCON's co-chairs discuss the event's evolution and what to expect at this year's show.
By Sarah Novotny
June 10, 2011

In this inaugural OSCON 2011 sneak peek podcast, Edd Dumbill and I talk about the history and evolution of OSCON (now in it's 13th year) and our reasons for moving data and Java into their own sub-conferences.

JavaScript spread to the edges and became permanent in the process - Node.js expert James Duncan on JavaScript's rise and what lies ahead.

JavaScript spread to the edges and became permanent in the process - Node.js expert James Duncan on JavaScript's rise and what lies ahead.
By James Turner
June 9, 2011

James Duncan, the chief architect at Joyent, is one of the people using JavaScript in surprising ways. In this interview he shares his thoughts on how we came to depend so heavily on the language and where it might be headed.

The secrets of Node's success - Why Node.js has caught on while other server-side JavaScript implementations faltered.

The secrets of Node's success - Why Node.js has caught on while other server-side JavaScript implementations faltered.
By Troy Topnik
June 8, 2011

What is it about Node.js that makes it interesting to developers? The key factors are performance, timing, and focusing on a real problem that wasn't easily solved with other server-side dynamic languages.

Why a JavaScript hater thinks everyone needs to learn JavaScript in the next year - JavaScript is now a necessity.

Why a JavaScript hater thinks everyone needs to learn JavaScript in the next year - JavaScript is now a necessity.
By Mike Loukides
June 7, 2011

JavaScript is everywhere: servers, rich web client libraries, HTML5, databases, even JavaScript-based languages. If you've avoided JavaScript, this is the year to learn it. And if you don't, you risk being left behind.

Why OSCON Java? - OSCON Java will look at the language's role in data, mobile, enterprise, and cloud computing.

Why OSCON Java? - OSCON Java will look at the language's role in data, mobile, enterprise, and cloud computing.
By Mike Loukides
June 6, 2011

The Java community has always been a broad, fractious, interesting mess, capable of doing surprising things with little warning, and that's precisely why we're attracted to it.

Developer Week in Review: The other shoe drops on iOS developers - iPhone devs may need lawyers, Apache gets a new project, and Java programmers abuse a pattern

Developer Week in Review: The other shoe drops on iOS developers - iPhone devs may need lawyers, Apache gets a new project, and Java programmers abuse a pattern
By James Turner
June 2, 2011

If you were an iOS developer, you may have gotten to meet a process server in person this week, as Lodsys doles out the first batch of lawsuits. Oracle gave Apache the keys to OpenOffice, and told them to take it out for a spin, and your faithful editor vents about a commonly overused Java pattern.

The state of speed and the quirks of mobile optimization - Steve Souders on browser wars, site speed, and the HTTP Archive.

The state of speed and the quirks of mobile optimization - Steve Souders on browser wars, site speed, and the HTTP Archive.
By Jenn Webb
June 1, 2011

In this interview, Google performance evangelist and Velocity co-chair Steve Souders discusses browser competition, the differences between mobile and desktop optimization, and his hopes for the HTTP Archive.

Four short links: 30 May 2011 - Tables to Charts, Crowdsourcing Incentives, Domain Boondoggles, and Conquering Complexity

By Nat Torkington
May 30, 2011

Chartify -- jQuery plugin to create Google charts from HTML tables. (via Rasmus Sellberg) Designing Incentives for Crowdsourcing Workers (Crowdflower) -- In a tough turn for the sociologists and psychologists, none of the purely social/psychological treatments had any significant effects at all. The gTLD Boondoggle -- ICANN promised back in 1998 that they would bring the world lots of...


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