O'Reilly and Associates

An Open Letter to Jeff Bezos

Your responses...

Tim's Open Letter appeared on February 28, 2000
The following 10,000 responses were recorded over a period of five days, from 17:00 PST 28.Feb.00 thru 16:24 PST 03.Mar.00

February 28, 2000

Sigh. Here we go again. Good thing the Web gives consumers the upper hand, hmm?

Lane Becker


February 28, 2000

Patents like this beget patents much worse. Stunt the free nature of the net, and all net-based businesses will fail. Please, stop this.

Ethan Deneault


February 28, 2000

Henri Asseily


February 28, 2000

<p>As a published author and subsequently having an indirect business relationship with Amazon, I'm not happy with this situation. There's a pattern being established which places the future in jeopardy. My book is doing well on Amazon but, instead of being pleased, I feel like I'm sleeping with the devil.

Alex Charalabidis


February 28, 2000

Matt Hallmark


February 28, 2000

Tom Cook


February 28, 2000

I have ordered books from Amazon when they were a young company, I was wholly satisfied with the service. Finding and ordering is easy, and the shipping is prompt. However, I find Amazon's actions with this patent wholly disgusting. I can order O'Reilly books (and other reading material) from a local book store within walking distance from my house. Bezos, I hope you are happy about alienating the entire of the technologically inclined. We don't just read O'Reilly books (sorry Tim, but you don't seem to carry much Science Fiction).

Jeff Frasca


February 28, 2000

Alex Whitney


February 28, 2000

Kit Lo


February 28, 2000

Dennis Pipper


February 28, 2000

I double dare you to sue whoever actually uses your technology. Second I ask some of you protesters to continue developing in your technologies as iof none of this bull had ever happened. You can't stop a moving train Mr. Bezos especially when you're riding on it in the caboose. The Internet is the epitome of "I'm going to build XYZ regardless of what fool thinks they run it." Ayn Rand had a passage about some 20 illustrious engineers who invented the candle in her book Anthem. Are you inventing the candle Mr. Bezos? I do think you are. Please cease and desist. (Yes, I am a fan of Rand not so of her followers, but anyway yes, she did in fact warn us about this fscking shit earlier.)

Rares Marian


February 28, 2000

Until recently, nearly all of my DVD collection (mostly Anime) as well as the vast majority of computer related books I have purchased online were purchased from Amazon.com. >From this point on I will be purchasing computer books from Fatbrain and videos from Reel and Buy.com. Unfortunately, I have not found many of your competitors to offer the features I particularly enjoyed about Amazon.com (like the commentary sections and the consistently excellent handling of orders) I have missed the excellent service I have consistently received from your company. However, though your competitors do not have better service than you, they ARE sufficient. This combined with the fact that they are not abusing the broken patent system to destroy the culture of openness that made their (and your) very success possible, tips the balance in their favor for at least as long as Amazon persists in defending this patent. In the past I have even given business to your company even when competitors had beaten your price slightly, because I knew that I would receive excellent service and it was not worth the trouble to try them out. You have an excellent customer focused company, perhaps the best. Your abuse of the patent system is the ONLY reason I am not doing business with you. I know that we (the principled computer-enthusiast demographic) will not be able to harm you significantly by our boycott. Since the ranks of Amazon's customers are being constantly swollen by apathetic newcomers, our exodus will not be too sharply felt. We can at least see to it that they stay in business, so that you will not attain in market share the hegemonic monopoly you are presently trying to attain by hijacking obvious ideas and by chilling the culture of innovation that has made the Web and E-commerce viable. Sincerely, Jeff Keays (Santa Clara, CA)

Jeffrey Keays


February 28, 2000

I've been a regular Amazon customer for quite a while now. Until Amazon makes a few changes and gives up the patent to 1-click and their new patent on associate programs I will shop with bn.com instead. Amazon really isn't any better than Barnes and Noble, but I shopped with you guys for so long it became a habit. Time for a new habit.

Geoff Taylor


February 28, 2000

Having been using 'the web' since its infancy I find what Amazon has done a personal afront to the community, and yet another reason why there should be serious patent reform.

Menachem Pastreich


February 28, 2000

Tim is quite right. Bogus patents like these hurt everyone in the long run.

Matt Jensen


February 28, 2000

These are trivial patents and not novel

Jim Tivy


February 28, 2000

While I think the bulk of the blame of these ridiculous patents belongs with the US Patent office, Amazon should be using their rights to the patents to prevent someone else from using them, rather than using them themselves. They should follow the model that Linus Torvalds has with handling the Linux trademark. I personally haven't bought anything from Amazon since their attempt to enforce the 1-Click patent. I plan to avoid them best I can, purchasing items elsewhere whenever possible, until they change their methods.

Douglas L Stewart


February 28, 2000

Nile Geisinger


February 28, 2000

If Amazon believes it can pull off stunts like this, then I believe they no longer deserve our business.

Chris Grantham


February 28, 2000

I have to agree - Amazon has, through this action, taken the first steps towards being a less customer friendly company. I will certainly take my business elsewhere until this is resolved. I cannot imagine that this patent is worth the damage this controversy is causing to the Amazon brand.

Sam Schillace


February 28, 2000

I am an Amazon.com customer and I agree with Tim O'Reilly and Richard Stallman about the 1-click patent. No need to repeat or add to their arguments so that's all I will say here.

Dan Tenenbaum


February 28, 2000

Joe Tan


February 28, 2000

Very well said!

David G. Green


February 28, 2000

Matthew Gioia


February 28, 2000

Shame on you.

Ed Sherry


February 28, 2000

Ken Cotton, Tokyo Japan


February 28, 2000

Robert Karabelnikoff


February 28, 2000

The voices of my peers have spoken well for me. Thank you Tim!

Benjamin Connelly


February 28, 2000

Philip Levis


February 28, 2000

Garrett Rooney


February 28, 2000

I have long been a buyer from Amazon but now I feel they have gone too far. To me this is an obvious abuse of power that is a consequence of being successful, I would even go so far as to compare Amazon to Microsoft! I will not be buying any more merchandise from Amazon, alternatives exist for everything they do (especially here in Europe where the choice of services is less than in America). /Trevor

Trevor Lyall


February 28, 2000

Jay St. Pierre, Boulder, Colorado


February 28, 2000

Every signature on this page is a customer lost, Mr. Bezos.

Matthew Lefkowitz


February 28, 2000

Alan Schussman


February 28, 2000

the big K gonna gecha!

Michael Collins


February 28, 2000

Tomasz Kaczynski


February 28, 2000

Stephan I. B¸ttcher


February 28, 2000

Stop Amazon.com before they patent online ordering!!! :-)

Azher Ahmed


February 28, 2000

If Amazon.com wants to continue trying to patent such broad and stupid things as 1-click shopping and the Affiliate Program, then they can kiss any future business from me or my family goodbye. This patent was never fully reviewed as a number of other sites have used things like this (such as LinuxMall.com to which I am an affiliate). Write your Senators and Representatives and let them know how you feel about the ease with which these patents have been getting through the patent office and demand that changes be made to the system.

Kevin Brown


February 28, 2000

Enough already! And I thought patents were supposed to be for "non-obvious" things...

Margaret Balfour


February 28, 2000

This really sucks. I'm disappointed in Amazon for taking advantage of an obviously busted patent system to the detriment of themselves and everyone else. :(

Frank Font


February 28, 2000

I've been a big customer of Amazon in the past. No more. I'm stopping any sort of purchase from Amazon until you stop enforcing the patent you stole from the original web innovators.

Subrata Das


February 28, 2000

Don't become just another company sadly scrambling to exploit the digital age. You have prospered on the innovation of others. Don't be so selfish, we all lose.

Chris Elder


February 28, 2000

I've started buying all my books from Barnes & Noble since this started and will continue to do so. I've likely spent 躔-񘈨 on books with you in the past.

Matthew Steven


February 28, 2000

Aside from these patents being absurd (patently absurd?), they are harmful to the internet. I agree with everything Tim O'Reilly has said on the subject. Drop the patents, Amazon!

Thomas Winzig


February 28, 2000

it's a shame that a patent like this can be granted and it's even greater shame when somebody enforces it.

Erik Steffl


February 28, 2000

Best of luck to O'Reilly & Associates. I am very pleased that you have taken the time to bring this to the attention of so many. I will no longer being using Amazon to purchase my regular book orders.

Michael Weber


February 28, 2000

David Cheal


February 28, 2000

Scott Kazimour


February 28, 2000

what amazon is doing is rediculous. they may be as bad as microsoft in terms of what they are doing to the software industry. between patent abuses like this and legislation like the uctia anyone who values thier personal freedom and right to know whats on thier computer has some work to do. http://www.gnu.org

pixel fairy


February 28, 2000

After careful review, I have advised the company I work for to avoid proposed dealings with Amazon.com. I also advise a smallish school system, and have pointed out to them the fact that your patenting of obvious and pre-existing ideas goes against both the original idea of patents and against common sense. Amazon.com is no longer linked on any of their sites. I will not reconsider my reccomendations in the future. With your patenting of the "associates" program (incredibly similiar to Multi-Level-Marketing), you have shown utter disregard for both patent protection and the wishes of a large portion of your customers. Thank you for your time.

Paul Tice


February 28, 2000

When amazon grows beyond the emotional age of a petulant three year old unwilling to share, I will once again give them my business. Until then, I will denigrate them to all my family and friends.

Mike Sali


February 28, 2000

no one has said it better :) right on, Tim.

brent verner


February 28, 2000

Mitch Moritz


February 28, 2000

The 1-click patent is a sham, an embarrassment to our (software) Patent system.

Donn Baumgartner


February 28, 2000

Stop the madness. Why do this to your very successful business, Amazon? Why anger the very people that brought you this success? We can't stand still as this happens.

Sergio Villarreal


February 28, 2000

I have done a considerable amount of shopping at Amazon.com. This patent causes me to reconsider where I take my future business.

Matt Tornowske


February 28, 2000

Christopher Campbell


February 28, 2000

Arun Katkere


February 28, 2000

While I appreciate your position in wanting to retain rights to your intellectual property, I do not believe that "One Click" qualifies as either "intellectual" or "property." I have spent many hundreds of dollars at amazon.com in the past, but I will find it difficult in the future to reconcile to my conscience the act of subsidizing an organization that pursues such dubious claims. Other vendors offer, in my mind, equivalent services without the moral baggage, and they shall be rewarded with my patronage in the future. Please reconsider your decision in this matter.

Dr. Brian J. Albright


February 28, 2000

I was, at one point, a strong proponent of your site, primarily in its infancy, when I thought that it was a good thing, both for book lovers and for the 'Net at large. Unfortunately, I'm no longer of that opinion. Your virtual store has adopted business practices that I could never condone, primarily through your patent applications, which make a mockery of the process as well as stifling competators who are obviously not deriving their innovations from your work. I can assure you that my purchases from now on will be from corner booksellers and from fatbrain.com. You have certainly lost my business.

Kyle Niedzwiecki


February 28, 2000

Just because you can, doesn't mean you should. I shouldn't have to say this, but clearly Amazon cares a lot more about inappropriate and indefensible patents than they do about customer respect.

Cari D. Burstein


February 28, 2000

We agree here, too. No more purchases from Amazon. Go to <http://noamazon.com>.

dk smith


February 28, 2000

Daniel Knighten


February 28, 2000

James V Nutley


February 28, 2000

Mike Farahbakhshian


February 28, 2000

Ray Beausoleil


February 28, 2000

Omari Carter-Thorpe


February 28, 2000

In the past, I bought a lot of books at Amazon. Maybe I will do it again.

Christian Ullrich


February 28, 2000

For years Amazon was known as "Spamazon" in the net.abuse newsgroups. When they realised that spamming didn't pay, they turned to aggressively "defending" ludicrous and ill-conceived patents. They have shown that they care about _nothing_ but their bottom line (which in these strange days, means market share and stock price rather than net profit), and will screw every customer they've ever had to achieve it. Nothing less than an abrupt, total, complete about-face in their entire corporate philosophy will get me to even consider doing business with them. I hope others--MANY others--will take the same course of action.

Colin Bigam


February 28, 2000

Jeff (Mr. Bezos), I stopped shopping at Amazon some time ago. Computer Literacy (now FatBrain) gets my and my co-workers book orders at work. I went so far as to get a corporate account at FatBrain, just so that everyone else in the office wouldn't use Amazon for purchasing (reimbursed) books. Counting up texts, I bought 12 O'Reilly texts in 1999, 4 Oracle books and 3 more security texts. Ok, so I still haven't cracked that Camel book. The 10 other programmers in the office buy alot of books every year. We *get* it - you don't. In a market where there is little differentiation between sites, all that it takes is one (seemingly) little thing to cause me to set my bookmark at a different site. Did I mention that I also buy CD's online too? Coders tend to listen to CD's a good bit of the day ... but that's another protest email. Paul Drake

Paul Drake


February 28, 2000

Emre Kiciman


February 28, 2000

These patents wouldn't help you make any money or even any significant advantage over your competitors. You guys're getting a bad rep around my peers... BTW Thanks Tim, Oreilly continues to be my favourite publisher.

Pedro Sam


February 28, 2000

Though I generally despise the idea of open letters in general (due to the lack of individuality of the response mostly), this is quite simply one injustice that can not stand. It is clear that this is not only a frivilous patent, but an immoral one as well. I cannot possibly believe that Amazon was the first to generate the "invention" of utilizing cookies for credit card storage purposes, and it suprises me that no one has publically announced prior art on this issue. Regarding the pattenting of "affiliate" programs, that is simply bogus. That is patenting a business practice, a money-making strategy. That is no invention, no new technique of innovation. And of course there have been affiliate programs before Amazon's (I actually think theirs is quite new). Amazon's inability to realize this fact (or at least in the case of their CEO) has led me to join the Amazon boycott and sign this letter. For now on, the only purchases made by myself at Amazon.com will be made using 100% gift certificate purchases (thus actually causing amazon to lose money). I'm sure borders.com or bigwords.com or barnesandnoble.com will be happy to receive my paying business, and I won't notice the difference anyway seeing how they brutally copied Amazon's patented internet techniques.

Zach Hensel


February 28, 2000

While I appreciate your position in wanting to retain rights to your intellectual property, I do not believe that "One Click" qualifies as either "intellectual" or "property." I have spent many hundreds of dollars at amazon.com in the past, but I will find it difficult in the future to reconcile to my conscience the act of subsidizing an organization that pursues such dubious claims. Other vendors offer, in my mind, equivalent services without the moral baggage, and they shall be rewarded with my patronage in the future. Please reconsider your decision in this matter.

Dr. Brian J. Albright


February 28, 2000

I used to think Amazon.com was cool. I used to be proud of them for being a successful Internet-based business. Now I do not. I will not buy books from Amazon.com again. I get all I need from Fatbrain. Incidentally, that's close to 20 books in the past two months, with many more to come...

Tim Howe


February 28, 2000

I have been a customer of Amazon in the past. No more. Unless Amazon drops their 1-Click lawsuit, I will not purchase from them. Note: dropping does not include simply losing the court fight (which is pretty much inevitable). A few weeks ago, I was in the market for almost 躔 (plus shipping) of textbooks (and I will be again next semester, and the semester after that . . .). I purchased none of them from Amazon. In addition to the 1-Click issue, I find Amazon's whole additude of "patent whatever we think we can get away with" very distasteful. That distaste is will certainly to influence my buying patterns, even if the 1-Click lawsuit is dropped.

Noah Romer


February 28, 2000

This kind of abuse of the patent system is what will make it crumble. I will boycott Amazon.com and all of its partners as long as you keep it.

Olivier Crete


February 28, 2000

Amazon.com just lost a customer. Sigh.

Brent Metz


February 28, 2000

Nicholas Bayle


February 28, 2000

I agree whole heartedly with Tim - these absurd patents constitute a theft from the global community. Is Amazon prepared to pay damages to those who have been hurt by this abuse of the courts?

Adam West


February 28, 2000

This action cannot be seen by anyone who is reasonably well educated about the issue as anything other than an ill-advised attempt to use the legal system of the United States of America to stifle electronic commerce of all types by attempting to impose an industry-wide tax on all electronic commerce, the collected funds from which are directed to the coffers of Amazon.com. Being profitable should be based on a business' ability to compete in its market, and the validity of its business plan, not on its ability to essentially unethically stifle competition.

Patrick Anderson


February 28, 2000

Stefanos Kiakas


February 28, 2000

You have lost my business. I tell everyone I know about you. So you have lost a lot more than just my business. You have lost business from my friends, my mother, my father, etc. And you will continue to lose more everyday. I now buy my books from FatBrain and B&N.

Adam Yellen


February 28, 2000

I used to be an Amazon customer. But I feel that as a consumer and a member of the IT community the only way I can vote is with my pocket book. So I hereby pledge, and intive other signatories to do the same: I hereby pledge that not one cent of my money or money that I have control over via my professional budgets and spending allowences will go to Amazon until such time as they publicly retract their holds on both the 1-click and the affiliate patents.

Dale Babiy


February 28, 2000

I am an Amazon associate. Or at least, I was until I read about this instance of what I feel strongly is patent abuse and "evil overlord" style tactics with your competitors. As an information technology professional who has been using the internet since 1993, I find the business practices Amazon is attempting to be unfair and petty, to say the least. I'll be switching my associate status to Barnes & Noble.

B. Hall


February 28, 2000

Jeff - >From what I have read about this issue, I get a bad taste in my mouth when I think of Amazon, especially after this second patent. I used to base my shopping decisions entirely on price. Now I make a point of avoiding Amazon to go to Fatbrain, Ecampus, or Barnes and Noble. If you stop with the patent bullying, you have a return customer right here.

Charlie O'Keefe


February 28, 2000

One would really have to have a big financial incentive to believe that 1-click is a patentable idea.

Eric Lehman


February 28, 2000

Xarath


February 28, 2000

A patent on customer service would be no more absurd.

Nancy Collins


February 28, 2000

Steve Burnett


February 28, 2000

Derek J. Balling


February 28, 2000

Greg Jewell


February 28, 2000

David Harkness


February 28, 2000

As someone who makes his living writing computer books, I have a vested interest in Amazon's success. That's why I'm asking you to reconsider your approach of using patent law, instead of competitive energy, to boost your market trajectory. Apart from the fact that 1-Click(sm) is an obvious descendent of cookies, and that there is prior art that should have kept the PTO from issuing the patent in the first place, the larger issue is that you are fouling your own nest. By taking the stance that *you* invented this technology and that it's *yours*, you are running the same risk that my 5-year-old occasionally encounters while playing with friends: others, including the huge cadre of associates and customers that have made you successful, may decide not to play with you any more. Compete, don't litigate.

Paul Robichaux


February 28, 2000

Tim says it best when he says "trivial application of cookies." There's so much that Amazon does very very well, I can't understand what benefit Amazon thinks will be gained by attempting to artificially limit competition. In the meantime, Fatbrain.com is a fine source for my numerous O'Reilly purchases.

Andy Lester


February 28, 2000

I will no longer be buying from amazon.com

Patricia J. Hawkins


February 28, 2000

This is like the Y2K windowing patent: silly. >From now on it's www.noamazon.com.

Josh Knight


February 28, 2000

Dear Mr. Bezos: I think that your efforts to maintain and enforce the One-Click patent are a mistake which make me question whether I want to continue working with Amazon.com. I agree with Tim O'Reilly's views on this subject and I believe Amazon has not articulated any sensible position in response. I hope you will reconsider. Sincerely, Michael Karlin Beverly Hills, CA

Michael Karlin


February 28, 2000

The two Amazon patents are about as close as you can come to patenting the air. Until Amazon drops the patents and apologizes for abusing the patent system, I will make sure that our company no longer makes purchases from Amazon. How can the Patent office be so incompetent in the software area, makes you wonder what is going on over there. I wonder if you can get a patent for hyperlinks since no one has patented it already.

Marshall Carroll (President Iocomp Software)


February 28, 2000

I sent you, Amazon, a message earlier this week. You responded back with a form letter not even addressing my concerns -- you addressed the one-click issue, which alone was not enough to convince me to join the boycott. With the inclusion of the affiliates patent, it's clear that this was not a one-shot deal. I can no longer support your company. And I was a pretty damn big customer. Too bad.

Kenneth G. Cavness


February 28, 2000

Eric Schoenfeld

ericms{at}NOSPAMpanix[dot]com


February 28, 2000

Both of Amazon's patents are *trivial* applications of cookies and URLs. Unbelievable!

Si Ly


February 28, 2000

I have always admired O'Reilly and Associates for their role in the Open Source community. After reading Tim's letter I am more convinced than ever that the people at O'Reilly deserve the respect I have for them- as a business well aware of the needs and issues in its community.

Matthew Helsley


February 28, 2000

I completely agree with Tim. Here's another angle, consider using Amazon for ONLY research. Use their database for finding what you want. Then go buy it elsewhere. Me personally, I've been doing this for over a year. I find it online and then go out and buy it from a local merchant. I'd much rather have a vibrant local economny than save Ū for a book. Call me a sentimentalist but I like seeing my neighbors having JOBS.

Bill Kearney


February 28, 2000

Please declare the 1-click patent not to be enforced. This is a technique which is obvious to anyone skilled in the art and should never have been awarded a patent.

Carl Ellison


February 28, 2000

Tim Lundeen


February 28, 2000

Tim, I agree. I felt this was so important that I forwarded Dave's comments this morning to all the members of the Common Licensing Work Group (CLWG). Thank you for taking a stand. Michelle

Dr. Michelle Kraus


February 28, 2000

Kudos to Mr. O'Reilly for taking a public stand on this issue. Has the U.S. Patent Office truly gone off its rockers?

Christopher Gill


February 28, 2000

Aaron Montes


February 28, 2000

Add my vote for short sighted and antiInventional. Competition will evolve a way around and over any barrier this weak patent presents. What was the motivation fot the patent application? Surely not to teach! I use Bookpool.com as well as Amazon. Perhaps other purchasers will too?

Jim Christophersen


February 28, 2000

Brent Simmons


February 28, 2000

I am all for Amazon and others refraining from doing the "wrong thing." However, even if Jeff Bezos decides _today_ not to be agressive, whoever follows him will de duty-bound to grab these trivial patents. It is important to realize that the fault largely lies with the patent office in this case. WRITE TO YOUR REPRESENTATIVE, alongside the letters to patent holders.

Bulent Murtezaoglu


February 28, 2000

Amazons application and enforcing of these silly patents is rediculous. I can't belive someone who bases their whole business on open standards and free software, of which they wouldn't even EXIST without, is now seeing fit to go proprietary. This about face lends me to take my business elseware, its such an insult to me, and everyone else who uses the internet.

Warren Chartier


February 28, 2000

The "1-Click" and affiliate patents are examples of taking advantage of a patent office that can't seem to keep up with the times. I happily take my business to FatBrain, and will continue to stay away from Amazon until this stupid patent nonsense is finished.

Drew Taylor


February 28, 2000

Owen Leonard


February 28, 2000

Joel Hnatow


February 28, 2000

At this point, my only worry is that I still have a credit card number somewhere in the Amazon database waiting to be hacked. Because I see Amazon's attitude as a threat to the future of the web, I now fufill all of my shopping needs elsewhere.

Ken Boucher


February 28, 2000

Price Ramirez


February 28, 2000

Scott M Parrish


February 28, 2000

I care about integrity.

Jeff Breidenbach


February 28, 2000

I have been a happy and satisfied customer of Amazon for a long while. I think it provides good service -- and I use it frequently. I know several others who feel the same way. I am then surprised that Amazon feels the need to use frivolous patents like one-click ordering and the affiliates program to be able to compete. I strongly urge Amazon to not take this path. It is important not to choke off the flexibility of the web in this short-sighted manner.

Anurag Acharya


February 28, 2000

If only I were as eloquent as Tim. Amazon, I simply must stop doing business with you - both for personal as well as business related books - until this is over. I'll take my money to your competition.

Tackett Austin


February 28, 2000

Software patents are a bad idea. Independent reinvention is so much more likely than for other things that get copyright and patent protection that patents wind up depriving a lot more people of their true rights than they protect. In addition, the other existing forms of software protection -- copyright, trade secret, and license agreements -- also go too far today, because: 1) Nearly all software is obsolete in 10 years or less. Having copyrights expire that quickly (or at least creating an automatic licensing mechanism like the one that now exists for music) would enable software professionals to improve and debug each other's work, raising the average quality of software in the marketplace and increasing the rate of innovation. 2) Trade-secret law and licensing have been abused to let software makers install code on your computer without your knowledge that reports to them about what other software you have, what web sites you visit, and the like. In my view, you as a sysadmin have the need and the right to know everything that any program on your system may do, no matter where that program came from. 3) Licensing agreements have further been abused to prohibit you from running benchmark comparisons of the licensed code, publishing their results, or telling anyone about bugs in the code. Such restrictions destroy the functioning of the market and give you no recourse if the program does not even come close to doing what it promises to do. I strongly favor abolishing software patents, limiting other IP protections to 10 years or less, limiting the restrictions a license can impose, and not enacting UCITA.

John David Galt


February 28, 2000

Yet Another Formal Loyal Amazon Customer. Tim O for prez! :)

Blue Lang


February 28, 2000

I am sorry to see that Amazon.com has shown that they are committed to continuing to abuse the US Patent system with trivial patents. I no longer purchase any books from Amazon. Furthermore, I have influenced my current and former companies to also cease purchasing from Amazon. This includes approximately 1,000 technical employees in the high tech field of software programming and operating system design. Consider retracting the use of these patents in an offensive manner. Your current policies are damaging to your reputation.

Joshua Rodman


February 28, 2000

Troy Engel


February 28, 2000

Amazing, the things a company will resort to in fear of the competition. I always thought you were a fearless innovator. You could win without these tactics. Bye Amazon, Hello Powells.

Steve Flippin


February 28, 2000

Tom Negrino


February 28, 2000

Fredrik Vraalsen


February 28, 2000

I have been a strong proponent of Amazon, both in my online book shopping and as an Amazon.com Associate. I have spoken in public and on several mailing lists about how much better your affiliate program is than any other I've worked with. According to your associates site, I have brought you over 񘘐 in business since you started keeping track. This does not include the books I've bought from Amazon.com over the years. I have a support Web site for my book on which I used Amazon.com as the default bookstore for all clickthroughs. Let me explain. I use a redirector service that allows people to choose a bookseller, from the several affiliates programs to which I belong. When they have chosen a bookseller, they can click on any link related to my book or on any of the lengthy list of books in my bibliography, and they will be redirected to the page on their favorite bookseller's site where they can purchase the book. Thus, my redirector gives the customer the ultimate choice, as well as saving them time. In essence, it's the same sort of trivial application of cookie technology and backend logic that characterizes your "1-Click" ordering, only by holding the backend logic, I can make a small change to my script and cut off all or most of the traffic that would have come to you. I believe that your practices of late are destructive and short-sighted, and I have accordingly redirected all of the default traffic from my site to fatbrain.com, whose prices tend to be slightly cheaper, whose Web site provides a better and more detailed rundown of my book, and who have the second best affiliates program I've worked with. I hope you will realize that by refusing to enforce the patents you have been granted, you will restore the faith that I and millions of other customers have had in your service over the years, and, conversely, that continuing to use the patents as a weapon, you will not only be shooting yourself in the foot, but alienating your core customer base.

Steven Champeon


February 28, 2000

David William Hess


February 28, 2000

Tim, Thanks for taking a public stand--and a strong one at that. This is starting to feel like the makings of a business school case study classic in how to throw away a leadership position: "Blinded by good fortune, e-commerce pioneer loses moral compass and incurs the wrath of his earliest supporters." Brian

Brian Mulvaney


February 28, 2000

Get a grip Jeff. I love Amazon, but this has made my view of you and your company go right down the tubes. To be straightforward..."Get a Life!"

Joshua Link


February 28, 2000

I am voting in the way that Amazon will feel the most: my wallet. I used to buy from Amazon all the time. But now I don't. I hope that we can make a difference. </A></I></I>

Andy Berkvam


February 28, 2000

Stefan Langerman


February 28, 2000

Andy Helfrich


February 28, 2000

One of the driving forces of the "web community" has been that of self-sustainability. We have not had to wait for the market grow to meet our needs; we created the market. Try to take that away and we will rebel.

Kenneth J. Strait


February 28, 2000

I don't know what's worse, the fact that Amazon filed patents on the blatantly obvious, or that they were actually awarded the patents. Words cannot adequately describe the depth of stupidity that this fiasco plumbs.

Matt Kennedy


February 28, 2000

brian singer


February 28, 2000

I just felt that I had to send in this protest. Amazon is apperantly trying to kill the web and everything it stands for and it seems so absurd me. Why bite the hands that feeds you??

Magnus Larsson


February 28, 2000

I can't say anything that hasn't been said before. Keep the ideas free.

Josh Logan


February 28, 2000

Amazon's competitors are all just Two-Clicks(tm) away from exclusively getting my money.

Chad Netzer


February 28, 2000

Software patenting embarrasses humanity and showcases American capitalism for all its evils.

Kirk Woll


February 28, 2000

I try my very best to avoid rewarding companies that are greedy, and you have now become one of them.

Dean Klear


February 28, 2000

Dear Jeff, I look forward to remaining an *EX* loyal customer of amazon.com until this issue is resolved to my satisfaction.

Peter Brenton


February 28, 2000

I have bought several books from Amazon in the past, but I will not buy anything else from you until you publicly disavow this atrocious patent.

Mike Coleman


February 28, 2000

Jeff R. Allen


February 28, 2000

Dear Amazon, I know your brokers will have been on your back about the importance to your stock price of creating a monopoly - but those guys know nothing about keeping customers. You have lost this one. john weiley

jweiley


February 28, 2000

As a regular customer of Amazon I strongly disagree about Amazon's tactics and recent patent filings.

Mark Janssen


February 28, 2000

You gain patents at the expense of the good will of your customers! Is your business producing and selling propritary software, or selling of books and other goods? Would you rather have a patent which may prove to be worthless or purchases and recomendations of regular customers? The choice is yours!

Mark J Roley


February 28, 2000

I certainly will not shop at Amazon.com until they drop the patent-related lawsuit AND issue a public apology to the community. Furthermore, the whole frivolous software patent issue is so frustrating to me personally that I make it a point to inform people of the issue, and my stance, whenever they mention Amazon.com. I would estimate that my urging has cost Amazon at least 15 customers at this point.

George McBay


February 28, 2000

I am the president of a small company. We're building a website with big plans. Those plans were thought up totally independantly of ever using your site (I never have and now never plan to), however those plans will incorporate things that fall under your "patent". When it's up, I'll tell you, then you can sue me. It would be worth it just to turn it into a PR nightmare. Nate Bender President, Curiosity Trading

Nate Bender


February 28, 2000

I used to be an Amazon customer. But I feel that as a consumer and a member of the IT community the only way I can vote is with my pocket book. So I hereby pledge, and intive other signatories to do the same: I hereby pledge that not one cent of my money or money that I have control over via my professional budgets and spending allowences will go to Amazon until such time as they publicly retract their holds on both the 1-click and the affiliate patents.

Dale Babiy


February 28, 2000

Interesting thought: To those of you who control your sites' firewall: block amazon.com at the firewall. Yes, its completely over the top, and infringes upon others abilities to use their computer as they see fit. But it would make a much larger impression (or lack of one) in a bigger hurry. user: "Hey, how come I can't hit Amazon?" sysadmin: "It must be those German hackers again. See if they're shutting down FatBrain." Paul

Paul Drake


February 28, 2000

I object to these patents being used to stifle competition, and in the long run hurt the customer. I don't understand this since Amazon is such a service centered business. This is even more unbelievable considering visiting a competitor's place of business is trivial on-line. Why potentially hurt your business by harming the customers that you are fighting so hard to keep? In the mean time, I have ceased using Amazon and am using more customer friendly alternatives.

Ian Cahoon


February 28, 2000

Because I love the Internet more than any single entity on it, I am boycotting y'all. I took down all links to you from my web site, (actually, I did this yesterday; before I heard of this boycott; wasn't that prescient of me? :-) and won't purchase from you again until you put all this stuff in the trash where it belongs. Remember, the Internet community made you who you are today. Haven't you aquired enough without legal recourse? Be grateful, Amazon, not greedy. Sincerely, Michael Goglia PS: My records show that I purchased 跕.52 worth of stuff from you between 5/98 and 2/00.

Michael Goglia


February 28, 2000

Abigail Rolling


February 28, 2000

Geoff Romer


February 28, 2000

Amazon.com was the only online site that I bought my college books from. Now I may have to go to a different site. I can nothow these patents passed. That's like Ford trying to patent the wheel, even though it's been used for centuries, and it was a collective idea. They didn't create it, they just gave it a fancy name and called it their own. This is just wrong. Products like these should not be patened, they are just cookies..and that is a collective product also.

Travis Folck


February 28, 2000

I believe this is a very blatant abuse of the patent system, both the one-click ordering and the affiliates program. Especially the affiliates program. Jeff, I have a very difficult time believing that 1-click and affiliates are somehow innovative and deserving of a patent.

Ben Kosse


February 28, 2000

David Meeker


February 28, 2000

The system is in a sad state of affairs. It has become so out of touch with the reality of technology that our elected officials enact laws that strip us of our freedoms everyday, without realizing it. I believe the "Big Brother" that Orwell predicted should have been the "Big Stupid Bumbling Brother." I need not look far to prove my point. Any of the following will suffice: the DMCA, Amazon's patents, Sony Bono Boneheads extension to copyright law, crypto as munitions. The laws have been passed, the freedoms have been stripped, but luckily we haven't had an elected official that's seemed to realize their power yet......

Richard Long


February 28, 2000

Amazon has provided a great survice to many customers throughout the world. This software patent is totally outrageous. It attempts to make a common-sense practice that I for one know has a been a general practice for a while on many sites. It's a basic practice, not some super-special idea of yours. Cookies were intended to store data about a user. Website operators can choose to use data from a cookie in any way that suits the needs of their site. Therefore, I ask you to do the smart and just thing and remove the patent.

Christian T. Hilchey


February 28, 2000

Josh Joyce


February 28, 2000

I agree with all of the points in Tim O'Reilly's letter, save one. He has not endorsed the boycott against you (Amazon) because he believes you provide a valuable service to the community. I believe that while you provide a good service, you are not the only fish in the sea. Because of your enforcement of the 1-Click patent, I have spent 趚 in business on your competitors which I would have otherwise assuredly spent at Amazon. I had been a loyal customer before this, buying a significant supply of books from you over the web. But no more. I will spend no more of my money on you, and recommend to friends and family (and strangers) that they do the same. I find it ironic that this was triggered by 1-Click, as I find it to be a dangerous service---I disabled it on my Amazon account when it first became available. Yet your attempt to monopolize the idea has driven me away from you because I find the attempts to enforce such obvious patents unconscionable (and it is obvious---any competent web engineer asked to implement 1-Click would come up with a system identical to yours). I hope that you will reconsider using 1-Click and other such patents in any other than a defensive manner. I cannot say when I might return to Amazon, but I can guarantee that it won't be before you change your behavior.

Mark Jefferys


February 28, 2000

Nick Kolowski


February 28, 2000

You did a great job with Amazon. I often browse your german site (www.amazon.de) but I will not order any book until you drop this patent. Your competitors are just one mouse click away...

Thomas Geil


February 28, 2000

I was very impressed with Amazon at first and used it to find and buy hard to find books. Since the 1-click patent I have stopped using Amazon and switched to Barnes and Nobles. If the patents are given up freely by Amazon then I will consider returning as a customer but as it looks I will soon prefer another company anyway and you will forever loose a customer.

Chris Aurand


February 28, 2000

I've used and admired Amazon. Your patent policies are forcing me to go to other sites. Innovate -- don't litigate.

Grant Skousen


February 28, 2000

If Amazon believes it can pull off stunts like this, then I believe they no longer deserve our business.

Chris Grantham


February 28, 2000

Dear Jeff Bezos As the microsoft trial proofs unethical manuverings and hard tactic does not win friends and can and will be found legally culpable. So if you don't want to wind up indicted and tried like MS. You'll drop your patent. Patenting 1-click and Affliate programs will only have the affect of ultimately killing innovation and vast increasing expenditure on proprietary research. So listen to common sense and drop the patent

Jianying Ji


February 28, 2000

Timothy McClanahan


February 28, 2000

Keep your lawyers away from my software, Bezos!

Doug Salot


February 28, 2000

I urge Amazon.Com to drop these patent issues and get back to selling books. I have bought many books from Amazon.Com in the past, but until the patent stance changes with Amazon, I will be buying my books elsewhere.

Mike Hill


February 28, 2000

Ethan Bakshy


February 28, 2000

Mathias Wegner


February 28, 2000

Claire Lundberg


February 28, 2000

Yorick Dix


February 28, 2000

You're all alone, Jeff.

Peter Folk


February 28, 2000

Eric Skaug


February 28, 2000

<xmp>Minneapolis MN, USA</xmp>

Steve Paltzer


February 28, 2000

Gregg Belli


February 28, 2000

Andrew van Biljon


February 28, 2000

Jan Karjalainen


February 28, 2000

Henrik Mattsson


February 28, 2000

I have been a customer of Amazon.com since almost the very beginning, and have spent hundreds of dollars on purchases at the Amazon.com website. I feel that Amazon.com offers an amazing variety of services, at reasonable prices. That said, I am also gravely unhappy with Amazon.com because of the way that Amazon.com has chosen to patent ideas that were obvious to me (as a software professional) years before Amazon.com was glimmer in Jeff Bezos' eye. Neither "1-click" shopping or "Affiliates" programs are new ideas; mail order houses have been using these techniques for decades. Amazon.com may have the monetary high ground, but they do not have the technological high ground, or the moral high ground in this war. I'd hate to pour money into the coffers of Barnes and Noble (www.bn.com) but I'd rather do that than support Amazon.com's bid to monopolize Internet commerce.

W. Craig Trader


February 28, 2000

There are enough online bookstores -- I can live without amazon.com and their 1-click "technology"

Latchesar Ionkov


February 28, 2000

The net's open kind and patents' proprietary character just don't fit together.

Stephan Tolksdorf


February 28, 2000

just one more unhappy customer... btw, jeff, why don't you tell us all why you don't see this as an abuse of the patent system???

amy alexander


February 28, 2000

I've bought O'Reilley books from Amazon, but rest assured, I will buy them elsewhere from now on. Thanks for standing up for us, Tim.

Joe Rumsey


February 28, 2000

I'd rather click several times in the process of purchasing goods online than make one click to purchase anything from Amazon in light of this comical patent.

John Sommerville


February 28, 2000

Thank you for speaking out Tim. This sort of behavior by a company that, in-part, defines the internet today, is a step backward. As such, I choose to direct my business elsewhere.

Jeff Johnson


February 28, 2000

Hi, Over the last twelve months, I have purchased at least 25 CDs from Amazon. As of immediately, I will not buy another product from your company again, until you withdraw your greedy and short-sited patent claim. Ken Ambrose

Ken Ambrose


February 28, 2000

What does it say about Amazon's intelligence if they really expect these patents to be upheld? What a PR disaster this is. Nobody likes a bully, especially a contemptuous or foolish one. Maybe it's a streak of self-destruction. This is really a very sad development.

Jozsef Izsak


February 28, 2000

I am very sad that Amazon has chosen their current course of action. Amazon HAD! a loyal following among the web/computer techie crowd. We are a group that likes purchasing items on the web. But I'm now urging all my associates and clients to boycott Amazon. First the 1-click stuff, now the simple concept of an associate program. Amazon can not be permitted to continue this very damaging "land grab".

Chuck Gadd


February 28, 2000

As many others have already stated, I too am participating in a total boycott of Amazon.com. I have done so since the first day the story broke... Since that time, I have purchased books at BN.COM exclusively... Even when it meant paying a couple of dollars more than had I bought from Amazon. I'm not so kind as others (like Tim) have been... I hope this patent nonsense utterly destroys your company, and your person fortune. A statement needs to be made. I vote with my dollars. Thousands of others will too.

Bruce Arnold


February 28, 2000

Frank McNamara


February 28, 2000

Yorick Dix


February 28, 2000

I fail to understand how Jeff Bezos can label this a "successful" patent when all it patents is something completely obvious as an implementation of cookies. He is abusing the patent system in order to leverage his competitors. In these days of "internet time", the time and money it takes to fight an erronerous patent (as is in this case) could easily overwhelm the company trying to fight and and result in their inability to sucessfully compete. Everyone knows that this patent is garbage and has obvious previous-use behind it. Come on, Jeff. Using this patent it just playing dirty pool and you've already proven you don't need to do that.

Dave "Zoid" Kirsch


February 28, 2000

Shimpei Yamashita


February 28, 2000

I have been boycotting your site for some time. My trust in the fundamental value of your company has been badly shaken. I spend *a LOT* of money on books. And I miss your site; you simply do things better than your competition. But not because of stupid, obvious things like One-Click; rather, it is the clever use of data mining and targeted advertisements. I do not like B&N's site as well -- but they and their online competitors get my book money until you back off from this foolishness. You don't need these bullshit patents to survive and prosper. You are making life difficult ON ME and I resent it very much. Sites that I like may not be able to use a trivial technology like 1-click ordering until your spurious patent is overturned, and this infuriates me. I plan to continue boycotting for sixty days to see if you change your mind. If you continue pressing patents for such ridiculously obvious 'inventions' as 1-click and affiliates, I will never patronize your online store again. They boycott will be permanent, regardless of your later actions, and I will strongly recommend the same to others. Your attitude is becoming obvious -- win by any dirty trick available. Do you really want to be remembered that way? Ron Watkins

Ron Watkins


February 28, 2000

Wing Lee


February 28, 2000

Justin Mohr


February 28, 2000

I am a long time Amazon customer, and have been well pleased with their service and products. But frivolous software patents and strongarm lawsuits to protect software are two of my biggest pet peeves. Amazon, if you are serious about having an edge in web commerce, lead the way with inovation and service, not lawyers. Outperform the competition, don't strangle it with a checkbook. Oh, I'm a professional software engineer, so I understand the importance of intellectual property in software.

John Enright


February 28, 2000

J. L. Woudt


February 28, 2000

Bernd Dulfer


February 28, 2000

Geoff Janjua


February 28, 2000

I have to say that I am disgusted by Amazon's insistence on resorting to collecting frivolous patents in a misguided effort to be more competitive. Such vague and far-reaching patents on concepts such as '1 click shopping' and 'associate programs' undermine the basic advantage of the Internet, openness. So I've decided to put my money where my mouth is and no longer purchase from Amazon.com. Jeff, you have plenty of competitors that I'm sure are dancing in circles these days because of all the negative publicity Amazon.com has made for itself (Chapters springs readily to mind, for example) and who would be more than happy to take my business from you. Be a man (and a mench) and swallow your pride on this one. It's not going to gain you anything in the long run except for the same sort of reputation that Microsoft has built around itself.

Avram Cherry


February 28, 2000

Steve Pordon


February 28, 2000

Filip Zawadiak


February 28, 2000

Ed Farnbauch


February 28, 2000

Sean Channel


February 28, 2000

Nathan Walther


February 28, 2000

Get real amazon.

Brandon Camp


February 28, 2000

John Krahn


February 28, 2000

To Jeff Bezos: To protect its competitive position, all Amazon had to do was to publish the specs for 1-Click and the Associates processes used by Amazon. This would preclude anyone else filing for a patent. Then competitive forces, rather than the US Patent Office, would be responsible for the outcome. Filing for a patent, on the other hand, suggests your intention to monopolize certain ecommerce techniques. As the inventor of the term "ecommerce" for the California Legislature in 1984, I could have trademarked the term, I suppose. It would have been equally foolish. Bob Jacobson Redwood City, CA

Bob Jacobson


February 28, 2000

Timothy Danford


February 28, 2000

david newman


February 28, 2000

Frank Fletcher


February 28, 2000

Nick Barnes, Zĺrich, Switzerland.


February 28, 2000

Obvious things are not ment to be patented.

Janne Liimatainen


February 28, 2000

Mikko Saari


February 28, 2000

Small business owner and *former* Amazon customer.

Eric Johnson


February 28, 2000

When will they stop taking and start giving!

Karl Kopp


February 28, 2000

There are only two things I have to say. First, even to file for these patents is obscene, full of greed and arrogance, and represents a slap in the face of lots of people who made possible the internet. Who do you think you are? Second, you lost a customer. Kay Schneitz

Kay Schneitz


February 28, 2000

</i> Amazon has too many competitors to adopt the Microsoft style of business. It won't work for them.

Michael Harder


February 28, 2000

Thank you Mr. O'Reilly for your support and efforts towards this cause on behalf of technology users and innovators everywhere.

Iain Cox


February 28, 2000

I've had little reason not to buy from Amazon before, now I do and I won't. I can recommend OneBookStreet to any looking for a book source.

George Van Arsdale


February 28, 2000

Mr. Bezos: In the last twelve months, I spent 跄.45 at Amazon.com. Until you drop your offensive use of software patents, I will spend my money elsewhere.

Robert T. Huffman


February 28, 2000

People who want to consider alternatives to Amazon might peek at my list of online bookshops http://www.progsoc.uts.edu.au/~telford/reference/bookshop.html

Telford Tendys


February 28, 2000

I think we should be asking too who are these guys at the Patent Office who are allowing these obvious "innovations" to go through. Both Amazon and the Patent Office are wrong.

Naju Ventura


February 28, 2000

As the author or editor for a decade, including for many books sold on Amazon.com, I believe that enforcement of the 1-Click patent is short-sighted and ultimately harmful to all of us in the publishing business--including Amazon.com itself.

J.W. Olsen


February 28, 2000

Jeff, I've been an admirer of your efforts with Amazon as one of the major players in a successfull deployment of e-Commerce. Your attempt at patenting cookies, a "technology" the Web community have known and used for a long time, is not admirable at all. Please just drop it. It's not worth the bad publicity you'll be receiving.

Per Weisteen


February 28, 2000

This and other patents, including the ones given to eCash and Stefan Brands (now licensed to Zero Knowledge Systems, exclusivly), are putting an enourmus burden on the on going epansion to the new markets and taking us to a more opne market all over the globe. Hopefully, but not likely, this kinds of patents will be rejected and sent away to the trashcan were they belong.

Per Kangru


February 28, 2000

It is with a grave heart that I've started to boycott the online bookstore with the best user interface, most comprehensive features and widest selection. Stop the madness! I am a professional software developer and have consistently refused to take part in immoral patent scheming, though my employer offers large financial incentives (granted, to protect ourselves and not for frivolous lawsuits such as yours).

Wouter Cloetens


February 28, 2000

Tim Conrad


February 28, 2000

Mark Durham


February 28, 2000

Kai Puolamäki


February 28, 2000

Te-Cheng Shen


February 28, 2000

I personally have never bought a product as Amazon; however, I am now quite certain that I never will. This abuse of the patent system to destroy competitors is inexcusable. I will continue to by to majority of my books from a physical book store(I like the smell of all the new books, and the enviroment of being able to flip through any book that interests me).

Andrew Parker


February 28, 2000

Toivo Voll


February 28, 2000

Toivo Voll


February 28, 2000

Tim stated the concerns shared by so many of us much more eloquently than I ever could. Rest assured my boycott of Amazon will stay in effect until Amazon realizes the error of their ways. I am still taking every opportunity that presents itself to inform others as to Amazon's practices regarding enforcement of their ill-gained patents. Last years Amazon spending: 񘒘.45 Total spending since the B&N injunction: Ũ.00

Bill Giese


February 28, 2000

David Karowsky


February 28, 2000

Rob Sweet


February 28, 2000

I am very disappointed in Amazon.com. What if one supermarket chain had patented the concept of "put items in a shopping cart and bring it to cashier"? Would all the others have to make their customers hand-carry everything? Amazon's 1-click patent is just petty and mean-spirited, and I will now take my business elsewhere. </I>

Jim Gottlieb


February 28, 2000

We need more openness in this industry, not aggressive tactics to gain market share and limit innovation. This is the same sort of underhanded game that Microsoft plays so deftly to the detriment of all users of computer software and the internet. This patent should not have been granted. A trademark for "One Click" is even streaching things a bit.

Brennan Hildebrand


February 28, 2000

This is truly outrageous. I'm sorry, Mr. Bezos, but I cannot lend any form of support to a company willing to sink so low to make a quick buck at the expense of the general public. I sent a couple of books to friends a while back and thought Amazon was pretty cool for a little while, but I won't be doing it again. Not now. Not soon. Not ever. The world doesn't need companies with the ethics that Amazon exhibits.

Jonathan Locke


February 29, 2000

I first shopped at Amazon.com over 2 years ago. In the past year I have spent ũ,117.40 at your site. I've had to make a conscious effort since last month in boycotting your site because I'm so used to going there... but I can't anymore in good conscience. Hopefully, you'll come to realize soon how foolish this all is. If not, then it saddens me to say that I'm sorry that your software patent is more important than my patronage.

Leonard Lin


February 28, 2000

Mr. Bezos, I strongly disapprove of your company's ludicrous actions, and the sooner this insane patent is thrown out, the better. For your employees sake, I hope that the firms you have bullied away by brandishing this patent never file suit against you for lost revenues, for I feel they would have a strong case. If it were only you, and any other member of the management who supports this inanity, who would be punished, I would be the first in line to assist in said lawsuit.

Jason Baker


February 28, 2000

Making use of the community development and ideals is a fine thing to do,it encourages development for the betterment of the web community. However, abusing this, and claim the work of others is wrong, in the strongest sense of the word.

Peter Crystal


February 28, 2000

I have placed hundreds of dollars worth of orders through Amazon.com over the past few years and have always enjoyed your company's service. The way in which you have used the patent system is inappropriate, however, and I will join the boycott.

Garin Hiebert


February 28, 2000

I've spent close to ๛ a month at amazon in the past two years. Its too bad that because of thier greed, i'll be forced into going elsewhere.

Jeff Eineke


February 28, 2000

Look at the size of this page. Get with the PR agency quick, you've got some damage control to perform, Amazon.

Scott W. Hill


February 28, 2000

Yet another lost customer... pity.

Clay Scott


February 28, 2000

Amazon is a wonderful place, but I cannot approve of such a ludicrous patent.

J. Robinson


February 28, 2000

Markus Pihlaja, Finland


February 28, 2000

Yet another lost potential customer... pity.

Clay Scott


February 28, 2000

Leo Breebaart


February 28, 2000

Koen Van den Heuvel


February 28, 2000

Ronald Parazoo


February 29, 2000

Bill Bercik


February 29, 2000

Mark C. Chu-Carroll


February 29, 2000

Since Amazon has started enforcing patent 5,960,411 I have boycotted their business and will continue as well as encourage others to do the same.

Trevor Bakker


February 29, 2000

David Himelright


February 29, 2000

1-click signed ...

Frank Roscher


February 29, 2000

Hey Mr. Bezos, Fatbrain's going to get all my business till you stop this shit.

Kevin Broch


February 29, 2000

How dare you use *my* disk space to store your cookies and then have the gall to say that others can't. I would say that should be up to me, wouldn't you? Keep your damn cookies off of my machine!

Scotty Orr


February 29, 2000

I have been a long time Amazon customer and until this patent issue came up, Amazon was the only online book seller I ordered from. Now it is the only one I won't order from. I hope that they can wake up and see their mis-use of software patents.

Kevin Lilly


February 29, 2000

I have bought from both Amazon and B&N.com. By experiences with Amazon were very positive. My experiences with B&N.com were not. This had nothing to do with how tough the ordering was, it came to down to customer service. Stop the stupid patents. Open Source is revolutionizing software development.

Paul Rentschler


February 29, 2000

All I can say is that this is very sad. I had previously thought of Amazon as a great pioneer in web commerce; and I imagined Mr. Bezos to have understanding of the community. Clearly, the 1-Click patent falls under prior art. I sincerely hope Amazon can assume a more friendly position on this issue; I would be more than willing to make my purchases on Amazon rather than Barnes and Noble if I felt that Amazon was more in tune with the technical community.

Jason Clouse


February 29, 2000

That the patent office granted such a patent shows ignorance which can (hopefully) be overcome with proper education about software. That Amazon submitted such a patent in the first place shows complete disregard for the internet community and adherence to underhanded business practices. I'm certainly going to boycott anything from Amazon and will encourage all friends and co-workers to do the same until the patent is withdrawn and a formal apology is given.

Marty Combs


February 29, 2000

I vehemently oppose the increasing abuse of the patent system in the technology area. The entire point of patents is to protect your ideas. When patents are used as weapons the whole market suffers, including consumers and, indirectly, the patent holder. Even frivolous patents that won't hold up in court are a weapon because a company has to spend large sums to prove it's frivolity in court. Thus any small competitor is effectivly eliminated from using the patented techniques, regardless of whether they are obvious or previously used.

Seren Thompson


February 29, 2000

Lisa Mann


February 29, 2000

Michael Rozynski


February 29, 2000

Bad, Bad Amazon!

Herb Mathews


February 29, 2000

Eileen Tso


February 29, 2000

Jason Pollock


February 29, 2000

Joe Thomas


February 29, 2000

Rick Bartels


February 29, 2000

Michael S. Edwards


February 29, 2000

Joseph Laudadio


February 29, 2000

http://www.fatbrain.com

John Bridleman


February 29, 2000

I will not buy from Amazon because of this patent.

Rachel Sundquist


February 29, 2000

I will not buy from Amazon because of this patent.

Rachel Sundquist


February 29, 2000

I couldn't have said it better, Tim!

nan zhang


February 29, 2000

I am a former Amazon.com faithful. Note the word former.

Thomas Briggs


February 29, 2000

Come on Jeff, don't be a bozo. You're just losing the respect of your customers.

Ken Spreitzer


February 29, 2000

Even though I prefer Amazon, I will be ordering my books from Borders and B&N until this patent issue is resolved.

Phillip Toland


February 29, 2000

Well, I believe Amazon just lost a customer! You're not the only one selling books on the web. bye!

Fredrik Bonde


February 29, 2000

I am appaled by Amazon's actions. I am the "go to" guy for most of my friends when it come to computer related topics. I now reccomend against using or supporting Amazon due to their stupid attempt(s) to enforce the patents that should not have been granted. A nice quote from the US supreme court: It was never the object of patent laws to grant a monopoly for every trifling device, every shadow of a shade of an idea, which would naturally and spontaneously occur to any skilled mechanic or operator in the ordinary progress of manufactures. Such an indiscriminate creation of exclusive privileges tends rather to obstruct than to stimulate invention. It creates a class of speculative schemers who make it their business to watch the advancing wave of improvement, and gather its foam in the form of patented monopolies, which enable them to lay a heavy tax on the industry of the country, without contributing anything to the real advancement of the arts. It embarrasses the honest pursuit of business with fears and apprehensions of unknown liability lawsuits and vexatious accounting for profits made in good faith. ¨U.S. Supreme Court, Atlantic Works vs. Brady, 1882 Hopefully Amazon will learn the wrongs of their ways, and will be forced to pay damages and legal fees for the defendants in any cases they bring forth. --Mahlon Hollway

Mahlon Hollway


February 29, 2000

I, too, have and will continue to consciously avoid purchasing anything from Amazon.com and actively suggest to others to do the same.

Craig Michael Nathan


February 29, 2000

Amazon has unfortunately been learning too many lessons from Microsoft. I will no longer buy from Amazon, and urge everyone else I know to do likewise.

Andrea J. Cameron


February 29, 2000

It is my stated intent not to purchase anything through Amazon.com and to convince people around me until Amazon publicly denounces these abusive practices.

Tom Heynemann


February 29, 2000

Perhaps next you're going to try and patent "priority shipping" ? Come ON, Amazon, this is an embarrassment to you and a detriment to the web.

C. Alvarez


February 29, 2000

Due to your abuse of the patent system, I will now choose Fatbrain over Amazon for technical book purchases, and encourage my co-workers to do the same.

Craig McDaniel


February 29, 2000

I wish Priceline would get a grip, too. What's next - patenting the integration of OE/AR/AP systems with the web? Patenting English auctions? Dutch auctions?

Keith Gibbons


February 29, 2000

Rick Saenz (Austin, Texas)


February 29, 2000

Excellent letter Tim! Lets make sure that the web remains an open standard as it is! I stopped ordering from Amazon because of this patent some month ago.

Peter Thoeny


February 29, 2000

Over the past four years, I have probably spent close to 񘘐 at Amazon.com. Until they reverse their position on this topic, I will not spend another cent with them.

Curt Hagenlocher


February 29, 2000

I agree with Tim O'Reilly that the patents are ridiculus, and I agree with Richard Stallman that a boycott of Amazon is a good idea. My next order will go to Barnes & Noble.

Anders S. Buch


February 29, 2000

I have been an Amazon.com customer in the past, but I will no longer be a customer as long as you attempt to enforce your frivolous patents and/or continue to file such patent claims.

J. Allen Crider


February 29, 2000

I find the attempt to enforce this patent to be an anti-competitive and ungracious business method. Amazon should show some respect and gratitude for the thousands of developers on who's innovation they built their business.

Lawrence Dol


February 29, 2000

Scott Gasch


February 29, 2000

I have been a regular and happy Amazon customer, sending large chunks of my disposable income to you for several years, but intend to shop exclusively at your competitors until you drop this conscienceless patent pursuit.

Jay B. Parker


February 29, 2000

I will no longer purchase (I haven't for some time now) from Amazon. I have always been a loyal O'Reilly customer, and my future O'Reilly purchases will either come from a local shop or directly from the publisher. Thanks for your support here, Tim.

Brian St. Pierre


February 29, 2000

Amazon had their oposition beaten up down and sideways until they started down this road. Now they are just a site I use to look up ISBNs before I buy elsewhere. That's 1000 quid a year out of their income, and I can't be the only one they have driven away who spends that amount.

Richard Caley


February 29, 2000

I have been a regular Amazon customer for quite some time. No more. For as long as Amazon continues to abuse the patent system and otherwise acts in a manner I consider irresponsible, I will take my business elsewhere. Guess Amazon better run out and grab that 0-Click shopping patent, because that is what they will be getting from me for the time being ;)

Jim Cole


February 29, 2000

Amazon used to be well respected for their innovative mix of technology and business. Now they are becoming the laughing stock of the Internet. Come on guys. Tim is speaking more than his mind; it's the truth of how open-source helps everyone out, including you. Why not let the marketplace determine the winner, without having to "stack the deck" in your favor?

Jimmy Sieben


February 29, 2000

As a software engineer, I find taking someone else's innovation, made freely available by them, and trying to turn it into a proprietary technology, appalling. This is exactly what this "1 click" patent nonsense does with browser cookies. I have purchased dozens of books from amazon in the past. I will not be doing so in the future, unless amazon cleans up its act.

Josh Shepard


February 29, 2000

I believe you are taking advantage of our patent office with your patents. They are not adequatly equiped to handle the current rush of new technology patents and by slipping one like your "1-Click Shopping" under their eyes, you have taken advantage of something that was originaly created to inspire inovation, not stigmatize it. I am glad to say I have never bought anything from Amazon.com, nor will I.

Logan Hall


February 29, 2000

I have only been an online shopper for about 6 months now, but Amazon is the one that got me excited about it, and was my favorite. This is NOT because of the 1-click ordering!!! Now that I spend much of my monthly entertainment budget on the web, I am saddened to feel compelled to boycott Amazon,but I never like to reward needless greed and bullying of competitors. Shame! You guys should realize you don't need this stupid patent!

Kelly Hardwicke


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos: Shrewd business move, Mr. Bezos. Look at what you've done now. You upset all these people with your company's selfish decision. Once you have a mad enough audience in the computing world and you have the greater public's eye, you will retract the patent so that you can be the hero and everyone will buy from you again plus some new customers that were lured in. A well thought out way to get free publicity if you ask me...

Kevin Schoenrock


February 29, 2000

I used to use Amazon often, and I am a co-author of a soon-to-be-published O'Reilly book about web programming that will undoubtedly be sold on Amazon (and guess what, like the previous edition published years ago... it discusses cookies). However, I no longer shop on Amazon and I will encourage anyone who asks about my book to avoid you as well. It will take much more than simply dropping the lawsuit at this point to repair the damage you have done.

Scott Guelich


February 29, 2000

While I tend not to be activist over issues, I agree that this patent is frivolous and should be overturned. I don't know how much Amazon's business will be affected by customers and potential customers boycotting your service, but can you really afford to take that chance? Besides, I find price and customer service to be far more important than simply reducing two or three mouse clicks to one. As long as you are a leader in those two categories, you won't have anything to fear.

Nevada Hamaker


February 29, 2000

I strongly agree with this letter. The Internet was built through the good-faith efforts of government, engineers, and hobbyists. The shameless "corporatism" being revealed by companies like Amazon is more than just an insult to those who have built the Internet; it impedes future net development. I hope that Amazon either recognizes the ill-will that their FUD tactics promote, or pays the consequences. On principle, I will not buy Amazon products until they start acting like responsible netizens...

Alan Stein


February 29, 2000

A warning to Bezos: Revolution When people have nothing more to lose, Then revolution will result. Do not take away their lands, And do not destroy their livelihoods; If your burden is not heavy then they will not shirk it. The sage maintains himself but exacts no tribute, Values himself but requires no honours; He ignores abstraction and accepts substance. -Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching In other words, focus on being of substance, and do not try to exact tribute (do not enforce these patents), for then we will have nothing to lose and it will lead to a revolution against you.

Moxie


February 29, 2000

I would like to register my strong opposition to your company's patenting trivial and obvoius applications of web technology, as exemplified by the one-click and partners program patents. The fact that the patent office is willing to grant these patents does not mean that they are are beneficial, ethical or that they will stand up in court. Amazon in its attempts to monopolize e-commerce by patenting the obvoius stands to ruin its good name and become the new nemesis of many not because of market share, but because of its odoius business practices.

Jonathan Caplan


February 29, 2000

I agree with the content of the open letter crafted by O'Reily. Your patent-wielding of such obvious prior art is akin to the monopolistic and abusive practices of Microsoft. Why do corporations think that they have to be immoral to compete and to think that they can act immorally until they get caught? Perhaps if enough people cared to make you feel it in the wallet, you'd think twice. I am but one man, but I can assure you that, as a previous customer of Amazon.com's I am not presently. You have destroyed an good-will that you may have had with this previous customer!

Don Bivens


February 29, 2000

I had actually ordered a book from Amazon and have cancelled the order because of your patent practices. I reorded this book through Barnes and Noble (bn.com) immediately after cancelling my order with Amazon. I order books on-line at least a couple of times a month, and until your position on patents is reversed, these orders will be exclusively through bn.com and half.com. Greetings from Amazon.com! You have successfully cancelled your order #103-2750320-9959806 For your reference, here is a summary of your order: Order #103-2750320-9959806 - placed February 20, 2000 at 11:57 AM PST Status: CANCELLED - on February 28, 2000 at 06:33 AM PST

Brian Keen


February 29, 2000

This situation illustrates two important points. 1. The patent authorities have only a fraction of the knowledge required to handle modern information technology and software patents. It should be easier to stop the patenting of ideas that are already in common use. 2. I recently attended a symposium where Jeff Bezos was one of the keynote speakers. Jeff was enthusiastically talking about being customer centric and ˘focusing on the customer, not the competitors÷. This statement becomes relatively funny when Amazon.com resorts to attacking their competitors through dubious patents rather than focusing on increasing service to the customers. Apparently Amazon needs to become much more afraid of their customers!

Mathias Dybvik


February 29, 2000

Jeff, I'm dissapointed...I was one of Amazon.com's earlier customers (I wish I still had the sticker from the banana that your booth babe handed out at one of your first trade show appearances). Over the years, I have spent not hundereds but THOUSANDS of dollars at your site. Many of these purchases have been technical manuals, and music to listen to whilst employing them. I'm sure the same can be said for a sizeable chunk of your customer base. Having said that...it's on to Fatbrain.com for me. And CDNow or any other online retailers. I've also noticed a very recent and marked deterioration of your fulfillment operations and customer service. Jeff, the way to keep market share is NOT to cut these while making yourself "the only game in town" in an industry, ala' Microsoft. As already stated, none of the recent patent motions by your company are likely to hold up in court in the long run. The only thing that you'll get out of this is lost sales and a bad reputation.

Jen Runne


February 29, 2000

Sandy Blyth


February 29, 2000

Michael McDuffie


February 29, 2000

Kenneth Wong


February 29, 2000

Kevin Ring


February 29, 2000

Paul Davis


February 29, 2000

Kenneth Topp


February 29, 2000

Glenn Barnett


February 29, 2000

Jeff Uphoff


February 29, 2000

Matthew Theobald


February 29, 2000

Ludicrous patents have been part of the software industry for too long. A patent on 1-click, if not the winner for chutzpah, is surely a leading contender. David Wilczynski President, Pacific Software Solutions

David Wilczynski


February 29, 2000

Magni Ons░ien


February 29, 2000

Hey, this is EVIL amazon.

Brian Wolfe


February 29, 2000

Thomas Scoville


February 29, 2000

I agree with Tim. This patent is ridiculas !!!!

Arturo Bialas


February 29, 2000

Amazon. I think you have just sealed your own coffin

Mark Shelly


February 29, 2000

I will not buy anything in Amazon, and I will tell my friends not to do it.

Mauricio Rivera


February 29, 2000

Pick your battles carefully, Amazon. Surely this one is not worth the cost.

Joseph L. Jones


February 29, 2000

Amazon, drop the patent strategy. I will boycott you until you do.

Michael Please


February 29, 2000

I just spent โ at CDNow and Barnes & Noble. I put my money where my mouth is. :)

Paul Schreiber


February 29, 2000

These patents are ridiculous and will stifle the web. Please consider storing them in the wastebasket.

Damon Clinkscales


February 29, 2000

echo Bezos | tr "es" "o " This patenting of ideas that are trivial is a pox on humanity.

Kerry Liles


February 29, 2000

I do not shop at Amazon anymore. Your patent on One-Click Shopping is as fraudulent as patenting tying one's shoes.

June Kontvis-Bell


February 29, 2000

In truth, the actions of Amazon.com violate the spirit and the rules of the WWW - rules that were once known by all who frequented this space.

Michael Lautman


February 29, 2000

As a multi-year Amazon.com customer, I really regret your destructive software patent strategy. I will take my business elsewhere until it changes.

Rob Campbell


February 29, 2000

I stopped shopping at Amazon when they started selling toys and home improvement articles. Now I will ask my friends and associates to shop only at Barnes and Noble.

Gary J. Antonetti


February 29, 2000

used to by all my programming books and others at amazon. Have taken business elsewhere - will not be back until patents are dropped

alan macdonald


February 29, 2000

This is crap. I've used Amazon almost exclusively for online purchases, but I won't put up with this blatant patent misuse. I'll take my e-business elsewhere.

David Bender


February 29, 2000

While I have ordered items from Amazon in the past, I will no longer do so and I will encourage my colleagues to also discontinue business with Amazon due to the ridiculous nature of this patent.

Duane Healing


February 29, 2000

(My first submission disappeared, and with it my comments. This site has obviously had some traffic today ;-) I heartily agree with Tim O'Reilly's letter.

Henning Strandin


February 29, 2000

Laurie Trindle Gennari


February 29, 2000

Software patents are bad, mmkay? Especially when there is quite a bit of prior art. At this rate, Amazon, you will lose all of your customers, and *NEVER* turn a profit! :)

Adam Muntner


February 29, 2000

It's hard to imagine Jeff B. keeping a straight face explaining that while "he believes the patent process can sometimes be abused, he believes that this is not the case with Amazon's 1-Click patent."

Noah Booth


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com Dear Jeff, with this patent application you have become: First in e-commerce innovation First in taking over a common resource First in the hearts of what NetCitizens don't want. Phillip Knowlton

phillip knowlton


February 29, 2000

I have been boycotting Amazon since October and I hope that this petition will finally bring Amazon to its senses. Amazon's myopia will only bring them down in the long run and ruin what is a truly great ecommerce site. Matt

Matt Midboe


February 29, 2000

Thank you, Tim. I totally agree with everthing that you wrote in your column. This patent that Amazon is trying to get is frivolous at best and offensive at worst. Hopefully, they will soon understand the magnitude of their folly. Thanks.

Colin DeLong


February 29, 2000

"pissing in the well". I agree. I was disapointed by Amazon's response to my e-mail saying I was going to shop somewhere else while they pursued this patent; they believed the error was in my confusion, not in their behavior.

mike hemming


February 29, 2000

This is a patent that should be swiftly overturned as blatantly obvious. In the meantime, I will be spending my online dollars anywhere but Amazon. Once Amazon has ceased trying to patent the obvious, then they'll go back on my vendor list.

Michael Llaneza


February 29, 2000

Amazon, you underestimate the consumer and are not in a position to act as a monopoly. You are risking consumer hatred without any exclusivity on the book market. Very silly. I am also participating in the boycott, and am recommending my friends and family do the same.

Marco Bianco


February 29, 2000

While I have and will continue to applaud Amazon's creativity and innovation, this idea of patenting ideas that aren't really theirs to begin with is ludicrous at best and downright dangerous to the continued "open" structure of the Internet at worst. Please stop the madness before it's too late.

Frederic Woodbridge


February 29, 2000

It's pretty obvious that most people boycotting do, in fact, like the Amazon web site. Unfortunately, our hand has been forced by ridiculous business practices. If Lotus and Apple can't protect large, complicated applications and operating systems via the patent system, what gives you any hope this ridiculous One-click patent will hold up?

Sam Yates


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, I don't have anything to add to Tim O'Reilley's argument, but I can tell you that I completely support the Amazon boycott. I won't be shopping at Amazon until the patent is dropped, and I will be asking my friends to order from your competitors as well. Please re-think your position. You're biting the hand that feeds you.

Kirk Rafferty


February 29, 2000

As a teacher I used to recommend Amazon to my students as a place to buy books. I can no longer do this. I am telling them to support this boycott. Placing patents on ideas drawn from Open Source software is dubious and morally wrong. You are taking advantage of bad laws to patent trivial uses of other people's ideas. You can't own the web and you can't own e-commerce. Bill Beaver

Bill Beaver


February 29, 2000

I've been an Amazon supporter since the beginning. When B&N opened their web site by filing a frivolous lawsuit against them I vowed never to use or recommend B&N and never have. What Amazon is doing now with this joke "patent" is just as bad. Unless Amazon reverses this - I'll buy elsewhere whenever possible and incourage everyone I know to do the same. Do the right thing and change this now.

Dusty Nidey


February 29, 2000

I used to be an amazon customer, a very happy one in fact. After hearing this rather devious and inherently evil action, I've chosen to personally boycott your site, even before RMS's call to action. Your a book and media seller, what are you doing patenting web technology? Your very own patent works against the very business model that you started under, the small business! Please, don't become yet another member of the pack of Evil Empires residing here in Seattle.

Ryan Whitney


February 29, 2000

I've been using Amazon's services for quite some time now, and though my contributions to your bottom-line would be considered miniscule relative to the number of people who purchase at Amazon, I still feel like I have spent a considerable amount with Amazon over the years. I've done this because of the convenience, the broad selection, and to be honest the great customer service. However, as of now, because of your enforcement of your 1-Click patent my purchases with you will stop. Please reconsider your stand on this issue.

Bren Smith


February 29, 2000

There is no doubt that Amazon.Com has spent a lot of effort in building its highly sophisticated web site. But your success and failure in the long run will have nothing to do with your sole possession of a technology as trivial as "1-Click Ordering". It is a great convenience for your customers, but hardly a make-or-break proposition. Amazon's customers most appreciate its selection and service and are not going to switch to Barnes & Noble because they suddenly have 1-click ordering as well. You will gain more goodwill by backing off the patent than you will by being the "Only Site With 1-Click Ordering"

Michael Ross


February 29, 2000

I still recall the rainy night when driving home from work I listed to an interview with Jeff Bezos on Fresh Air. Ditched the plans to grab a beer and went home to check out this online bookstore. Loved what I saw. Since then I've purchased hundreds of dollars of books each year through Amazon.com for my technical library, for gifts, for whatever. None of this would have been possible without the technical contributions and collaborations of the web community. With these software patents Amazon.com is attempting to stifle the flow of technological lifeblood that nurished their online womb. Hopefully either the patent office or Amazon.com will not allow this to continue. Until then the business nurishment of my spending will flow elsewhere.

Michael Rasmussen


February 29, 2000

I find it disheartening that a company would try to lay claim to practices and knowledge that was born out of their own labors. I sincerely hope such blatant acts of thievery and Bill Gates style land grabbing will not be tolerated by the public or upheld in a court of law. Until Amazon.com ceases in this endeavor I will not patron them my business.

Brian Kohl


February 29, 2000

I myself have participated in patents filed for defensive reasons, but in using patents merely to squash the competition, Amazon is pissing in the well once they have had their fill. What particularly offends me is the notion that Amazon is protecting *their* innovations. I myself worked on one-click shopping (not implemented due to customers' unfamiliarity with online shopping in 1997) and affiliate program tracking via unique identifiers in URLs (implemented and still in use). And in the case of affiliate programs, I was learning techniques from looking at parameter passing via URLs as implemented by others. This kind of cross-fertilization is the only reason that the web exists. I cannot believe, Mr. Bezos, that you are so blinded arrogance that you cannot see the work that others have done before you. Patents and the legal system exist to further competion, not prevent it, Mr. Bezos, and your obligation to your shareholders neither entitles you nor requires you to knowingly abuse the patent system and legal system in the name of gutting the competition. The end result might be that you gut the web itself, cut off the true sources of innovation, and kill the boom in prosperity you so richly enjoy. As a member of the internet development community, I urge Amazon to cease their destructive policies now.

Jason Thaxter


February 29, 2000

To: Amazon.com c/o Jeff Bezos Dear Amazon, You're Fired. As several previous communications from your employers (aka customers) have pointed out, Blatant abuse of the technologies that put Amazon.com where it is today is not acceptable behavior. Despite several clear communications regarding this matter, Amazon.com has continued to flagrantly engage in these practices. We therefore, regretfully, find it necessary to terminate your employment. You may now take your place in the unemployment line behind etoys.com. Thank you.

Sean Clark


February 29, 2000

Ben De Rydt


February 29, 2000

Cheryl Short


February 29, 2000

Jacqueline Clark


February 29, 2000

Kim Scott


February 29, 2000

I agree...

Schoenmaekers Raf


February 29, 2000

Gary Nutbeam


February 29, 2000

Roberto Trevino


February 29, 2000

Chris Mangum


February 29, 2000

Greg Glover


February 29, 2000

Andrew Deckowitz


February 29, 2000

Keep open standards open Jeff - you will have only yourself to blame when innovation is stifled and your business takes a nosedive as a result.

Maru Newby


February 29, 2000

Jesös Reynaga


February 29, 2000

Patently mad. Goodbye amazon.

JohnK


February 29, 2000

Barnes and Noble just got a new customer.

David Wolfe


February 29, 2000

I will join the boycott.

Ben Abraham


February 29, 2000

Ever heard of One-Click Bankruptcy (~TM)? ;-)

Paul Miniato


February 29, 2000

Time to re-read Aesop's Fable about the dog with the bone...

Monique Reed


February 29, 2000

I refuse to buy books through Amazon due solely to the patent issues.

James Farley


February 29, 2000

I wholeheartedly agree. Amazon has great service but they have lost my business.

kent davis


February 29, 2000

I haven't purchased anything from amazon.com since mid December of '99.

Jeremy Hankins


February 29, 2000

I no longer buy at Amazon, I informed them of my decision, and I urge anyone I know to do the same.

Ori Pessach


February 29, 2000

The patent is absurd, enforcing it is even worse. I will not be supporting Amazon in any way until it reverses its decisions.

Bruce Beyeler


February 29, 2000

I've been directing people to Barnes and Noble or Fatbrain for some time...down with proprietary primadonnas!

Peter Burris


February 29, 2000

I too will not be buying any more books from Amazon solely because of Amazon's abuse of the patent system. BarnsandNoble.com, here I come.

Robert Spotswood


February 29, 2000

I've used the Amazon.co.uk site a few times when I've needed books, but I won't be going back while Amozon is behaving like this.

Alexa M. Robinson


February 29, 2000

As a previous user of amazon.com, I hope that you will stop your abuse of the Patent system, so I can once again use your site.

Warren E. Downs


February 29, 2000

Amazon is a bad citizen of the net. I have joined the boycott, and have successfully urged technical people not to join Amazon's staff.

Elizabeth Parish


February 29, 2000

Totally ridiculous to allow an open Web technology to be owned and controlled by one entity. The Patent people need to open their eyes.

Peter Andersen


February 29, 2000

Give me a break, Jeff! To file the patent is one thing, but to actually claim that it is valid is embarrassing to you and the entire Internet community!!!

Michael T. Williams


February 29, 2000

This is absolutely ridiculous and I will be adding my name to the already length list of those who will be boycotting Amazon until they give up on this patent.

Douglas Simon


February 29, 2000

A blantant attempt to squash fair competetion, shame on you Amazon! I WILL NOT use your site or any of your affiliates as long as you pursue such actions. SFT

Stuart Trimbath


February 29, 2000

A blantant attempt to squash fair competetion, shame on you Amazon! I WILL NOT use your site or any of your affiliates as long as you pursue such actions. SFT

Stuart Trimbath


February 29, 2000

What an absolutely stupid and arrogant attitude. I will refuse to purchase anything from Amazon until this changes.

Desh Sharma


February 29, 2000

A blantant attempt to squash fair competetion, shame on you Amazon! I WILL NOT use your site or any of your affiliates as long as you pursue such actions. SFT

Stuart Trimbath


February 29, 2000

I used to patronize the Amazon.com web site, and recommend it to friends and family. I can no longer in good conscience shop on your site, and I will encourage my friends and family to use other resources.

John Straw


February 29, 2000

I am now a very satisfied customer of borders.com and barnesandnoble.com. Too bad for you. I also have many friends, colleagues and family that have stopped or will not start buying from Amazon. Those who live by the sword...

Peter Hull


February 29, 2000

What a nasty bout of hubris. Amazon has changed the face of commerce forever -- I wish you took your responsibilities as trendsetter more seriously. It's not just about your company -- the world watches you.

Amy O'Hair


February 29, 2000

I will not be buying anything at Amazon until they stop this abuse of the patent law. I also will make sure that the managers of the mutual funds I own (and which contain Amazon stock) are made aware of the backlash building up against Amazon.

Eric Simms


February 29, 2000

This patent is sad, and has only been granted through the inadequacy of the US patent system when it comes to technology patents. I would urge you to please relinquish your patents, on the basis of prior art. Amazon is a really great site. Don't do damage to yourself like this.

T. Thatcher


February 29, 2000

I have purchased a large number of books through Amazon.com in the past, and in general your service has always been excellet. However, I find it hard to take seriously the claim that "1-click Shopping" represents an innovation worthy of patent protection.

Kevin J. Brennan


February 29, 2000

FWIW: Barnes And Noble is probably a /worse/ choice as an alternative. Their business practices involve driving out competition in local markets. Support your local retailer - or someone else's local retailer, like Powells, Wordsworth or others. They can all order anything.

JB Segal


February 29, 2000

May a thousand fleas infect your armpits and may your pile of monopoly money be reduced to nothing more than the elaborate hoax you are trying to perpetrate on the Internet community at large. I am supporting a boycott of amazon.com and any affiliate thereof.

Matthew Snyder


February 29, 2000

An IT friend of mine told me that O'Reilly books are the best source for learning or referencing computer technology and that Amazon was a good place to order from. Now I will have to check back with him to see where the IT field will be purchasing from... and me.

Carl Kristoffersen


February 29, 2000

www.spree.com, www.fatbrain.com, www.borders.com, www.barnesandnoble.com and others will be getting my business in the future. Jeff, with all respect to your innovative marketing, alienating many of your best customers and partners is demolishing any chance you might have had at profitibility.

William Harris


February 29, 2000

Until Amazon relents and cancels their attempt to patent "1-click ordering" and smilar patents of existing technology, I will boycott their service. I will instead patronize their competition and other companies that demonstrate through their actions and good-spirited participation in the Internet community. Adam Klein

Adam Klein


February 29, 2000

The amazon patent is just purely abuse. It's very easy to spread the bad-word at Universities, so I urge everyone in school to tell a friend about amazon's rediculous stance; maybe even take out a small ad or write a quick letter to the editor in the school newspaper. After all, we are their current and future consumers.

Scott Fritzinger


February 29, 2000

As long as you stick with this ridiculous patent policy, I will choose your competitors over you for all my online purchases. I hope you will rapidly realize that the long-term losses resulting from a bad public image largely outweigh the short-term advantage this kind of patent might give you over your competitors, temporarily.

Pascal Vincent


February 29, 2000

I have been using Amazon since early 1997. Since Amazon started keeping track of my orders in late 1997, I have spent 񘋌 in books and music from that service alone, much of it while i was a student. However, brand loyalty only goes so far. thanks for the coffee mug last Christmas. I have a ฟ gift certificate on my desk I would like to return. Good bye.

Rachel Walls


February 29, 2000

I will be buying specifically from those companies that are being attacked under this patent (e.g. Barnes & Noble) until this stupidity ends.

Henk Hesselink


February 29, 2000

I've been an Amazon customer in the past, but I won't be so again until you stop bludgeoning competition and innovation by trying to monopolize a simple idea. What you're doing flies in the face of the open internet spirit that gave birth to your business, and I think it's a slap in the face to all of your customers. You don't need this to compete--stop using software patents!

Steven G. Johnson


February 29, 2000

These patents are an insult to the technology industry and, more specifically, the nature of the Internet. The advancement of the industry in general will be _severely_ hampered if Amazon continues on its current course. As such, until these practices are stopped, I will no longer conduct any business with amazon.com, and I will urge all of my family, friends, and colleagues to do the same.

Andrew Zajkowski


February 29, 2000

I am a regular buyer at Amazon.com and a receiver of many of your emails. I *do* agree with RMS and will promptly remove myself from all mailings, remove my wish list, and refrain from buying at Amazon.com until they come to their senses. The patent office is rife with abuse over software technology and 1000 lb gorillas like Amazon.com just make it worse. Jonathan Arnold

Jonathan Arnold


February 29, 2000

I used to be a regular Amazon customer. Because of this patent nonsense I have taken thousands of dollars of my business to Fatbrain (http://www.fatbrain.com/) and DVD Express (http://www.dvdexpress.com)! I am in no way affiliated with either business. I will continue to boycott any organization that exploits the ignorance of the US patent office in such a flagrant manner!

Dr. Johannes Ruscheinski


February 29, 2000

This has got to stop. I'm sure that lawyer and business types consider patents like this as just "part of the game", but this particular game is wrong. I've bought a few things from Amazon before, but I'm going to look harder at alternatives now. If I ever hear of you trying to enforce this patent against a competitor, then that competitor will almost certainly be getting my business, as a show of support.

Barry Pederson


February 29, 2000

These patents do little more than make Amazon look ridiculous as it bites the very hand that has made it a success. If other money-hungry companies follow and begin patenting other basic methods of doing business online, it will not be long before we see the day that the independent retailer can no longer compete online. And we will have Amazon to thank for it. Honestly, Mr. Bezos. What were you thinking?

Kevin Murphy


February 29, 2000

There are plenty of high quality web sites who sell everything you do, for comparable prices and customer service. And they don't resort to insane patent disputes to keep their business. Maybe you've heard of them; the competition, they're who will be getting my business from now on.

Jeramia Ory


February 29, 2000

Why aren't we sending an even more strongly-worded message to the morons at the Patent Office? I don't think it's right to protest against amazon.com : it's not gonna stop the rest of the dot-coms from abusing the system. Protesting to the law-makers and the Patent office as voters is a better long-term solution. Why isn't anybody getting the Patent Office to comment on their incompetence in reviewing prior art?

Mittal Monani


February 29, 2000

I wholeheartedly agree with R. Stallman│s feelings, and Tim O│Reilly│s considerations. Amazon│s patent goes against the spirit of the internet. Such bully tactic│s may appeal to a stock-oriented management but are inherently a treason to the medium that in first place gave them the opportunity to make a nice business. For the time being I will buy all my O Reilly books from www.ora.com and shift to Barnes&Noble for the rest.

Enrique Lemus Rodriguez


February 29, 2000

Mr Bezos, It would appear that your accolades as Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" were misplaced. Either that, or they have gone to your head. Be aware that you have begun to tread upon dangerous ground. While customers have placed their loyalty in your business, it may just as easily be placed in the hands of your less greedy competitors. After all, another website is just "1-Click" away from yours. I will not be shopping with you until you eliminate this incredibly short-sighted and greed-infested patent.

John Gleisner III


February 29, 2000

The ability to abuse the system does not make it moraly right. Amazon should carfully consider the impact, not just now, but for the future, of absorbing other people's work as their own. In education, such practice is called plagerism. Enforcing, nay, even having these patents will have long term effects upon the internet, and technological innovation. In short, the customer will speak with his dollar, and my money will no longer support Amazon.com.

Cary Mathews


February 29, 2000

You are obviously offensively using the patent system to gain market share. I will no longer buy books from Amazon because of this. You advisors are surely telling you, as I have heard before that patents are one of the things people look for when investing in a company, but you need to invent something first. These patents you are describing are just uses of things that have already been used and created. It's nonsense and I won't stand for it as a consumer. I'm going to buy from your competitors. Sincerly, Eric M Gibson

Eric Gibson


February 29, 2000

I recently purchased ~ 贄 more in books from Amazon. Just after that, I started reading about these absurd patents. I personally used (coded) cookie-based one-click systems 5+ years ago. The bottom line: I nearly cancelled my order, and will neither browse, nor purchase anything from the amazon.com website until they cease their destructive behavior. Sincerely, Noah Fiedel

Noah Fiedel


February 29, 2000

I have been a regular customer of Amazon since its inception, and a strong supporter of its business approach. However, Amazon appears to have given in to the terrible and soul-eroding temptation of greed, and lost any sense of proportion or, apparently, decency. The 1-Click and "Associates" patents are both absurd on their face. While it is true that they both suggest the patent law is in dire need of being drastically revised, the fact that Amazon chose to abuse a system ripe for abuse does not reflect well on Amazon either.

David Link


February 29, 2000

Open standards and processes are the foundation of the environment in which your business operates: The Internet. By refusing to honor the spirit of cooperation and mutual benefit that created your market you sadden, dissappoint, and anger your (in my case former) customers. I submit that it is more advantageous in the long run to maintain the widespread grassroots energy of the internet and the goodwill of its users than it is to shut bn.com out of the christmas shopping season with an offensive (in both senses of the word) patent suit.

Michael Jurney


February 29, 2000

The Patent system was designed to support patents of the design of physical products that must then be produced. The idea of a patent separates the "designer" from the "producer", and protects the former's monetary investment in a new design from someone else who can copy the product. In the software field, all programming is "design;" only the binary copying equates to "producing." We already have an adequate if overzealous copyright law relating to software copying; if the patent system is applied to software, then every program in the world should have its own patent.

Ted Spence


February 29, 2000

Doing business in such a way as to harm others in the same market is no better than stealing. Good business is done by offering something that no one else currently has, or by offering better quality or service. These are the kind of things I look for in a business. I feel that you are abusing the use of a patents by patenting something that would hinder further development of the Internet, and that being 1-Click Ordering. This should be open for developers and other businesses to use freely. I might not boycot Amazon because of this, but Amazon has lost my loyalty, and in the future I will shop elsewhere unless Amazon is my only or last resort.

Matt Johnson


February 29, 2000

Totally disturbing that Amazon, up until now such a clean organization, would violate both the intent of the patent process (by depending on the ignorance of the examiners) and the ethics of the Internet community. My reason for buying from Amazon rather than B&N up until now stems from B&N's own history of questionable business practices (intentionally destroying independent booksellers and the like). However, there's always Borders.... I wonder if the open computing community could set up an arrangement where the community as a whole could become affiliated with Amazon's competitors, and funding generated in this way for free software development. Further, could the GPL be amended to give rights to everyone _except_ those on a patent abuse blackhole list?

Whit Blauvelt


February 29, 2000

I am an Amazon Associate, which means that I direct people to the Amazon site on books that I've read and recommend. I can not continue this practice any longer in good conscience. Instead I will start pointing my readers at other online sites. Since I probably make less than โ/year in "referral fees" I don't this going to hurt Amazon nor me very much (except for the inconvenience of reworking the web site). If M. Bezos and his bevy of lawyers want to make a positive contribution to the Internet that made his business so successful, he should keep this patent and others, but give away licenses to use them for free. That way noone else can try to control the technology. Acquiring patents is an expensive and time consuming task that no volunteers has the resources nor the will to pursue. On the other hand, if the open source community is to survive, it must protect its "intellectual capital" from hoarding by others.

Ken Mayer


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos: I am the webmaster and primary content author of a small website for fans of literature, photography, and music. While my site could potentially bring a number of dedicated readers to Amazon.com (I link to many booksellers and music stores online each week), I have chosen instead to prominently display my official position on Amazon.com (which coincides with Mr. O'Reilly's), linked to Richard M. Stallman's call for a boycott of Amazon.com, and taken much effort to find alternative sources of books and music online to encourage people not to patronize your business. I will continue to vocalize my position against Amazon.com and encourage my readership to seek alternative sources of books and music until Amazon.com officially states that it has reversed its policy on WorldWide Web patents, at which time I will encourage my readers to show support for your decision by purchasing books and music from you. I look forward to seeing such an announcement from you soon.

L. D. Steiner


February 29, 2000

I doubt that I can express my disgust with Amazon's business practices more eloquently than Tim O'Reilly, other than to say that I am yet another heavy purchaser of books in general and technical books in particular who boycots Amazon.com and encourages others to do so as well. As to the rediculousness of the patent, the simple fact that I can explain it to non-technical web users in under a minute is clear evidence that "trivial" is about the kindest thing that can be said about it. To take the fruits of the Gift Economy and pervert them as Amazon has done is the height of disrespect for all those who contribute real innovation and intellectual capital to the world. To Amazon, I tell you that I have cost you marketshare and will continue to do so for as long as you persist. When people consider purchasing on-line, they ask the opinion of people like myself, and when I tell them to use bn.com or fatbrain.com, they do. By offending the technical opinion leaders of the world, Amazon has most definitely created a severe long-term problem in the pursuit of short-term gains. -Chandler Howell

Chandler Howell


February 29, 2000

As a professional in the computer field(s), I feel compelled to comment on Amazon's actions. My position may, in-fact, be unique, because I work for a subsection of a company that does prepress book publishing. I am a software developer, have been a web developer, and a system administrator. I believe that most people don't understand the significance of the software patent problem until they've worked in/been exposed to the field for some time. (Please see the league for programming freedom -- http://lpf.ai.mit.edu/ -- for more information on how damaging these patents can be. It's too much to cover here.) What we're dealing with at Amazon may be just that -- someone who doesn't understand. That said, I can not condone, or permit Amazon to continue along this course of action with any real or imagined support from myself. It really does not matter whether the people at amazon lack understanding, or simply lack morality. Any online book purchases I may have made from Amazon will go to Barnes & Noble until this is resolved favourably. If this is resolved, and Amazon's patent is upheld, I'll not be shopping with Amazon again. I want to make that clear. This protest will last as long as Amazon enforces the patent, and not just until the legal trouble is over. I will do my best not only to refrain from buying things from Amazon, but to refrain from using any Amazon services during this time. I know somebody who sells things on zshop, and I'll be purchasing them directly from him rather than through zshop, for instance. I'll also display a bias against any institution which chooses to associate itself with Amazon. The only way for Amazon to redeem themselves at this point is to release all claims on this patent. Anything else is most likely unacceptable.

Christopher Smith


February 29, 2000

Ed French


February 29, 2000

M. Buendia


February 29, 2000

Brad Parker


February 29, 2000

Roger Eberhart


February 29, 2000

Derek Richardson


February 29, 2000

David Jao


February 29, 2000

Bill Redmond


February 29, 2000

Matthew Zeier


February 29, 2000

David Reiss


February 29, 2000

Justin Lessler


February 29, 2000

Bill McKinnon


February 29, 2000

I fully support the message behind this letter, and, as a loyal customer, truly believe it is in Amazon's best interest to comply.

Nick Burling


February 29, 2000

Jeffrey Hulten


February 29, 2000

Just too greedy. You'll fail.

Weigen


February 29, 2000

Just too greedy. You'll fail.

Weigen


February 29, 2000

Just too greedy. You'll fail.

Weigen


February 29, 2000

Einar Fl░ystad D░rum


February 29, 2000

Stella Fabiane


February 29, 2000

I'm disgusted.

Benjamin Turner


February 29, 2000

You can't be serious. The joke is over. Give it up, Jeff.

Matt Long


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com is a great convenience, but I'm done doing business with them... this patent is ludicrous.

Mike Lewis


February 29, 2000

I have to agree with the sentiment. I've quit buying from Amazon because of this.

Richard Vasquez


February 29, 2000

I'm going to be even happier about the O'Reilly books that I'll be buying - somewhere other than Amazon.

Tracy Atteberry


February 29, 2000

I've never purchased from Amazon. I plan to make that a policy in my home, and to encourage others to do the same.

Eli Vaughan


February 29, 2000

Tim pretty much said it all -- you are hurting the entire industry with this sort of behaviour.

Jonathan Kift


February 29, 2000

Please don't exploit the poorly-run patent infrastructure that made the mistake of granting these patents.

Todd Hutchinson


February 29, 2000

A former Amazon employee: given my opposition to ludicrous software patents, it would have been hypocritical to stay.

Dave Carrigan


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, do you really want history to remember Amazon, and you personally, as a bully, rather than an innovator?

Benjamin Leidner


February 29, 2000

I agree with the letter and ask that you stop this use of patents. Until you do so, I will not shop or recommend that others shop at your store. VO

Vince Outlaw


February 29, 2000

Amazon is a bad citizen of the net. I have joined the boycott, and have successfully urged technical people not to join Amazon's staff.

Elizabeth Parish


February 29, 2000

I love Amazon and have ordered many products from you- last winter I had an Amazon Xmas. Don't blow it by becoming hated. Continue the good work.

Robin Hankin


February 29, 2000

I have ceased buying from Amazon.com and am encouraging my friends and family to do likewise. Your exploitation of the USPO's ignorance is breathtakingly unconscionable.

Nicole Carlson


February 29, 2000

I will also take my business elsewhere until Amazon gives up trying to enforce these ridiculous patents. We thought you were the good guys. Were we wrong?

Glen Henshaw


February 29, 2000

I found this letter just after purchasing a CD from an Amazon competitor. I would have preferred to buy from Amazon, but I won't while this ridiculous patent in force.

Jim Hague


February 29, 2000

I don't like anyone messing with the integrity of computers and the internet. Nobody is more powerful than an irate mass of consumers, so take heed, Amazon. Play by the rules of the internet.

Patrick Draper


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, because of Amazon's frivolous patent filings, Borders.com earned my business. You have contributed to my research on both more friendly policies and on lower prices. Thank you.

Michael S. Keller


February 29, 2000

I bought one O'Reilly book on Linux from Amazon. Hope I can find another vendor to buy the second edition. I don't want to buy anything about GNU from vendor that Richard Stallman boycotts.

Rafal Michalski


February 29, 2000

I have been an Amazon customer for more than 4 years. Even though I like to support local companies, and several friends work or have worked for Amazon, I will not support Amazon until they drop their 1-click patent.

Aki Namioka


February 29, 2000

I've bought from Amazon in the past, but will not do so again until this patent abuse issue has been resolved. If Amazon will play dirty with its competition, I hope customers will realize that they are the ones to get hurt in the end.

Tom Lofgren


February 29, 2000

There was once a fellow named Bezos Who promised to sue the bejeezus Out of anyone who With means that WEREN'T NEW Tried with one-click orders to please us! I resent that, and will boycott you until you cease to hold this aggressive position.

Sean Callanan


February 29, 2000

It seems like Amazon has forgotten one of the rules to keep a good business going: Don't get [too] greedy! ... While my โ or ์ worth of book may not make a big difference, let's see what happens if everyone who's signed here buys their books somewhere else...

Luis Orozco


February 29, 2000

I was a loyal customer of Amazon in the past. Due to their absurd patent applications, I can no longer deal with Amazon in good faith. Until Amazon backs away from their attempts to make the Internet their own private marketplace, I will take my business elsewhere.

Stan Melton


February 29, 2000

I've enjoyed doing business with Amazon over the past three years believing them to be an asset to the net and considered them a merchant I could trust. However, after reading Tim O'ReillyĂs "one click" article, I've decided my loyalty was misplaced. I will be more careful in the future.

Frank Lea


February 29, 2000

Competition, not protectionism, is what has made our economy strong. While true innovations should be encouraged and rewarded, patenting trivial reuses of technology should result in penalties commensurate to the time and energy wasted in establishing and subsequently challenging them.

Paul Mineiro


February 29, 2000

Since Amazon has attempted to enforce this patent I have stopped purchasing from Amazon. I have also urged others not to shop from Amazon with success. I will not purchase from Amazon and will discourage others from doing so until Amazon relents from attempting to enforce the "1-Click" and the "Associates" patent.

Mark Menard


February 29, 2000

The intent of the internet is not to stifle your compitition by abuse of the patent office with trivial and obvious extensions of existing technologies, or to bog down rivals with lawsuits. I can not support your business until you support and respect the community that gave you the opportunity to have such a venture.

Dusty Jones


February 29, 2000

I am lending my voice to this cause as well. I will be taking my dollars elsewhere until the patent issues are resolved. I will also be encouraging family, friends, and colleagues to do the same. Additionally, I encourage O'Reilly to stop shipping books to Amazon until a satisfactory outcome has been reached.

Michael S. Lewis


February 29, 2000

I've already written back to Amazon in response to a marketing e-mail they sent me informing them that I would no longer shop there while they pursued this ridiculous patent on a toy technology. I was given a patronizing response indicating that Amazon was aware of a significant amount of confusion regarding their patent litigation. The confusion is inside the gates, not outside. Stop this ludicrous litigious onanism. Innovate, don't litigate.

Brian Sletten


February 29, 2000

As a computer professional and a believer in freedom, Amazon's attempts to stifle innovation and restrict the Web disgust me. A patent on the associates program? Business associates and alliances are older than the US PTO! I will not be buying anything from Amazon until they become a merchant worthy of my money. And I will make sure everyone I know understands just how slimy they're being.

Kai MacTane


February 29, 2000

I completely agree with Tim. Amazon provides a very good service. I had no problems and I gave Amazon.com a lot of my business up until Christmas, the whole patent issue came up and I decided to join RMS's ban on Amazon. Barnes & Noble's online store got my business that season and most of my purchases were books of one order or another. There are other book, music, electronics, movie sites on the web. See <http://www.noamazon.com> for some.

Steve Lamb


February 29, 2000

In addition to relying on the good will of consumers, Amazon should also take note of the fact that it is still losing money and is relying on investors to keep itself solvent. As public opinion grows against Amazon's unethical patenting processes a public boycott serves to further endanger the interest of their investors. In short, they should stop spending their time and effort on frivolous lawsuits over their patents and instead go back to what they're good at - selling books.

Jeanette Johnston


February 29, 2000

This is truly unfortunate. The Patent Office has become nothing less than a rubber stamp generator for incredibly greedy people. Between patenting of gene sequences (Jeez!!!!) and obviously frivilous patents such as this, the whole Patent issuing process has to be over-hauled or scrapped. I can only hope that some one at the Patent Office will have their light bulb turned on eventually. (P.S. We were doing browser state-management for Web-based applications developed around '94 and '95. We have source-code archives kicking around somewhere.)

Gerard Hynes


February 29, 2000

I have purchased thousands of dollars worth of merchandise from Amazon, but I am so outraged by their clueless, anti-Internet, parasitic behavior that I stopped buying from Amazon several months ago. Adding up my purchases from Buy.com and Borders -- purchases I researched first at the Amazon site, before switching over to their competitors to place my actual orders -- I see that I have spent 躲 in the past 3 months that would ordinarily have gone to Amazon. I would prefer to buy from Amazon, but cannot in good conscience support them until they begin to act responsibly.

Walter Purvis


February 29, 2000

While i always enjoyed shopping at amazon i dont anymore

Arne Hueggenberg


February 29, 2000

I was an Amazon.com customer long before they became the giant that they are now. I'm saddened and ashamed that they have chosen this path, and I sincerely regret that I can no longer support them or recommend them to others, at least until they back away from this ridiculous and fraudulent claim. Mr. Bezos, peel the dollar-signs from your eyeballs and take a good look around. These are the people that made you and your company what they are today. Don't continue to alienate them by persisting in this foolish and self-destructive act of greed. In the end it will be you, not your competitors, who will be the biggest loser.

Keith Wasserman


February 29, 2000

This really rubs me the wrong way. Amazon has obviously benefitted from the work of others, but seems uninterested in giving anything back. That's bad enough, but not reason to stop using their service. However, the fact that they see fit to stop others from freely using that medium disgusts me. I, and the rest of my family, have been regular customers of Amazon in the past. Not anymore. It's a shame, I really liked Amazon. They seemed like a class-act. This seems far beneth them. But we have been using other web-based booksellers, and will continue to do so, until Amazon stops its abusive practices.

Bryan Scaringe


February 29, 2000

At present, the granting of software patents in the US appears to be a frighteningly arbitrary process. Each unfairly granted patent allows one party to enjoy priveleges that are wholly out of keeping with the spirit of exchange and innovation that IP law seeks to promote. One party wins a pyrrhic victory, every other party loses the freedom to undertake simple everyday tasks, innovative or otherwise. When this happens sufficiently often there will be no winners at all - nobody will be able to do anything without infringing patents. Amazon did not invent clicking on a hyperlink. They did not invent sending a cookie. By patenting trivial ideas, Amazon is endorsing and supporting a system from which they stand to lose at least as much as anyone else.

Duncan Pierce


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, I have no problem with your registrations of these aforementioned patents, but I do feel that by using these patents to inhibit the competitive nature of your market you are wrong. The techniques you use for your "one-click" shopping have been around in use at hundreds of web sites before you used these techniques. Admit this, keep your patent and use it only to keep others from trying the same exploits as you now do. While my past purchases from Amazon.com may not add up to much, I am fortunate enough to be in a position where those who are unfamiliar with e-commerce ask my opinion for the best sites on the web to purchase certain items. Amazon.com has been one of my recommendations in the past, but if you continue with your absurd stance with this "one-click" patent and possibly your "associates" patent, then I must express my influence and tell people to buy their books and other merchandise at places such as fatbrain, Barnes & Noble and cdnow. Please reverse your decisi! ons to use your patents to be anti-competitive. Thank you for your time.

Joel Hart


February 29, 2000

As a professional in the computer field(s), I feel compelled to comment on Amazon's actions. My position may, in-fact, be unique, because I work for a subsection of a company that does prepress book publishing. I am a software developer, have been a web developer, and a system administrator. I believe that most people don't understand the significance of the software patent problem until they've worked in/been exposed to the field for some time. (Please see the league for programming freedom -- http://lpf.ai.mit.edu/ -- for more information on how damaging these patents can be. It's too much to cover here.) What we're dealing with at Amazon may be just that -- someone who doesn't understand. That said, I can not condone, or permit Amazon to continue along this course of action with any real or imagined support from myself. It really does not matter whether the people at amazon lack understanding, or simply lack morality. Any online book purchases I may have made from Amazon will go to Barnes & Noble until this is resolved favourably. If this is resolved, and Amazon's patent is upheld, I'll not be shopping with Amazon again. I want to make that clear. This protest will last as long as Amazon enforces the patent, and not just until the legal trouble is over. I will do my best not only to refrain from buying things from Amazon, but to refrain from using any Amazon services during this time. I know somebody who sells things on zshop, and I'll be purchasing them directly from him rather than through zshop, for instance. I'll also display a bias against any institution which chooses to associate itself with Amazon. The only way for Amazon to redeem themselves at this point is to release all claims on this patent. Anything else is most likely unacceptable.

Christopher Smith


February 29, 2000

Jason Reid


February 29, 2000

Evan Robinson


February 29, 2000

Michael Bealer


February 29, 2000

Gabriel Bereny


February 29, 2000

Jesse Grosjean


February 29, 2000

Subhajit Bhattacherjee


February 29, 2000

Do the right thing.

Joey Tsai


February 29, 2000

Rodger Crawford


February 29, 2000

David Krinsky


February 29, 2000

Robert Del Huerto


February 29, 2000

Roger Franz


February 29, 2000

Dave Erickson


February 29, 2000

Julian LaPlace


February 29, 2000

James I. Slaydon, III


February 29, 2000

Your patent is ludicrous and I no longer buy any books from Amazon.

Brent Halsey


February 29, 2000

Former customer & maybe never again -- Amazon's choice.

Bill Kohn


February 29, 2000

I'm a big fan of Amazon. Please do the right thing.

Patrick Colgan


February 29, 2000

Amazon is damaging the internet and its time to route around it.

Maurice Davis


February 29, 2000

To say I am most disappointed with Amazon would be a severe understatement.

Alan Krause


February 29, 2000

It should be bloody obvious that the patent is bollocks. Just drop it.

Alex Pasternak


February 29, 2000

I support the ban on Amazon use until the patent issues are resolved.

Sean O'Grady


February 29, 2000

I will not purchase from Amazon for so long as Amazon feels that it must use exploitative business practices.

Garrick James


February 29, 2000

I've never been to Amazon, I've never even seen one. But this I'll tell you anyhow, I'll never see or be one.

Jeffrey Chimene


February 29, 2000

As a software developer, I purchase quite a few books every year. Fatbrain gets all of my business until Amazon wises up.

Dave Neuer


February 29, 2000

this patent makes a mockery of the patent system and should never have gone this far. Shame on you Jeff Bezos.

Ed Meyer


February 29, 2000

I say we patent delivering content via HTTP for the intent of selling merchandise. Then we sure Amazon and put them out of business =)

David Vedder


February 29, 2000

My loyalty to Amazon.com has ended. While I'm at it, I plan on submitting a patent for the process of putting a pen cap back on the pen.

Darrell Brogdon


February 29, 2000

I believe that this is an abuse of the patent office ignorance of Internet technologies.. It should be revoked. I urge Amazon.com to relinquish its patent and the patent office to review it own Internet patent pollicies. -Richard Monson-Haefel

Richard Monson-Haefel


February 29, 2000

I agree with your denouncement of Amazon's patenting policies. On a wider scale, I dislike software patents in general. Add my name to the list.

Robert Smith


February 29, 2000

I have been a big Amazon customer for both books and music in the past year. This will stop and I will go to alternate sites. I love the convenience, but not at this cost.

Claus Laundrup


February 29, 2000

I have no intention of doing further business with Amazon.com as long as they continue to enforce this or any other ridiculously broad and socially harmful software patent.

Brian McGuinness


February 29, 2000

I support software patents, but only when they are for legitimate processes. These patents violate the spirit of the patent system and cast a shadow over all software patents.

Runako Godfrey


February 29, 2000

No longer is the internet a place of intellectual freedom and sharing of ideas for the common good. It is now a place of pure greed, it's corruption is complete, Thank you Jeff

Jay Hellmann


February 29, 2000

No longer is the internet a place of intellectual freedom and sharing of ideas for the common good. It is now a place of pure greed, it's corruption is complete, Thank you Jeff

Jay Hellmann


February 29, 2000

I've been a satisified Amazom customer for years, but my business will be going elsewhere until this situation has been resolved. I'm also actively encouraging co-workers to do the same.

Don Krause


February 29, 2000

I am a formerly very satified Amazon customer, but I will no longer do any business with them until they stop misusing the patent system.

Kelly Price


February 29, 2000

Patenting simple technology such as use of a cookie is petty and simple-minded. I will likely purchase my books elsewhere until you see the light and stop trying to stifle technological development. Thank you.

Mike Dodd


February 29, 2000

Agree with Tim's letter wholeheartedly. Amazon is a wonderful business, but their patents are beyond outrageous. Until they drop their efforts to constrict the Web, I will not shop with them.

Gordon Strause


February 29, 2000

David M. Hungerford III


February 29, 2000

I hope that by attaching my name to this letter, it will help convince you that attempting to enforce the patent (not just getting it) will prove to harm more than help your company's bottom line.

Scott Wolford


February 29, 2000

Amazon seems lost in their own jungle, missing the forest for the trees and I think they just ran head first into a big one. Listen to Tim, guys, he's trying to play native guide, and you could do worse.

Zachary DeAquila


February 29, 2000

I was formerly a very happy customer of Amazon.ca, unfortunately due to this blatant abuse of power on Amazon's part, I will no longer deal with them until they realize the err. in there ways and correct it. Keep the Internet open.

Robin Bolton


February 29, 2000

I'm actually more upset with the USPTO than with Amazon, but I absolutely agree that agressively persuing a bad patent is just as bad as granting it in the 1st place. Jeff: Please stop. Tim: Thanks for the call to action. JB, not shopping at Amazon.

JB Segal


February 29, 2000

I have bought several books through Amazon, but can no longer continue to do so, given Amazon's patent issues. Please reconsider your position with these patents. I have also advised my many local and 'net friends to consider boycotting Amazon for these patent practices.

Jim O'Brien


February 29, 2000

Just today I bought seventy dollars worth of books that I would have much rather bought at Amazon. Instead, because you continue to abuse patents, I was forced to purchase from another vendor. I hope that you are pleased with what your entirely foolish behavior has caused.

John Mascher


February 29, 2000

Thanks Tim for picking up this battle. We need somebody with enough leadership and visibility to speak up. Those few hundred bucks each of us is spending individually on Amazon.com isn't much of a leverage to give the giant a nudge. But I sure hope that combined they make a difference.

Joel R.


February 29, 2000

first i called amazon and told them to delete my name from their database. then i went to http://nowebpatents.org/ and registered with their boycott. my next steps are to urge my friends to to do the same, and to choose a different bookstore to spend several hundred dollars each year.

Adam Chandler


February 29, 2000

Thanks to Tim for saying it so well for all of us. If Amazon does not follow his advice, I will join the boycott of Amazon. I have already stopped using Amazon and checking out the competition. Amazon's superior lists of books and prices are the reason I use it; the one-click is irrelevent.

John G. Stewart


February 29, 2000

This position is disturbing, and I applaud Tim and company for their approach to the protest. As of this date I will not buy anything on Amazon, and will persuade my friends and family to do likewise. I hope Jeff decides to change his position, as I would really like to continue to do business with this company.

Matt Bacchi


February 29, 2000

I was previously a devoted Amazon customer. Their recent assults on the free and open nature of the web have insulted consumers like myself as well as every retail site online. I have since canceled my pending orders and will give my patronage to other sites until Amazon gives up their policy of aggressive comonplace-technology squatting.

Jamie Zucek


February 29, 2000

I've spent a total of ๠ at online bookstores. That's not much, but there are _many_ more people who may have spent equals amounts. I spent them at "www.bn.com" because of the Amazon patent issue. I will continue the boycott of Amazon until the patent issues go away, and I hope many thousands of others do likewise.

Thomas Palmer


February 29, 2000

It is sad how little knowledge the patent office seems to have about technical issues. It is even more sad how eager companies like Amazon.com are to exploit this flaw in the patent office. What is not sad, however, is the level of knowledge of the general public. They will not allow this; if Amazon's sales are not hurting now, they soon will be. And I will be doing eveything in my power to guarantee it.

Sonja Tideman


February 29, 2000

I have been surprised and disappointed at Amazon's patenting trivial technology. It only says bad things about Amazon, and the US Patent Office. My company has been buying a lot of technical books through Amazon the last few years, but this patent has caused the software company I work for to start using other sources. Please reconsider this awful direction you have chosen. There is still time to make the right decision.

Robert Leider


February 29, 2000

Your decision to actively support the patenting of 1-click ordering is wholly foolhardy, especially considering that you chose to emphasize the user-experience part of the process (the single click) over any particularly clever application of code that would allow for 1-click shopping. Patenting an idea is presumptuous in the extreme, and I urge you to take this letter and what it represents _very_ seriously.

Ben Cochran


February 29, 2000

I find it hypocritical that a company who's success is derived from the open systems of the internet, would try to patent such a trivial application. Where would we be if someone patented the hyperlink? I am writing a letter to Amazon requesting that all my credit card data and personal information be removed from their system. I am also selling all my Amazon stock and promoting http://www.noamazon.com any chance I get.

Joe Pearson


February 29, 2000

I had heard of cookies before I heard of amazon.com. As a professional developer the most "obvious" use I saw for cookies was to store customer information. I remember being slightly paranoid about the security of cookies and my credit card information. An obvious use of technology is about as far from an invention as possible. Amazon, please drop this suit and make the "one-click" patent freely available in the public domain before you lose more customers like me. Thank you. Craig Maslowski

Craig Maslowski


February 29, 2000

Amazon, you are seriously jeopardizing a significant segment of a loyal customer base. As a member of an internet startup, I and my colleagues not only make a high volume of purchases through Amazon, but are often engaged in getting our less tech-savvy friends and relatives comfortable with on-line purchases. Your egregious abuse of muddy intellectual property law has ensured that you will not be receiving further business or references from us. I hope you will reconsider the patent.

Paul Agostinelli


February 29, 2000

When Amazon filed their 1-click shopping patent, I decided not to purchase anything else from them. Still, I kept relatively quiet about it, and didn't really try to convince others to do the same. Guess what? Twice is too much. My decision to not purchase from Amazon until they revise their patent policy has been extended, to convincing others not to purchase from the company as well. It's not as if there aren't other sources for books on the web; often cheaper, as well. I look forward to exploring them.

A. Freed


February 29, 2000

The filing and legal enforcement of this patent is against the principles that the 'net was built on in the first place. After learning more about this issue, I will reserve my book money for organizations that are more in-tune with the culture of the Internet. Do not turn your back on the Internet culture, it is what has nurished your business from the start. I would like for you to change your position and come out in support of the openness that the Internet was built on. When you do this, you will earn my appreciation and even more of my business.

Michael Learn


February 29, 2000

I find it hard to believe that all the ill will you are generating can be balanced by your pursuit of this and other patents. If your motives were defensive I could understand, your actions indidcate otherwise. I can live without one-click shopping and I can't help wondering how valuable your Associates program can be as fewer people use your site. Prior to this patent absurdity, my first inclination when looking for a book was Amazon. Sadly for Amazon, that is no longer the case, now I look for alternatives. I urge Amazon to re-examine their position. To paraphrase an old ad campaign, "A lost customer is a terrible thing to waste."

Jake Spiller


February 29, 2000

I am (or should I say "I was"?), a good customer of Amazon's. I purchased plenty of books from them, as they gave me the possibility to get some otherwise unavailable technical books. I am truly disappointed by their current behaviour and I am therefore refraining from buying anything from them as log as this issue is not satisfactorily solved. I hope that they do check my previous record of book orders and do notice that they ceased. I hope that they can estimate how much money they will be losing on this issue and step back. As a matter of fact, during the last 6 months I ordered some 躔 worth of books, from other people. Too bad for them.

Giacomo Mulas


February 29, 2000

I wrote a similar letter to Amazon when I first heard of this and received a response much like the response Tim got. I have since made all of my book purchases through Amazon's competitors. I will continue to abstain from using Amazon so as long as Amazon continues its abuse of the patent system by patenting commonly used e-commerce techniques. I strongly believe, however, that Amazon will continue to try to fence in technology as long as they believe that the masses will remain ignorant of what they are really doing. My fear is that this will encourage other companies to do the same. Then we will start to lose not only common e-commerce processing techniques, but perhaps more general computing techniques as well.

William Green


February 29, 2000

It is this sort of patently stupid (and if your foolish enough to patent "1-Click" then you might as well formalize the colloquialism and patent "stupid" as well)corporate strategy that ultimately kills the very corporation it was designed to protect. Turning a blind eye to your consumers in an effort to fend off competition and establish, essentially, a monopoly in a given market is a good way to ensure that your customers will desert you and your business will fail. In the end it's not the consumer that's hurt, it's you. If you value your current position in the market, I suggest you listen to your customers and cease such monopolistic and predatory actions as the "1-Click" patent and the lawsuit against Barnes & Noble.

Alaric G. Weigle


February 29, 2000

I have ordered countless items from Amazon since my first order in February 1997. They were an excellent service with excellent prices. I am apalled they have succumbed to shortsighted corporate greed--especially considering their success without resorting to such tactics in the past. I have cancelled my 6 unshipped orders and will make no further purchases from them unless they redeem themselves by renouncing their exploitation of an outdated patent system to the detriment of the Web and the philosophy of open-source. I don't make this decision lightly. It will mean I must now make many purchases I was used to making online at other websites, or even at brick-and-mortar locations, spending higher prices and wasting more time. I will do it anyway because the openness of the Net is far more important to me that the convenience of Amazon.

Adams Douglas


February 29, 2000

This truly sickens me to see Amazon.com patent and enforce the patent on such a blatantly obvious technique. There are some people in this world who will knowingly do things just because they feel that they can get away with it. It is my impression that Amazon.com falls into this category. It's clear to everyone that Amazon is willfully abusing the patent system. As such, they are showing their true colours and demonstrating their lack of business ethics and common sense. In light of this, I can honestly say that I will not purchase anything else from Amazon now or in the future, no matter what the outcome of the patent situation. Even if they were to give up their patents, the damage has been done and Amazon has been exposed for what it truly is. I will always remain a <B>former</B> Amazon customer. Amazon.com, I wish you everything you deserve.

Matt Perry


February 29, 2000

Very well said, Mr O'Reilly. Amazon should ponder very carefully the implications of the reaction their moves have provoked amongst the technically aware community. It's not just direct loss of sales which is involved: despite all the current hype e-commerce is still in its infancy, and many people still find the prospect of making their first online purchase a daunting and uncomfortable one, for which they seek reassurance and advice from someone who has already done it - and the technically aware are still a large part of this pool. In such an environment, bad repute can spread rapidly and result in permanent loss of business as potential customers become familiar and comfortable with competitor's offerings. Perhaps even more significantly, the reaction gives a strong indication of what will be the consensus of undeniably expert testimony should a challenge to this mischievous patent come to court.

Pete Lee


February 29, 2000

I regret that Amazon insists on this ludicrous patent. When we reflect on other foolish software patents, like the Compton patent on all multimedia or the Microsoft patent on web discussion forums, we can see how uninformed the USPTO is about software issues. Can Amazon be confident that no competitor will dredge up some inane patent to use against them? And if not for a service they currently provide, for an area in which they seek to expand? I think not. It is in Amazon's interest to make software patents a non-issue. Their brand equity and customer loyalty are very good, and their willingness to rethink their mission constantly as the e-commerce world grows will serve them well. Building walls of this kind wil not, and the side effect of alienating a vocal segment of technophiles and early-adopters will not. I have bought over 񘈨 of books from Barnes and Noble since this began, using Amazon only for hard to find titles. I am also considering boycotting them altogether until this is resolved. Since I have been shopping with Amazon since 1996, and since I have spent in excess of 񙇈 with them, I believe I am one of their core customers. That is the future they are building as far as I am concerned. Sincerely, Steve Salkin

Steven Salkin


February 29, 2000

I have purchased from Amazon in the past, but not since I heard about the absurdity of their "business decision" to patent non-original ideas and processes. I believe that brick-and-mortar is the way to go; at least there, I can read the book (or at least get a good idea of the contents) before I purchase it, and don't have to worry about violating someone's patent (no matter how trivial it really is) just to make a purchase! Barnes and Noble, here I come....or Hastings, or Borders, or.... Mr. O'Reilly, thank you for your eloquent and unbiased letter to Mr. Bezos, and I can only hope that the number of signers to this letter and the number of sales they lose as a result might become an eye-opener for Amazon.com. One thought: perhaps we could inform Amazon directly as to what their potential customers think! this page has a list of their customer support email addresses: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/subst/help/mail-menu.html/103-8692251-0663030 Robert A. Cooper Bryan, Texas, USA

Robert A. Cooper


February 29, 2000

E J Steil


February 29, 2000

David Besch


February 29, 2000

Mel Norbeck


February 29, 2000

Dave Parker


February 29, 2000

The history of this industry is full of stories of people and companies appropriating obvious work. Does Amazon realize they are now in idealogical alignment with the guy who patented the pivot point Y2K fix? I've been a strong supporter of Amazon and have liked the way they have done business to now, but until they relinquish their stand I will remove all affiliate links and shift my business to powells.com .

Dave Slusher


February 29, 2000

Joshua Baer


February 29, 2000

James S. Neff


February 29, 2000

Bruce J. Lindsay


February 29, 2000

Brian Bush


February 29, 2000

Patrick Green


February 29, 2000

I've been buying books from Amazon for several years now but this patents issue fills me with revulsion for their methods. Its sad to see a once truly innovative company go the way of the Gates of this world. No more Amazon for me (of course, if they publicly retract their claims, I might rethink).

Papi Menon


February 29, 2000

Jeff MacDonald


February 29, 2000

Arno Hollosi


February 29, 2000

Sean Cummins


February 29, 2000

Ben Esacove


February 29, 2000

Allan Morstein


February 29, 2000

Daniel Mercer


February 29, 2000

Judy Anderson


February 29, 2000

Ken Hagler


February 29, 2000

Christopher Schweda


February 29, 2000

Bem Jones-Bey


February 29, 2000

Guillermo Aranda


February 29, 2000

Raymond M. Reskusich


February 29, 2000

Andrew Bakun


February 29, 2000

Greg Robbins


February 29, 2000

Mattias Wadenstein


February 29, 2000

Simply ridiculous!

William A. Aquila


February 29, 2000

Former customer

Joachim B. Haga


February 29, 2000

I'm boycotting, and I'll advise others to do so too.

Nigel Purdy


February 29, 2000

Another unsatisfied, former customer.

George Kyle


February 29, 2000

I completely agree with Tim. Don't buy from Amazon!

Michael Grinder


February 29, 2000

Amazon, you should be embarassed by your behavior.

Dave Newton


February 29, 2000

I agree with the letter on all points.

J. Stephen Warren


February 29, 2000

Amazon has gone too far with this. Despite finding their service excellent, I will no longer buy from them.

Alex Burr


February 29, 2000

Trivial patents hurt everyone, especially Amazon's customers. I guess I have to find books elsewhere now. This is a shame since I appreciated Amazon's good customer service.

Nathan Lawson


February 29, 2000

Amazon is off my list of vendors to consider for any purchase. I am advising others to not deal with Amazon. Amazon is not a "good neighbor".

Peter Hoffman


February 29, 2000

Dear Mr. Bezos I am taking my business elsewhere. I am not impressed by Amazon's behaviour with regard to prosecuting spurious software patents. Kindly reconsider, Saras Udanpur

Saras Udanpur


February 29, 2000

Ease up, or I buy elsewhere. Customer loyalty is an easy loss, especially on the net. I like Amazon the site and service. I dislike Amazon the bully. Desist!

Richard Taylor


February 29, 2000

Please reconsider your stance on your two software patents. Actions such as these can only be detrimental to the future development of the World Wide Web. Thank you.

Amy Csizmar Dalal


February 29, 2000

As a result of Amazon's ridiculousness, Amazon has no chance at any of my business until they cease and desist trying to patent a vital and common element of e-business.

Colin Spitler


February 29, 2000

I am an O'Reilly customer and purchase books (both technical & non-technical) online. I am supporting the boycott of Amazon until this issue is resolved to my satisfaction. Ian Paul Foot

ian.foot(a)dial.pipex.com


February 29, 2000

The 1-click patent does not protect a unique or novel technology. It's just a legal artifice, borne of a corrupt patent system, that Amazon is using as a bludgeon to attempt to smash its competition. How crass.

Andrew Tannenbaum


February 29, 2000

It's quite simple Jeff, if you continue with this, you will have a huge boycott on your hands... There are many alternatives to your site now, I'll have no problem with going elsewhere. It's your call.

John Gardner


February 29, 2000

I completely agree with Tim. This is the end of my business with Amazon, my family's business with Amazon, and many of my friends' business with Amazon.

Ed Kern


February 29, 2000

As an employee of one of the largest brokerage institutions in the US, I am urging my fellow coworkers to go elsewhere to purchase books online until the management at Amazon.com comes to their senses.

Phil Johnson


February 29, 2000

I've also spent hundreds of dollars in the past at Amazon, but as a developer myself, am disturbed by what I consider to be Amazon's unethical and irresponsible actions in this matter. I would urge Amazon to reconsider.

Phil McJunkins


February 29, 2000

I find Amazon's patent on 1-click ordering, and almost all software patents in general, to be disgusting. They're already stifling innovation in the software industry, and they are rapidly on their way to destroying the Internet.

Pete Flugstad


February 29, 2000

Being an e-commerce innovator, I'm saddened by how Amazon has stifled continued growth and innovation in this field. I will not support a company that doesn't support the industry/medium that it was founded upon.

Jeff Carnahan


February 29, 2000

Until Amazon stops trying to enforce this ridiculous patent, I'll be boycotting and encouraging all my friends to do likewise. Please do yourselves *and* the net a favor and stand down from this absurd position.

Claudia Mastroianni


February 29, 2000

Intellectual Property is a public trust, intended to reward innovation and spur invention, for the public good. This patent serves only private profit, and without meeting any measure of innovation. As such, it deserves no public largesse.

Jeff McCoskey


February 29, 2000

You may add me to the list of *former* amazon.com customers. Mr. O'Reilly did not state the case too strongly when he accused Amazon of "pissing in the well," and I for one will not buy from a vendor who does that kind of thing.

WAde L. Scholine


February 29, 2000

I have brought tonnes of books from anazon.com and amazon.co.uk (lots of them ORA books :-) and if you don't desist from this daft behaviour over patents I'll be forced to follow RMS's boycott suggestion -- please have a re-think.

Chris Croome


February 29, 2000

Guys, if you back off from this you will not loose your face, quite opposite. If you show that you can learn from your mistakes it will be the best marketing you can get. And I do hope that it's just a mistake on your side!!!!

Artem G. Abanov


February 29, 2000

Ya know, I was really irate when Barnes and Noble went after Ingram, so I took my consumer voting dollars to Amazon. Now Amazon has decided they can play the bully and profit off the efforts of others. So much for them taking the high road.

Larry Loesch


February 29, 2000

I cannot say anything better that what have previously been said. I guess will just say "Barnes and Noble" here I come. I have money burning a hole in my pocket and books to buy. If you come around, send me an e-mail, and I would be happy to come back. Well ... until then ....

Jeff Barrett


February 29, 2000

Indeed, the World Wide Web was given to us all as a gift, and now some are trying to claim parts of it as their own. I guess that's business as usual, but it doesn't make it ethical and I will not be buying from Amazon until they wake up and see the light.

Michael Schwager


February 29, 2000

I do most of my book purchasing from Amazon. Not any more. I also purchase CDs, videos and toys/electronics. Until Amazon wakes up I will shop elsewhere. BTW Amazon I also purchase MANY technical books for a large department. You are losing more than a typical single customer.

Michael Kriss


February 29, 2000

I agree with Tim's letter and feel that Amazon should drop the patent. Most of the techno-weenies I know (including myself) all think that Amazon looks really stupid for having the patent. After all, the technology was around before they were and was given freely to the world...

Christopher Lamey


February 29, 2000

Like many others, I am not a large source of income for Amazon. However, I agree that what you are doing is wrong. I think that the patents should never have been issued. I will not be buying anything from you until you quit your abuse. Plenty of other sources for O'Reilly books out there!

David Kubalak


February 29, 2000

I can appreciate Amazon filing patents to prevent someone else filing the patent and then trying to collect royalties. But I do not agree with your policy of using the patents to restrict others.

John McQuilling


February 29, 2000

Tim said it best, you're "pissing in the well." You don't have to "give back" to the community, but you certainly have no right to strangle it. If I can boycott the entire movie industry due to the DVD fiasco, then I'll have no trouble boycotting one online book store (that's you). Thanks.

John L. Varga, III


February 29, 2000

It is indeed not logical in any definition of the term to go against those who created the technology you (Amazon) wish to hide. In fact, as has been stated by so many others, it will prove to be counterprofitable. The Betamax is a prome example of short term greed. Learn from it!

Neil J. McLeish


February 29, 2000

As a previous Amazon.com customer (books & cd's), I'm disappointed in Amazon. I will not buy anything from Amazon.com until they change their stance on this issue.

Joe Phillips


February 29, 2000

I have supported Amazon.com for quite some time, even defending their position in the book industry as my friends bemoaned the "demise" of the small bookstore. Given Amazon's unreasonable pursuit of this patent issue, I will be shopping elsewhere, and encouraging others to do the same.

David Hoskin


February 29, 2000

You would think that, in this time of general public recoil from companies like Microsoft, Amazon would be smart enough to not go against the principles that so many of the people on the net hold dear. I, for one, will be trying to purchase books elsewhere from now on, with Amazon as my last resort.

Kristin Anne Igaki


February 29, 2000

I find Amazon's behavior and intent fascinating. Mr. Bezos et al have amassed immense fortunes which, at least in part, are results of other people's time, effort, and sense of community. To ignore this fact is shameful. Perhaps there is something in the Seattle water supply that causes this amazing selective memory.

Calum Lawler


February 29, 2000

I have spent more than 躔 to date at amazon.com, and have never purchased books or CDs from any other online merchant. However, in light of the abusive patents on One-Click ordering and the Affiliates program, I can no longer countenance purchasing anything from Amazon. I hope you see fit to change your policies soon.

Seth L. Blumberg


February 29, 2000

Over the past several years my colleagues and I have built a very large library of technical books here for us to reference. In the past we looked to Amazon as a major supplier of those books. In the future we will not buy anything from Amazon until they admit that the 1-Click and Associates patents are absurd and cease to enforce them.

Jeffrey A. Everett


February 29, 2000

The Amazon case is just the tip of the iceberg. The current patenting practices have to be subjected to a review by the courts (inevitable) as well as in the public policy arena (desirable and more important). It is high time to question the normative and practical preconceptions that underpin our attitude towards intellectual "property".

Dieter Zinnbauer


February 29, 2000

I am a small business owner and Web developer. This type of patent will hinder the advancement of the internet and ideas. I hope that after the obvious disagreement from the technical community Amazon will reconsider their position on this issue. The internet is a success because of it's open ideas and mass inovation. Not by the power of one.

Scott Burton


February 29, 2000

Tim has elucidated the situation clearly. As both an amazon.com and O'Reilly customer, let me say that as of today I'm a former amazon.com customer who will be purchasing O'Reilly books elsewhere from now on. I'm also an amazon associate, but I'll be removing all those links from my website shortly, and directing folks to more responsible vendors.

Pann McCuaig


February 29, 2000

I was an Amazon associate/affiliat, but have converted my online bookstore to use FatBrain. Amazon had captured nearly 100% of my book purchases, but now I go elsewhere, and will continue to do so until/unless these patents are dropped or assigned to some neutral entity (see http://www.p3c.org, or http://www.openpatents.org) with a free license.

Gregor N. Purdy


February 29, 2000

Like many others, I am not a large source of income for Amazon. However, I agree that what you are doing is wrong. I think that the patents should never have been issued. I will not be buying anything from you until you quit your abuse. Plenty of other sources for O'Reilly books out there!

David Kubalak


February 29, 2000

I am a Software Engineer and have seen and heard stories about software patents. How a simple idea could not be used simply because some lawer took it away. The patent system is being used outside of the spirit of its purpose and is bringing great harm to the whole industry. No software should be patentable, just copyrighted. I will never buy from your company again.

Jon Allen


February 29, 2000

I concur with the above letter. I furthermore wish to add that I have been an Amazon customer in the past -- but will not be in the future, if this ill-considered patent move is not reversed. There are still plenty of "bricks-and-mortar" stores where I can get my books, and even other online book sellers. I will make no further purchases until this ignorant stance is reversed.

Brandon Havey


February 29, 2000

A trademark on "1-Click Ordering" is one thing, but a patent on such an obvious process? This whole rush on patents on obvious e-commerce processes is remarkably like the rush on domain names a few years ago. Hopefully the courts will get some technical advisors who realize that granting patents for most of these things is like letting me grab www.coca-cola.com just because I was faster than Coca-Cola.

C. Robert Stevens


February 29, 2000

I have been aware of this for a while, and it's clearly ridiculous. I believe Amazon is also suing over coffee cups (another one of their great, and proprietary ideas) and of course, the entire process of selling books through the mail: "We WRAP them, and put POSTAGE on them, - get it? - OUR idea!" - Bezos was quoted as saying Tuesday by a source who refused to be identified, stating "they might claim they thought me up, too."

James Woodson


February 29, 2000

As a former independent bookseller, I have a long history of loathing Barnes and Noble. Even though Amazon contributes to the death of these small businesses, Amazon was my preferred on-line dealer because there was none of the paternalistic censorship that we can expect from B&N. Patenting and enforcing patents on obvious technology that you have borrowed is flat out wrong. Until such time as Amazon's patent policy is changed, I will buy books from B&N or Fatbrain.

Louis Moore


February 29, 2000

I can't belive the audacity of Amazon to believe that these ideas are worthy of patenting. The innovation and creativity these ideas embody is exactly what these patents will destroy. The internet is a medium that fosters innovation and technological advances and these patents, if enforced, will stifle exactly the innovation that made Amazon what it is. I will never, ever, ever buy anything else from Amazon and hope that everyone else follows suit.

Mark Davis


February 29, 2000

Amazon has always been one of my favorite stops on the web. I've always considered it a model for excellent customer services. I am very distressed to learn of Amazon's tactics of patenting what is an obvious technology, and clearly in an attempt to extort money out of other websites. I will no longer shop at Amazon. I will withdraw my memberhip in their affiliate program, and I'll be sure to tell all my friends to shop elsewhere. Goodbye Amazon!

Steve Faiwiszewski


February 29, 2000

Thank you Mr. O'Reilly for taking the time and energy to publically address this critical issue. I am impressed by the professionalism with which you've handled yourself and the creativity you have shown by providing this mechanism for the rest of us to make our voices heard. I sincerely hope that these efforts are not made in vain and that Amazon sees the error of their ways in regards to both the 1-click *and* the affiliate-program patent issues. Sincerely, JSF

Joshua S. Freeman


February 29, 2000

The 1-Click and Associates program patents that Amazon has acquired and apparently intends to enforce are outrageous. A few weeks ago, I bought what I think was my 10th Amazon book; now I regret it. I won't be shopping with Amazon until Amazon gives up these trivial, overly broad patents. I can't believe you ever sought to obtain them in the first place. If that's not hubris, I don't know what is. O'Reilly's 'pissing in the well' comment is right on the mark.

Charles Hornberger


February 29, 2000

I have been a customer of amazon.com for a long time, and have been very satisfied with the level of service. In short, amazon.com has always made me a happy customer. Sadly, I have realized that amazon.com now subscribes to business-practices that is totally unacceptable, even to the best of my wishes. The patent on one-click-ordering and the associates-program is forcing me to get my books elsewhere, even if that means lower service and higher prices. Too bad, but here goes another customer...

Jo Totland


February 29, 2000

Amazon is simply taking advantage of a woefully inefficient and ineffective patent process that is unable to distinguish legitimate inventions deserving protection from those that are not. This scenario is repeated over and over again in many different industries. It is invariably left to a judge/jury (non-technical) to make a decision. I have always believed that the way to win in the marketplace is to run faster than the competition and suggest that Amazon do the same instead of erecting barriers which impede progress for everyone, including their own.

Jerry E. Hurst, Jr.


February 29, 2000

I spent some money over the holidays at Amazon and recently ordered two books. I won't order anymore from amazon.com. There's not an informed person on the web who thinks this patent (or the patent application on affiliate programs) has any merit. Don't prey upon the ignorance of the patent office by asking for a patent on the marketing spin of an already established technology. And don't kill the goose that laid the golden egg...the free invention and exchange of technology "tricks" ultimately benefits you more than trying to create and enforce these kinds of restrictions.

Kim Flint


February 29, 2000

I work as a computer tech and sys admin and I'm pretty apalled by Amazon's attitude. I bought from Amazon before because I thougth their prices were great and because of the service. But I have to agree with Tim and Amazon is in fact trying to limit the potential of the net. As a technical user, I (and the company I work for) require to buy plenty of books (several by O'Reilly in fact). In fact yesterday I decided to got to Fatbrain.com to buy 2 books. I hope Amazon sees "the light", but until then I will shop elsewhere. I thought something like Amazon should be successfull because its service, not its bullying tactics.

Manuel Alducin


February 29, 2000

Dear Amazon, I was once a frequent and loyal customer. I eagerly recommended your web site and service to my friends. As a programmer and computer scientist, I have also been an opponent to obvious software patents. In the past, this industry has seen many foolish and clearly obvious patents. Unfortunately, your one-click patent is one of the most obvious. I will not support you in your effort to impinge upon the future innovation of the web. I will continue to boycott your business, and I will continue to dissuade my friends from using your service until these patents are released into the public domain.

David Johnson


February 29, 2000

I, also, have been a good customer of Amazon.com. But, this patent should never have been granted, submitted, or enforced. Prior art alone should have rendered this a non-issue. Patenting a cookie process would be as insane as patenting gene sequences (I forgot, Patent Office is issuing patents on those also). The only good that could come from this is if Amazon comes to the public and says that it was doing this as an experiment to show the folly of the Patent Office and they were using this as a test case to show Congress they need to overhaul the process. But, alas, they probably are not creating a test case and merely creating ill-will.

Jason McClellan


February 29, 2000

I am the CTO of a small internet startup as well as being a full time application developer. My startup does not make any purchases from Amazon, and I've stopped buying there myself. All of my co-workers have joined the boycott of Amazon as well. I'm not happy about this situation, as I think that Amazon is a great company with great service. However, if Amazon maintains their current position much longer, it's very likely that many of us will become so comfortable with and used to using Barnes and Noble, fatbrain, Tower Records, and many other sites that there will be no reason to ever go back to Amazon even if they do finally come to see reason.

Matthew Yarbrough


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com used to be my "default" online book retailer. I really liked thier search tools and one-click ordering. Fact is, though, I have not even accessed Amazon.com since the 1-click patent and absolutely will not order anything from Amazon.com now that they have taken this to the next level. Amazon.com, Please stop closing and locking doors on the Web. The Web is driven by open technology. The spirit of the Web involves giving and preserving the environment for the advancement of technology. 1-click and affiliate programs are a "step ONE" in the life of e-commerce sites. Unblock the next step. Matt Warden http://mattwarden.com/

Matt Warden


February 29, 2000

As I read about the conflict in process, my only thought is, 'What a shame.' It's obvious the Amazon attorneys have too much time (and money) on their hands. Imagine what kind of new features and enhancements could have been made to your site if you would spend the resources on improving the technology. Your site is not as great as you think it is. It takes up to four cookies just to load the first page. I don't know where your hiring your programmers, but where I come from that's not good programming. I wouldn't be surprised if your attorneys soon filed another patent on selling the information your gathering from people just visiting your site. What a shame.

Jorge A. Garcia


February 29, 2000

A company that has benefitted so much from open standards as Amazon has should never have filed such stifling patents as these. Amazon: you have no right to continue doing business using the innovations provided to you by the likes of Tim Berners-Lee, the Netscape group that formed the cookie specification, and many others. I personally feel cheated, having recommended to others and contributed my own money to a business that would rob the Internet community in this way. Thus I will discontinue my business with Amazon, and take every opportunity to urge my friends and those who trust me to do the same, until Amazon completely reverses its position on software patents, contributing those that it already holds to the public domain.

Oliver Stewart


February 29, 2000

A company that has benefitted so much from open standards as Amazon has should never have filed such stifling patents as these. Amazon: you have no right to continue doing business using the innovations provided to you by the likes of Tim Berners-Lee, the Netscape group that formed the cookie specification, and many others. I personally feel cheated, having recommended to others and contributed my own money to a business that would rob the Internet community in this way. Thus I will discontinue my business with Amazon, and take every opportunity to urge my friends and those who trust me to do the same, until Amazon completely reverses its position on software patents, contributing those that it already holds to the public domain.

Oliver Stewart


February 29, 2000

Daniel P. McCarty


February 29, 2000

Dear Jeff Bezos, As both a Web developer and an employee of an organization who's heart and soul is in the education of students, I believe what Amazon has done is appalling and will seriously hurt both the Internet business and the education of people around. Amazon is in the business of books from the start, and it should not stand in the way of those others who would like to get books into the hands of those to learn. I also hope that this stands as a message to the patent offices of the world that they must be more careful and educated in their granting of patents. Their job should be the promoting of innovation, not the stifling of it! Sincerely, Andrew Jung Analyst, Web Services Centre for Education Information Standards and Services. http://www.ceiss.org/

Andrew Jung


February 29, 2000

I am personally boycotting Amazon and will use other services, i.e. fatbrain.com, until such time as Amazon drops this childish behaivor. If they want to "take thier ball and go home" they will be alone in an ever evolvoing web environment.

Rod Richeson


February 29, 2000

Why the hell where you (Amazon.com) ever allowed to obtain a patent on a simple thing like "cookies", that you didn't even invent! Ridiculous! It is sad that the American public is not informed enough YET to understand the gravity of your greedy actions. As technology evolves and time goes on, people will understand more and more about these kind of technical issues and will lump you into an unpopular and distasteful catagory like Microsoft. Unfortunately it will proabally have little if any negative effect on your profit margins, and that is most likely the only thing that would grab your attention enough for you to consider releasing rights to this patent. All I can do is use my power as a consumer to not shop at your site and convince everyone I know to do the same. Amazon.com : Think about it.

Austin Vaughan


February 29, 2000

I am one of Amazon.com's early adopters and a techie, buying many books, toys, music, and video, including many of O'Reilly's. I am also distraught about this malicious abuse of patent law, and a clueless patent office. Until Amazon ceases this land-grab on the 'net, I will no longer purchase any product or service from Amazon, or an Amazon affiliate like drugstore.com. This is not a slanderous affair, I'm just not putting my money into a business which violates the "New Ethics" of the internet. If I'm buying books on Open Source Software, I'm going to buy them from a company that believes the Internet and simple applications like Cookies are also open. Call it a Service Mark, make it better, do whatever, but it's easy to prove prior art. Until then, this is a more malicious instance of etoy v etoys. Until Amazon learns to play nice with the other kids in the sandbox, I'm leaving this playground.

William Foy


February 29, 2000

Tim, First, thank you! Not only for the excellent quality of the books that you publish, but the manner in which you voiced so eloquently your concerns over the recent Amazon.com (tm) patents. Second, like many of the others who have signed this open letter, I am telling as many of my on-line companions about my views of the things that Amazon is pulling, and I am providing them with lists of other places to look and shop for their books and such. TOI date, there has only been one person whom I have not been able to convince to shop other places than Amazon. The reason for that is that her interests are rather obscure in medieval manuscript arts. But, as soon as I can find a reliable source for those types of books, I can bet that she'll start buying elsewhere, too. To Amazon, I can only say "Shame on you!" The idea in marketing is not to piss off your customers... It should be to please them so well that they continue to buy from you. Only then can you get out of the "red" and actually start making a profit, which is really the idea behind business: to MAKE money, rather than loose it. Sincerely, Geordon VanTassle Former Amazon shopper

Geordon VanTassle


February 29, 2000

Like so many others who have signed this open letter, I am a formerly happy and satisfied customer of Amazon.com. Moreover, I have friends and family who have worked for Amazon, and whose opinions of your company were extremely high. In addition to my own purchases, I have certainly referred many others to purchase books, music and other things from you. I hope that you understand that Amazon.com cannot afford to lose the goodwill of the community which supports them. For awhile, you can continue to profit from those who are unaware of your patent claims, but eventually the vast bulk of your market will migrate to your competitors. Even if your patent were to be upheld as valid, this would be a very ill-considered strategy. You know very well that Internet changes the rules of business in extremely significant ways. One of these changes is that intellectual property claims (even valid ones) will often create a backlash more costly than the value of the protection. When it is one so precarious as the 1-Click or Affiliate claims, I think you should save the money you've been spending on lawyers, drop these at once, and invest in reacquiring the goodwill you've lost.

Mike Goldman


February 29, 2000

Derek Harrell


February 29, 2000

Rob Bryan


February 29, 2000

Sandor Fuss


February 29, 2000

James Eagan


February 29, 2000

Sean Cavanagh


February 29, 2000

Chris Peikert


February 29, 2000

Neil Hoggarth


February 29, 2000

Wade Badenhorst


February 29, 2000

David Menestrina


February 29, 2000

Guenter Schneider


February 29, 2000

Javier Arturo Rodriguez


February 29, 2000

David M. Zendzian


February 29, 2000

I heartily support Tim O'Reilly's letter.

Jeff Shepherd


February 29, 2000

David M. Zendzian


February 29, 2000

I have been an Amazon.com customer for quite awhile but I refuse to purchase another product from the site until the patent application is withdrawn. I used to have a great opinion of Amazon.com but now I see them as just as bad as Microsoft. Not a good business strategy.

Tyler J. Alumbaugh


February 29, 2000

Theodore Hong


February 29, 2000

Andrew Sherman


February 29, 2000

Gregory McLean


February 29, 2000

Reuben Sumner


February 29, 2000

William J. Murphy


February 29, 2000

William Hester


February 29, 2000

Peter Palfrader


February 29, 2000

Robert G. Schmertz


February 29, 2000

Scott Elliott


February 29, 2000

Cloyce D. Spradling


February 29, 2000

Triantafillos Karayiannis


February 29, 2000

I'm shopping at Fat Brain and Powell's, until amazon lets up.

Floyd Mann


February 29, 2000

I used to really like Amazon. Now I stay away.

Bradley R. Smith


February 29, 2000

This patent has convinced me to take my business to other online bookstores.

James W Walden


February 29, 2000

Please take account of your customers wishes. They made you company.

Hugh Potts


February 29, 2000

Your abuse of the patent system has already cost you this (formerly satisfied) customer.

Shane Pielli


February 29, 2000

This is almost as ridiculous as the Onion joke about Microsoft patenting the numbers 0 and 1.

Ron Laufer


February 29, 2000

That technique existed well before Amazon. Bezos, your altruism is displaying grred here !

David Hilton


February 29, 2000

Luckily, most the books I want I can get at FatBrain. The rest I'll go to a meat bookstore for.

Adam Heinz


February 29, 2000

Is Amazon going to patent bookmarks next? Or cover jackets? Repent. You have invented NOTHING.

Paul F. Dubois


February 29, 2000

Can I patent that revolutionary blue-green color on my Windows desktop and then make Microsoft stop using it?

Tim Gales


February 29, 2000

Well, it's off to Barnes & Noble. And to think, I had been so pleased with your site that I have never even tried anyone else.

H. B. Harris


February 29, 2000

Being a developer of e-commerce sites I can safely say that I am in violation of this Patent and proud of it.

Robert Nylander


February 29, 2000

Add one more person (me, duh!) to the list of people disgusted with Amazon's actions in the area of software patents.

scott jacobs


February 29, 2000

I will not order anymore merchandise from Amazon from this day forward until they abandon their one-click shopping patent.

Patrik Dousa


February 29, 2000

Although I have been a loyal Amazon customer since the beginning, I am now joining the boycott until Amazon releases these frivilous and selfish patents.

John Boardman


February 29, 2000

My animal rights group currently has an association with Amazon for our recommended reading list. We're switching to Wordsworth because of Amazon's lameness.

Dave Rolsky


February 29, 2000

I very much like Amazon.com, and have bought many books and CD's from amazon. But I really think that these patents are a bit off of the deep end. Please Mr Bezos, drop these patents.

Zachary Kessin


February 29, 2000

My best internet shopping experiences have been with Amazon, but until you stop pursuing such baseless patents, my business will now go to fatbrain.com, bn.com, and a host of other web retailers.

Steve Lewis


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com *used* to be my favorite place to shop online and I recommeneded it to everyone who'd ask me. As a consultant, I am asked alot. Amazon is no longer on my list - and will not be - until this silly patent is dissolved.

Lisa Kramer


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com *used* to be my favorite place to shop online and I recommeneded it to everyone who'd ask me. As a consultant, I am asked alot. Amazon is no longer on my list - and will not be - until this silly patent is dissolved.

Lisa Kramer


February 29, 2000

I won't be using Amazon while they enforce the 1-click patent. Barnes and Noble offers a similar service at a similar price at bn.com, so why support Amazon's attempt to use the patent system to stifle competition?

Andy Latto


February 29, 2000

I agree fully with Tim. I think this whole business will hurt Amazon far more than it will help. Remember, unhappy clients share their experiences with others FAR more frequently than happy clients do.

Kimberley Harding


February 29, 2000

As a former loyal Amazon shareholder and customer, I am very disappointed by Amazon's ill-advised use of software patents. I can no longer support the company until they publically state they will change their practices in this area.

Jason Bandlow


February 29, 2000

I stopped shopping at Amazon the day the decided to enforce their pathetic 1-click patent against Barnes and Nobel (www.bn.com). I buy everything I need at Fatbrain (www.fatbrain.com) now and I urge others to do the same. I don't miss Amazon one bit.

Tim Drury


February 29, 2000

I was an enthusiastic Amazon customer and never hesitated to recommend them to my friends. However, given your recent efforts with regards to patenting, I am now doing the opposite whenever possible. Beware the power of memes: "No Pesos for Sr. Bezos."

Tom Maszerowski


February 29, 2000

I share the belief that Amazon has reaped huge benefits from public domain technologies, and is now repaying the favour by engaging in intellectual theft via absurdly obvious patents. I am informing all of my non-technical friends and family members of Amazon's behaviour, and they can make up their own minds whether to continue giving their business to such a destructive and selfish corporation.

Robert Martin


February 29, 2000

Amazon used to be a great company that built its success on providing superior service and selection to customers. I am very disappointed that it has abandoned this strategy in favor of using thuggish tactics to squelch competition. I won't be buying from Amazon any more.

Kevin S. Van Horn


February 29, 2000

I used to be a regular customer to amazon.com. However, I am now participating in the boycott and will continue to encourage others to do so until this issue is reversed. I will not spend my money in a corporation that pursues such anti-competitive policies.

Brandon Schmidt


February 29, 2000

Since I first heard about this patent and suit, I have turned to other book outlets on the web. I believe that this patent is ludicrous, yet dangerous. I won't be buying from Amazon until the patent is dropped. I will have my information purged from their database.

Charles H. Baker


February 29, 2000

Both of these patents are a slap in the face of the real Web inventors. Trying to enforce these patents is hypocritical and ultimately self-destructive. I will not buy anything from Amazon while they are trying to use these patants as a cheap trick to stifle competition.

Scott Johnson


February 29, 2000

I will not be purchasing books from Amazon.com until this gets resolved. While I am not a major source of income to Amazon.com, I am public in my opinions and am speaking out to my friends and family that do make purchases from Amazon.com. I will continue to do so until the patents are dropped.

Chris Riddoch


February 29, 2000

Stephen


February 29, 2000

Amazon, I like your service and website in general, but I cannot condone your stifling of innovation with ludicrous patents. I order a considerable number of books each year, from various booksellers, and will be taking my future business elsewhere. I hope your stupid patent is worth all the ill-will and lost business.

Alex Stangl


February 29, 2000

Since January 29, 1998 I have placed 39 orders worth Ū,215.57 with Amazon and have until this point been a satisfied customer. The above amount does not count my wifes purchases or my company - we have 12 employees. Please rectify the patent issue so we may continue doing business with Amazon, until that time, my business goes elsewhere.

John Wise


February 29, 2000

I have stopped buying books from Amazon, the place I used to buy all my books for school, in support of RMS' call for a boycott. This patent is pantently absurd. I have also begun actively telling the other students at my school to hold back from buying at Amazon until they sign the rights for these patents over to the Free Software Foundation.

Joseph Lesh


February 29, 2000

Amazon, the world wide web thanks you for your contribution to the sea of trivial patents and innovation. Certainly a powerful company such as yourself couldn't possibly have needed the freely given hardwork of countless others to get to where you are to day. Congrats on how well you stand on the backs of others and rakin in your dough. Davon Shire.

Davon Shire


February 29, 2000

The other day I actually went to the bother of driving to Borders and physically walking in and buying some books in person, rather than go online and buy from Amazon.com -- this patent this is just crazy! I will also more regularly visit my local independent hole-in-the-wall bookstore rather than go to Amazon.com, until they come to their senses.

Carole E. Mah


February 29, 2000

I think that Amazon is engaging in non-productive and non-profitable activities with this pursuit. I hope that they can be dissuaded from endeavoring to coral the WWW for themselves. Further, as Tim stated, Amazon has an obligation to contribute to the Internet. For with out the Internet, where would Amazon be? Sincerely A saddened Amazon customer

Christian Ullman


February 29, 2000

I have bought quite a few books from Amazon.com, but I will not buy another until both the "Associates Program" patent and the "1 Click" patent have been released. I had thought Amazon.com was above this, and am sorry to discover that I was wrong. I am also encouraging everyone I know to buy from either bn.com (Barnes and Noble online) or a local bookstore rather than amazon.com.

Joey Smith


February 29, 2000

I've always considered Amazon a excellent company that is responsive to customers' interests, but this patent nonsense would simply give your company a monopoly on certain aspects of the web. This is something I don't want anyone to have, and it's enough to make me avoid buying from you until your policies are changed.

Dru Oja Jay


February 29, 2000

I'm now convinced that the world has gone mad. Patents on something as widespread as an affiliate program or the use of cookies for shopping are ludicrous. What will come next? Patents on the way Amazon.com is designed, with the tab look.. one that is successful and that many ecommerce sites have mimicked because of the familiarity? I'm hoping that these patents fall over. As a web developer this really concerns me.

Amy Pronovost


February 29, 2000

I used to buy books at Amazon.com and stopped when I learned about this silly patent. Tim's open letter has prompted me to further action. I will email all my friends about this and ask them to pass the message on. Further, I'll to tell them to take their business elsewhere, such as competitors fatbrain.com and barnesandnoble.com. Personally I have beneifited greatly from Open Source software and the web. Amazon's appropriation of public property for private use I find infuriating.

Clifford V. Moravetz


February 29, 2000

Most people don't pay much attention to patents and why the patent system was created in the first place. Patents were originally designed so that "inventors" could profit from an invention in which the inventor has invested a lot (time, money, etc) in. 1-Click is not an invention. It is an amalgamation of prior works. Furthermore, it is one which is already in common use. Patents are not for one entity to first claim as prize. Ironically, this is the most common use of (software) patents.

Albert Hopkins


February 29, 2000

I used to be a faithful and loyal customer of Amazon's. In my experience they have phenomenal service, and reasonable prices. My evangelism has brought Amazon dozens of customers. But being deeply offended by Amazon's patents I felt forced to search out an able competitor. It took over a month trying out several different companies but I have finally found an online bookseller I am satisfied with, and who is now the subject of my evangelism (fatbrain.com). Goodbye Amazon, I will never buy anything from you again.

Jason Grimes


February 29, 2000

It is because of this issue and other similar ones that I now shop at Fat Brain. It is revolting to me to see that a company that has so much obvious talent and ability would turn its focus to underhanded legal tactics in order to get ahead. Sadly, this is a common tale. In the process of going public and having tremendous success, someone always gets greedy, surrounds the company with a moat of lawyers, and begins to be unscrupulous. You become part of the system, and unless you are very careful and stand by some guiding moral principles, it becomes part of you.

Chris Monson


February 29, 2000

Amazon should be ashamed of itself. This is a patent that should not have been granted in the first place. The very fact that Amazon feels the need to enforce something of this nature speaks volumes to the fact that Jeff Bezos is just another money-hungry, greedy, capitalist. I strongly doubt that Amazon would be significantly hurt by other web sites using the term "one-click ordering". I mena, come on! Amazon has already reached "critical mass" in terms of brand recognition as an "E-Tailer". Amazon, take this opportunity to take the high road and show a little class. Enough already.

Alberto S. Lopez


February 29, 2000

I buy lots of books from Amazon, even though you are not always the lowest price, and I have for several years now. I am also a stockholder. I also admire your website from a technology standpoint. I consider a lot of what goes on in the "intellectual property" arena to be classic examples of corporate predatory behavior, and unfortunately it looks like you may be included in this category. I'm not sure if I'm going to totally boycott you yet, but I am shifting some of my purchases elsewhere. I am also circulating material about this to my acquaintances. I hope you change your mind on this issue.

Rick Saling


February 29, 2000

Dear Mr. Bezos, I enjoy(ed) using Amazon for many years and believe that it does have the best website for buying books and cds. However, I cannot condone the use of the patent offensively. So, I regret to say I've switched to a competitor, Borders.com. I would consider switching back if I observed that stop using this patent in this form of terrorism. It is anti-competitive and immoral. The Internet has been good to you and your stockholders. Thankfully, the inventors of the cookie didn't terrorize you. Every eBusiness person is terrified by your stance on this issue. Please do the right thing. -Ron Perrella

Ron Perrella


February 29, 2000

Sarah Gandt


February 29, 2000

I have purchased from Amazon in the past. I find your site extremely convenient and you always have what I want at reasonable prices. However, I will not be shopping at Amazon until you cease your abuse of the US patent system. You are shooting yourself in the foot by angering the customer base that spends hundreds if not thousands of dollars per year on heavyweight computer books such as those from O'Reilly. You are also doing yourself out of valuable word-of-mouth advertising from the "techie" population who until now have been your biggest advocates.<br><br>I urge you to reconsider your position on software patents.<br><br>Respectfully,<br>Bill Duetschler

Bill Duetschler


February 29, 2000

The continued growth of the internet will largly depend on the success of the ethical struggle to nurture and maintain open standards and systems. Amazon has benefitted greatly from the open ethic of the internet and would not exist in its present form without it. Amazon, as a pioneer of e-commerce, should gratefully and enthusiastically contribute its knowledge to open systems. It is almost incomprehensible that an internet pioneer would create a corporate policy and culture to keep its knowledge proprietary, thereby contributing to degradation of the internet. Success on the internet will be achieved by organizations that base their policy and actions on the development and sharing of management and technological excellence. Internet Organizations that develop a proprietary culture expose the 18th. century thinking of management.

Gordon McAllister


February 29, 2000

Tim O'Reilly mentions that "that while (you) believe the patent process can sometimes be abused, (you) believe that this is not the case with Amazon's 1-Click patent." While this may be true in a strictly legal sense, it is certainly not the case where the perception of your customers is concerned. Like many of the people signing this open letter, I was once a frequent Amazon customer. And like many of the signatories, I no longer patronize Amazon because of my perception that your 1-Click "technology" (sic) is a gross abuse of the intent of the patent system and the lack of technical savvy on the part of the USPTO. I have ensured that neither my friends or family will do business with Amazon as well. The nugget here is that regardless of how valid your actions appear in the wrapping of legal technicalities, if your customers perceive that you are acting in a manner which is either unfair or counter to their best interests (or both!), you and your company will end up the worse off for it.

Erik Jakowatz


February 29, 2000

Mark C Smith


February 29, 2000

Michel Dalal


February 29, 2000

Wesley Tanaka


February 29, 2000

Wesley Tanaka


February 29, 2000

Brett Rosen


February 29, 2000

Aaron Fuegi


February 29, 2000

Stan Purington


February 29, 2000

dave green


February 29, 2000

Arnaud RđVEILLON


February 29, 2000

Rick Dieringer


February 29, 2000

Ralph Jocham


February 29, 2000

Ronald Yorgason


February 29, 2000

Steven O'Toole


February 29, 2000

Tim's letter speaks for itself.

Steve LePera


February 29, 2000

Kathleen E. Forden


February 29, 2000

The associates patent is the last straw; I will boycott Amazon.

Neil Weber


February 29, 2000

I agree entirely with RMS and Tim. I have closed my account with Amazon.

Edmund GRIMLEY EVANS


February 29, 2000

I purchase close to a thousand dollars worth of computers and business books per year. I had been dealing with a local bookseller up until recently and was interested in trying out your web service. In light of the current patent issue, I do not believe I can support a company that would take what was given freely, then close the door on others. This behavior is akin to being first in line at a buffet dinner and taking every single item. At a restaurant, you would be considered a pig. As a business, you should be ashamed of yourselves.

Travis Schneider


February 29, 2000

By these tactics, Amazon.com is on its way to become the other bully in Seattle.

Sriram Venkataraman


February 29, 2000

I'm boycotting Amazon and urging everyone I know to do the same.

Arthur Parker


February 29, 2000

I fully support this letter to Amazon. I will shop elsewhere until this matter is resolved.

Holland Guldberg


February 29, 2000

Amazon has lost a lot of business from me since they started this silly patent crusade.

Troy Klyber


February 29, 2000

I am a current amazon customer and decry their blatant attempt to stifle competition.

Bill Pfeifer


February 29, 2000

wake up! You lost another company's business. No clickee, no money.

Bryan Hunt


February 29, 2000

There is no way this abuse of the patent system will stand up in court. Until then, boycott Amazon.

Neal Groothuis


February 29, 2000

All my on-line book purchases have been with Amazon. I will use other vendors until the patent is dropped.

Gary Dean


February 29, 2000

I think Tim has spoken for the community quite eloquently in this case, and deserves our support and our thanks.

Keith Russell


February 29, 2000

This is a general problem that requires a general solution. However, in the meantime, it is incumbent on the techo-savvy to police themselves.

david Butcher


February 29, 2000

I used spend about โ a month at Amazon. I will now be taking my busness elsewhere unless they decide to drop their patent.

Brian Richards


February 29, 2000

It's time to stop these innovation-unfriendly bogus intellectual property patents that make things worse for consumers and developers.

Andrew Huff


February 29, 2000

The web succeded there others tried, mainly because it was open and non-proprietary. Was the web patented, you would not be here.

Daniel M. German


February 29, 2000

Not only will I not use Amazon until this patent is dropped. I have requested Amazon to purge all information about me from their database.

Ed Bruce


February 29, 2000

I agree fully with Tim's Letter and hope that this will make Amazon realize the amount sales lost mainly by people in the technical field.

David Pieniaszek


February 29, 2000

I routinely spend large amounts of money on books for school. Until Amazon stops their abuse of the patent system, none of this money will be going to them.

Nathan Ingersoll


February 29, 2000

Jason Mellein


February 29, 2000

Amazon has shown that it's not out for anyone but itself, and will subvert the legal system to its own gains. I refuse to support such a company.

Wade Minter


February 29, 2000

I'm still buying stuff from Amazon, but unless they rethink their patent strategy quickly, I'm not sure for how long I'll keep doing it...

Nuno Nunes


February 29, 2000

It is my hope that amazon (and any other company or indvidual) who trys to own public domain property or ideas "one clicks" them selves into oblivion.

Spike Wetmore


February 29, 2000

I have been a member of the affiliates program at my personal HTTP://atkeison.org site, but I will switch to another program if Amazon does not change within the week!

John Atkeison


February 29, 2000

I'm a long-time customer and frequent user of Amazon. I heartily agree that you are stupidly angering people like me when you could be sharing your ideas and winning us over.

Art Mellor


February 29, 2000

I believe it is time for an about face. There is nothing ignoble about reversing ones views in response to discusion, rather it is quite the opposite. It takes a brave person to do the right thing.

Ian Hodur


February 29, 2000

I believe that Amazon's attempts to patent such trivial applications of web development technology represent a current and real threat. I won't shop at Amazon until they drop this application.

Tom Janofsky


February 29, 2000

It is about time that companies begin to act responsibly rather than what is in their short sighted best interests. Amazon, you may think this is an advantage but you are gaining quite a negative image.

Ben Edwards


February 29, 2000

I am a software designer/programming engineer and I find this kind of patent abuse appalling. I for one am not going to buy anything from Amazon until this behavior is halted. I will also make it a point to spread the word along.

Paul Moreau


February 29, 2000

I love the convenience and price at Amazon, but I have stopped all purchasing there. I've been going to brick-and-mortar stores again. I'm willing to suffer with higher prices and fewer choices if it can help put an end to this absurdity.

Tofer Chagnon


February 29, 2000

I recently recieved a letter from Amazon asking why I had not ordered anything from them in so long. I stated then that I was refusing them my business in disgust over their current business practice. Until they reform, they will not get my money.

Scott Boland


February 29, 2000

I would rather pay twice as much on my technical books than support a company that feels it needs a patent on a trivial process to remain competitive. I will no longer even use Amazon to find books because of your abuses of the patent system. Goodbye internet.

Walter Wicklund


February 29, 2000

I had contemplated becoming an Amazon customer for some time until I heard about your abusal of the above named patents. I will gladly keep my business and money with bn.com and buy.com and will encourage my family and friends to do the same. You're only hurting yourselves by pushing the patent issues.

Andrew J. Heroff


February 29, 2000

Tim stated it well - the development of the web depends on the open use of shared technologies. Imagine if someone had patented the link! Where would we be? Amazon needs to get with the program, or they will find themselves left in the dust, either financially or eventually somewhere karmically!

Justin Hall


February 29, 2000

I never did shop with amazon.com, but I probably never will now, in light of these absurd and greedy patents..it's a shame the so-called "Man of the Year" has to resort to dirty pool to try to get a leg up on the competition..are you going to sue CDnow.com because they have an `Affliates'-like program as well?

Timothy R. Geier


February 29, 2000

This abuse of the patent system, and the lawsuits that have come from this abuse, have caused me to boycott Amazon.com. In short, last night, when I purchased my mother's birthday present books, I bought them from Barnes and Noble (bn.com), rather than Amazon. I will not do business with Amazon until they release these patents.

Brent E. Edwards


February 29, 2000

Patenting the trivial hurts the small guy more than the big guy, folks. I'm a small guy. I feel myself restricted by this frivolous patenting - what's next? A patent on using color to highlight something on a web site? Will I get sued? - that I feel entities that abuse IP law deserve boycotting and any other retaliation that is allowed by law.

Thomas Tonino


February 29, 2000

If this patent is allowed to stand then I will immediately patent the process for relieving the mucus pressure upon one's sinuses as follows: 1) Placing an receptacle object against ones nostrils and: 2) Blowing until all pressure is relieved and the sinuses are clear. Seriously though, I will no longer be spending money with Amazon.

Alex Olshove


February 29, 2000

I find the actions of Amazon absurd and ruthless. They're trying to destroy what so many have spent so long creating. I used to buy books at Amazon all the time. I thought Barnes and Noble was a joke. Now, I buy all my technical books at bookpool.com or fatbrain.com, and all of my other books at barnesandnoble.com. No more Amazon for me.

Peter Thatcher


February 29, 2000

I've purchased a little over 񘈨 at Amazon in the past year -- up until RMS called for the boycott, that is. Since then, I've been purchasing through a local "brick and mortar" retailer that matches prices with Amazon. So, Amazon is welcome to keep their patents (until they are voided), and I'll just keep purchasing everything through other vendors.

Robert Butler


February 29, 2000

I have bought several hundred dollars worth of merchandise from the Amazon web site. since then I have learned about their patent practices. I am glad to say that I have not bought one thing from them since then. It isn't too hard to find other vendors that sell the same stuff, and I think it's worth my time to do so. Go Two Click Shopping! - Marc

Marc Hughes


February 29, 2000

Ask any IP attorney he/she will tell you this is the easiest it has ever been to get a patent, particularly in the so-called business processes area. I understand the PTO is swamped and very little/thorough prior art investigation is done. I have bought at least 100 books in the past year alone, if Amazon follows this route I will never buy another book from them.

Ayokunle Giwa


February 29, 2000

Besides short-term gain, I'm unsure as to what Amazon has to gain here. Thus far it's seemed to breed only ill-will and contempt. Fortunately, this feeling is spreading beyond just the technical community and into the mainstream mindset. Hopefully the number and importance of people who are pissed at Amazon will be significant enough to deter them from pursuing this any further.

Benjamin White


February 29, 2000

I believe software patents, especially frivolous ones like the Amazon ones, are a tragedy to the internet. I will purchase no more products from Amazon as long as they are enforcing their patents. If I hear a public statement from Amazon that they are backing down from their stance on these patents, I will begin purchasing from them again. Until then, I consider it a sin to buy from them.

Brian Hayward


February 29, 2000

Granted, I'm not up on intellectual property law, I dont see how this patent could possibly be upheld. Lastly, I would think that trying to own a technology that has been freely available in the public domain is a terribly tacky thing to do. Perhaps someone should try to pass off a document delivery mechanism by the patent office, and then license only amazon for implementing the technology as a web server... Maybe they'd then get the picture. Probably not, since money is quite an intoxicating substance.

Adam Prato


February 29, 2000

I would like to see the magical code you have written for your one click shopping. It seems to me that all you really have to do is store an encrypted credit card number associated with a cookie. (Something I would never do on my sites anyway). I would guess it would take about 10 lines of simple ColdFusion code. I guess maybe I should patent my search bar code that allows visitors to search from a pulldown menu of websites. I have never purchased anything from Amazon ever since you turned into the Wal-Mart of the web. If I need a good book I'll just go to BN.

Kyle Singer


February 29, 2000

I think the real problem is the patent office not being technologicaly informed enough to be issuing patents like this. I think it is up to the patent office to stay informed on new technology and do the research required before giving patents away to such important things as these. Amazon has further irritated the situation by taking advantage of this major fault in the patent office. If we do not take a stand on this issue not only with Amazon but the patent office we will soon be over-run with unimaginable patents that will kill the growth of the Internet.

Candie Yoder


February 29, 2000

I used to recommend Amazon as the best place to buy books online. Your customer service and your selection were excellent. My referrals encouraged dozens of your customers. But since you have chosen to abuse the US patent system with patents as obvious as one-click ordering and your associates' program, I can no longer do business with you. Until you pledge to use your patents only for defensive purposes, you can rest assured that I will cost you lots of customers. People in the Internet business understand exactly what you're doing, and many of them are profoundly unhappy.

Eric Kidd


February 29, 2000

To Jeff Bezos - I used to shop quite a bit at Amazon. I used to think that you guys were at the start of the whole e-commerce revolution, etc. I also encouraged friends and family to use Amazon to buy books, CDs, etc. The day I heard about your patent, I informed all of those friends and family (who look to me as the 'computer expert') that I was boycotting Amazon and immediately switching my business to Barnes and Noble. You are taking advantage of a Patent Office that is not yet up to speed with this new technological world. You have lost mine and my friends business for now, possibly forever. When your patent gets overturned, I may be back or not... Sincerely, William J. Edney

William Edney


February 29, 2000

With each passing day, my disappointment with the U.S. patent system grows - but not nearly as much as my disappointment in those people who, whenever the opportunity presents itself, will abuse it. I have participated in Richard Stallman's boycott ever since it was called for. Nothing personal, really - I simply hope that each and every company that pulls an "intellectual property" stunt like this (triply so when they didn't invent it in the first place) goes violently and permanently bankrupt. I believe that Mr. Bezos earned his fortune. I believe that Mr. Bezos has also - through this action - declared his company unfit and undeserving of all the support it has received from the online community. But above all else, I believe that Mr. Bezos doesn't care in the slightest what I - or any of us - think any more.

Damien Spracklin


February 29, 2000

I have been a loyal Amazon customer for years. I have yet to find anyone who can consistently compete with your prices. I have purchased hundreds of dollars worth of books and videos from the Amazon website and I had suggested your site to all of my friends and colleagues. However, I am loyal no more. I have been participating in the boycott since it started. The patent on 1-Click ordering is the one of the most ludicrous abuses of patent law I have ever seen, and Amazon should be ashamed by its conduct. I don't care if I have to pay more money when I buy from other outlets. I will not support any internet business which so selfishly abuses current regulatory systems at the expense of the people who helped carry Amazon through its early years. Your ingratitude toward the people who helped make you a sucess will only hurt you and your company in the long run.

Matt Popke


February 29, 2000

Kraig A. Olmstead


February 29, 2000

Looks like I'll be shopping bn.com.

Joe Brandt


February 29, 2000

A well reasoned letter I am proud to add my name to.

Andre I. Mel'cuk


February 29, 2000

I've always enjoyed shopping at Amazon but I will find other venues.

Fred Dirkse


February 29, 2000

Note to Amazon: Technical people are laughing at this patent. What if Apple had patented the phrase "One-Click" when their one-button mouse was introduced? Get with the program.

James Quinby


February 29, 2000

I certainly hope that trivial software patents get reevaluated in the near future. The supression of ideas and applications by corporations is a scary reality.

Greg Bodnar


February 29, 2000

While I admire Amazon's tenacious competition, trying to base a patent on cookies is a complete shame and a hoax pulled on the non-technical public. It is tantamount to patenting variables for the temporary storage of information in a computer language - all hogwash. And, to take liberty with a well known phrase, to live by the patent is to die by the patent. Shame on you amazon.com!

Greg Ouzounian


February 29, 2000

A clear example of "I'm on board with my millions, now pull up the ladder". PS, it's not the patent office's fault. They can be sued if they refuse to grant a patent, but they have nothing to lose if they do grant one, even if it's overturned later. In other words, the system is deliberately designed to work this way. You can thank your corrupt system of special interests and lobbyists for that.

Robert O'Callahan


February 29, 2000

I am new to purchasing books and music on-line and have only made a few purchase from amazon. No longer. Barnes & Noble gets my business now.

Phil Jones


February 29, 2000

Frivolous technology patents need to be stopped. Exploiting a patent office that doesn't know any better is not fair or good buisness. When I read that Amazon was trying to patent '1-click' I was furious. Bezos should do the right thing and encourage innovation by dropping the patent persuit, not to mention the fact that he OWES his fortune to the people who invented he technology he is trying to claim credit for, in no small part.

Steve Steele


February 29, 2000

It is unfortunate that Amazon and Jeff Bezos are choosing the low road. Amazon's sole remedy to me in this case is to place in the public domain (or better yet, under GPL) any of their so-called proprietary "innovations." At that point I might consider buying from Amazon again. Meantime, I can still pick up ORA books in other places, like http://www.fatbrain.com/ and http://www.bn.com/ . Good luck, Jeff. Is the made for TV movie going to be called Dances with Lawyers?

Brian Bilbrey


February 29, 2000

rediculous patent

Clint Whaley


February 29, 2000

How Absurd.

Leigh Shoemaker


February 29, 2000

Amazon are not what they used to be - now too rich and too stupid to see the consequences of this.

Michael Strang


February 29, 2000

I have moved all my business (hundreds of dollars in the past few months) Barnes & Noble and Borders since I heard of the 1 click patent.

Mark Marsalese


February 29, 2000

How long will it take for companies to realise that this kind of patent isn't effective, even if ruled valid? All it does is antagonise people. Amazon has totally lost my respect solely because of their patent policy.

Andrew Main


February 29, 2000

That's what I really like about Tim O'reilly. Complete, clear and to the point! I agree 100% with what Tim has said. But I'm also "voting with my dollars" and taking my business elsewhere. (have been for a while now) I'm also going to encourage my associates, friends and family not to buy from Amazon.

Duane G. Meyer


February 29, 2000

The fact that patenting a technology of this sort is *possible* says the worst possible things about the intelligence of patent lawyers. But Amazon should have enough of a sense of fairness and good business to realize that this isn't the way to get or keep a competitive edge. I won't buy from Amazon and I'll make sure other people know why.

Julia Flanders


February 29, 2000

Amazon was my favorite online store. The service was excellent with every purchase I made. I even have a directory in my bookmarks called "Amazon books," for all the books I intended to purchase from them. I will now be buying all those books from their competitors. I continue to search the Amazon website for the excellent commentary, but I've not made a single purchase from them since the first patent action.

Dennis Peterson


February 29, 2000

Can't wait to see amazon patent the entire e-commerce side of the internet. The real issue is not just the patent but your Amazon's use of the patent. If they try to enfore it they will get a massive amount of bad publicity. Amazon's entire play online has always been there Web focused, friendly neighbor based reputation. Enforcing patents to eliminate potential competitors is just doing to opposite of what your PR agencies tell us. If Amazon enforces it will lose in court and it will lose in the PR game. Either way the will feel it on the bottom line.

Sam Sorenson


February 29, 2000

In 1999, there was a brief boycott of Amazon when Amazon's legal counsel asked inappropriate questions about the sexual orientation of the owners of Amazon Bookstore, a feminist bookstore which has been around since the 1970's. Since the case was settled out of court, I reluctantly gave Amazon another chance. Now there's the much larger issue of patenting completely obvious uses of technologies which others made available for free. If Amazon admits that it has made a bad mistake and relinquishes the patents willingly, even now I will give them another chance. However, if Amazon persists, and when the courts hold the patent to be invalid (which seems very likely), it will be clear that Amazon really thought it has a right to these patents. If this happens, it will be my decision to refuse to do business with Amazon for the rest of my life. There comes a point where you don't get any more chances.

Sean Crist


February 29, 2000

Unless and until you stop enforcement your 1-Click and Associates Program patents I will make every effort to avoid shopping at Amazon.com. I will also encourage others to do the same.

Brooks Davis


February 29, 2000

Anthony Meyer


February 29, 2000

I'm joining the boycott as well.

Steve Pierce


February 29, 2000

I completely agree with this letter, and I will also support the RMS boycott.

Michael T. Gallagher


February 29, 2000

Your patent is nothing more than plagiarism; as a result, I will do no business with Amazon.

Josh Neal


February 29, 2000

May this, my support and dislike of "capitolizers" do some good in the world of FREE and OPEN tought and invention.

Patrick Moore


February 29, 2000

One less customer.

Mike Smoot


February 29, 2000

񘈨/yr+ in book sales will start migrating towards a company that is more innovation friendly. -Mark

Mark Interrante


February 29, 2000

We have all had these naive hopes that maybe, just maybe this once business wouldn't come in and trash a beautiful environment.

Peter M. Kane


February 29, 2000

I find your web site useful for seeing opinions on books. It's a shame that now I feel obligated to go someplace else to make the purchase.

Fred Krogh


February 29, 2000

We do need a lot of technical literature, being a company whose success is based on continuing innovation. It looks as if we would better turn elsewhere for 'innovation friendly' suppliers now that this 'patent' exists.

AGS Applied Geo-Systems Technology


February 29, 2000

You took our money, we didn't mind - we thought you were a cool company. Now you're betraying us. I actually bought a book on cookies and saving user prefs before you filed this wierd patent. Perhaps you should patent underlined links?

Rob Buijs


February 29, 2000

I am about to set up a web site which will include literature, philosophy, history, geography and art sections, as well as being connected to a major teaching institution. I had planned to add an Amazon link to the home page, but now it will be BOL.

Madelaine Davidson


February 29, 2000

I can't believe that a company I've enjoyed doing business with would sink to this level. Amazon provides a great service, but this isn't the right way to grow your business; there are easy ways to do almost the same thing which would not technically violate your patent.

Roger Walkup


February 29, 2000

A character in "Wall Street" said, "Create something! Don't live off buying and selling alone." Enough has been said on the subject of patents. The question is, what has Amazon given back to the web that it has gained so much from? Maybe that's an old fashioned idea. Giving. Or is it?

Pandurang Rao


February 29, 2000

The worst thing is that whoever at Amazon suggested applying for this pattern must have known it's wrong, morally and technically to apply for something so obvious and previously used. In any case, I stopped buing books from Amazon as of December, 1999. Amazon, please delete my records from your database, my name and e-mail is above.

Milan Zimmermann


February 29, 2000

It is unfortunate to see an industry leader such as Amazon embarking on the distasteful path of trivial software patents. As such, I and many others will take our business elsewhere. In addition, I recommend the decision makers of Amazon read the Cluetrain Manifesto and heed its warning, for it applies directly to the consequences of these wrongs being committed.

Alexander Kent


February 29, 2000

So, a company who patents software which was not originally created by them, on ideas thought up by other people, who is using the patent to bully their way to the top of its industry. Hrm, that sounds a lot like another large company who we all know and hate for their stranglehold on the personal computer OS market. And we all know how much we do anything to not have to use that other company's products.

Gary Margiotta


February 29, 2000

OOPS! Looks like you have 'accidentaly' made some people mad at you by doing something of questionable ethics...and it seems likely that some of those people are net savy programmers... now lets see, where did I put that list of web sites that were under attack a few weeks ago... I guess that you can be glad that most people have a sense of ethics and try to be good net citizens. It works out best if everyone cooperates...tit-for-tat...Golden rule... Good & Bad Karma, whatever. You could blame it on the 'lawyers'...people would understand...

Bill Mothershead


February 29, 2000

I give Amazon kudos for acquiring such a wonderful defensive patent. Unfortunately, defensive patents are basically a requirement currently, just to block other companies from manipulating the patent process to stifle creativity on the Internet (and your companies trivial practices). The proper course of action now requires Amazon to give the right to use this Patent away to the Internet at-large, or dissolve the Patent all together. This would leave us with the net effect of what should have been a clear case of Prior Art and trivial "innovation". Do this, and I believe the technical community will appreciate your move.

Mike Dawson


February 29, 2000

That you would patent this as an original "invention" make it appear that your organization is too clueless to understand original thinking when you see it. The initial success of your organization occurred because of some great original thinking. That you can no longer recognize original thinking suggests that Amazon is in trouble as a customer service expert -- and more distinctly -- as a long term business investment. The value of Amazon stock is based largely on its promise for the future, not on current earnings, but on its "intellectual" capital. The capital is apparently running out.

Mike Meyer


February 29, 2000

I remember using Amazon.com for the first time several years ago. Since then, I have purchased most of my books and CDs from them. Until the 1-Click patent. Now, I buy from bn.com and fatbrain.com, and educate my friends and family against using Amazon.com for any purchases. The Affiliates patent is the nail in the coffin, and is quickly inspiring me to become much more vocal in my opposition to Amazon.com and software patents, in general. I hope the stock market crashes hard with Amazon.com leading the way. I hope one day I'll read in a magazine (purchased from B&N) about how Jeff Bezos is now working at the local car wash to make ends meet since Amazon.com went belly-up and his new software company was sued for patent infringement.

John Zachary


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, If anything, you might be entitled to a trademark or copyright for 'one-click shopping' but nothing more. Is this part of your grand scheme to get Amazon.com profitable by litigation against anyone who offers the ability to purchase over the web? Amazon certainly did not create the idea and to have the arrogance to believe that you are entitled to an enforceable patent, in anyone's eyes is plain wrong. But the real injustice was done the pinheads in the courts that granted it, as they have clearly not done their homework. Those same courts will, I believe, prove that the patent you have been granted will be unenforceable and ultimately repealed. What's next, a patent on the term 'shopping cart'? I fully agree with Mr. O'Reilly's comments and will fully support my colleagues in our collective boycott of Amazon.com. Mr. Bezo's, as the CEO of an company, one of your key duties is to ensure a return on the investment for the shareholders, so keep this in mind as you make further decisions that will drive business away from your company. Respectfully, Glenn K. Schulke

Glenn K. Schulke


February 29, 2000

I just saw the 'Silicon Summit' show on MSNBC where John Markoff (from Kevin Mitnick fame, or should I say, Kevin Mitnick exploitation) asked Jeff Bezos about the 1-Click patent issue. Jeff replied that they don't have a patent on 1-Click and that he would not discuss it. My mouth dropped. I used to spend quite a bit of money at Amazon, but with their Affiliate patent as well as Jeff's comments on tv... I just can't endore or buy from them and feel good about myself. It's really pissed me off! I, single-handedly, developed the most advanced e-commerce system for the life sciences industry. And to have Amazon getting patents on processes that are not only obvious, but essential for the growth of commerce on the web, is just ridiculous. So, to take things a step further, I've also boycotted companies Amazon has invested in. This includes drugstore.com and kozmo.com, two very cool sites. I've let all my relatives and friends know of the situation and urged them to do the same. Even if Amazon withdraws the patents, I don't know if I'll go back... Jason Lee, Lead Developer, Biospace.com

Jason Lee


February 29, 2000

Chip Olson


February 29, 2000

Matthew Barry


February 29, 2000

Daniel Gredler


February 29, 2000

Claus Ekstroem


February 29, 2000

Tucker Goodrich


February 29, 2000

Joe Friend


February 29, 2000

Stephen Jolly


February 29, 2000

Dave Barron


February 29, 2000

bradbury taylor


February 29, 2000

Guntis Glinavs


February 29, 2000

Chason Chaffin


February 29, 2000

Benjamin Gittins


February 29, 2000

Liam S Coughlin


February 29, 2000

As I turn to look at my bookshelf, I see hundreds, if not a thousand plus, of dollars worth of books purchased from you. On my desk sits the Amazon.com insulated coffee cup which I received from Amazon for Christmas, 1996. My last order exceeded US趆. As I write this, I am listening to Hendrix' "blues" which I recently purchased from you. By trade, I am an Information Architect; the free use of cookies is an easy way to establish persistent state and has been so for many years. Your patent threatens to close avenues of resources which I depend upon to generate the income which allows me to spend so much money with you. I won't need to boycott you; if you persist, I won't be able to afford you. Does it have something to do with all of that rain in Washington that makes companies act like 800 pound gorillas?

Joe Stein


February 29, 2000

Vijay Karunamurthy


February 29, 2000

Shawn A. Roske


February 29, 2000

Brian Greenberg


February 29, 2000

Mitch Armistead


February 29, 2000

Indirajith Meganathan


February 29, 2000

Jonathan Westmuckett


February 29, 2000

I agree.

Kathryn Schultz Miller


February 29, 2000

i support the RMS boycott.

Edward Wetherell


February 29, 2000

The patent(s) are rediculous, and have reaffirmed my commitment not to by from Amazon.

Phillip Fox


February 29, 2000

Well stated Tim. I have never joined any sort of boycott before, but this will be my first.

Rich Peiffer


February 29, 2000

I used to buy my books from Amazon. I switched a while ago to buying from Fatbrain due to this patent.

Greg White


February 29, 2000

I regret to say that I can no longer in good conscience buy from amazon.com, your abuse of patent law disgusts me in inumerable ways.

Kevan Shea


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com's efforts to acquire and enforce unjustified and unearned patents completely destroys their reputation.

Scott Horn


February 29, 2000

You can be sure that I will ask AMAZON.com to remove my account...I WILL never purchase anymore books, videos, OR DVD from AMAZON.

David Choi


February 29, 2000

The one-click patentis absurd. I have removed all links, including my Associates links, regarding Amazon from my web site.

Alex Russell


February 29, 2000

Amazon's patent is ridiculous, and I'm in full agreement with this protest. Amazone has gone from a cool startup, to a corporate entity, and only seems to rudimentarily understand what made their success possible - the very freedom of innovation they are now trying to crush. Time to hit this newly turned corporate entity where it hurts -- it's wallet. There's plenty of other places to buy books and other items online. Maybe I'll come back to Amazon when they give up this silly idea.

Matt Hall


February 29, 2000

One would think a company wholly dependent on the internet would care more for the health of the internet than this.

Michael Stover


February 29, 2000

I've used BN.com for most of my book purchases since I'm an investor of theirs. This move by Amazon just gives me more reason to stay with BN.com.

Marc Gallagher


February 29, 2000

I have spent nearly 񘈨 at Amazon over the last few years, but I will not be doing that anymore. I will be switching to one of their competitors.

Jake Edge


February 29, 2000

Two words "Prior art". Not only that, but it's a patent of an obvious idea. Not only that but it's a cheesy way to try to get a leg up on your competition. Andrew Smith

votex


February 29, 2000

I've already contacted Amazon and asked them to remove my Wish List and close my account. Let's all hope they respond to the will of the people and do the right thing!

Rod Myers


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com is a wonderful site, but I will not be shopping there as long as they continue their practice of frivolous patents. Ideas are meant to be shared, not hidden.

Billy Mabray


February 29, 2000

You guys are a leader in the online-retail industry. With that comes the responibility. Do the right thing and use your patents to keep the web free. Happy web users actually buy things.

Chad Brewbaker


February 29, 2000

I have been an Amazon customer in the past, but will hold off on any further purchaces until it is clear that Amazon will not be using my money to enforce such unfortunate patents.

Aaron Sherman


February 29, 2000

I have bought my last book from Amazon.com There are too many other on-line book companies that aren't trying to pull the garbage Amazon.com is trying to get away with.

Joshua Skillings


February 29, 2000

Joseph Benavidez


February 29, 2000

I am sadden to see that a company I considered one of the forefathers in ecommerce is so short sighted, the money was comming but you got greedy! Now you will no longer get my money!

Laurel Campbell


February 29, 2000

I have returned my most recent order to Amazon and am now shopping exclusively at competitors' sites. I sometimes use Amazon's site for product information, and then click over to another store to buy. Gotta love the web.

Adam Stein


February 29, 2000

I pledge not to buy any more products from Amazon until they withdraw their patents. Last year I spent several hundred dollars there. Luckily there is still plenty of competition in this market, so I have plenty of other options.

Brian Buck


February 29, 2000

Surely you cannot ignore the amount of people that are displeased with your "patent(s)". This letter alone is evidence that both your customers and potential customers will think more than twice before shopping with you.

Kevin N Shallow


February 29, 2000

I wish companies would compete based on the quality of their service and products, not by how many lawyers they employ. Trying to acquire patents on simple and obvious concepts is not a good way to improve your service or products!

Michael Hentges


February 29, 2000

I have to agree with Tim's comments and with Dave Winer that if the response is for everyone to get their own patents, we will all be using more lawyers than developers. The fun of developing for the Internet will be gone. <http://davenet.userland.com/2000/02/28/noMorePesosForSenorBezos>

Ian Roberts


February 29, 2000

I have to agree with Tim's comments and with Dave Winer that if this the response is for everyone to get their own patents, we will all be using more lawyers than developers. The fun of developing for the Internet will be gone. <http://davenet.userland.com/2000/02/28/noMorePesosForSenorBezos>

Ian Roberts


February 29, 2000

As a software developer, you have insulted me and all of the real web pioneers that GAVE you the tools of your success. Yes, _GAVE_. As a customer, I don't buy from Amazon anymore. Period. Oh, and I'm very chatty to all my friends about WHY. Oh, and I have a lot of friends.

Earl Higgins


February 29, 2000

Software patents are bad enough; patents on obvious Web technologies are absolutely ridiculous. I have bought books worth several hundred dollars since Amazon received the patent. None of those books came from Amazon, and this will continue to be the case until I see some clear change in policy.

Reuven M. Lerner


February 29, 2000

I'd agree with Amazon if they'd come up with a new technology, but all they've come up with is a marketing slogan for a trivial use of existing technology. By all means Trademark "1-Click", by all means copyright the code, but a patent? You've got to be kidding. In the meantime, I'll buy my books elsewhere.

Tony Smith


February 29, 2000

I support Tim O'Reilly wholeheartedly on this issue. I think that while a boycott is morally the right thing to do it will have little effect. Most customers of Amazon would not understand the issue and not follow the boycott. Amazon is hurting its long term profitability and Tim O'Reilly's article and letter sum it up nicely.

Elmar S. Heeb


February 29, 2000

I understand that you had to apply for the patents to prevent your competition from doing the same thing. The initial blame lies with the patent office for issuing a patent. Now that that is over and done with, the best way to win customers from your competition is not by enforcing the patent, but by giving free use to anyone who wants it.

Eric Wagoner


February 29, 2000

Check my account. I'm a regular customer but won't be one again until you change your direction on this patent noise. The basic rule for patents should be: "If you can step on it and break it, you can patent it". I have a patent. I'm amazed that your patent passed muster. Perhaps we need technical reviews by advisory boards because, clearly, the patent office is lost.

Tim Daly


February 29, 2000

To Mr. Bezos: I firmly agree with all that Mr. O'Reilly has stated. You are "pissing in the well," as he puts it. I am not necessarily a frequent customer of yours, although I have bought some books from you in the past, and have even done so after Mr. Stallman first began urging his boycott. But if you and your company continue in this vein with regard to patents, I shall be forced to move my business to one of your competitors.

Carson Chittom


February 29, 2000

Both one click ordering/shopping and affiliate programs have been used by a number of commercial web sites for a couple of years now, even before Amazon.com was widely known. Software patents of these kinds can only harm the online community in the long run by stiffling innovation. It would be an excellent sign of faith if Amazon.com would release these patents, and I'm certain that by doing so, the Free Software community would stop our current boycot.

Roger Messier


February 29, 2000

I have been a regular customer of Amazon for several years. But because of their patent nonsense, my business will be going to fatbrain.com and my local bookstores and CD stores until they back down. It costs me nothing to change vendors; I had stayed with Amazon because I liked them, and wanted to encourage this pioneering business. But the good will has dried up, at least on my end. There are other competitors in every Amazon marketplace of which I know. Those competitors will get my business.

Patrick Lamb


February 29, 2000

1-Click ordering is scary at best, offering way too easy of a conduit for purchasing books or merchandise online. I have never used the 1-click feature, or any other on the amazon.com web site, besides checking out with a shopping cart. You should patent this. At least you can then bully 95% of the online retailers. Holding and enforcing patents on IP that you didn't even create is ludicrious at best. But the denial of your conscience for your wallet makes amazon.com's actions unacceptable.

Eric Hoffman


February 29, 2000

Like most of the rest of those who have signed this petition, I will henceforth not conduct business with your company. Furthermore, I've been successful over the past few months in convincing several other people to do likewise. Ill will is something that is extremely hard to overcome. Word of mouth advertizing (especially negative kinds) can grow exponentially. There are plenty of places that sell books on the internet. Only an idiot would have granted your patent in the first place as it is obvious in the extreme. You can patent a mouse trap. You should not be able to patent trapping mice.

Alan Pugh


February 29, 2000

I agree with Tim about Amazon's flagrant abuse of the patent system. While the patent office should certainly know better, it is apparently beyond our collective abilities to appeal to their common sense, since the awarding of far-reaching and obvious software patents goes on. I will therefore boycott Amazon and any other company that knowingly abuses this unfortunate hole in our nation's commercial oversight. I urge Amazon to give up on the issue of the 1-Click patent. It is true that Amazon has already unavoidably affected any good will that the technological community had for them; however, I believe that acting in good faith from this point on will eventually turn that negative opinion.

David Fay


February 29, 2000

Jeff Grollo


February 29, 2000

Chris Shabsin


February 29, 2000

Robert Lucier


February 29, 2000

Cameron Purvis


February 29, 2000

Brian Campbell


February 29, 2000

david m. reville


February 29, 2000

Jason Werpy


February 29, 2000

Mark Geary


February 29, 2000

Einar Rune Haugnes


February 29, 2000

Andrew Waltman


February 29, 2000

Wade Leftwich


February 29, 2000

Christopher Farnham


February 29, 2000

Karl Braun


February 29, 2000

Dan Wilson


February 29, 2000

Catherine Hartley


February 29, 2000

Allen Hutchison


February 29, 2000

Florian Neuburger


February 29, 2000

Michael E. Meyers


February 29, 2000

Amazon has lost my business.

Grant Warkentin


February 29, 2000

My wife and I have been, and will continue, boycotting.

Eric Fitton


February 29, 2000

Amazon, you've lost me as a customer - stop the madness!

Tom Novak


February 29, 2000

Amazon is not the first to think of this idea and not the first to use it, only the first to use their lawyers to steal it. It's no fun in the Marketing Sandbox when someone steals all the shovels.

Marion Flanagan


February 29, 2000

I agree fully with the Letter by Tim and hope that this will make Amazon realize the error of their ways.

David Cornely


February 29, 2000

I too, support the RMS boycott. I have not purchased anything from amazon.com since 12/20/99.

Jim Campbell


February 29, 2000

Jeff, I'm disappointed that you took this tactic. Try doing something original and I'll back you 100%.

Doug Schwartz


February 29, 2000

One of the most arrogant attempts to use the law to stifle the spirit of the internet to have ever come along.

Paul Wear, Jr.


February 29, 2000

Amazon has lost my business until they learn to play well with others.

Lloyd Sommerer


February 29, 2000

I am no longer buying any products from Amazon. I am no longer visiting Amazon's web site. I am advising everyone I know to do the same.

Terence Mark


February 29, 2000

I am no longer buying any products from Amazon. I am no longer visiting Amazon's web site. I am advising everyone I know to do the same.

Terence Mark


February 29, 2000

I'll keep it short. I spent almost 񘘐 with Amazon.com last year. No more, bn.com will get my business. Absolutely reprehensible.

L Hill


February 29, 2000

I have not bought from Amazon since they did this patent. I would be happy to buy from them again if they drop it. Paul Vincent Craven

Paul Vincent Craven


February 29, 2000

I've ordered 46 books, CDs, toys, etc. from Amazon over the last 3 years, but I won't be buying anything else until they drop this stupid patent.

Michael P. Persons


February 29, 2000

Amazon has lost my business, and my referrals. This loss shall occur for as long after the 1-click patent is gone as the 1-click patent existed.

Russell Billings


February 29, 2000

The two patents recently given to Amazon are a travesty, and can only harm the field/industry in the long run. Please, let common sense prevail here!

Mike Miller


February 29, 2000

I wholeheartedly agree with Tim O'Reiley's argument against Amazon.com's two recent patent filings. They are a travesty in the face of the open world of the Internet.

Aaron Dershem


February 29, 2000

Hey Jeff--what about buttons and listboxes, too?

Dale Goetsch


February 29, 2000

Simone Paddock


February 29, 2000

I agree with Tim O'Reilly on this. Please return your focus to meeting the needs of your customers, supporting open standards, and creating the best implementation of them.

Kathleen Sinnott


February 29, 2000

It is unclear to me how anything in the Amazon business model requires such intellectual thievery. I am a new Amazon customer but will not be for long if this practice of patenting stolen ideas persists.

Stuart Popejoy


February 29, 2000

I've purchased books from Amazon for home and my place of employment. I'm so fed up with this "patent fever" of theirs, I don't think I'll buy from them EVER again. Screw you Jeff! BTW, excellent prose Tim!

Doug Smoak


February 29, 2000

Tim, thanks for saying something. I've been disturbed by Amazon's patent abuses for some time, and I can thankfully say that I've stopped buying from them as a result. I encourage others to do the same.

Jon Shiring


February 29, 2000

I don't have anything to say that hasn't already been said by others, but I wanted to add my voice to the protest. Ultimately, I hope that the patent office wises up and realizes how much prior art there is in the computer field.

John Welch


February 29, 2000

David Horsey


February 29, 2000

How does that go again? If I tell Ten people and each of them tells Ten people, etc...etc... Amazon, don't worry, once everyone has stopped buying books from you, maybe you'll be able to make money from collecting on your patents.

Aaron Shackelford


February 29, 2000

Amazon has always provided great service and value to its customers, including myself. It's unfortunate that you would pursue such an obviously misguided course even when confronted with a sound argument such as Tim O'Reilly and others have made. I will be clicking at least twice to make purchases as long as Amazon continues on this ill-advised course.

Kris Lilley


February 29, 2000

I will not buy from Amazon while this patent nonsense is still active. I further have convinced the rest of my family (a great deal of whom are online, and find ordering online convenient) not to shop at Amazon anymore. I've pointed them to places like Barnes & Noble instead.

Galadriel Billington


February 29, 2000

I strongly agree that Amazon has patented something that was created and in use by other people and companies. I think that this patent should never have been granted.

Jeff Plummer


February 29, 2000

You will note that I AM an Amazon customer, and though I have directed many of my companions to your services (which you have benefitted GREATLY!), I find your stance repugnant, and, as the letter states, forwarding a process that will unravel the foundation upon which you sit.

Tom Payne


February 29, 2000

</i><!-- attempt to fix the formatting of an earlier response --> I love Amazon.com and use it often. Now, because of Amazon's aggressive aggrandizement of public domain intellectual property, I feel that I must stop using Amazon.com, despite all the convenience it offers.

Jeffrey Henning


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com was my favorite online book provider. Not just books, but music, videos, and everything else. I really enjoyed a one stop solution. Now, thanks to the "1-Click" patent I will look elsewhere for my needs. If Amazon ceases their current actions I may begin shopping there again. Maybe not. As my mother tells me - once trust is lost it is very hard to regain.

Joseph Martin


February 29, 2000

As an Internet Strategist, I buy a large number of books to keep up the flow of new information and keep myself current. As a web developer since 1995, I know that the web was built on people improving each others "neat web hacks". Given Amazon's recent behavior, I can't possibly consider buying anything else from a company that so recklessly disregards that ethic.

Cushing Whitney


February 29, 2000

Abuses, like this, of the U.S. patent system should be considered criminal. Your actions are speaking louder than any words. With the attempted enforcement of this patent, you are effectively saying: "We will use whatever means necessary to keep our lead in the eCommerce world, even if it means squashing the open community that created 99% of the technology we base our business on."

Steve Weinrich


February 29, 2000

Amazon used to be the first place I went to order books (including before physical stores). I've spent over a ũ,000 in the last year on computer books alone, and consider Amazon to be the easiest way to get book reviews and books. I will never by another book from Amazon and will encourage every one I know not to as long as patent abuses continue. This disgraceful abuse of patents is absolutely unacceptable.

David Richardson


February 29, 2000

Tim O'Reilly put it quite well. Amazon has not developed anything new, and their patent is the equivelant of patenting crushed ice. Cookies, like ice crushers, might be patentable, but not the product, or ice, that is the inevitable result. I hope Amazon backs off from this strategy and owes up to it's mistake. Give Amazon back to the technical people who built it, not the Marketing people who are driving it into the ground.

A Hoffman


February 29, 2000

Until Amazon began pursuing this ridiculous patent, I was a loyal customer who didn't bother to look any further for what I needed. Pursuing this one-click patent has made me look around a bit - as it turns out, the competition (FatBrain.com in this case) has quite a good selection of technical books (Including the O'Reilly line). So, until Amazon gives up wasting everyone's time and money on these foolish court cases, I'll be buying elsewhere.

Michael Kohne


February 29, 2000

I am a big fan of amazon.com, and I often have made use of their wonderful sight to browse for books and make online purchases. However, I believe that amazon.com is not acting in the best interests of the Internet community as a whole when is attempts to patent trivial web technology. In addition, this irresponsible use of the patent system further deteriorates its usefullness as a way to register true inovations. For these reasons I do not intend to purchase anything from amazon.com until they change their strategy on this issue.

Nick Bartoli


February 29, 2000

I have not purchased anything from Amazon since RMS asked the community to boycott Amazon and you can be sure the way things are going you won't be getting my money anytime soon. It has ben tough I have spent a good deal of money at Amazon but there are other places to shop: http://www.bn.com/ http://www.fatbrain.com/ http://www.booksamillion.com/ http://www.chapters.ca/ http://www.uk.bol.com/ http://www.borders.com/ and there are more I just don't know them.

Shafik Yaghmour


February 29, 2000

I'm a graduate student in computer graphics; I buy most of my technical books online. Patents like this are a slap in the face to two groups which matter very much to me -- the open source movement and the academic research community (without which the Web wouldn't exist in the first place). 1-Click is a trivial application of an idea (namely cookies) placed into the public domain. Unless and until the patent is overturned (or is no longer enforced), I feel obliged to take my business elsewhere.

Andy Wilson


February 29, 2000

As someone who buys a LOT of books both personally and for the IT department I work in, I have to say that Amazon has, until now, always been my choice of vendors. The customer service is easier, the website is more detailed, and the shipping practices are better than any other online booksellers that I've encountered. Until this patent nonsense is dropped, however, I'm willing to go through the extra hassle of ordering from other vendors. Meanwhile, I'll still be using Amazon's website to look up details & reviews on books I'm considering purchasing. Amazon, this is NOT a good business move on your part!

Raaven O'Quinn


February 29, 2000

Sir: I recently helped design a web site for a contest promoting a game. The contest won second place. During the design process, we decided to set up a link to an online retailer for the ordering of books related to the game (which is based on a reasonably famous role-playing game). When the question of who to go with came up, we spoke a few times. Amazon was rejected as the result of the 1-click patent. Our logs indicated at least 10 orders from our actual affilate - and we do not know how much was sold per order. Perhaps if more sites with your affiliations turned it to someone else, you would begin to notice the situation changing.

Geoffrey M. Depew


February 29, 2000

I must say I was very dissappointed when this whole mess started out. I decided to send Amazon.com an email explaining my dissappointment, and my reason for ceasing to purchase from them. I've since found out, though, that there are better prices elsewhere anyway. Between bn.com and buy.com I get everything I used to from amazon and almost always for cheaper than amazon can offer. I'm still dissappointed in their chosen business tactics, but it's not hurting me at all to simply stop buying from them. So I urge anybody else reading this to do the same. (And I commend anybody who read *this* far down the page of comments ... wow, you've got more patience than I, that's all I can say.)

Thomas Trelvik


February 29, 2000

Initially I was a large Amazon.com booster. I purchased books from Amazon even though the shipping made your prices more expensive than I could get at the bookstore because I believed that Amazon was the way of the future. I am most disappointed in the effort to enforce a patent of an obvious use of cookies. Any person with coding experience will find the "1-click" technology to be self-evident. I have now ceased purchasing anything from Amazon.com and have moved my spending to sites such as fatbrain.com and Barnes & Noble simply because they are not Amazon. This is a pity since I found the Amazon site superior in nearly all ways, except the moral one of course. Andrew Benson Network Admin

Andrew Benson


February 29, 2000

This whole issue is such an insult to the technical community. I still can't believe that you're actually pursuing this course of action. The fact that somebody has royally screwed up at the patent office is dis-heartening. But to see a corporation that I thought was above this blatently excercise a right that it never posessed is plain sickening. I didn't always feel this way - oh no... I've got several books bought from amazon sitting right next to me as I type, but will I ever shop there again? NOT IF MY LIFE DEPENDED ON IT. I guess amazon is more effected by competition than I though and quite frankly, I'd love to see them bankrupt. If you want to support a truly viable technical book alternative, try out bookpool.com - they sell technical books and that's all. No, you can't get your favorite Pokeman cards there, but who uses amazon for that anyway? I still can't believe it.....

Joel Brubaker


February 29, 2000

The US patent system now *encourages* the filing of such frivolous patents: - A frivolous patent such as the Amazon patent is a powerful weapon against existing or potential competitors. It reduces their chances to get capital (who wants to invest in a lawsuit?). The weapon relies on the possibility that a trial would go badly wrong and award damages for willful infringement. Even if the probability of such an event is low, it is high enough to create a lot of pressure. - Filing more frivolous patents is the best defense against other patents (frivolous or not). It gives you chips to trade in the event of a patent attack... - There is no downside on filing frivolous patents. It is very unlikely that you will get fined for filing a frivolous patent. Proving that you did so knowingly is close to impossible. Therefore something must be done. - Leon Bottou (speaking in my name)

Leon Bottou


February 29, 2000

It is sad to see such a great company using such low tactics to succeed in their marketplace. Over the last few months, I cannot recall the number of times (well over 20) that I've been wanting to buy books or even other articles (Amazon doesn't just sell books anymore) from Amazon. Unfortunately, because of their practices, I've had to restrain myself and use competitors (I had never been to Barnes & Nobles' site www.bn.com until I had to find an alternative to Amazon) to do order my books. I've shared my views with my wife and friends and although they may not go as far as signing this petition, they have also decided to boycott Amazon after hearing my arguments (which are certainly nothing new to you if you are reading this). I hope that Amazon realises their error. I would so easilly and willingly switch to a real marketing machine for them if they were simply willing to pull away from these silly patents. Wake up Amazon! You have so many things that makes me want to be you customer. Christian Saucier Atlanta, GA.

Christian Saucier


February 29, 2000

Geoff Catlin


February 29, 2000

Howard Cheng


February 29, 2000

Mitchell Hall


February 29, 2000

Johan Eriksson


February 29, 2000

Frank Bodmann


February 29, 2000

Neal Mooers


February 29, 2000

Sandi Steding


February 29, 2000

Bruce C. Denman


February 29, 2000

Alex Pukinskis


February 29, 2000

David Medinets


February 29, 2000

David Hunt


February 29, 2000

Guy Albertelli II


February 29, 2000

Andrew Brown


February 29, 2000

Levi Purvis


February 29, 2000

Alex Lindgren


February 29, 2000

Andrew Brown


February 29, 2000

Larry D. Burton


February 29, 2000

Scott E. Johnson


February 29, 2000

29-Feb-2000

William B. Sharrock


February 29, 2000

I fully intend to boycott Amazon until this is resolved.

Richard Smith


February 29, 2000

While Amazon is patenting software, whether it is enforcing those patents or not, I will not buy anything from them.

Alison Hawke


February 29, 2000

Jeff, This claim will weaken the very medium that helped you and your business become succesful. Why don't you try showing some gratitude instead?

Victor J. Zuylen


February 29, 2000

I agree with Mr. O'Reilly and ask Amazon to abandon these patents. I am a long time customer of Amazon, but will boycott them until they cease chasing these patents.

Paul Firgens


February 29, 2000

If Amazon makes a mockery of intellectual property rights, then so shall the individuals. Why buy from Amazon when you can copy a book from your neighbor? A former Amazon customer,

Peter Constantine


February 29, 2000

I strongly protest the idea of patenting such trivial things which are far from innovations. This is just an attempt to kill the competition. Something Microsoft has taught us all.

Nadeem Hasan


February 29, 2000

I agree with Tim O'Reilly's assessment that the 1-click patent is a trivial and obvious application of something that was known within the WWW. I shall boycott Amazon until there is a change in policy.

Kumar Balachandran


February 29, 2000

I have been boycotting Amazon.com since October, and I will continue to do so until amazon withdraws its patent suit against B&N. I was a good customer Mr. Bezos, and I would like to return.

Chris Rohlfs


February 29, 2000

Your "one-click" patent is absurd and a slap in the face to those who have created the internet on which you have made your fortune. Your competitors will continue to enjoy my patronage until you remedy this madness.

Andrew Parker


February 29, 2000

I hope the folks at Amazon come to their senses - We have enjoyed spending our money there in the past, and want to return as customers in future, but enforcing these ridiculous patents is a waste of resources.

Faith Loewen


February 29, 2000

A patent on the concept of your affiliates program? A patent on a trivial usage of Netscape's cookie protocol? Shame on all of you. I'm with Richard Stallman on this one: Amazon, you don't deserve my patronage.

Matthew Benjamin


February 29, 2000

In the so-called "Internet age," service is more important than monopolizing the software industry. Acts like these will only contribute to Amazon's fall from power. Please don't make all your decisions in the name of the holy dollar.

Andy Cox


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, Your frivolous patents constitute a slap in the face of all the generous contributors to the software/networking/internet/www world that made your business possible. I do not intend to give you any more of my business.

Scott D. Webster


February 29, 2000

It's amazing that these patents were granted. Reflects poorly on the PTO and also reflects poorly on Amazon. I will be looking elsewhere to purchase books, though I am somewhat disappointed since I've always received prompt and reliable service from Amazon in the past.

Jesse Hong


February 29, 2000

I think Amazon is the best. They have been my prefered vendor for everything they carry. I am so disappointed about these ridiculous patents they are obtaining. I feel I have no choice but to look to other vendors for my needs unless (or until)Amazon drops this effort.

Dennis Kelley


February 29, 2000

I always compare prices on many sites when I order a book, and almost always order from Amazon because of their great service and quick response. After this, I will be using other sites to get my books/CDs/movies/etc online. There's still a chance for Amazon to fix things if they will just think about their customer base.

Jake Williams


February 29, 2000

I have not done any web programming at all except for a few cgi scripts. That being said however, I think that after about a week I could produce a "one-click" feature on a website just based on the description. I don't see how this got patented in the first place, and I don't know how Amazon can honestly stand up and defend what clearly is not innovation.

Floyd Walker


February 29, 2000

Let's see - Short-term benefit: Restrict competitors from using one-click purchasing and referrals Short-term detriment: Piss off customers and competitors Long-term benefit: None (patents will be revoked) Long-term detriment: Piss off customers and competitors What are you thinking? You have the opportunity to make it right, and perhaps generate goodwill. Swallow your (false) pride and do the right thing.

Pete Shay


February 29, 2000

As the owner of Studio B Literary Agency www.studiob.com that represents over 150 technical authors, I agree completely with Tim's sentiments. Amazon is a great company, and will remain a great company if it continues to compete openly without setting up unnecessary and harmful barriers. Amazon - You ARE the 500 pound guerilla. You don't need to put a padlock on the bananas in order to horde them.

David Rogelberg


February 29, 2000

Thank you Mr O'Reilly for writing this letter. I wish to give Amazon the benefit of the doubt on this matter, hoever their actions toward B&N indicate that their intentions are not honorable with regards to these patents. I will not be purchasing from Amazon at all, unless they resolve this in a timely and acceptable manner. Even if the patents are found to be invalid, should Amazon continue to pursue this, I will continue to discourage others from purchasing using Amazon.

Christopher McKinley


February 29, 2000

The real injustice is that patent offices exist that grant such patents. As long as such terrible mistakes can happen without being overruled, we will have to fight similar cases again and again. Of course, I'm boycotting Amazon now, but I think of the thousands of other patents that have been granted in a similar way that do not find a lobby fighting against them. What's up, Mr. Bezos, would you raise a fund to fight patents granted by clueless patent offices worldwide? You have made your proof that such a fund is urgently needed. Get your head out of this silly case with a clever initiative.

Andreas Koenig


February 29, 2000

I have in the past bought books from Amazon. I even bought books for a college course I was taking through Amazon, rather than the school bookstore. My wife is an avid reader who has is the past bought loads of books (via the above email address) from you. But if you check your records you may notice that no books have been bought via that email address over the last few months, including the Christmas season. That is no accident. During that time we bought no less than 12 books through your competitors. I view software patents as inherently evil. You are of course withing your rights to take them out and use them a vigourously as you can. But my family will buy *no* books through Amazon while you persist in this behavior. Neither will anyone else that it is within my power to convince.

Ted Dennison


February 29, 2000

The only reason I've never tried other book sales sites is because Amazon's setup seemed quite elegant. I liked your eyes program, particularly since it was a validation of something I'd proposed to a former employer for relationship marketing several months before you adopted it, and I enjoyed having all my past mailing addresses ready for my next delivery. I will now take the time to use other online sellers. How can you claim that simply because you're using a cookie rather than a user name/password to access database information that 1-click is non-obvious? I hope you succeed in taking this to court. When you loose, I hope congress will take a look at the patent system and see there is a need for change. I also hope private companies will create searchable library services with prior art to fight these patent lawsuits so that resources can once again be applied toward companies competing based upon who has the best service and support, not who holds the most patents.

John David Thomas


February 29, 2000

To Mr. Bezos et al at Amazon, I concur with Tim O'Reilly's statements as expressed in his letter to Jeff (reprinted in the Ask Tim feature of the O'Reilly Web site) and would like to add a short comment of my own regarding the self-nurturing nature of the Web. Transparency is the sine qua non of the World Wide Web. A generation (and soon many more) of programmers and other enthusiasts have built their skills upon this transparency, using the basic tools of the Web to expand and enhance their knowledge of the Web and how it works. I count myself among that group, having "popped the hood" of many a site using my browser's "View Source" capability to gain a better understanding of how a site operates and flows. Skills built using this and other techniques which depend upon the openness of the Web and the Internet as a whole have contributed tremendously to my own productivity as a programmer and Web designer, as well as to the success of my clients' sites. Doubtless your own success is due is some measure to the similar experiences and knowledge bases of your own programmers and technicians, who have leveraged knoweldge gained from utilizing the Web's transparency to make Amazon the commercial epiphany I truly believe it to be. Yet your actions in regards to filing for and enforcing your 1-Click patent threaten to suffocate the very environment which has benefitted yourself and your company so much. Future generations of Web services and technologies will suffer for such efforts, because the expertise necessary to understand, deploy and extend them will be limited to those "within your own fences", as Tim put it. The effects of sustained climate of secrecy and proprietary technologies will leave us all -- businesses and consumers, programmers and end users -- appreciably worse off, and will stymie the growth and richness of the Internet in all its facets. Please do not discount your role in the evolution of the Web. As a leader in so many areas, Amazon sets the standard by which others abide. The notoriety, credibility and concrete practical benefits to be gained from doing the right thing in this case far outweigh the short-term gains you could possibly realize from your current course of action. This is an opportunity waiting to be seized. Sincerely, Jonathan P. McCarter

Jonathan McCarter


February 29, 2000

Laura Schmier


February 29, 2000

Mike McGee


February 29, 2000

Mike Janger


February 29, 2000

Dear Jeff Bezos I have read about your moves to enforce your trivial 1-click patent and am deeply disappointed by the action Amazon has taken. It is contrary to the spirit of the internet and is a betrayal of the many people who have helped to shape this exciting medium. I plan not to buy any further from Amazon until you change your policy. I will also advise friends and colleagues in the UK to stop buying from Amazon until you indicate that you will give up the patent. Details that I have received from Tim O'Reilly have disappointed me and will go to my large mailing list of IT and education contacts in the nwest. I think that you should reconsider your position fast. Ian Harford

Ian Harford


February 29, 2000

Grant Zurko


February 29, 2000

Gale Langseth


February 29, 2000

I have been a web developer and I have operated a web site hosting company since 1995. This predatory action by Amazon directly affects my ability to continue to make a living. I agree with those who will discontinue shopping at your site, as I have been an Amazon customer for over a year - I will now look elsewhere. I will not support someone who is trying to hurt me in this way. Think about what you are doing to people - if you damage us it will come back around to you. Rick Bastedo President GygaBite, Inc.

Rick Bastedo


February 29, 2000

I not only govern my own purchases, but I also have the ear of people who influence purchasing at a local college and several businesses (not to mention family and friends). My recommendations for purchases will be for Fatbrain.com until you refrain from your absurd and anti-competitive abuse of current software patent law. Your recent behavior is a disgrace to the industry, and your callous disregard for those who's work you have reaped the benefits of disgusts me.

Nickolas Atkinson


February 29, 2000

I buy many things online, but I have bought nothing from Amazon since this patent issue came to light. I also encourage my less technically savy friends to use outlets other than Amazon, and they have mostly done so.

Thomas S. Urban


February 29, 2000

Jeremy Sheeley


February 29, 2000

Carly Huitema


February 29, 2000

Chris Micacchi


February 29, 2000

Andreas Rasmusson


February 29, 2000

Jonnathan Briggs-Lee


February 29, 2000

Shame on you.

Laura Wilber


February 29, 2000

David Guthrie


February 29, 2000

Jason Deck


February 29, 2000

Leo Dejan


February 29, 2000

Mike Krasnay


February 29, 2000

Rex Mc Dowell


February 29, 2000

Michael Agard


February 29, 2000

Allen Wyatt


February 29, 2000

Půl Ove Pedersen


February 29, 2000

John Kohler


February 29, 2000

Robert Jones


February 29, 2000

Braden Gibson


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, Openness built you. Your business is built from the ground up on standards, protocols, and technologies that were freely given. Every time you make a sale, you benefit from the efforts of thousands of academics, programmers, and entrepreneurs who gave, expecting to gain nothing but the benefits from others who did the same. Now you've turned around and spat in their faces. Your "one-click" patent is a ridiculous land-grab, a slap in the face to the community of openness that created the Internet and, by extension, you. You aren't required to play nice. You aren't required to call off your attack dogs pursuing lawsuits against competitors who implemented the same obvious feature as you did. But I'm not required to buy from you, and neither is anyone else. Please keep that in mind.

David Price


February 29, 2000

Avner Kenner


February 29, 2000

Software patents are the beginning of the end of future independent innovation. I agree that Amazon should recognize this and change their policies, despite their market size.

Joe Ripley


February 29, 2000

Aaron Strich


February 29, 2000

Greg Landrum


February 29, 2000

Fatbrain.com, here I come!

Mark Kennedy


February 29, 2000

I used to think Amazon was pretty cool and ordered from your site several times. However, once this (and some other, similar things) came out I stopped even looking at your pages when shopping. It's not like there aren't lots of other companies I can turn to...

Trevor Hayes


February 29, 2000

Ronald L. Sheridan, Jr.


February 29, 2000

Tim, I agree 100%

Ray Mears


February 29, 2000

I spend at least 躔.00 a year on computer books, CD's, DVD's, and leisure books. 95% of my purchases had been at amazon.com due to the spectacular service and ease of order. I have been unable to continue to use amazon.com as of December 15th, 1999. Being a computer programmer myself, I agree 100% with Tim O'Reilly, Richard Stallman, et al. You wont get another dime of my money. _Andrew

Andrew Embury


February 29, 2000

I will take my business elsewhere as well.

Jim Crumley


February 29, 2000

Pathetic, simply pathetic.

Aaron Morris


February 29, 2000

Janne Kulmala


February 29, 2000

I will not buy any more from Amazon.com

Jagadeesh Venugopal


February 29, 2000

Stop typing amazon.com. Start typing noamazon.com.

Alex Blume


February 29, 2000

BEWARE!!!!! The Internet gaveth to Amazon, the Internet can taketh away!

popman


February 29, 2000

BEWARE!!!!! The Internet gaveth to Amazon, the Internet can taketh away!

popman


February 29, 2000

You go Jeff. A dollar in your pocket is a dollar in mine.

A. Meade


February 29, 2000

I think the patent office should be apportioned some responsibility in this letter.

Charlie Goodier


February 29, 2000

William Crosby-Lundin


February 29, 2000

This issue is of enormous importance, and not just within the United States.

Paul Martin


February 29, 2000

You do not own this technology. So stop trying to steal it. Thank you.

Manny Manuel


February 29, 2000

I am in full agreement with Tim -- and RMS.

Steve Lamont


February 29, 2000

The 1-click patent has got to be the dumbest patent ever awarded and Amazon should be ashamed of it.

Kristoffer Henriksson


February 29, 2000

I am boycotting until this situation is resolved...

Adrian Rollett


February 29, 2000

I will be shopping elsewhere until Amazon assures me that they will not attempt use their patents to keep other sites from using obvious ideas like cookies (one-click ordering) and multi-tier marketing (afiiliate programs).

Eric Costello


February 29, 2000

Dear Sirs, You're a big enormous company, I'm just a customer. I can't stop you, but I won't buy books from you.

Jos'h Fuller


February 29, 2000

If you purue this patent, I hope you fail! pk

Pete Kingswell


February 29, 2000

I have ordered things from Amazon since the patent was granted, but I'm beginning to think that that may have been a mistake.

Kevin McKenzie


February 29, 2000

Until Amazon changes their ways, I'm using Barnes & Noble, or ordering direct from publishers like O'Reilly

Richard Rognlie


February 29, 2000

Once the best bookstore on line, now interested in selling everything (including the kitchen sink) and obsessed with growing at any cost.

Bill Symmes


February 29, 2000

Rethink it!

C.W.P. Schoenmakers


February 29, 2000

My last amazon.com purchase was made last week, and that only because I had gift certificates to spend. Mr. Bezeos & co. will not see any more of my money.

Steven V.


February 29, 2000

I will boycott amazon until they resolve this matter. If the courts resolve it for them, patent or no, I will never do business with you again.

Sam Stintson


February 29, 2000

I prefer amazon over other services. Unfortunately, I view their actions as abusing the very system that helps them exist. I will boycott until amazon corrects this.

Brandon Hill


February 29, 2000

I'm in agreement with most of these opinions and will certainly buy elsewhere until I hear this issue has been resolved. (not that I could actually read them all given the large number who have already responded)

Paul Mueller


February 29, 2000

Jeff, You must be following bad advice with these misguided patents that bites the hand that feeds you. I am disappointed with your actions. Align Co. Publishing, Media, and Technology Consulting

P. G. Secondino


February 29, 2000

I can contribute nothing substantive to what Tim O'Reilly and Richard Stallman have already written. However, I feel compelled to add that you should be ashamed of yourself.

Joe Formoso


February 29, 2000

Stop Software Patents Period. Make money with supporting open standards and creating the best implementation of them.

Jochen Bedersdorfer


February 29, 2000

Let Amazon compete on _service_ not patents. I used to shop at Amazon because they understood customer service better than any other book seller. Now Amazon has lost its way and my money will go elsewhere.

Edward Franks


February 29, 2000

I've stooped using your service, Amazon and intend to continue the boycott until this situation is resolved

Dmitriy Meleshko


February 29, 2000

because of this issue our family has decided to cease doing business with amazon.com. we need to send a clear message to these big sharks that such purely greedy attempts are simply unacceptable. they will ultimately hurt us all. this is simply outrageous!

bettina gentry


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com is using a petty tactic to beat back its competition, and I think it stinks. I'm not patronizing Amazon.com anymore. (I might use their terriffic web content to make purchasing decisions, but they won't see anymore of my money.)

Drone Head


February 29, 2000

Im you persist on this patent's things, I will stop buying books from you and urge all the persons I know to stop doing it.

Alejandro Forero Cuervo


February 29, 2000

I have nothing to add to what many others have said about this issue.

Ian Jackson


February 29, 2000

Please differentiate on services and material offerings. Differentiating on the cookie level is simply ridiculous. Look at what the patent has gotten you, and then compare that to the ill will it has bred. Was it worth it? It's not too late to turn this puppy around, you know.

Erik Ratcliffe


February 29, 2000

These patents are wrong, and until cease this activity I will and have been participating in RMS' boycott of Amazon. I have also convinced some non-tech friends/relatives to participate in the boycott as well. Its your choice, and it seems clear what you should do.

Ethan Benson


February 29, 2000

I'm happy to buy my books elsewhere. I'm a student in Digital Design and spend at least 贄 a quarter on computer and design books. I'm also happy to inform my classmates, teachers, and the underclassmen whom I work with, about Amazon.com's brazen actions towards monopolizing a common vehicle.

Elisa Del Vecchio


February 29, 2000

Even though I am satisfied as a customer by Amazon, I am absolutely horrified that somebody could be STUPID enough to grant a patent on cookies. And that Amazon would exploit holes in the US patent system is in my opinion almost a criminal act. So I think they should back down.

Michael Wulff Nielsen


February 29, 2000

Amazon is one of the easiest and most effective ecommerce sites around. While I may not buy huge numbers of books, 95% of the books I have bought in the last 12 months, and 100% of the books bought online were ordered through amazon.co.uk. As of yesterday (28/2/2000) I've started using bol.com.

Gary Hill


February 29, 2000

Amazon used to be the first place on the web where I looked for books. Now it is the last thanks to their insistence on enforcing their trivial patent. If Amazon insists on protecting their territory instead of innovating, it won't be long before someone else comes along and comes up with something that will put them out of business.

Tanner Lovelace


February 29, 2000

To Jeff Bezos, Simply Chinese proverb analogy, Amazon - Boat Us the book buyers - Water We can keep you afloat, we can also sink you just as easy. I would like to start shopping at Amazon again, but in the meantime, I will take my business elsewhere. Sincerely Xu He

Xu He


February 29, 2000

I don't know who told you getting a patent on cookies was a good idea, but I don't think they should get a raise this year (or next year.) I was a fan of Amazon.com. It was bright and shinny and could do no wrong. Now your image is tarnish and I don't know if myself or my family will ever be customers of yours again. I'm sorry for you.

Sterling Keener


February 29, 2000

I have been an Amazon customer and have purchased books on varied subjects from them. However, since this whole fiasco started I have taken my business elsewhere. I absolutely refuse to deal with any company which behaves in such a greedy and predatory manner.

Brian Showalter


February 29, 2000

While Amazon.com chooses to enforce its "1-click" patent (or any of the other ridiculous patents they have been granted) I will no longer purchase from Amazon.com, either personally or on behalf of my company. Further, I will take every opportunity to encourage my friends, family, and colleagues to do the same. I look forward to the day when such patents are declared invalid in a court of law. Jason Ruiter

Jason Ruiter


February 29, 2000

One would think that Amazon, supposedly knowing the Internet so well, would never pull something like this. I can understand assembling a portfolio of defensive patents to protect your interests, but using obvious ideas like this offensively is unconscionable. Now Amazon will learn how well the Internet routes around obstacles (of any kind). IĂll be shopping elsewhere until further notice. -Darin Buck

Darin Buck


February 29, 2000

I was neutral on this case until I read Mr. O'Reilly's comments. After reading the summary of Mr. Bezos' comments, I am 100% behind the boycott. I think Mr O'Reilly is in a tough position that precludes him from boycotting Amazon, but it IS the reponsibility of the reader's of O'Reilly books to join the boycott. I spent over ū,000 at Amazon in 1999, just in books and CD's. Now I will point my browser and my dollars elswhere.

Bruce Bilbrey


February 29, 2000

Mark Bridgers


February 29, 2000

Amazon does not need a patent on 1-Click to still be successful. There are many other ways that Amazon can ensure their success without unfairly bullying their neighbors out of using such a basic function as saved preferences and express checkout. Can you imagine if one supermarket chain owned the right to offer an "Express checkout line"?! Customers will ultimatelyh base their shopping choices on the their end experience, and not on marketing names.

John Genuard


February 29, 2000

Until Amazon stops with these silly patent claims, they should not be expecting to see any of my money. There are plenty of other vendors who provide a similar service for a similar price. They need to be aware that once we get used to purchasing from a different vendor, Amazon will no longer be the first place we look for books.

Steven Evatt


February 29, 2000

If they were not to be so utterly and blatantly ridiculous patents, perhaps there would be some merit in Amazons patenting scheme. Perhaps. I used to buy about 赨 in books from amazon.com a month (being a developer) and now i buy 0. I currently buy all my books at it's competitors (including the one amazon has filed a lawsuit against) and will continue to boycott amazon.com until releases the patents. Maybe forever. Amazon.com people: your customers are not happy. DO SOMETHING.

Paul Nguyen


February 29, 2000

Patents are supposed to be to encourage people to make public things they do in secret so that knowledge might be advanced. Even if the dubious merit of business process patents were to be accepted, one-click shopping is not something that needed patent protection to encourage its being published or developed. In my opinion, the granting of your patent was unconstitutional. Your insistence on using this patent offensively has lowered my opinion of your company from audacious innovator to the level of a slimy cybersquatter.

Eric Hopper


February 29, 2000

Amazon...Take down your patents! Seriously-- your move to patent the 1-click process is (as I'm sure you have been made aware by now) both illegitimate (in that it is not the creation of a novel 'art' or process... simply an application (and not a particularly inventive one) of the cookie) and (in the long run) ill advised. Chalk up one more book buyer who will not grace your 'virtual' storefront with their presence. (estimated weekly expenditures on books(as averaged over the last few years)-- between 贄 and 赨 dollars.) (Not to mention CD's) :P

Kerry Lazarus


February 29, 2000

I have enjoyed shopping at Amazon.com for quite a while. However, after hearing about the patent nonsense and RMS's call for a boycott I checked out the competition. So far I haven't been as happy with the competition, but in an attempt to make a statement, I am avoiding Amazon.com. The world wide web is already suffering greatly from the realization of corporations that it can be commercially viable. I thought Amazon.com was a good example of how an e-company should work. Please return to sensible business practices and back off of your frivolous patent claims. Those actions do not set a good example.

Jeffrey W. Jones


February 29, 2000

I agree with Tim O'Reilly and RMS that this trivial software patent is an abuse of privilege on the part of Amazon. The open standards Internet technology and open source software make it possible for Amazon to exist. This attempt to illegitimately lay claim to public technology must not be allowed to continue unchallenged.

Charles Spurgeon


February 29, 2000

<P>I agree with Tim O'Reilly's well-written thoughts on the Amazon.com 1-Click patent. Amazon.com should spend more time and money working on improving customer service, maintaining a great site and continuing with innovative technology, and spend less time trying to enforce a patent that should have never been granted in the first place. There is nothing innovative or unique in the Amazon.com 1-Click system.</P> <P> Until such time as Amazon.com retracts the patent application and lawsuits, I will cease purchasing from Amazon, and will advise all of my friends and family to do the same. After all, I can always order my books directly from O'Reilly or BN.com...</P>

Mark Boltz


February 29, 2000

I, like the hundreds who have signed their names above and below me, am appalled by your misguided and shortsighted attempts to stifle creativity by turning trivialities into minefields of potential litigation. I have not purchased anything from Amazon.com since your ridiculous patent action, and do not intend to do so until you come to your senses. Pissing in the well, indeed.

Chris Crick


February 29, 2000

I work for Thomson Consumer Electronics, the manufacturers of RCA, GE, and ProScan consumer electronics equipment and one of the leading holders of patents in the consumer electronics industry. Although I personally have mixed feelings about software patents, I have much fewer problems with software patents that are non-trivial and non-obvious. (You might want to look into the history of the Bell Labs' setuid patent at this point.) Trying to use obvious and trivial patents to protect your business position is a pure short-term strategy. Short-term because competitors will use their obvious and trivial patents against you to begin with, short-term because it makes you look very bad in the eyes of the technically astute customers who were your early adopters and are still probably among the best at spreading the word of Amazon.com to others, and short-term because eventually the Patent Office will start revoking these patents, thereby removing your business advantage from these obvious and trivial patents. When the Amazon.com technicall staff comes up with non-obvious, non-trivial software techniques that will get patents that will stand up in court, it would be very understandable for Amazon.com to patent these techniques. Unfortunately, the 1-click ordering and affiliates program are not those patents. I will still continue to tell people about Amazon.com -- it is by far the handiest way to order books and music at home.

Mark Leighton Fisher


February 29, 2000

I would like to speak as a technical professional whose book spending is literally in the multiple thousands of dollars per year. I was increasingly using Amazon for my book purchases. After trying several on line book vendors over the last year I was pleased with Amazon's customer service and in light of this the slight increment of price over other vendors was no object. I also enthusiastically encouraged my non-technical friends and family (generally voracious readers) to use Amazon. I frequently linked to Amazon URLs in on line discussions and e-mails. Then the 1-click patent came along (not to mention the even more unspeakable associates program patent) and everything changed. Tim has made both the technical and moral case against these better and more authoritatively than I could. And let me add that I respect the hard work that has gone into the creation of your excellent site, and fully support your right to appropriate trademark and copyright protection. However, it is with deep regret that I am unable to buy from you, recommend you or link to you any longer. I have found the service from your competitors acceptable if somewhat less polished than the service I enjoyed from Amazon (this has absolutely nothing to do with the patents at issue, I may add, but just old fashioned hard work). I cannot speak for the thousands of other avid book buying technical professionals like me, but if Amazon would step back from this ill conceived business strategy, I for one would give you a second look.

Matthew F. Leo


February 29, 2000

I too am appalled at the misbehavior of Amazon. Like so many others, I have switched my online book purchases to Barnes and Nobel and others. I urge Amazon to do the right thing, to be competitive on thier own merits and to save themselves the trouble of fighting these ridiculous patent fights.

Howard Ship


February 29, 2000

Rob Klink


February 29, 2000

Tom Jones


February 29, 2000

Eric Grove


February 29, 2000

Chris Abiad


February 29, 2000

What Amazon is doing is retarded. Time magazine should revoke Jeff Bezo's "Man of the Year" title. He's the schmuck of the year (so far). He's become an enemy of the Internet. This will not be easily forgotten.

Mark Cidade


February 29, 2000

David Shantz


February 29, 2000

David Heffner


February 29, 2000

Tyranny does not drive innovation. Amazon would be nothing without the generosity of previous works which were made freely available to Amazon. To claim a patent on well known technology is preposterous. Amazon will not be getting my business.

Brandon Poyner


February 29, 2000

Paul Penedo


February 29, 2000

Mando Escamilla


February 29, 2000

Michael Pirnat


February 29, 2000

Simon Hill


February 29, 2000

Kay Nettle


February 29, 2000

Richard Weeks


February 29, 2000

I purchased books from Amazon over xmas and was impressed with the service and selection. However I will no longer use amazon.com due to what I see as a predatory practice of pantenting technologies that were developed from prior technologies developed in a more open environment. If it were not for this open environment, the web, as well as Mr Bezos and his company would be a lost advance in communication and information science. One Gates is enough.

Wesley Harrell


February 29, 2000

Danna Cornick


February 29, 2000

Stefan Buchholtz


February 29, 2000

Chris Hubble


February 29, 2000

Michael Wiltsie


February 29, 2000

where do I apply for a pattent to cut and paste between frames?

Andrew Snyder


February 29, 2000

Products want to be sold, but the Internet needs to be free!

Erik Peterson


February 29, 2000

I'm a social worker and don't know a lot about technology, but I know oppression when I see it.

Julie Johnson


February 29, 2000

Patent something I can write in an hour? Gimme a break. I'll buy at barnes and noble and reel.com from now on, thank you.

Jason Wambach


February 29, 2000

I have been boycotting Amazon since they announced the patent and have been urging all my friends and relatives to boycott it too. Frivilous patents like this stifle innovation.

Charles Leeds


February 29, 2000

Many with more skill in putting words together have stated above exactly what I feel. The only thing I want to add is that I, too, have exclusively shopped at B&N since this ludicrous patent was awarded.

Glen Frank


February 29, 2000

For the good of the Amazon's customers, employees, and shareholders (and, oh yeah, the rest of the world) ... it's time to lay these patents down. In cases such as these, where there *is* prior art, there should be no patent. Daniel Gray geekbooks.com

Daniel Gray


February 29, 2000

alison headley


February 29, 2000

As long as Amazon.com continues such greedy, foolish behavior, I will not spend a dime at their website. Furthermore, I will urge my friends, family, and clients to purchase products at alternative websites until Amazon backs away from its current stance.

Ryan Hennig


February 29, 2000

Pavel Shevchenko


February 29, 2000

I think Amazon has done a number of positive things for the industry, but I cannot support the issuance or aggressive defense of this and other such trivial patents. I believe Amazon should drop defense of this patent, and will boycott their site(s) until they do so.

Poney Carpenter


February 29, 2000

The granting of the 1-Click patent application is another indictment of the incompetence of the US patent office. I hope Amazon try to enforce it and a reasonably savvy judge laughs you out of court. Heres hoping such patents never get granted in the free world.

Gareth Owen


February 29, 2000

In the past I have bought thousands of dollars worth of mechandise from Amazon, as well as recommended your company to many others. I will no longer purchase from or recommend Amazon as long as you insist on causing long term damage to the community for your own short term gains.

Dan Green


February 29, 2000

Even as a die-hard-laissez-faire-economics-libertarian, these patents offend me to my very core. I am uncertain who to direct my anger against, the evil of Amazon.com for filing the patents, or the nonchalant ignorance of the U.S. Patent Office for allowing them to succeed.

Michael F. Maddox


February 29, 2000

I have stopped purchasing from Amazon for both my personal items as well as my corporate purchases. I will continue to boycott you and direct my business transactions to your competitors until you reverse your stand on both of your patents, 1 Click and the Associates patent. Respectfully, Jeff Hinrichs Omaha, NE

Jeff Hinrichs


February 29, 2000

I am a registered affiliate of amazon.com, but with such predatory tactics being used by Amazon, I have no choice but to drop my affiliation from a company that no longer stands for innovation. A company that can't compete on it's merits, and must resolve to using cheap and dirty tactics.

Vidyut Luther


February 29, 2000

I agree whole-heartedly with the sentiments of Tim O'Reilly's letter.

Alastair Burt


February 29, 2000

I have been a good (maybe even excellent) customer of Amazon.com since it started several years ago. I have never used the One-Click process and never will. I don't expect to stop buying books from Amazon, but I certainly do object to their efforts to keep for themselves something they "stole" from the public.

H. Milton Peek


February 29, 2000

I'm just one but I will not buy from Amazon, and have written some people and will try to convince others to stop using them. It's too bad because they're so convenient but, I'll use them for user-comments, but actually buy stuff elsewhere. We have to discourage trivial ankle-biting patents.

Jeff Donner


February 29, 2000

I used to by books from Amazon, no longer. Their competators have the same prices, so that's where my dollars now go. Maybe I should patent the idea of providing a button to click on in a website and enforce it against Amazon, or better yet, the idea of cookies. Patenting the obvious is in my opinion a form of corporate criminal behavior. Enjoy your loss of market share.....

Owen C. Creger


February 29, 2000

I applaud Mr. O'Reilly for a rational and even-handed dissection of this issue. Mr. Bezos should not attempt to learn his business ethics from Mr. Gates and the competition-squashing mafia in Redmond. Like many others have already stated, there's nothing Amazon sells that I can't click-and-buy at any number of other sites - ones that are far less predatory and abusive.

Scott Harvey


February 29, 2000

Although not many, I have purchased books from you in the past, and do not intend to buy from you in the future if you continue such behaviour. If my name is not in your records, it is from the necessity of having to borrow another's credit card.

Jeff Read


February 29, 2000

As someone who are been on the net for several years now, there have been incredible advances in technology that have come about simply by people sharing their ideas. What Amazon is trying to do, in essence, *stealing* these ideas, sickens me to the core. As long as Amazon continues this blatant misuse of the patent system and utter disregard for pre-existing technologies, I'll continue to not do business with them, and to tell my friends the same.

Doug Muth


February 29, 2000

I will no longer purchase books through Amazon.com. I am a college student and an avid reader--and will purchase my significant volume of books elsewhere until such time that these ridiculous business practices are discontinued. Please also keep in mind that for each of us who speak in this forum, there are untold others who feel as we do-- please, please, reconsider! It will be better for business.

Jennifer Jensen


February 29, 2000

I am a devoted Amazon customer. However, as an Internet Technologist I cannot condone the patenting of any system that is merely a superficial application of a technology that has been open source from day one. That way lies Microsoft, err, I mean, Madness.

Robert G. Ferrell


February 29, 2000

I have nothing to add but to note that I will never again use the services of Amazon, if they should even continue to be construed as services. Pharmaceutical companies patenting nature, business executives patenting well known technologies; what next? Engineers who do not share their knoweledge and insist on patenting every line of code. Sigh. Mark Washeim Technical Director, Large Medium AB Proud to support OPEN SOURCE! (NetBSD, Apache)

Mark Washeim


February 29, 2000

Your software patents are an obvious attempt to gain a monopoly in an open environment. Had patents such as '1-click shopping' been approved in the web's infancy, you would be selling books out of your parent's garage. I personally plan to boycott amazon.com until this matter is resolved. Please take this not as a threat to you, but as a necessary means to an end...The patent will be overturned eventually, Jeff, but will the community's doubt in amazon.com?

Jim Sproull


February 29, 2000

Jeff, I have been shopping at Amazon.com for years now. I think it is a great store with incredible potential. As a software developer and one who believes in open standards, I believe what you are doing is simply wrong. Because of this, I and any others can I get to join my cause, will be boycotting your store effective immediately. Please overturn your 1-Click and Affiliate patents and I will be happy to return to your store... Scott Meeuwsen High Level Software, Ltd.

Scott Meeuwsen


February 29, 2000

Since hearing about this One-Click patent nonsense, I've ceased even visiting the amazon site. The Amazon link on my netscape toolbar has now become a Barnes and Noble link. Amazon will never again see a dime of mine until they begin acting like rational and decent citizens of the online community (and having the patent revoked by the Patent Office or overturned by a court doesn't count as acting rationally). I may not be wealthy, but I spent a fair amount at Amazon, and if enough of us stop shopping it will add up.

Michael McLaughlin


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos- Since learning of Amazon.com's intent to pursue patent litigation, I have ceased to be a patron of your company, and have urged those around me to do likewise. It's one thing to succeed by being an innovator, it's something wholly different to be selfish and arrogant with other people's technology. I doubt my 跌 annually (and whatever my circle of friends might spend) means much in terms of your company's bottom line. I may even end up paying slightly more out of my own pocket by using other vendors, but feel that compromising not only my own principles, but those of the people who make the internet work, live, and grow.

Rafe Brox


February 29, 2000

I love Amazon's book site. It makes books easy to find and easy to order. The author and reader commentaries are useful. I used to buy most of my books from Amazon. No more. The 1-click ordering and associate program are nice, but they were NOT my reason for visiting Amazon, and the fact that some other on-line store copies those features will NOT make me go there. Price and information, price and information, that's what attracts me. I will happilly resume buying from Amazon as soon as they publically declare that they will no longer use patents as weapons.

Bill St. Clair


February 29, 2000

Whatever "rights" Amazon or any other corporation or individual feels they have to patent software and business processes, the fact is, such patents are already having a chilling effect on Internet development and innovation, which will in the end limit everyone's (including Amazon's) ability to make money off the Internet. I hope that anyone considering registering a slew of patents will instead spend their money more wisely: lobby the U.S. government to reexamine the work of the Patent and Trademark Office, and the concept of patents themselves. Just in the past quarter, my site ahref.com has brought over 迀 of business directly to Amazon. Within 24 hours, ahref.com will stop referring purchasers to Amazon.

Edward Piou


February 29, 2000

I'm disappointed by Amazon's ludicrous claim to have invented anything (in regards to 1-Click). This is a misnomer. To keep my statement in context though, I want to be clear that I have books on my desk purchased from Amazon. And though I'm not enforcing or advocating any boycott, I have chosen other book vendors ever since I first read that Amazon applied for this patent. I've also told others in my IT organization where they may find computer related books from a less nefarious organization. I see your move as pathetic and unrealistic. In my eyes it's about as relevant as copyrighting letters of the alphabet. My personal opinion is that you can go f**k youself until you decide to drop your claims of having invented anything. (these are all personal opinions really, none of which reflect the views of my employer.. )

Dagen Brock


February 29, 2000

I've been upset about this patent since the beginning of the year, and as a software developer who usually spends between around 躔/year on books, my protest alone has moved 贄 in book sales to other web sites. I've also taken the time to forward this information to my less technical friends who've invested in Amazon, and used their services to tell them likewise to boycott amazon. So Mr. Bezos, you've screwed up. Cover your behind and hold your patent but leave it in the public domain so others are free to use it. Have you noticed your sales starting to decline? Computer books seem to be the most expensive books and all programmers I've known have decided to shop elsewhere. I'm looking forward to your next quarterly statement to see how your losses are increasing. But I don't believe you've got a clue since you are now patenting the "associates program" or whatever it's called. I don't care if I don't get paid(not that I ever participated in linking to amazon for cash), I'll link to any web site but yours.

Dan Pieczynski


February 29, 2000

I am saddened and disappointed by Amazon's ill-advised use of software patents and I can no longer support Amazon in good faith until they rectify this issue.

Lawrence Leung


February 29, 2000

Jon Snader


February 29, 2000

I thought the 1-click patent was an absurd childish ploy that I could ignore. Now I'm frought. I have long supported and promoted Amazon, have been very loyal as a customer, and am (for the moment) an affiliate myself. But now I have some serious pondering to do. The reason for my support was because Amazon was innovative and provided good service. I didn't care for BN because I wanted to shop from a company with a new model, in short, because Amazon didn't have brick and mortar stores. I liked their innovation as much as if not more than anything else. But now they appear to be slipping. They're not innovating. I haven't been particularly happy about their expansion away from their core business into tools, toys and auctions, where they're less than original. But it's becoming obvious that they're moving away from innovation and into anti-innovation, into an attempt to have an anti-trust lawsuit filed against them, perhaps? The fact is, we all know that 1-click ordering was just a typical use of existing cookies technology, and that affiliates programs are nothing but an old marketing method from long before the internet existed. What really matters is where Amazon goes from here. Perhaps the 1-click suit was just an ill-advised childish phase, and this newest absurd patent will be allowed to just collect dust. I certainally hope so, and will be watching closely.

Chad Gard


February 29, 2000

Dennis Scott


February 29, 2000

Iain Holmes


February 29, 2000

Tim Riehle


February 29, 2000

Scott Houle


February 29, 2000

Justin Stringer


February 29, 2000

Agreed

Bob Bunge


February 29, 2000

John Anderson


February 29, 2000

John Hicks


February 29, 2000

kevin mayhew


February 29, 2000

Greg Johll


February 29, 2000

Michael Thicke


February 29, 2000

David Miller


February 29, 2000

John Camille


February 29, 2000

Patrick Misterovich


February 29, 2000

Never was a customer, and now I never will be.

Matthew Bielanski


February 29, 2000

Joshua Duke Sharp


February 29, 2000

This is to register my support.

Richard A. Phillips


February 29, 2000

I used to be a customer of Amazon and value their service but unfortunately I have to go somewhere else for my books now.

Albert Dorofeev


February 29, 2000

Amazon was good,but there are oter online sites ,which respect The Internet more than amazon.com.

Guntis Liepins


February 29, 2000

The key thing is that Amazon publish their intentions with their patents and are held publically accountable to them.

Martin Burns


February 29, 2000

This patent issue is an outrage. Why doesn't Amazon get a patent on the alphabet or the decimal system - these are also available to take.

Szymon Sokol


February 29, 2000

The one-click and affiliates patents make me wear my fatbrain.com hat and t-shirt with extra pride. It helps me remember who to buy from...

Brett g Porter


February 29, 2000

Excellent letter Tim. I can't believe that amazon is going ahead with not only applaying for, but also enforcing, these patents. Keep the net free of "cash and grab".

Noah Genner


February 29, 2000

I refuse to give my business to a company that insists on stifling technological innovation.

Noal McDonald


February 29, 2000

I am an <i>Amazon customer</i> but will not be purchasing any more books (or any other merchandise their <em>empire</em> wants to sell) from them until they get over this childish patent.

Alex C Tan


February 29, 2000

The patent is bogus to anyone who has the slightest idea of how the web is designed. They just had enough money to get it and slipped it past inept PTO officials. I only shop BN now.

ernie mcginty


February 29, 2000

What happens to patents if the company dies .... for example the highly profitable AMAZON.COM ??? I would like them to go out of business ... highly unlikely but such a nice thought!

Frans de Wet


February 29, 2000

I've been using Amazon for a couple of years but now I'll be going elsewhere. I spend about ˙250 per year on books, mostly from Amazon, but they won't see another penny.

David Allewell


February 29, 2000

Watch out Amazon. I am going to patent the click itself and counter sue. Then I will sue for licensing anytime someone pushes the mouse button for using my patent. Oh boy! This will be great!

Chad Z. Hower


February 29, 2000

I have joined the Boycott. Another example of a private corporation gorging on government open source fueled innovations and then turning around claiming that they invented it, they own it.

Mark Saltzman


February 29, 2000

All I can say is that since these issues have arisen I've bought many hundreds of dollars worth of books that I might have purchased from Amazon from other sources instead.

Howard Ding


February 29, 2000

All I can say is that since these issues have arisen I've bought many hundreds of dollars worth of books that I might have purchased from Amazon from other sources instead.

Howard Ding


February 29, 2000

Amazon has potentially a long way to fall. I am astounded that a company I previously thought to be forward-thinking can be so short-sighted. Step back from the abyss before it is too late.

Robert Galbraith


February 29, 2000

I haven't bought a single thing from Amazon since this whole fiasco started. That's more than 跌 they won't be seeing from me in the near future. Maybe a small amount, but with enough people, it adds up.

Shaun Thomas


February 29, 2000

Software patents of this kind are evil, and I will not do business with any company that uses a tactic like this to gain market share. Until Amazon sees the light, I'm doing my book shopping at bn.com or fatbrain.

Monty Manley


February 29, 2000

Althought I have been an Amazon customer in the past, I have been part of the boycott. And, unfortunately for Amazon, I have been so pleased with Barnes and Noble, I doubt that I will return to Amazon now, regardless of what they do.

Sara Mabon


February 29, 2000

Onde again, it was a plaisure reading Tim's opinion. I believe Amazon will see the light and stop trying to corner the market with their patents. Until they do, I will be having a great time reading books from O'Reilly and others wich wont be purchased at Amazon.

Jose Venceslau


February 29, 2000

It saddens me to say that I won't be spending any more time or money on the Amazon website. Your service and selection over the years has been excellent, but I simply can't abide your patent policies. When and if you revisit your decisions, I'll revisit mine.

David Love


February 29, 2000

I fully agree with Tim's position and I support the boycott of Amazon. I have bought several O'Reily books from them in the past. Now, their competitors will benefit from my future purchases.

Michael Lippo


February 29, 2000

Even thought I have purchased from Amazon in the past, and been happy with the experience, I will not spend another cent at Amazon until they drop these ridiculous patent issues. There are many other places online to get books. www.fatbrain.com , www.alibris.com, www.bn.com, www.borders.com, etc.

Matthew Van Horn


February 29, 2000

As an online customer and a web developer, I am continually frustrated by the attempts of large corporate interests such as Microsoft or Amazaon to take technologies which were formerly free and open and make them proprietary. These practices, which exist only in the interests of the employees of the companies that pursue them, are antithetical and poisonous to the open, unbounded nature of the web. I will boycott companies such as yours, who attempt to grab resources that should be available to everyone (and if you check your database, you'll see that I have been a customer in the past). Furthermore, I will encourage friends and family to do the same. Best regards, Heather M. Buch

Heather Buch


February 29, 2000

I had nothing but respect for Amazon.com, and have made purchases through them. As a member of the IT community and an advocate of the open standards that have made Amazon's success possible, I am disgusted by their current behavior. Therefore, until Amazon.com changes its tune, I will be participating in the boycott against them called for by RMS, and I will be urging others to do the same.

Frank Wierzbicki


February 29, 2000

Amazon like many other corporations in recent history has forgotten its roots and what helped it to get to where it is today. If it hadn't been because of the web and its free and innovative offerings Amazon and many other e-commerce would not be in existance. Amazon should do the right thing and release these patents into public domain ASAP.

Fred Rahmanian


February 29, 2000

Like at least one other signer, I too have avoided "spamazon" as a result of the extremely negative light they cast themselves in on the news.admin.net-abuse newsgroups in the past. I was beginning to reconsider, but this absurdity has only widened the gulf I'd have to cross. Sorry, Jeff. I will continue to recommend your non-spamming, rational competitors as long as you direct the company in this manner. It's sad in a way; I hope this self-immolation of Amazon's stops soon.

Patrick P. Murphy


February 29, 2000

I have been a big Amazon fan, I've ordered a lot of books and participated in auctions. Until now I've never hesitated to recommend the site to my family and friends. However, these two patents have utterly dismayed me, and I feel betrayed by a company that I thought had actually grasped the idea of web-based commerce. Until Amazon backs off from these patents I will never use the site and will advise everyone I know to boycott it as well.

Paul Caton


February 29, 2000

Your abuse of swamped patent clerks to pass such a ridiculous patent is really low, and to acutally use the patent to sue your competitors is really the lowest! It's equal to domain name pirating (i.e. being first at registering whatever). I thought you competed with high availability, efficiency and a wide sortiment, but apparently you do not. If you only had registered the patent to stop someone else from doing what you do I'd still respected your business, but not anymore.

Lars Rasmusson


February 29, 2000

Before they lost their customer focus, I used to spend hundreds of dollars per month at Amazon.com, mostly on books. Then came the 1-click patent, the published lists of books purchased in particular locales and from particular domains, and the associates patent. This tells me that Amazon.com has moved its focus inward; it no longer cares about its customers. I cannot in good conscience encourage that sort of business practice, so I will be spending my money at Fatbrain, Borders, and Barnes and Noble until they regain their customer focus.

Joseph Walsh


February 29, 2000

Mr. O'Reilly put a great deal of thought into what he's done. From his summary of the response he got from Amazon.com, I have to agree that he was brushed off. The one-click patent <b>not</b> a frivilous patent? The associates patent <b>not</b> a frivilous patent? Come on. Both have tons of prior art. Why is there so much prior art? The people who used the ideas before weren't bone-headed enough to think that they may be doing themselves a favour by patenting it! Save yourself a lot of time and aggravation: drop the patents and instead patent the method that you used to get the US Patent Office to give you a patent on such an already-used technology.

Andrew Kohlsmith


February 29, 2000

I don't believe anything has gone unsaid in the preceding signatures. Amazon - see the light. You may think only techs care about this ... but believe me (and others) - it isn't difficult to convince the public. Do you want to be compared to corporations such as Microsoft? Microsoft might have a 95% market share for desktop PCs ... it might not hurt their bottom line to have people decrying their practices. However - you don't enjoy the same position, think about this. Barnes & Noble, Borders, DVDexpress, reel.com, etc. - you're replaceable, you really are. All you are to people is this: http://www.amazon.com a URL .. nothing more, nothing less. Easy to replace, easier to forget. Think carefully if this is worth pursuing this silly patent.

Brice Ruth


February 29, 2000

It's a chilling sign of the times when service business's feel they are above the ones they service. As with Microsoft, the argument is not so much with the actual product (although it may also well be drawn into question), but with the assumption of absolute right to ignore basic moral codes in order to gain market share. While there have always been differing views on what is the best way to go forward with new technologies, the end results tend to prove that innovation, solidity, & growth flourish where ideas are free and even nurtured, whereas overly stringent and/or overly petty attitudes based on immediate financial power tend to produce inferior and non permanent results. I'll spare the History 101 course, as the above has been proven again and again over the centuries. Amazon had moved to my list of companies to Not give my hard-earned money when the initial patent announcement was made. Too bad that such a wonderfully convenient service has decided to play such a shortsighted game.

Theresa Heath


February 29, 2000

I thought the 1-click patent was an absurd childish ploy that I could ignore. Now I'm frought. I have long supported and promoted Amazon, have been very loyal as a customer, and am (for the moment) an affiliate myself. But now I have some serious pondering to do. The reason for my support was because Amazon was innovative and provided good service. I didn't care for BN because I wanted to shop from a company with a new model, in short, because Amazon didn't have brick and mortar stores. I liked their innovation as much as if not more than anything else. But now they appear to be slipping. They're not innovating. I haven't been particularly happy about their expansion away from their core business into tools, toys and auctions, where they're less than original. But it's becoming obvious that they're moving away from innovation and into anti-innovation, into an attempt to have an anti-trust lawsuit filed against them, perhaps? The fact is, we all know that 1-click ordering was just a typical use of existing cookies technology, and that affiliates programs are nothing but an old marketing method from long before the internet existed. What really matters is where Amazon goes from here. Perhaps the 1-click suit was just an ill-advised childish phase, and this newest absurd patent will be allowed to just collect dust. I certainally hope so, and will be watching closely.

Chad Gard


February 29, 2000

I greatly admire Amazon for capitalizing so brilliantly on a new market opportunity. The marketing, user experience, speed and simplicity they have demonstrated are remarkable. I must say, though, that they have lost my business due to these patent decisions. Amazon, as a big business that must maintain a competitive edge, is now making greater use of "big business" tactics, one of which is patenting. However, it doesn't look like this kind of a patent will be a licensing revenue source; it looks more like a competitive advantage issue. Ironically, as Tim states so well, the platform that made Amazon such a success case was an open, non-proprietary environment, a level playing field where someone with a better product can win; thus the success of Amazon. What they are doing now is trying to lock their current market position in. But they are starting to fragment the platform without which they would have not succeeded. I might say they are starting to rely less on their value added (customer service, ease of use, wide selection) to keep their advantage, though I have seen no evidence of this. They are in a tough position, no doubt: competitors could crop up as strongly and quickly as they did. The patent office has been recklessly giving patents out for business models on the net. I would imagine Amazon though if they didn't pursue these patents, someone else would (given the patent office's propensity to grant these types of patents). Think of a smaller firm looking to get a foot in the door/market? This is no justification, however, for what has happened. If they won't relent on the patents, I would ask Amazon to be creative with them. Let them keep ownership of the patents, but grant the world non-exclusive rights to reuse without need to credit the patent owner. When that, or something much more intelligent, happens, my wife and I will gladly come back as a customer. Cheers, Miguel Marcos

Miguel Marcos


February 29, 2000

I completely agree with Tim, in all his arguments. The practice of patenting already widely-used software and commerce techniques is not just selfish, but an obvious "bully tactic" against competitors. This is evident in the Amazon v. Barnes&Noble, which was executed suspiciously soon after Amazon's awarding of their [1-click] patent. Considering that B&N is one of Amazon's biggest competitor, it's hardly coincidence that this would happen. In addition, no suits have been filed against e-commerce companies who use similar (or identical) techniques for business unrelated to selling books or music/movie media. I'm sure many people are grateful that Amazon's lawyers have NOT pursued suing "everyone and their mother" for patent violation - which would be the "all" in "all or nothing" - but even more people are concerned about this practice in general, regardless of who you choose to target in your patent-based lawsuits. Therefore, the best thing Amazon should do, is not to b! ully people who've used the same technology that was literally handed to [Amazon]. To Amazon: Your people seem to think that retracting your patents might make your company look "weak" or "unsure of yourselves". I completely disagree. By taking advantage of the patent system and the technologies given to you by established Internet innovators, you have already been labeled by thousands of other netizens and patent lawyers as bullies. Your public image is already tainted, and an apology to the community you serve will certainly let you regain your image as a responsible e-commerce company. Please don't interpret this the wrong way, because I don't mean ill-will towards you as a company. I would like to see this issue adversely affect your sales, if even the smallest amount. Money talks, and while your public and peers (our fellow netizens) are voicing their opinions and boycotting your service, you should consider the reason. You work for your customers, not yourselves. Where would you be without us?

Erik Allan Schorr


February 29, 2000

Jon Booth


February 29, 2000

Iain Allan


February 29, 2000

Amazon has lost all credibility as a company ready for the paradigm of online business. As an aside, from one developer (me) to the developers that work for Amazon: Aren't you ashamed of yourselves?

Tommy Hayes


February 29, 2000

Mark Vernon


February 29, 2000

I have written many systems to register and keep track of users and user information over the web. Including using cookies, or pathinfo, or hidden form fields to keep a single identifier for the user. Several of these systems were dynamic, and so the list of fields could easily have included "credit card #" and "shipping address". And a form button to send the identifier to a single routine which pulls that info and sends it to the order processor was so trivial as to be not even considered... Oh, sure, I didn't actually connect the one block I had to the other, but it would've taken me five minutes, not thousands of hours, to do so. There is no innovation in One-Click(tm) ordering - it's a connection of blocks that people have been using before Amazon existed. And a trivial connection. Had you merely patented it to keep other people from doing what you're doing now, that would be one thing. What you are doing instead is actually morally and truly wrong.

silver Harloe


February 29, 2000

Jeff Harris


February 29, 2000

Cherry Marks


February 29, 2000

Diego Zamboni


February 29, 2000

Spencer Booth


February 29, 2000

Victoria Clarke


February 29, 2000

I just made my last Amazon.com purchase, and wish I had read this letter first. I will urge my friends to not buy anything from Amazon, as long as it maintains its offensive protection of ludicrous patents.

John Locke


February 29, 2000

Hear, hear!

Druce Vertes


February 29, 2000

Rob Campbell


February 29, 2000

Dan Haley


February 29, 2000

Rumy Driver


February 29, 2000

Emmanuel Pirsch


February 29, 2000

Allan Neal


February 29, 2000

Amazon' use of trivial patents in an offensive manner is cutting off its nose despite its face. I have no doubt that this tactic will, in the end, cost Amazon far more than they are able to gain. The only question is, how much collateral damage will this sort of behavior cause in the meantime. In order to hasten the day when Amazon will see the error of their ways, I will be taking my business elsewhere, and encouraging others to do the same. Brent

Brent Eubanks


February 29, 2000

Fabio Rojas


February 29, 2000

Jared Warren


February 29, 2000

John Krueger


February 29, 2000

Keith Ballard


February 29, 2000

John Krasnay


February 29, 2000

Jim Knight


February 29, 2000

Julien GILLE


February 29, 2000

Robert M. Wagner


February 29, 2000

Alan Oursland


February 29, 2000

Peter Vachuska


February 29, 2000

Akilesh Rajan


February 29, 2000

Michael Westmuckett


February 29, 2000

Ron Manley


February 29, 2000

Mike MacLeod


February 29, 2000

Robert "Christopher" Hunt


February 29, 2000

I consider myself a loyal customer of Amazon's and I would like to express my disillusion with the enforcement of the 1-Click patent and the possible enforcement of the Associates patent.

Gregory Yepes


February 29, 2000

I'll shop elsewhere until the patents are released to the public domain.

Neil Booth


February 29, 2000

Now we know why they picked the name Amazon. Their lawyers are the crocodiles! Someone call The Crocodile Hunter!

Fred Porlock


February 29, 2000

I would hate to lose amazon.com (and amazon.de and .co.uk for that matter) as suppliers of fine books. Please reconsider!

Adrian A. Baumann


February 29, 2000

Amazon are good, but there's nothing I can't get elsewhere. They've lost another customer - at least until they see sense.

Simon Green


February 29, 2000

This has all gone too far. I've urged my fellow employees to also boycott Amazon. There are lots of competitors anyway (see www.noamazon.com).

Steve Willer


February 29, 2000

I was an early and enthusiastic customer of Amazon.com. I will not do any more business with them until they return their focus to customer service rather than this patent folly.

Daniel Nachbar


February 29, 2000

Joputas!!!

Julio Gonz▀lez


February 29, 2000

Excellent letter, Tim. A note to Amazon - in biology organisms (amazon) feeding on their hosts (the internet) with (almost) no restraint are called "parasites". You can do better than that.

Christian Reiniger


February 29, 2000

Unlike, Tim, I have no qualms about RMS' method of protest. So, no more books/music from Amazon until they rethink their ill-advised attempts to hold the web to ransom.

steven filling


February 29, 2000

Mark Russinovich


February 29, 2000

I am complete agreement with Tim O. It is now 'borders.com' for me now.

bill slaybaugh


February 29, 2000

since i've been coding, my goal has ALWAYS been to perform a specific function with as few instructions as possible. Do you really think you're the first site that that's looking at efficiency? Duh!

Allen K. Cacko0wski


February 29, 2000

Bruce Fletcher


February 29, 2000

I have spent a great deal of my money as well my employer's money on books from your site. Because of your company's actions regarding this patent, I have decided to begin typing bn.com in the address field when I need a book.

David Mabe


February 29, 2000

I used to purchase some textbooks from Amazon. Until Amazon kills this patent, I will no longer purchase from Amazon.

Adam Hollidge


February 29, 2000

William Grosso


February 29, 2000

Excellent letter Tim! It's a good thing Mr. Bezos has already recieved most of the "bigtime" accolades. With his current crop of corporate stunts, I rather doubt more will be forthcoming. Personally, I will find it very easy to 1-Click on over to Bookpool or FatBrain for my future purchases (heck, they're usually cheaper anyway).

Eric Lorenz


February 29, 2000

I work for a software company that is heavily involved in e-commerce, so I'm fully aware of the importance of intellectual property. However, I fail to understand how either of the technologies in question could be novel or non-obvious to experts in the field. It is a sad indication of the failure of US patent law to keep pace with the Internet revolution that either of these patents was awarded. You should be embarrassed, as an e-commerce leader, to be trying to enforce what is so clearly a simple attempt to damage competition that is fairly beating you.

Michael K. Werle


February 29, 2000

I support the ideas in this letter 100%. I used to spend well over 񘈨 per year at Amazon, but I stopped when RMS called for the boycott, and have taken my business elsewhere. I do like Amazon's interface better, and would most likely return to them if they drop the existing action and make a strong statement that they won't do it again.

Pace Willisson


February 29, 2000

I agree completely with the comments made by tim O'Reilly in his letter to Amazon. Having used Amazon extensively for a number of years and found the servcies they offer, I can only hope that they realize that there real service to their customers is the sales services they offer, and not tricks like "one-click". Will somebody now try to patent 1.5 click next? Karl

Karl Schopmeyer


February 29, 2000

Your irresponsible use of patents has caused me to become a former customer of yours. While you provide a valuable service I cannot abide a corporation who cuts off innovation on the web by patenting ideas which Amazon clearly did not invent and are commonly used. Your actions stifle the web's growth and I will no longer purchase from your site as long as you insist on these ridiculous patent suits.

Jason Oppel


February 29, 2000

Why on earth did Amazon ever think that they had to become a software bully to keep my business? Before this I used to use them all the time and spread the word to people who I know who were just getting onto the net (friends, family). Now I make a point of sending them to other book sites and I tell them exactly why they should ignore Amazon. Without exception my advice has been accepted. Nobody likes a bully.

Dave Pearson


February 29, 2000

First of all, Jeff Bezos said Sunday night on MSNBC's "Summit in Silicon Valley" that Amazon.com did NOT have a patent for the one-click ordering system. Either he is lying or you all have raised a big stink about some serious misinformation. Second of all, the program that Amazon.com has recently applied for a patent is called the Associates program, not the Affiliates program, which is the similar program used by barnesandnoble.com.

Amanda Dombek


February 29, 2000

I strongly urge amazon.com to reconsider your current patent litigation, and to make clear your intentions with regard to the remainder of your patent portfolio. As a long time amazon.com customer and as a web application developer, I can say that your actions are threatening to my livelihood. Until this matter is settled in a way that benefits both the web community and amazon.com, I cannot justify conducting further business with you.

John Burkhard


February 29, 2000

It took a while for me to explain this to my wife, who was a loyal Amazon shopper (3-4 books or cd's weekly). We have since switched to other online bookstores, and she is very happy with the service she is receiving.

Christopher T. Smith


February 29, 2000

Thank you Tim for a most eloquent letter. Amazon/Jeff, My recommendation for you is to back off enforcement of your patent. This will save the company face, and with a little quiet PR (if there is such a thing), all can be made well with the technical community. As for my book purchases, which totaled about 踰 last year, and will total more than that this year (I am an MBA candidate), I will likely be shopping at fatbrain.com or varsitybooks.com.

Stuart Hall


February 29, 2000

I let my wife know that 'we' do not shop via Amazon anymore. We homeschool, and typically we spend 轜 to 񘈨 dollars on books for our childrens education. That money is going to other resources now. I've been in the computer industry for close to 20 years, and the idea of 'saving state' has been around since working on my first IBM 4600 mainframe.. Amazon is acting in bad faith, and at this point, I feel strongly that I may never shop there again, even if they drop their patents...

Stuart Hunt


February 29, 2000

As a software developer and long time Amazon customer I protest this abuse of US patent law and declare that I will no longer be spending any of my hard earned dollars (earned BTW using many open source tools and technologies) at Amazon.com.

Philip Corp


February 29, 2000

I don't believe that amazon is doing this. It is what we as the online/internet community has feared would happen. We as the community are trying to fight this kind of thing. We need to consider that we have groups like UCITA who are trying to control the IT field and we recieve news that one of our own Amazon is doing such a thing like this unbelievable. I am very disappointed at this action and well no longer buy books from Amazon until they come to they're senses. One Love, One Peace, One Free Online/Internet Community. I believe that we can all profit if some stop being so greed.

Sedarin Perry


February 29, 2000

I've seen Jeff Bezos being interviewed on UK TV a number of times, and I always liked his attitude. He believed in giving good service, and looking after the customers. He realised how easy it is for someone to take their business elsewhere on the internet. Someone can just as easily go to fatbrain, waterstones, whsmith, barnes&noble. And that's just what I intend to do. I find it hard to believe that the person I saw interviewed is the same person responsible for these patents. I now feel like I have been watching a politician. A nice media friendly image, but not so nice in reality. It's very sad.

Mark Brinton


February 29, 2000

It's a chilling sign of the times when service business's feel they are above the ones they service. As with Microsoft, the argument is not so much with the actual product (although it may also well be drawn into question), but with the assumption of absolute right to ignore basic moral codes in order to gain market share. While there have always been differing views on what is the best way to go forward with new technologies, the end results tend to prove that innovation, solidity, & growth flourish where ideas are free and even nurtured, whereas overly stringent and/or overly petty attitudes based on immediate financial power tend to produce inferior and non permanent results. I'll spare the History 101 course, as the above has been proven again and again over the centuries. Amazon had moved to my list of companies to Not give my hard-earned money when the initial patent announcement was made. Too bad that such a wonderfully convenient service has decided to play such a shortsighted game.

Theresa Heath


February 29, 2000

I believe the proper channel for protecting your "One Click Shopping" should be trademark law, not patent law. You are simply using cookies the way cookies were designed to be used, and it is a travesty that this patent was granted. However, if you wish to create a trademarked service name, such as One Click Shopping, to protect an investment in a branded targeted service, then you have every right to defend your brand name (but not the underlying technology, which you had nothing to do with developing or innovating). If any other non-affiliated vendors start calling their service "One Click Shopping", let them have it. If they use cookies to save state information, then they are simply using prior art and public tools in the way they were designed and envisioned to be used. Leave them alone. I believe Amazon offers a superior service to most other online vendors, and my wife and I spent several hundred dollars at Christmas alone last year with your store, most of which was gift certificates that likely drove even more additional business to your site. Until you abandon and further renounce this abuse of the patent system, I will be forced to take my families business to Barnes and Noble simply to protect my future as a web user and software professional. You think the abuse you are getting now is bad? Just wait until the literary community can be made to understand that what you have done is roughly analagous to patenting the application of ink on a printed page to convey information. It will take a while for them to "get it", but they will, and when they do, then there will REALLY be hell to pay. I further commit that this week, I will make at least one public statement (hmmm... maybe talk radio) and to make at least one non-technical person understand the danger (not to mention the sillyness) of what you are trying to do.

Bill Kilgallon


February 29, 2000

Gary Thornock


February 29, 2000

Harry Hochheiser


February 29, 2000

Ian Wienand


February 29, 2000

I am a customer of Amazon who has thoroughly enjoyed shopping at Amazon because of their excellent selection, nice web design, and decent pricing. However, after collecting all the facts about these frivolous and unfair patents that Amazon, I have decided to consider other options before purchasing anything from Amazon. Amazon provides an excellent service to the technical world, but if they are going to take advantage of the technical world, the net gain from Amazon is 0.

Robert Johnson


February 29, 2000

Julie Weaver


February 29, 2000

I was floored when I heard about this patent. While patents are legitimate in instances of true innovation, this hardly qualifies, and I hope the patent office has the good sense to eventually overturn this patent. Meanwhile, fatbrain, b&n, or provantage are more likely to get my online purchases than amazon.

Basil L. Copeland Jr.


February 29, 2000

Bryan Borsa


February 29, 2000

Rod Knowlton


February 29, 2000

Brian Agnew


February 29, 2000

Brinton Sherwood


February 29, 2000

Amazon who?

Dale Hull


February 29, 2000

win with service not lawyers

Michael Lowe


February 29, 2000

I bought one book from Amazon and was planning to buy more when I heard about this patent and the lawsuit. I won't be buying any more books from Amazon, not until they change their tune on patents. I urge everyone to not only sign this letter, but to join RMS's boycott of Amazon. I'd also like to ask Tim O'Reilly to stop supplying books to Amazon for sale. If he really cares about this issue, he will. You must vote every day, not with your ballot, but with dollars.

Jason Stephenson


February 29, 2000

Patents are for fools !!! Free the cookies !!!

Marco Muskus


February 29, 2000

Tim is right. I'm on the virtual picket line now....

Rob Thornton


February 29, 2000

Former frequent customer (to verify check my info you captured with 1click)

Ray S. Duvall


February 29, 2000

Anyone with the slightest claim to "expert" status can see that the "One-click" method is both trivial and obvious, and not deserving of a patent.

Dan Ritter


February 29, 2000

Rowell Sotto


February 29, 2000

As Tim has thoughfully pointed out, this can facilitate a hostile atmosphere of proprietary standards. Something that I am not waiting to see reoccur.

Brian Gupta


February 29, 2000

Having read the patent in question, it is clear to me that it is (as Tim says) a trivial application of cookies, and unworthy of a patent.

John Hartnup


February 29, 2000

Software patents are disgusting, especially obvious ones such as "1-click shopping". I have already stopped making purchases from Amazon.

Jaakko Lipasti


February 29, 2000

my wife and I are former Amazon customers. We will not purchase at Amazon as long as these patents (and others like them) are in force.

Eric S. Johansson


February 29, 2000

As a (former) Amazon-customer I am very sad to witness what is going on. Please reconsider your decision regarding the patent. It isn't doing anybody any good....

Peter Andreasen


February 29, 2000

As a librarian and fairly knowledgable computer user, I find such behavior frightening. I have never been an Amazon customer and, given Amazon's continued stance in this matter, will likely never be.

Peter Tagtmeyer


February 29, 2000

I'm saddened by Amazon's disregard for the free spirit of the web that helped launch their success. Neither I nor any of my friends will return to spend more at amazon until this bizzare patent is abandoned.

Matthew Neumann


February 29, 2000

I'm a long time customer of Amazon.com, and have always thought they were a great place to shop... But, as long as they continue filing for and enforcing such trivial and lame patents on completely obvious ideas, I can just no longer buy from them in good conscience...

Robert Seace


February 29, 2000

Until you decide to stop enforcing this ridiculous patent I shall not be purchasing any further items from Amazon.

Orion Hodson


February 29, 2000

Jeff Bezos - I find your use of patents to be offensive. My orders will now go to Barnes and Noble, and I will advise my 3000+ clients nationwide to do the same. I have used Amazon extensively in the past, but cannot support a company that steals from the community that built it.

Con Dowler


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, et al., the aquiring by Amazon.com of the so-called "1-click" patent does nothing more than stifle innovation and lay claim to something that pre-dates your company. It is this innovation you seek to supress that allowed the prosperity you currently enjoy. But now you show your appreciation by biting the hand that fed you.

Dave Coyle


February 29, 2000

I agree whole heartedly with Tim. Amazon's actions only serve to encourage other companies to exploit the patent system before they are fenced out of the game. I used to use Amazon exclusively for my personal and educational requirements, but their attitude in this leaves a sour taste in my mouth and have therefore lost my business.

Christopher Dahn


February 29, 2000

Mr. O'Reilly is 100% correct. I am a IT professional and was surprised when Amazon was able to hoodwink the patent system. The prospect of a patent being filed on every application of cookies is frightening. I can't even imagine the stifling effect that patents would have had if VisiCalc had filed them on its digitalization of spreadsheet paradigms.

Jim Bernstein


February 29, 2000

As a member of a software consulting company that buys books online almost exclusively from Amazon, it greatly concerns me that you have chosen a course of action that closes opportunities for growth and innovation on the internet. It is my sincere hope that you will cease and desist immediately, so that I do not have to encourage my organization to find another book seller.

Nathaniel Talbott


February 29, 2000

Patents are for fools !!! Free the cookies !!!

Marco Muskus


February 29, 2000

Jeff, The first time I ordered from Amazon, I was immediately impressed with your customer service. Amazon.com is a model for what e-commerce should be. With that said, I agree completely with Tim's letter. You have benefited enormously from the generosity of Tim Berners-Lee and others. Until you decide to give up on the patent issue, I will boycott Amazon. There are many other choices out there (FatBrain, BN, Borders, local bookstores).

Matthew Ikle


February 29, 2000

I have used amazon.com in the past for ordering many computer books. At 30 to 60 bucks a pop, you'd think they'd want to do more to keep me. Well, not anymore, I think it's time to hit barnesandnoble.com some more. I mean, what is keeping us here, prices certainly aren't much better than anywhere else either is the service and silly patents like this may affect the way I do my job in the future and I don't like the thought of that. Off to barnesandnoble.com I go.

Dan R. Smorey Jr.


February 29, 2000

Amazon owes it's success to the technical community and the pioneers of the web. To stab those groups in the back with these jokes of patents is as low as it gets. I won't be making further purchases from Amazon, unless the company starts showing some ethics.

David Muench


February 29, 2000

While, in general, I tend to strongly disagree with Richard Stallman, I am forced to agree with him and Tim O'Reilly on Amazon's patenting of basic and trivial applications. Being somewhat familiar with the patent system, and being intimately familiar with software and computer architectures, it is obvious to me that there is nothing novel about "1-click ordering", nor with reseller agreements like your affiliates program. Until your policies change, I will be disinclined to continue purchasing from Amazon. I will probably be advising my clients in a likewise manner. I am also associated with an ACM Chapter that took advantage of the Amazon Affiliates program. I will be advocating our chapter's immediate withdrawal of Amazon Affiliate links from our web site.

Russell Schnapp


February 29, 2000

Your company is named after The Amazon, a might river. I hope you can see that the channel of even the mighty Amazon may be diverted if it becomes clogged with debris. Your recent patents have been dropped into the flow of Amazon's revenue stream and while most of the flow simply moves around them for the time being, they will become the base that snags more debris until the flow is sufficiently choked and you'll have to watch as your revenue stream leaves your banks and cuts a new channel elsewhere. When a farmer sees debris clogging a stream running through his property he removes it. I would hope you can make the right choice between saving face and saving market share. I have already diverted my own book purchases to http://www.barnesandnoble.com/ and have purchased both books and CD's in the past few weeks that would have gone to Amazon and I am adding the above URL to my sig along with links to the boycott information. carlos

Carlos Benjamin


February 29, 2000

The patent system has always supposed to protect true innovation in the market place. But alas, many of the patents you have filed, including the 1-click patent and the associate program, are 'obvious' uses of the technology made available by others. In enforcing these patents, you are abusing the patent system and taking advantage of a Patent Office which is clearly struggling to educate itself about the rapidly-changing technological landscape. If such patents as yours stand, I see only short term monetary gain and an Internet experience where developers are increasingly ham-strung by litigation and patent-minefields full of trivial ideas. In the long term, the withdrawal of support from purchasers like myself who would normally obtain 軸+ worth of books every year will be a far greater problem for Amazon - there are an increasing selection of other online booksellers who provide a similar service, and I shall be uses their resources until Amazon revokes these trivial pate! nts.

Dr Toby J.W. Haynes


February 29, 2000

Just what is Amazon.com trying to prove here, anyway? That Amazon.com can't compete in the marketplace and has to try to put down its competitors through other means? That Amazon.com wants everyone else to have better online shopping...only through Amazon.com? That the people who created the internet were "stupid" for letting people get on it and communicated for free? That the only people who can transact business over the internet are those that can afford a team of patent lawyers? I guess the "man of the year" can do no wrong. Don't get full of yourself, Bezos, the store around the corner may be able to have an attitude because it is close to my house, but EVERY store on the internet is right around the corner. I ordered stuff from you before, a shipment is coming now, but there will be no more orders from you while you are acting in this manner. The internet is a competitive place, and they compete on more than just price and interface. They compete on viewpoint a! s well. When all internet stores are one step away, why would I go to yours? It's obvious you don't respect the internet's foundation of openness, so my money is not going in your pocket.

Kipp Leland


February 29, 2000

I shall boycott, and urge others to do the same, until Amazon repents of this open display of greed and foolishness.

Dave Sherman


February 29, 2000

Thomas Glad


February 29, 2000

Jamie Stillman


February 29, 2000

Until Amazon relents, both on the patent and the privacy front, I won't shop, or even VISIT the site again. Over the past two years, I've bought several thousand dollars in books via Amazon, but no more. In the meantime, Bookpool gets my technical orders, and BN.com gets my general orders. It's the only way to force change: vote with my hard-earned dollars. . .

Keith A. Glass


February 29, 2000

To quote the U.S. Supreme Court in the case Atlantic Works vs. Brady, 1882: "It was never the object of patent laws to grant a monopoly for every trifling device, every shadow of a shade of an idea, which would naturally occur to any skilled mechanic or operator in the ordinary progress of manufactures. Such an indiscriminate creation of exclusive privileges tends rather to obstruct than to stimulate invention."

Aaron W. Thorne


February 29, 2000

I have been a customer of Amazon in the past, however I won't be buying anything else until this embarrassing patent debacle is cleared up. You stand on the shoulders of giants, either respect and acknowledge that or get off.

Ken Dow


February 29, 2000

Amazon's patent practice is sick - why don't you try to patent e-Commerce as well??? I'm impressed how Amazon sees something as trivial as 1-Click shopping an important invention of its own. I mean, c'mon, hire some better programmers. Even monkeys can do that. Thinking it as something worth patenting makes me laugh - it looks like a monkey is trying to tell the world how great it is because it can stand up and walk... I'll tell everyone on my icq list to stop doing any business with Amazon and tell them to do the same. I'll see how long you can survive.

Michael


February 29, 2000

What Amazon has done is a slap in the face to anyone who has done web development. Their patents are for obvious methods. I am wholeheartedly for initiatives to make them realize that their customers are not going to stay with them if this continues. If Barnes & Nobles were charging double for the books, I will buy from them on prinicple. Look me up Jeff, I'm a long time customer. Not anymore.

Benjamin Walling


February 29, 2000

Manfred Jeusfeld


February 29, 2000

Brent Chatham


February 29, 2000

PS Neville


February 29, 2000

Cathy Aki


February 29, 2000

James Buening


February 29, 2000

Mark Bridgers


February 29, 2000

Richard Campbell


February 29, 2000

Mark Cottrell


February 29, 2000

I feel strongly that your attempts to make proprietary that which should be open are both sad and regrettable. I've purchased from Amazon before the whole incident, and I shall not purchase from them again, especially with companies around who support my philosophy of moral behavior on the web, such as barnesandnoble.com and buy.com, which both offer much the same products without appearing in the news for bullying other companies.

Adam Watson


February 29, 2000

Gunnar Kreitz


February 29, 2000

I agree completely with Tim. Amazon, you are screwing up!

Bruce L. Bryant


February 29, 2000

The whole idea of software patenting is ludicrous.

Klas Laitinen


February 29, 2000

Mike Minton


February 29, 2000

Amazon won't get "1 Click" from me...

Chris Mance


February 29, 2000

John Lewis


February 29, 2000

There's plenty of other sites to buy books and all that other stuff from now...

KrisJon Hanson


February 29, 2000

Amazon will get no further "clicks" from me. I can find the books I need on elsewhere!

Jonathan Stitt


February 29, 2000

Brond Larson


February 29, 2000

If Amazon goes through with this patent Barns & Noble will gain me back as a customer.

debbie hull


February 29, 2000

give us a break! We haven't gotten the sour taste of Microsoft out of our mouths yet.

steve farris


February 29, 2000

give us a break! We haven't gotten the sour taste of Microsoft out of our mouths yet.

steve farris


February 29, 2000

So far, neither my wife nor I have wanted a title that we could not find at Barnes & Noble.

James Schultz


February 29, 2000

I don't express myself as well as Mr. O'Reilly does. So, I'll let him speak for me. We agree on the points mentioned in his letter.

Jim Putnam


February 29, 2000

amazon.com looked like an interesting place to order interesting things. I'm going elsewhere, 1-click or no 1-click. It's not that important.

Geoff Wozniak


February 29, 2000

I don't shop from work, and my home computer is a shared resource, so one-click shopping isn't for me anyway. Bye, Amazon. I won't even miss you.

Fritz Knack


February 29, 2000

Although I do still use Amazon's service, I feel that the 1-Click patent is unenforceable, because of it's use of existing and previously documented technologies.

Peter T Mount


February 29, 2000

There are few things to be said about this patent that haven't already been said. To patent such an obvious use of existing technology (cookies) is insulting to the web community, and has no place in today's market.

Philip Heede


February 29, 2000

The 1-Click patent is actually nothing more than an application of existing technology. Thanks, Tim for the clear and consise letter. I hope that Amazon and others will take it into consideration.

Chris Egolf


February 29, 2000

Daniel Stutzbach


February 29, 2000

Jef, Why do think cookies were invented? How much will it take you to realize that you have blundered? You have built and now killed Amazon. As far as I am concerned, I will never buy a book through your company.

Ceki Gulcu


February 29, 2000

A ludicrious patent, a great letter. Thanks, Tim, for expressing my feelings so exactly. Unlike you, however, I have no problem in avoiding using Amazon's services when I shop online. Chapters/bn.com/whoever here I come.

Chris Rovers


February 29, 2000

1 Click was silly. Affiliates is ridiculous. What's next are you gonna try to patent BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF" or perhaps the FONT FACE tag. Perhaps DoubleClick should patent ad banners and sue everyone else.

Jon Chang


February 29, 2000

I, along with family members and friends, have stopped buying books from Amazon. These patents of theirs seems to be an insult to the intelligence of their customers. I sincerely hope they right their wrongs very soon.

John F. Brainard Jr.


February 29, 2000

What more is there really to say? I used to be a faithful Amazon customer, and I must've bought at least a few hundred bucks worth of books a year there. But I don't think I'll ever buy anything from them again, even if they stop prosecuting their patents.

David Bonner


February 29, 2000

Well I've used Amazon, and I like it, now as an Internet Developer, there is just no way I can continue to use the services of a company that is trying to say "hey look we invented a way to use a cookie to remember who you are and make shopping faster !" so for books there is always www.bol.com

David Smith


February 29, 2000

Thanks, Tim. You've taken the first step to organize the technical community against obvious abuse of the patent system.

Tim Goldenburg


February 29, 2000

Barnes & Noble has enjoyed my business since Amazon.com was granted the "1 Click" patent. They will continue to have my business until Mr. Bezos and Co. realize that perverting the patent process in their favor will do more harm than good to their future incomes and share prices. Caveat Empetor!

Mark Herring


February 29, 2000

Amazon provides a great service and I've been a loyal customer for a couple of years. However, I agree with Tim O'Reilly, RMS, and others that patenting 1-click shopping and associate programs is ridiculous and damaging to the Internet. I will no longer patronize your organization until you resolve these issues.

Emin Martinian


February 29, 2000

I've ordered several books from Amazon, and have been quite happy with their service up till now, but I feel that software patents of this nature are not productive, or worth pursuing. I have colleagues at Sun who feel the same way (and who also order many books online) - you're damaging your reputation Amazon !!

Tim Foster


February 29, 2000

Agree with Mr O'Reilly, these patents (1-click and associates) contain no novelty or original process and should not have been considered. I am British and they could even provide a reason for trade warfare, why should we respect these patents, which are unlikely to be granted in (at least) the UK patent office? I am boycotting Amazon where I used to use as sole on-line supplier. Long live bol and fatbrain until this is undone! Hugh Barnard

Hugh Barnard


February 29, 2000

I will not buy anything from Amazon, and I urge anyone to do the same. Amazon should fight software patents as could harm them in the future.

Christian Vilhelm


February 29, 2000

I am continually amazed by Tim O'Reilly's ability to cut to the heart of the matter and eloquently put to words the things I only feel. ([Amazon is] pissing in the well. Ha!) Patents are not universally evil but technology is changing the balance between the good of the Artist/Author/Inventor and the good of society. Until we figure out how to fix this balance we are going to have more growing pains like this. Until Law gets fixed we have Public Opinion and the Market as forces to regulate Amazon and other offenders' behavior. Let's use them.

David A. Marquam


February 29, 2000

Eric Chien


February 29, 2000

Ian Koetter


February 29, 2000

Jules Miller


February 29, 2000

I used to be Amazon's customer since it's day one and I am disgusted by the wave of ridiculous patents filed for by amazon. I am joining RMS's call for boycott and I am going to recommend doing the same to all my clients and friends.

Alex Luchkovsky


February 29, 2000

Dan Linderman


February 29, 2000

Fredrik Kronlid


February 29, 2000

James A. Tzitzouris, Jr.


February 29, 2000

Steve Hodge


February 29, 2000

Robert Shull


February 29, 2000

Creation of value for stockholders is not creation of value for society. A stockholder mentality built around quick return, rapidly upward mobile stock value, and pressure to find more ways to keep returns and rises happening is antithetical to the common wealth. None of us would be on the world wide web now if all the core technologies involved had not been freely available to everyone, creating value for society and benefiting our common wealth. Frivolous software patents do nothing in the long term for anyone except create ill will before they are struck down. I hope that Jeff Bezos has the courage to see the difference between benefit to stockholders and benefit to the common wealth.

James F Keenan


February 29, 2000

Bert Vermeulen


February 29, 2000

I Have ordered from Amazon in the past. No more.

Tom Grydeland


February 29, 2000

Hope Wyss


February 29, 2000

alex vorobiev


February 29, 2000

Matthew Barger


February 29, 2000

Lance J. Hoffman


February 29, 2000

Anthony Clark


February 29, 2000

patents are crap

Christopher Dickman


February 29, 2000

Steven A. Erickson


February 29, 2000

I agree with O'Reilly's letter completely.

Mike Waddell


February 29, 2000

Thanks for writing a great letter, I agree with your comments completely. The "1-click" and "associates" patent are ridiculous.

Richie Bielak


February 29, 2000

Amazon's patenting of "a trivial application of cookies" is tantamount to theft. I suppose I'll have to shop for books IRL now.

Eric Richmond


February 29, 2000

Having spend a lot of money with Amazon over the years I'm refusing to buy from them while they hold such patents - instead I'll buy books from their competitors.

Mike Bennett


February 29, 2000

Tor Magnus Castberg


February 29, 2000

until amazon ceases their present business practices, i will shop elsewhere - and, of course, ask ALL my friends, family, and co-workers to do the same.

matthew collins


February 29, 2000

Denis M. Bayada


February 29, 2000

Former Amazon customer. When all big names buy all patents there is virtually no room left for small developers. Anyone wanting to patent the if statement?

Michael Rathmann


February 29, 2000

I think Tim's said everything that needs to be said about this most eloquently. It won't be easy to function without Amazon, but it will be worth it if it helps them to see reason.

Andy Armstrong


February 29, 2000

I personally buy all my O'Reilly books directly from www.ora.com, not amazon.com. Until Amazon respects the proper use of the patent office and the framers of the Internet, I won't shop with them.

Duane Gran


February 29, 2000

Amazon, are you really so scared of your competitors that you need to resort to such desperate tactics to protect your business ? If you are that scared then maybe your competitors are winning.

David J. Williams


February 29, 2000

What more is there to say! Patenting something as technically basic as "one click ordering" is clearly set to inhibit the growth of the internet which is our primary economic indicator for the immediate future.

Peter Chapman


February 29, 2000

Untill now, I have purchased most of my technical books from Amazon. From now on, and untill this issue is resolved, i will always go to an alternative site first. (www.noamazon.com), I will also recommend to all my collegues to do likewise.

Moshe Vainer


February 29, 2000

Well said, Tim. It's a shame I have to do this, since Amazon offers so much great stuff. However, I'm no longer using the site and I'm reccomending the same to all my friends. It's disappointing to see such a promising company go so low as to put limits on the very medium which made the company possible.

Ric Rivera


February 29, 2000

I don't know what's worse, a completely lame US Patent Office, or a company like Amazon who insults our intelligence by claiming for it's own the good work of thousands who came before it. A company who stands on the shoulders of all those who gave freely, and presumes to take creative credit for the obvious!!! Outrageous!!! Boycott Amazon!!!

Robert Geiger


February 29, 2000

Based on the older news of your pending 1-Click patent and the recent news of your Associates patent, I have decided to STOP shopping at Amazon for both my personal and professional needs. As one who has contributed to the growth and benefitted from the growth of the Internet, I find it reprehensible that you are attempting to change the Internet into a closed, propietary system. You have benefitted from the open standards that helped make you what you are, and I see these patents as a reversal of all that. I may only spend a few hundred dollars with your company, but I have decision making authority for our consulting firm, which orders books quite a bit from your company. I shall be sure to use non-propietary competitors from now on. I urge Amazon to abandon it's attempt to enforce these two frivolous patents and to rejoin the community that it has benefitted from. Please see the following text from the O'Reilly Open Letter To Amazon for a very well written piece on this issue. Regards, -- Michael Shorten

Michael Shorten


February 29, 2000

The 1-click patent and the Associates Program patent are clear abuses of the patent system. Personally, I think, it would be immoral to support a company that is exploiting the current weakness of the US patent system and harms innovation - thus, I will not puchase anything from amazon.com anymore until they drop these and similar patents.

Manuel M. T. Chakravarty


February 29, 2000

Arjan Huijzer


February 29, 2000

Amazon greatest success, the one that earned it it's multi-billion market-cap, is the creation of the Amazon brand. Patenting, and enforcing the patent on, 1-click, is a step in destroying that brand, especially in Amazon's core market. While you reconsider your position on the subject I will of course boycott you, there are other on-line stores you know.

Michel Rodriguez


February 29, 2000

Amazon, if you have any idea about marketing - and it certainly seems that your success belies a little knowledge in it - It should seem obvious to you that for each signature on this petition probably represents at least another hundred disgusted customers who are just leaving you without bothering to say why. We're doing you a favour here, perhaps you should listen (and not just have your lawyers do your listening for you!)

Rod MacBain


February 29, 2000

Since Amazon.com started using tactics that I find repulsive (1 Click patent related lawsuit against Barnes and Noble, and the sharing of purchasing information without the consent of your customers), I have stopped giving my business to Amazon.com. There are other more reputable businesses that can provide the services and products I want. If Amazon.com stops the frivolous and harmful patent-related actions that they are taking, then I will re-consider giving Amazon.com my business again.

Greg Foster


February 29, 2000

Your patents are insulting to the very nature of the web, and the most anti-competitive move by an e-commerce company to date. You have let down your customers, and you have let down the Internet community in general. You will be forever scarred.

Corey Menscher


February 29, 2000

You've done a great job building a company that gets it right -- a real model of the way to kick ass as an online store. Don't blow it with this. You made a web site so easy and fun to use, it's been painful for me to avoid using it, but I'm not buying another book from Amazon until you've tossed those patents. You can make more serving your customers than you can abusing your competitors. After all, your competitors aren't the one with disposable income looking to buy books from Amazon. So focus on your real business and drop this anticompetitive patent-and-sue nonsense! Lawsuits aren't core business for anyone but lawyers.

Grant Gould


February 29, 2000

I run a popular Sci-Fi website. I was considering becoming an amazon affiliate, as a lot of our members regularly buy books, some of them online. When amazon started enforcing it's ludicrous 1-click patent, I immediately decided I'll not become an affiliate, let alone now they've patented the affiliate program self! C'mon, cookies and web-rings were around long before amazon was. I will definitely NOT be becoming an affiliate, I will definitely NOT be shopping at amazon ever again, and I definitely WILL be advising my friends to boycott them too... until such time as they make a public apology and statement that they do not intend to enforce these ridiculously obvious patents.

Nick Waterman


February 29, 2000

Since Amazon.com surfaced on the web I did nothing but rave about their service and excellence. A number of my co-workers and friends were recommended to use your service by me in the attempt to assure your survival because of the wonderful service you provide. To this the dismay that has befallen me due to your recent patent is just as great. After reading the patent, I find it extremely unfair and counter productive for the WWW as a whole. After seeing O'Reily's stance on the subject as well, my stance has grown even more firm. I do intended on making certain all of my referrals to your service find out about this misjustice. Alongside this I have no longer ordered any product from your company. Please change your view on this silly idea.

Michele Gosdin


February 29, 2000

Tim Becker


February 29, 2000

Until I heard about the 1-click patent issues, I frequented Amazon.com when I had my (monthly) urges to infuse new knowledge into my brain, usually on the order of 赨 a trip. However, since Amazon has enforced their 1-click ordering patent, I have been exploring other options for my hunger for technical knowledge, including Barnesandnoble.com and others. While Amazon.com has excellent prices and fabulous customer service, I cannot support a company that takes advantage of the open nature of the Internet, yet offers nothing back in return.

Kenneth Platz


February 29, 2000

Malcolm Silberman


February 29, 2000

Peter van der Spoel


February 29, 2000

Stephen Gusz


February 29, 2000

Eric Sandvik


February 29, 2000

Christopher Burgess


February 29, 2000

Protect using your innovation, not your lawyers.

Dave Marples


February 29, 2000

You've lost one more customer. This is ridiculous.

Steve Houghton


February 29, 2000

I won't buy from Amazon until they resolve this nonsense.

Martijn Faassen


February 29, 2000

I am returning to Barnes and Nobles. I have had it with your stupidities.

Erik Kjćr Pedersen


February 29, 2000

Paul Imboden


February 29, 2000

I am not buying from Amazon.com until the frivilous patents are dropped. I am encouraging all my friends to do the same.

Jason Bruce


February 29, 2000

With some sadness I will not be using your fine service until you come to your senses.

Tony Green


February 29, 2000

Charles LeDuc


February 29, 2000

I'm on my third e-commerce up-start, and I have admired Amazon for their innovation and quality of service for several years, and have frequently used them as an example of what e-commerce solutions can look like, if you're good. It therefore saddens me immensly to have to stop using their services (and stop giving them free publicity) for such an obviously stupid reason. I am active in Sweden, and here such a patent would of course never have been admitted. Nevertheless, I will stop using them, and stop recomending them, until I'm certain that they're not abusing the open economy of technology on the web.

Henning Strandin


February 29, 2000

Suffice it to say that I will take my business elsewhere until this is resolved to my satisfaction.

Gunnar Ljungstrand


February 29, 2000

Joseph Panico


February 29, 2000

As an internet applications developer, I cannot do business with a company whose practices are clearly harmful to the development of the web.

Tom Clark


February 29, 2000

I really think Amazon does not need such protectionism. I'm currently a regular customer at Amazon but might re-think this if they continue their current course.

Markus Peter


February 29, 2000

There's not much to say about. I'm a amazon customer, and also the company where i work. These kind of 'tactics' dissapointed me, i tought Jeff wasnt that kind of guy.

Maximiliano Kolus


February 29, 2000

I've purchased a number of items, primarily technical books, from Amazon in the past. Future purchases will be supporting their competitors, until they drop their absurd patent tactics at least.

Greg Norris


February 29, 2000

I have purchased nearly 500 dollars worth of merchandise from amazon.com. That was before the 1-click patent. Since then I've spent nothing, but barnes and nobel has had plenty of my business.

Eric Sandvik


February 29, 2000

Man, I should have patented the internal combustion engine when I had the chance.

Kyle


February 29, 2000

Amazon is not the only offender but it is the most visible one. We have to stop this trivial software patent madness now before it is to late and you cant write a single line of code without consulting a patent lawyer!

Steffen Vulpius


February 29, 2000

Kim Skinner


February 29, 2000

Neither I nor any members of my family will be buying anything from Amazon.com until these patent issues are dropped.

Keith McGuigan


February 29, 2000

I've spent hundreds of dollars on books from Amazon, both out of my own pocket and for my company. Guess it's time to move on to other sites. Thanks Tim, for speaking out about this and providing a public forum.

Scott Carpenter


February 29, 2000

I am outraged by Amazon's actions regarding patents. I have enlightened everyone I know about this behavior. I encourage them to boycott Amazon and help spread the word.

Eric Johnson


February 29, 2000

As someone involved in web development and e-commerce, I'm apalled that Amazon applied for and was granted a patent for something so obvious. Cookies were designed to save information about the client between sessions, which is all that 1-click shopping does.

Les Jones


February 29, 2000

I hope for your sake, and the sake of everyone else who's business revolves around the open standards that the net provides, that you drop this and other frivolous patent. You need to do what's best for your company without stepping all over the people and ideas that have helped propell your company into this new era of e-commerce.

Jackson Bloomston


February 29, 2000

There's nothing I can say that hasn't been said before. By trying to fence open technology, you're shooting the whole Web community in the foot, as well as yourselves. Is obtaining money from competitors really that important to you? Are you providing a service to the global public, or your few thousand shareholders?

Joseph Hoy


February 29, 2000

Although Amazon's actions are distasteful and they are loosing me and many others as customers, perhaps this protest movement needs to be directed at the patent regulations. If regulations make it legal to halt the evolution of electronic commerce, why direct our efforts at those who are following the letter of the law. Boycott Amazon, but write your congressman.

Joel Bowers


February 29, 2000

I've been on the web longer than Amazon, and I've been buying from them since their first months. Until now. The health of the web is more important than my old habits. No more Amazon for me.

Timothy Randolph


February 29, 2000

As a long-time customer and associate of Amazon, I'm appalled by Amazon's recent attempts to poison the well for their competitors while reaping the rewards of the generosity of technical innovators far more brilliant than the "inventors" of One-Click ordering and the Associates program. Amazon is one of the few companies that I love doing business with, but unless they reverse course on this, I cannot in good conscience do so.

Joshua Macy


February 29, 2000

As someone who works in this industry (and for O'Reilly - I wrote the NNTP server component of WebBoard) I'm appalled at the US patent office for this and many other stupid patents on software processes. Will it come to the point where I have to scan my code for all patent violations before submitting it to my managers? And what if I violate a patent that simply can't be coded around? Do we not publish the software - or try and seek a licence? Stupid stupid stupid. Am I the only one banging my head against the wall!

Matt Sergeant


February 29, 2000

As we move more and more fully into an e-commerce economy, it is in the best interests of the e-vendors to welcome as many customers as possible over the psychological hump of sending their credit cards off in a flurry of bits over the internet. Exclusionary tactics designed to gain short-term market share, such as Amazon's aggressive pursuit of questionable patents, will hurt the entire e-commerce industry, and therefore Amazon, in the long run. Please be respectful of your own future, and the open technology that got you where you are today. --James W. Lindenschmidt

James W. Lindenschmidt


February 29, 2000

I regard this sort of blatant profiteering as contrary to the whole concept of the internet. It is akin to, and as ridiculous as attempting to patent the idea of a total at the bottom of a regular bill. Scratch one more customer.

James Dening


February 29, 2000

I love using Amazon, and believe the company to be an example of how to do customer service on the web "the right way." Unfortunately, as a customer service company, you've chosen to do technology the wrong way, and my only response can be to look for another place to shop.

Michael S Czeiszperger


February 29, 2000

Lee Wilmot


February 29, 2000

Rod Brandt


February 29, 2000

Adam Stephen


February 29, 2000

I intentionally went to borders.com for my Christmas shopping because of Amazon's pursuit of the patent and will continue to do so for future purchases. In addition, I urge my family, friends, and colleagues to do likewise whenever possible. It is a sad thing to see a great and revolutionary company doing something so destructive and (in the long run) foolish.

Kenneth Haase


February 29, 2000

Petty fence building patents will halt the expansion of the internet, and that will harm us all. If you remember the parable of the scorpion and the frog, just because greed is the nature of a corporation, it doesn't make it beneficial to any of those involved. The paradigm has changed, and the good will of the internet users is the lifeline that enables all of us to succeed.

James Terwilliger


February 29, 2000

Patrick O'Callaghan


February 29, 2000

Jonathan Meltzer


February 29, 2000

I have already mailed separately to let Amazon know that I'm joining the FSF's boycott. I remain unpersuaded by the reply from Amazon's staff, and by reading the text of the 1-click patent and the testimony of the various people who participated in the litigation over it. I continue to urge Amazon as a company not to go down the path of proprietary implementations and software patents used as weapons against competitors, but that seems to be exactly what they intend to do. In good conscience I cannot make my on-line purchases from Amazon while they persist in this course of action.

James Wetterau, Jr.


February 29, 2000

herbert furtenbach


February 29, 2000

Will Mc Donald


February 29, 2000

Mike Bowler


February 29, 2000

Well said, Tim

Chris Rimmer


February 29, 2000

Jason Wojciechowski


February 29, 2000

The lawyers are taking control of this world also it seems.

Erik Gävert


February 29, 2000

Jason Arnold


February 29, 2000

Patenting like this is like stealing from the internet-community. The community that gave you everything you have now. If you want a patent, at least make an invention.

Peter Vos


February 29, 2000

Peter Grabowsky


February 29, 2000

As a frequent buyer of books, I have taken Amazon off my list as my #1 source. Until they lighten up and stop inhibiting innovation, I will no longer shop there. They have lost over 踰 of my money since they started this farce...

Brent Michalski


February 29, 2000

What more can I say that others haven't already said??

Jonathan W. Rose


February 29, 2000

Software patents such as these are killing the internet. The internet was built using open standard protocols and software innovations, filing patents on things you build using OPEN STANDARDS software is just evil, and I hope amazon.com gets blown away by the competition.

Paul Schultz


February 29, 2000

I want to register my support for this letter of protest - trivial patents like this are ultimately self-defeating efforts to privatise intellectual efforts that should be considered common property to us all.

Henry Farrell, MAx-Planck Projecktgruppe on the Law of Common Goods


February 29, 2000

Emilio Cesar C. Melo


February 29, 2000

I am in complete agreement with Mr. O'Reilly's remarks concerning Amazon's patents on One-Click Ordering and Affiliates Programs. Unless and until Amazon abandons these ridiculous patents, I will take my business elsewhere, and will encourage the readers of my web site to do the same.

Robert Bruce Thompson


February 29, 2000

I have used Amazon, and praised the efficiency with which I was serviced. They have built a good machine. Nonetheless, I support Open Source and an open web, and I can't tolerate any attempt to control it. There must be no monopolies, no dictators, no bullies. Please reconsider, Amazon.

Darrell King


February 29, 2000

I agree wholeheartedly with Tim on this issue. And so, affiliate this, Amazon, my 񘈨/yr will now be going "1-click-away" (no TM) to a competitor, like FatBrain and Powell's. _dave_(no longer an Amazon supporter)

Dave Paulsen


February 29, 2000

I have purchased quite a few books from Amazon - for myself & as gifts. I am also a software developer, and find their patent for 1-click and now this associates patent disgusting. This cheap "microsoft-like" behavior is beneath them. I seriously hope the re-consider. If the do not, I will not buy anything from them again.

Arron S. King


February 29, 2000

I'm horrified at what Amazon are doing today, and delighted to see such a respected publisher as O'Reilly speaking out against these patents. Over the last few years I have spent several hundred dollars ordering books from Amazon, but certainly will not be doing so again unless they back down on these ridiculous claims.

Shawn Hargreaves


February 29, 2000

i have already cancelled my amazon-account a few weeks ago because of this patent system abuse. i was a regular client of amazon (books, cd, dvd) and am now a regular one of dvdexpress, cduniverse and b&n. my webpage carries the noamazon.com link for weeks now and i will continue to support the boycott amazon movement. Sascha, Berne/Switzerland

Sascha Mettler


February 29, 2000

I have bought many book from Amazon in the past, however I can tell you with clear assuradness that I will NOT be purchasing any more products from Amazon atleast until this patent issue is resolved.

James Tyson


February 29, 2000

As a consultant, I purchase several books a month on new or new-to-me technologies. As an avid reader, I purchase several more a month from many genres. Once I heard of the enforcement of the 1-click issue against B&N.com, I took my customer support dollars away from Amazon.com, and will continue to do so until they reverse course. I cannot frame my disgust for Amazon's Patent Abuse any better than has already been done, and won't waste anyone's time trying.

Bill Romano


February 29, 2000

I used to buy about a dozen books a year from Amazon. Since this patent came out I have stoped buying from them as well as well as removed all my associate links to them.

Jose M. Vidal


February 29, 2000

I hope that you will see very clearly that your customers don't accept your cheap tricks. We internet people are a bright community, and we don't accept brute force. There has been word that it took a while until Amazon's programmers understood that "1-click" means really only 1 click, not one click and one additional confirmation click. Bezos had a hard time to get the message across. But the fact that these programmers are typical programmers doesn't make "1-click" an idea worth patenting!

Christoph Pingel


February 29, 2000

The web was built on a foundation of trust and with a culture of sharing and "giving back". Amazon's ridiculous software patents are a complete affront to the core values of the Internet. Unlike Mr. O'Reilly, I am not constrained in my actions towards Amazon. As a professional programmer, I buy upwards of 񘘐 - 񘧸 worth of books per year. In light of Amazon's patent tactics, I have shifted my purchases to fatbrain.com and encourage my colleagues to do the same.

Kevin Smith


February 29, 2000

I would just like to remind everyone that even using amazon.com as a reference site earns them money for every banner ad they serve. Please, refrain from hitting amazon.com for ANY reason! There are other options such as Barnes & Noble: bn.com; Borders: www.borders.com; fatbrain: www.fatbrain.com to name a few.

Eric Wright


February 29, 2000

I have bought many book from Amazon in the past, however I can tell you with clear assuradness that I will NOT be purchasing any more products from Amazon atleast until this patent issue is resolved.

James Tyson


February 29, 2000

I'm horrified at what Amazon are doing today, and delighted to see such a respected publisher as O'Reilly speaking out against these patents. Over the last few years I have spent several hundred dollars ordering books from Amazon, but certainly will not be doing so again unless they back down on these ridiculous claims.

Shawn Hargreaves


February 29, 2000

Henry van Dyk


February 29, 2000

Tony Finch


February 29, 2000

Matthew Bloch


February 29, 2000

Justin Martin


February 29, 2000

I've been, in the past, an Amazon customer, ordering a variety of books and CDs from their UK "branch". But now, while I don't consider a boycott an effective course of action, I still can't, with a clear conscience, order anything from Amazon's web site. For now, I am just holding off on purchases, but, if the Amazon situation doesn't improve (and, with the new "Affilliate Program" patent, it seems to be worsening), I will, reluctantly, have to start looking around for alternatives. I can't support the abuse of IP any further.

Canis Lupus


February 29, 2000

Geir Harris Hedemark


February 29, 2000

Timo Laine


February 29, 2000

Kay Blaurock


February 29, 2000

B&N thanks you for my business.

Will Sexton


February 29, 2000

Chris Shull


February 29, 2000

Amazon, NO MORE!! Sigh, it is indeed a sad day.

Nish Kohli


February 29, 2000

Sebastian Djupsj¸backa


February 29, 2000

It's really a sad day when companies feel they need to use the government, specifically the patent law, as a tool to hurt others. I won't do business with Amazon until they admit that their patents are nothing more than a thinly disguised scheme to prevent competition and discountinue the practice.

Mike Catchpole


February 29, 2000

Well spoken Tim! I'll still buy O'Reilly books, but not through Amazon...

Michael Lindgren


February 29, 2000

Matt Gilbert


February 29, 2000

Tim said it fair better than I could've done -- I'm a developer, not an author. I now consider buying from you equal to undermining the open flow of ideas and innovations which I depend on to do my work. Therefore, it's now a policy in the company I work for not to buy anything from companies like yours that seek to destroy the biggest advantage of our Internet, as opposed to the more proprietary networks, namely that standards and tools and protocols are open and available to all, giving low entry-barriers.

Eivind Kj░rstad


February 29, 2000

I do not believe in patenting business practices or marketing systems. They arn't inventions. Patenting "1-Click Shopping" is like patenting retailing itself.

Oliver Jones


February 29, 2000

I cannot stand this kind of extortion. I love Amazon, but I can't in good conscience shop there any longer with this kind of legal shenanigans.

Dan Gentry


February 29, 2000

Amazon should rely on quality of service rather than patents.

Timothy Sheerman-Chase


February 29, 2000

Herouth Maoz


February 29, 2000

I agree, absolutely. Thank you, Tim. I've done the little I can, too: asking amazon.com to cancel my membership in the Associates. (In case people think I'm making a big sacrifice, it hasn't earned me more than a few cents...)

Jerry Peek


February 29, 2000

I cannot in good faith continue to shop at a company which has a policy of what is essentially stealing. Until Amazon does an about-turn on these patent matters, and preferably apologizes for their actions, I will take my business elsewhere.

Jan Wiberg


February 29, 2000

I stopped using and recommending Amazon the day I heard about them enforcing the patent on their 1-Click system, which is very nice, but should not be patentable. When they stop this thieving behaviour I will consider using Amazon again; until then I'll just spread bad words about Amazon.

John Hopf


February 29, 2000

The original 1-click patent gave me serious reservations about dealing with a company like Amazon.com when I could spend my dollars on companies that haven't made a business policy of taking whats offered to them and not offering anything in return. The associates program patent has cinched it. Neither my money, or the money of any company I have purchase authority over will ever be spent at Amazon.com. Sure its only a few thousand dollars, but it adds up. I hope others do the same.

George Hartz


February 29, 2000

Amazon has converted me to a customer of Barnes and Noble by their outrageous actions regarding patents and the internet. I will never again buy anything from Amazon until they renounce their actions and guarantee that they will not enforce the patents they have been granted

Mark Stracke


February 29, 2000

It's really a shame it's come to this. Before 1-Click, I always went to amazon, I didn't even consider other vendors. Borders and Barnes & Noble have gotten so much of my money since then. It's been the same with most everyone I know. You tried to corner the market with this patent, and instead squeezed us out of your market.

Tony Lastowka


February 29, 2000

Sad, very sad.

John McQuillen


February 29, 2000

It pains me immensely to see companies who had some hope of being ethical and providing a great service to the customer (you don't _sell_ to customers, you don't advertise to them, you help them) reverts to such disgusting tactics to acomplish what? To get more of the market? to become a monopoly? To eventually get sued by everyone and get everyone to hate them? I just don't understand.

Max Pakhutkin


February 29, 2000

When I first heard about this patent, I also sent an email to Amazon.com and got the same kind of response as Tim mentioned in his article. And, I still disagree with the patent. It is a simple, obvious thing that should have never made it past any kind of initial scrutiny from a halfway educated patent board (which we obviously do not have.) My business has been going to Barnes & Noble ever since.

Susan Aker


February 29, 2000

I will never purchase anything from Amazon due to their exceedingly obscene business practices. What's next? Patenting credit card payments on-line?

Dave Coker


February 29, 2000

No comment needed, really. I have been a happy amazone'r, but not any more. There are other sources online.

Stein Skogseth


February 29, 2000

While I have used Amazon for quite some time now, and am an associate, I believe that what Amazon is doing with the 1-click patent is wrong and shortsighted....

Robert McCown


February 29, 2000

Richard Karsch


February 29, 2000

Michael Grant


February 29, 2000

Olivier Carlier


February 29, 2000

Joshua Rubin


February 29, 2000

Wayne Pierce


February 29, 2000

After carefully reading both the text of the "one-click" patent and the opinions of those who consider the PTO's granting of that patent to be thoroughly misguided, I am clearly in agreement with the latter. Your patent is totally frivolous and its claims are completely covered by a substantial amount of prior art, dating back several years and spanning thousands of contributions to WWW development by many people worldwide. I have no idea why the PTO granted this patent. Perhaps their examiners either lacked the resources or the technical literacy to fully understand the claims you made. As Tim notes in his letter, seeking a patent for defensive purposes is one thing, misguided though it may be in the case of something as obvious and non-novel as this. But your recent actions in this case and the "affiliates" program indicate that you intend to use these patents as a legal bludgeon. Until you come to your senses and realize that such unmitigated greed won't get you very far with your consumers (especially those who have at least a modicum of technical understanding), you won't be getting any business from me.

Alexander Mitelman


February 29, 2000

Illtud Daniel


February 29, 2000

This patent is absurd. Amazon, please drop your claim.

Dave Peticolas


February 29, 2000

I hope you are not naive enough to think you can just weather this one out amazon.

Ger Gorman


February 29, 2000

the affiliates deal was the last straw for me. i've been promoting amazon since '95, now they're on hold. z.

ziv navoth


February 29, 2000

I was looking into purchasing a stack of books on Java. With Amazon's constant ridicule of the open atmosphere which originally gave rise to their business model, I will take my business to B&N instead.

Sami Lempinen


February 29, 2000

In simple words: no Amazon orders from me or my workplace until you change your policy.

Gilad Ben-Yossef


February 29, 2000

Ron Newman


February 29, 2000

I would like Amazon to know that I no longer buy from them or refer people to their site. Their site to me is now just a catalog and I order through a book shop even if it sometimes costs more.

Mel Gorman


February 29, 2000

The game must not (can not) be won at the expense of the consumer. I was an Amazon consumer by night, a web developer by day, but now me thinks I'm gettin' screwed. If Amazon wins this war, then all that's left for me to do is to piss on their spoils.

Bart Wolther


February 29, 2000

My company GlobeCom AB (http://www.globecom.se/) has until now made most computerbook purchases from Amazon.com but will now be forced to take our business elsewhere at least until you reverse your policy on this issue. Henrik Johnson Technical Prime GlobeCom AB

Henrik Johnson


February 29, 2000

I feel as Tim does that this kind of trivial patent is a horrible abuse of our patent laws, and already has had a chilling and damaging effect on the fantastically productive and innovative web technology landscape. I intend to boycott Amazon, which is something that goes beyond Tim's objective, but something which I feel I must do in order to preserve the freedom to develop new technologies without walking through a landmine of greedy, unjustified, and short-sighted patents and lawyers.

Henry Minsky


February 29, 2000

As a regular Amazon customer, I am sickened by the recent bout of software patents (1-Click and Affiliates) registered by the company. The Cookies specification was devised for 1-Click ordering techniques, but was not patented because it is a trivial task and forming proprietary systems on an open-source system such as the Web is hypocritical. I urge Amazon to drop their proceedings against BOL and CDNow and embrace the web, before their customers turn away from yet another 'AOL' or 'Microsoft' of the 21st century.

Ian Abbott


February 29, 2000

Although Amazon is not the only company to abuse US software-patents, we need to make an example of them by speaking our mind all at once. Only that way can we hope to catch the attention of the other companies that are abusing the software patent law. Amazon make an excellent example because they are a very high-profile company, in a highly competitive market. -- Also, remember http://www.noamazon.com

Mar Orlygson


February 29, 2000

As a long-time customer and an affiliate both personally and professionally, it pains me to see Amazon abusing the patent system in this manner. I, like many others, will be taking my small chunk of business (several hundred dollars per month) elsewhere until this matter is resolved.

Ron Craswell


February 29, 2000

The Web started out as free. Let's keep it that way.

John Alex Hebert


February 29, 2000

This action is totally contrary to the spirit of the Web.

David Bell


February 29, 2000

Future book orders will only be placed with B&N.

L. A. Weber


February 29, 2000

This sort of behavior on the part of any commercial entity is inexscusable. One might have hoped that Amazon would know better. At any rate, they've lost my business, and that of friends, family, and random web page visitors I might otherwise have sent their way. It might not amount to much, but I've noticed these things tend to snowball...

Brennen Bearnes


February 29, 2000

Your patent = crap.

Matt Dieter


February 29, 2000

Scott Favelle


February 29, 2000

Rex Rhoades


February 29, 2000

I used to buy books from Amazon but I will no longer do so because of the patent issues.

Lee Leighton


February 29, 2000

Still boycotting Amazon...and will continue to do so until they Do The Right Thing.

Kate L Pugh


February 29, 2000

I used to buy books at amazon, and i wont buy anything from amazon, until the 1-click patent will not longer be in use.

Juergen G. Schimmer


February 29, 2000

Neil Salyapongse


February 29, 2000

Henning Holtschneider


February 29, 2000

Tom White


February 29, 2000

Your company arguably invented the business model of how what's now called "e-commerce" works. I have always found the Amazon site a pleasure to use, and have always bought books there -- at both the .com and the .co.uk sites. However, my conscience dictates that I cannot support the use of software patents as a predatory practice, so until this matter is resolved, I'm taking my business elsewhere. I hope you sort this out. It's a shame that such a good setup has been ruined by this kind of greedy behaviour.

Justin Mason


February 29, 2000

Aaron O'Brien


February 29, 2000

You will reap what you sow...

Robert J. Berger


February 29, 2000

patenting accepted standards can not and will not be tolerated, revoke your patent

Brandon Alanis


February 29, 2000

Your service was good, your prices reasonable, and delivery was fast... but your business practices are unacceptable. As one who has been a 'Netizen' since Gopher was state of the art in hypermedia, I consider myself an early adapter. This early adapter is pointing people to www.noamazon.com.

Dave Walker


February 29, 2000

I've bought from Amazon before but now I'm going back to buying from my local book stores. They don't have frivolous patents. I'll reconsider buying from Amazon when they drop the law suit and when they renounce their patent.

David Talmage


February 29, 2000

Jeez. If I was Tim Bezos, I'd be wondering: "Hmm. Just how much money do I NEED?" Aren't you already like a triple-gazillionaire? Sell the damn stock, move to the country, raise up some damn kids, and quit taking out insane patents that any rational human would laugh at. Oh yeah: SAN DIMAS HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL RULES!

Josh Walker


February 29, 2000

I long refused to shop with Amazon, preferring Stacey's for technical books (huge O'Reilly selection!), and used-book stores for classic fiction and soc sci. Now, I refuse to even visit their site; do ye likewise (fewer site hits => fewer "eyballs" => less advertising revenue => lower market cap => coredump)!

K Vainstein


February 29, 2000

Amazon's behavior is counter to everything that has made the Internet the phenomenon that it is. I boycotted B&N after their predatory attacks on Amazon during their early days. And I'm now abandoning my 1-Click account and removing Amazon affiliate links from my Web site for the same reasons. Until Amazon rejoins the ranks of those who are *building* the Internet and abandons those who are pillaging it for their own gain, don't expect any commerce from me, my family, or my company.

Chuck Shotton


February 29, 2000

I can only hope that the patent office starts hiring enough scientists to keep up with the flood of software (and genome) patents. However, the blame does not lie in the fact the patent was awarded, but in the strong arm tactics that Amazon is using to enforce a patent, when it should be a trade (or service) mark. Amazon, explain you didn't know the difference between trademarks and patents, and face far less embarassment and ill will than you are generating for yourself with your current position.

Judith Elaine Bush


February 29, 2000

Rex


February 29, 2000

Anything I could say here would simply be a repeat of what Tim has already put so eloquently, so I'll just say this: Starting this year, I've been making use of Amazon.com as a reference tool and doing my buying elsewhere. In some cases it costs me a few more dollars, but I'd much rather spend the extra money knowing it won't be used by a company that's biting the hands that feed it. I'd like to propose that if publishers really care about this problem, they enclose a leaflet explaining the problem in everything they distribute through electronic resellers. (I was initially going to suggest that the publishers stop selling through companies with practices like Amazon's. But why should they be forced to suffer because the executives at one of their distributors are acting like buttheads?)

Mark Feit


February 29, 2000

Tim Howell


February 29, 2000

Jon Saville


February 29, 2000

Avdi Grimm


February 29, 2000

Carlos Gamboa Dos Santos


February 29, 2000

Heath Tanner


February 29, 2000

As Tim put it, "you're pissing in the well". As someone who makes a living providing open Internet technology, I drink from this well every day. In my own self-interest, I'm not buying from Amazon until you stop being a threat to the Web.

Mark Koek


February 29, 2000

Mathieu Guillaume


February 29, 2000

Wayne Pascoe


February 29, 2000

David Kennedy


February 29, 2000

Sam Tobin-Hochstadt


February 29, 2000

I was a loyal Amazon buyer. Not anymore.

Tim Funk


February 29, 2000

I buy no more from Amazon till this patent is released to the public domain

Bob Ogden


February 29, 2000

With regret, I've ceased doing business with Amazon until they return to being a cooperative member of the Web community.

Jon Bloom


February 29, 2000

Amazon is trading long-term customer relations for short-term shareholder value. How much stock does the management still own and when does it plan to sell it, I wonder.

Stefan Eissing


February 29, 2000

There's still a way to make the best of this - look what Linus has done with his trademark - but right now it just looks like the same old same old, from people who really should know better.

Christian Hellon


February 29, 2000

hey amazon,...you just lost a *large* order

Paul Haley


February 29, 2000

I spent over 񘈨 dollars last year at Amazon, but I will no longer purchase from them until this patent problem is resolved.

Sean Leach


February 29, 2000

Thanks to Tim O'Reilly for speaking out on this issue. I had enjoyed using the services offered by Amazon.com I will now be giving my ๖+/month to fatbrain.com and bookpool.com instead of amazon.com. I thought you were smarter than to bite the hand that feeds you Mr.Bezos....What a sham(e). :(

Nino Benvenuti


February 29, 2000

I was shaken by the fact that this was allowed to happend. I certainly will not shop at Amazon.com after reading about this 1-click patent. Further I will make sure that none of my friends do either. I think it is very good that someone is taking action and hopefully this will be reconsidered before it does more harm to the internet community.

Ingemar Henriksson


February 29, 2000

Though I believe in intelectual property and it's protection, I also believe that it should only apply whenever it comes about after much effort and investment of time and money. A bright, ideia doesn't count, specially if it's an obvious feature. This doesn't even count as a bright ideia. 'nuf said.

Gustavo Carvalho


February 29, 2000

I first wrote to a letter to Amazon around christmas to let them know I would be taking my business to Bn.com for my holiday book purchases. In return, I got a ฮ gift certificate. Amazon, in my opinion, you were a great company once, but this patent business is inexcusable. You're going to lose quite a bit of business from myself and like-minded folks until you adopt a less antagonistic patent strategy, and focus on your service instead.

David Thiel


February 29, 2000

Do you really believe that you have a right to patent this technology? This technique was never yours, it was developed long before you were able to pull one over on the patent office. If you continue with this, I assure you that you and your company will live to regret it. The community that you used to build your empire will toss you aside. Hope you enjoy your "man of the year" award while you can. Save some money, it is a short trip. Sincerely, Jeff Coburn

Jeff Coburn


February 29, 2000

Do you really want to make yourselves the most hated internet retailer? Stop pursuing this trivial and fundamentally indefensible patent. I have ordered from Amazon.co.uk in the past. I will not place any more orders until you see sense. A policy that has seen Barnes and Noble gain orders from me for around 踰 U.S. That could, maybe in your opinion should, have been your money. I'm not alone. How much can you gain from this compared to how much you have already lost and stand to lose in the future?

Michael Cottle


February 29, 2000

This patent ordeal has reached a very high point in how the system can be abused. Asking or pleading to a company or an individual to abandon a patent that was made out of self egocentrism is a good start. But appealing to every such individual is next to impossible and striking at a big company like Amazon is a logical course. But I think a better approach would be sending the same pleas to the system that is responsible for such misshaps would have greater results. So I urge a person with high publicity value to start such a campaign.

Dmitry Schwartsman


February 29, 2000

I strongly object Amazon's policy on software patents. Futhermore, I will not purchase anything from Amazon until they change their stance on these two specific (1-Click and Affiliate) issues.

Jussi Hannunen


February 29, 2000

Oliver O'Hehir


February 29, 2000

Others have suggested it, and I will too. Assign the patents to the FSF. Let them (and companies who sign over their patents) use these patents as "defensive bargaining chips" against companies who use patents to attack Free Software or the companies who support them.

Brad Garcia


February 29, 2000

Terence Mac Goff


February 29, 2000

Peter Hofmann


February 29, 2000

Mike Muise


February 29, 2000

Rikard Anglerud


February 29, 2000

Creating shareholder value is pretty important, but by abusing wrongly granted you'll eventually loose your first and most important resource: your consumerbase. I suggest you read 'net gain' from Hagel & Armstrong (I guess you should know where to find that book), so that you can realize that the competitive advantage in business-to-consumer sites will heavily depend on the creation of active communities around your site.

Bram Kerkhof


February 29, 2000

Mark Roberts


February 29, 2000

Jon Wilson


February 29, 2000

David Hallowell


February 29, 2000

William Montgomery


February 29, 2000

Gill Martin


February 29, 2000

Reagan Blundell (UK)


February 29, 2000

I strongly object to Amazon's patenting practices that are extremely harmful to the development of the Internet and e-commerce at large.

Tatu Ylonen


February 29, 2000

Agreed totally. These broad ideas do not fit the requirements of patents. Can we also address the matter to the responsible elected officials for the Patent Office?

Don Armstrong


February 29, 2000

The whole 1-click-patent is kinda silly - i bet there was someone who developed this waaay before Amazon put a name on it. Amazon's use of patents to stop other from using this kind of techniques is like saying that noone else should be able to write gui's, except for Microsoft. (or someone else for that matter)

Mats Lindh (NO)


February 29, 2000

I agree. I've been thinking about patenting a "No-Click" process where the web browser remembers something about me so that the next time I visit, I don't have to identify myself. Of course, my new technology will leverage the power of cookies, a little-known browser feature that is just waiting to be exploi...err...I mean leveraged. As a matter of fact, amazon.com would be in direct violation of this patent. Hmmmm...off to the Patent Office...

Michael Swanson


February 29, 2000

Although I understand that a company must protect their ideas. The idea of one click buying is not such an idea. Pantents on software causes wheels to be reinvented instead of using solid foundations. Amazon need not feel that they are being singled out. It is just as easy to raise protest against a company that takes unfair measures against Amazon. However since Amazon is the one that is taking an unfair measeure, I am participating the this boycott until such time as this policy is reversed. Please keep in mind that mistakes are to be reversed, and fixed mistakes result in a new relationship between company and customer. I strongly encourage Amazon to release their patent as they were a wonderful resource for me to buy informative books.

Jeffrey Eugene Crawford


February 29, 2000

Brian Kelly


February 29, 2000

Although I would much rather purchase my books at Amazon, the current situation has forced me to shop somewhere else (B&N for instance), until Amazon gives up on enforcing this ridiculous patent. I encourage others to do so as well.

Remmelt de Haan


February 29, 2000

George Grewgious


February 29, 2000

Jon Edwards (UK)


February 29, 2000

Emmet Hikory


February 29, 2000

I never thought of the Amazon Patent as theft, or at least not giving back to the community that gave them the platform to make money. I now don't feel so bad about not buying books/CDs from them. Count me in on the boycott, chaps! Thanks Tim.

David Jolley


February 29, 2000

Thomas Eibner


February 29, 2000

Amazon has embraced many innovative features of the web that other companies have shunned - such as deep linking and using their customers to help sell their products. I fail to see how regressing to a big monolithic company intent on stamping out all competition is going to appeal to their user base.

Richey Smith


February 29, 2000

Cheryl Maynard


February 29, 2000

For a company which is devoted to spreading knowledge through books, this patent goes against the free flow and use of information around the world. I don't understand why people keep patenting stupid things like ideas in software, they will just make writing programs for rest of us much,much harder. I can see a day when software development is going to be like traversing a room filled with barbed wire. No-one gets across without being torn to pieces, and then people just do not bother. And then the proprietary companies will then have won.. I will not be using Amazon until they see sense. Sorry, but there are other places to buy books from, and perhaps customer pressure might do something.

Arron Shutt


February 29, 2000

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Marcos Paulo Hauer


February 29, 2000

Ingo Kegel


February 29, 2000

Amazon is throwing away the very substance of what it has developed during the past few years. It's reputation as the world's most famous Internet success story threatens to be tarnished, possibly permanently scared. Rather than going down in history as the company who pioneered e-retailing on a large scale, it will be remembered as the company who pioneered stupendously stupid 'software' (can we even call it software?) patents. This will not help Amazon in the long run, and will force many of their loyal customers to competitors. I for one now shop at Fatbrain.com for all my technical books. I cannot say it any louder. Listen up Amazon, refine your ways, do an about-turn in PR and set a good example to your competitors by abandoning your patents and pledging to cease the entire patent crusade.

Ben Myles


February 29, 2000

Anthony H. O'Bryan


February 29, 2000

Did you ever see that shampoo commercial, where the people just multiplied over and over again, sort of looking like the beginning of the Brady Bunch show? Amazon will reap its destined reward with the number of anti-referrals which will spawn from me and other intelligent people who know when to draw the line. Word-of-mouth can make or break a business, so just give it a little bit more time. The "Microsoft of the internet" shall suffer given its current mode of thinking. Repent, spin, dry, but do not agitate. Do the right thing and let patents be for the real genuine thing. Get real about what you are trying to patent here.

Ethan Weeks


February 29, 2000

I'll be doing business with Amazon's competitors from now on.

Joseph Ringh


February 29, 2000

Speaking as a customer and occasional shareholder, I'd like to state my displeasure in Amazon.com's patent-protection legal practices, and would highly encourage them to stop those practices, lest I take my money elsewhere.

Jim Whitfield


February 29, 2000

Alexander Larsson


February 29, 2000

Jani Ekqvist


February 29, 2000

I applaud Tim's opinion and agree wholeheartedly, particularly with respect to the open gift of opportunity that the Web presented to Mr. Bezos. I hope he will consider this gift and remember the implications of Amazon's "patent".

Eric


February 29, 2000

Although I spent a fair amount of money at Amazon last year, and value their services greatly, I joined the boycott as soon as I became aware of it, and will continue to avoid using Amazon for online book (and CD) purchases for as long as they keep persuing this patent.

Adam Spragg


February 29, 2000

Like many other longtime repeat Amazon customers, I will be going elsewhere for book, music, and video purchases until such time as they stop using invalid patents offensively. In addition to being contrary to everything that put Amazon where it is, Amazon does its stockholders a disservice. First, as you see here, you have created a great deal of ill-will among your core customer base. Second, you waste a significant amount of money pursuing a case that you most likely will ultimately lose.

Dave Fuhs


February 29, 2000

I've been programming for Web sites since the bad old days of the mid-90's, and I've been using cookies and other technologies to track sessions and access user information since the beginning. And I'd gladly testify to that in court, if necessary. Amazon's "patent" is a shocking, bald-faced lie. I can hardly praise Tim O'Reilly enough for his continuing demonstration that you can honor a commitment to Doing the Right Thing in the software business and still be very successul. Why don't companies like Amazon understand this? I am enthusiastic about buying from O'Reilly, not just because the books are excellent, but also because Tim and his company inspire me to give them my money.

Geoff Simmons


February 29, 2000

Brian Clark


February 29, 2000

Anders Munck


February 29, 2000

Andrew Whitwham


February 29, 2000

Maurice Buxton


February 29, 2000

Ronald J. Clark


February 29, 2000

Ola Torstensson


February 29, 2000

This is exactly the kind of land-grabbing you'd expect from today's corporations destroying the fabric of what really made the internet what it is today. I will not shop again with Amazon until this is dropped.

James Wilkins


February 29, 2000

Pierre Neihouser


February 29, 2000

Michael Costall


February 29, 2000

╩smund Tjora


February 29, 2000

Tim says it all.

Dave Sheridan


February 29, 2000

Christian Tanzer


February 29, 2000

Kevin Johnson


February 29, 2000

Karl Knutsson


February 29, 2000

Leon Widdershoven


February 29, 2000

Eric Warmenhoven


February 29, 2000

Bernhard Rosenkraenzer


February 29, 2000

This is good, people taking a stand for what they believe in - damn i like it. Amazon - you're going down !!

Paw R. Olesen


February 29, 2000

Johannes Beigel


February 29, 2000

Holger Hoffstaette


February 29, 2000

What's next? Patenting wallets?

tor fosheim


February 29, 2000

I have been reading most of the comments that are submitted here and one thing that struck me was how polite and insightfull the comments are. The people commenting here are *not* mindless goons shouting for another boycott because everyone else is doing so. These people are really offended by what's happening and are taking the time, like I am, to say something about it. I hope someone at amazon.com will get to read all these coments and get the message. I also hope other companies considering similar tactics will see why these tactics are unethical and indeed may form a danger to the Web.

Reinout Hoornweg


February 29, 2000

Bad form Amazon - how greedy can one company get?

Michael Merlin


February 29, 2000

Aaron Denney


February 29, 2000

Tord Jansson


February 29, 2000

Software patents are anathema. Arrogance and greed have consequences. Bad company, no donut. No more money for you from me...

Tamara Munzner


February 29, 2000

Lee Genz


February 29, 2000

This is a serious issue and we will certainly be taking our own steps to help education consumers and developers to these practices. The Ring Group, Istanbul, Turkey

Jeff Merriam


February 29, 2000

Until recently, I was very satisfied with the service provided by Amazon. However, until they have realised the error of their ways, my business will be going elsewhere and I will be advising my colleagues to do likewise.

Andrew Eacott


February 29, 2000

In this process I have become increasingly supportive of Oreilly and decreasingly impressed with Amazon. I think the whole thing is a tragedy, because Amazon does offer a great service. The freedom of information IS the root of a new intellectual movement, and it will not be stopped by selfish interests.

Kyle Cranmer


February 29, 2000

I support Tim O'Reilly and his calls for this patent to be surrendered. It can be shown that the concept of cookies to save personalisation settings existed for at least 12 months before amazon's presence on the web (or indeed anywhere). Since their "1-Click" is to all intents and purposes a clever branding of this process, I do not feel that a patent is appropriate - they may like to consider a trademark application for the name?

Jonathan Care


February 29, 2000

Alik Widge


February 29, 2000

I would love to be a financial genius and point out all the ways that Amazon is hurting themselves. I would love to be able to understand exactly what they patented and how that puts them in a position to sue Barns & Noble. I would like to have enough technical knowledge to be able to prove what Amazon is doing is wrong. But I am just an average consumer. I used to have a funny feeling Apple had single click patented because you had to double click everything in Windows. But, as I said, I am just a consumer. I only know that legal fees make products cost more. I know that my taxes increase to pay the judges salaries. I know that competition is good for me as a consumer. I know that it is the consumer that ultimately keeps you in business. I know that a business can be run without profit for only so long before the investors in that business decide the CEO was a con artist and his business plan was a scam. I know that I have referred at least 25 people to Amazon because you seemed to have so much on the ball compared to anyone else. I know that anyone loosing a game starts cheating. You are Cheating. INVESTORS DON'T BACK LOOSERS. So, stop cheating and looking like a looser. In the mean time, while you get your ducks in a row, I'll be buying my books at an old fashion walk in book store. I've told all the people I referred to you to stop using Amazon. That list includes: my mom, dad, 3 sisters, 3 brothers, a dozen co-workers, and a few of my friends. I'm sure they will pass the word along. You may find that the hype your business is based on works double when used against you. A lifetime of achievement is ruined by a single dishonorable act. It only takes one time. This is that one time. Fix It.

Jason Pippin


February 29, 2000

<sarchasm> Why doesn't Amazon try to get a patent on having a website or maybe breathing. I'm sure that there are no cases of prior art. </sarchasm>

Carsten Svaneborg


February 29, 2000

Josë Igor T▀mara Pati▒o


February 29, 2000

Emily Winch


February 29, 2000

David Riddoch


February 29, 2000

Jonathan Montgomery


February 29, 2000

Martijn de Vries


February 29, 2000

Douglas Krick


February 29, 2000

David DeGeorge


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com has lost my business.

Ryan Earl


February 29, 2000

James Lanfear


February 29, 2000

Antonio Lagana


February 29, 2000

You have one less customer, Amazon.

Matt Ebb


February 29, 2000

No Amazon books for me while this lasts...

Arjen Roos


February 29, 2000

RMS never speaks with a forked kernel.

Matt Christoff


February 29, 2000

freedom. freedom of information... freedom of ideas... freedom... and all will benefit.

Ricardo Contreras


February 29, 2000

Build it and they will come, Fence it and they will stay away in their millions.

Mark Chettle


February 29, 2000

A very wierd patent. How can someone patent a "Cookie" based system?? I shan't be using 1-Click anymore. Andy

Andy Williams


February 29, 2000

No business of mine or my company will be given directly or indirectly to Amazon until a written undertaking has been made by them to cease these absurdities. The initial request for the patent is offensive in the extreme.

Martyn J. Pearce


February 29, 2000

I hope Amazon have enough of a sense of justice so that they do not continue with stealing others ideas and patenting them as their own.

Andrew Wilson


February 29, 2000

As a naval officer stationed overseas I was one of the first Amazon customers, since Amazon made it easy for me to purchase books not available overseas otherwise. Now, however, as a law student specializing in intellectual property issues I must reconsider my previous appreciation and admiration for Amazon. I strongly urge Amazon to do the right thing and cease attempts to enforce its trivial ecommerce patents.

Ernest Miller


February 29, 2000

Any proficient software engineer would be ashamed to have his/her name on the patent application. If this is the heigth of genius Amazon has to offer...

Emile Heyns


February 29, 2000

Such software patents are for me a sad example of a larger problem: business competing not anymore with the quality of products but with the abuse of laws, regulations and institutions.

Dr. Christoph Tietz


February 29, 2000

Kent Neier


February 29, 2000

Trivial and malicious software patents are poison to the very software industry that gave you your current position. I will boycott your (otherwise excellent) service until these claims are dropped.

Alex Brown


February 29, 2000

I've used Amazon for a couple of years now and was always extremely pleased with their service. Unfortunately I can no longer purchase from them, and I encourage them to change this ridiculous policy as soon as possible.

Alisdair McDiarmid


February 29, 2000

I have always felt that Amazon provides one of the best interfaces for ordering books. However, I cannot support the use of such a trivial patent to beat down your competition. I will (regrettably) be taking my business elsewhere unless your patent policy changes.

Paul Pelzl


February 29, 2000

Its a disgrace whats happening, I only hope that someone quickly overturns this patent. It shows no respect or responsibility towards the medium and technology that allowed Ama-stole.com to reach the size it has. Needless to say I will not purchase books from them at all. Michael

Michael Stromberg


February 29, 2000

Please back off from this silly patent. I used to like your company, but your abuse of the patent system has changed my mind.

Keith Hankin


February 29, 2000

This is a stupid patent that anyone with a little knowledge of the web could 'invent'. I disagree with it wholeheartedly, and have therefore boycotted buying from Amazon. I instead go to my high street store, or order from a competitor of yours. Maybe if you loose enough customers who normally buy expensive manuals will you see that people do feel strongly on this, and that it makes sense for it to be dropped - it will increase your profits.

Mark Godfrey


February 29, 2000

I used to be a huge Amazon customer. Living in South Africa, I found that they stocked books that I just couldn't get anywhere else, and Amazon's customer service was always excellent. However, since this patent frenzy of theirs, I have started using alternatives like Barnes & Noble, and I have found them to be a more than acceptable alternative. I have placed over 35 orders with Amazon in the last 3 years and spent an obscene amount of money there. Oh well, Amazon's loss... their competitor's gain. I just can't spend my money at such an unethical bussiness.

Peter Knowles


February 29, 2000

Trivial and malicious software patents are poison to the very software industry that gave you your current position. I will boycott your (otherwise excellent) service until these claims are dropped.

Alex Brown


February 29, 2000

As a software developer for an internet company, I was an early customer of Amazon, and as a collector of first-edition hardback books, for a while I also made extensive use of your auction area. I have not visited amazon.com or amazon.co.uk since the day Richard Stallman called for the Amazon boycott in protest of Amazon's decision to enforce it's One-click patent with an injunction against Barns & Noble. As an avid reader I spend a considerable sum on books - I will be taking my business to your competitors (Barnes & Noble in particular) until Amazon changes it's stance on silly internet functionality patents.

Janice Wright


February 29, 2000

I didn't realize the potential ramifications of Amazon's patent claim on the future of the Internet until I read Tim O'Reilly open letter. My first impression was that it seemed like a good way to keep new ideas from being imitated and that Amazon was simply trying to protect's it branding of "One click". I realize now that this approach would seriously have stifled the growth of the Internet had it been enforced early on. Can someone like Yahoo come along and say they have a patent on web site directories or it's widely used categorization system? What about portals? Although, I won't go all out to boycott Amazon, I will certainly think twice about shopping at Amazon.

Juan Camacho


February 29, 2000

I own an ISP and am widely respected in my community regarding technology issues being also a member of our regional technology council. As a person, I have ceased to do business with Amazon, there are too many alternatives and I find their action, which is akin to seeing some one urinate and then patenting "urinating in a closed room", quite horrifying in terms of what it reveals about their corporate attitude. If that's how they're doing business now, what happens when they achieve the real power that comes when they finally become insanely profitable? I doubt they'll suddenly come down with a case of morals. At my company, we are ceasing to do business with Amazon until their attitude improves. All of our employees have been briefed on this issue and all of our customers have been notified of Amazon's actions; we advise them to stay away from Amazon and help them find alternatives. Likewise in my position on the Regional Tech. Council, I also am ensuring that everyone knows about this issue as well as understanding just how basic cookies and the idea of giving someone a percentage for a sales referral (affiliates program) really are...and how Amazon's actions are threatening economic development in our region and in our state (although not limited to us).

Lon R. Stockton, Jr.


February 29, 2000

Tim Ostler


February 29, 2000

Adam Thomason


February 29, 2000

Marrije Schaake


February 29, 2000

Ulf Käck, Sweden


February 29, 2000

Luc Van Hoeylandt


February 29, 2000

Kevin Kent


February 29, 2000

Emil KIRSCHNER


February 29, 2000

David Porter


February 29, 2000

Chris Winkler


February 29, 2000

David Oggs


February 29, 2000

Steve Calder


February 29, 2000

Rudi Sluijtman


February 29, 2000

Paul Hernaus


February 29, 2000

I had respect for Amazon until this 1-click patent nonsense. This is no longer the case, at least until they smarten up and drop this frivilous patent. I thought of this application for cookies years ago. I, much like others, also considered this a trivial use of cookies and not worth a patent. <p> I think that taking the work of others, who give it away freely for the betterment of all people, and patenting something that will hinder the growth of more innovation is despicable. Amazon, you should be ashamed of yourself! This action brands you not as a member of the community, but as a bandit who preys upon the community, having dollar signs as their only motivation. <p> Until this patent is overturned, i openly suggest people use www.noamazon.com instead of the other one.

Cam Mayor


February 29, 2000

Didier Leimbach


February 29, 2000

Graham Green


February 29, 2000

Patrick Keller


February 29, 2000

Ville Salmensuu


February 29, 2000

Greed gone mad!

David Hass


February 29, 2000

Marcin Gorycki


February 29, 2000

Down with this sort of thing!

Leo Talbot


February 29, 2000

customerlost++

Gulam Faruque


February 29, 2000

Now, I use www.fatbrain.com.

Alexandre Dulaunoy


February 29, 2000

You've lost my business. 'Nuff said.

St Aardvark the Carpeted


February 29, 2000

Play fair! Give up your patents, please. Or don't expect anyone I know to shop at Amazon's.

Roland Mas


February 29, 2000

Nis Donatzsky Hansen


February 29, 2000

No more Amazon purchases from me while they keep this nonsense up. Off to bol.com ...

Leon Verrall


February 29, 2000

Hm. Amazon: a user of Apache (v 1.3.6), and reputedly, of FreeBSD. Obviously Mr Becos just doesn't "get it."

Ewing Caldwell


February 29, 2000

Even though amazon.de offers great service, I haven't ordered a book with them since RMS asked for the boykott - down with silly patents!

Britta Koch


February 29, 2000

I am disappointed even to imagine someone can make a patent on someonelse's idea

Emilio Anzon


February 29, 2000

Hopefully ordinary people and politicians soon will realize that the benefits (?) of the patent system is by by far outweighted by the disadvantages.

Hůkon L░vdal


February 29, 2000

Martin Fluch


February 29, 2000

Hi Tim, I'm behind you and RMS on this whole issue. I will no longer support Amazon.com until these petty patents issues are dropped! "pissing in the well... " hehehe how true!

Chris Steinke


February 29, 2000

In 1999 I spent 軕.12 at Amazon.com. In 2000 I have spent Ũ.00. As long as Amazon.com continues this shameful patent suit I will use Amazon to find books and buy them elsewhere.

Brett Peters


February 29, 2000

Well, as a lot of ppl already said, until amazon drops their ridicilous patent, I wont buy another book from them. Search their site for books, yes, but buying them elsewhere.

Stefan Lindstrom


February 29, 2000

Amazon's service isn't worth their bad vibe. I'm shopping elsewhere now. Tim, why is the patent office is allowed to operate like this? They're destroying our collective prosperity! Jeff, go outside and look up at the stars.

Jon Cox


February 29, 2000

I have always used Amazon before as I felt they offered a great service, and have encouraged my friends and family to do so. Now with this greedy abuse of the patent system I shall take my business elsewhere, and shall encourage them to do so as well. Cian

Cian O'Connor


February 29, 2000

I can't remember not buying my books from Amazon: reasonable prices, swift shipping, all in all good service. But I will not buy another book from them until they stop this nonsense patent business which is, as Tim points out, a slap in the face of all the Web pioneers. Dag Hovden, The Netherlands

Dag Hovden


February 29, 2000

Trying to patent something that is a fundamental part of the HTTP protocol (ie, the cookie) is a *Bad* move. IMNSHO it constitutes unfair business practice; it gains you nothing, it steals others' work for your commercial misuse and it stops other people using what is an open protocol. Until you desist I shall persist in boycotting Amazon and continue to inform folks as appropriate. ~Tim

Tim Haynes


February 29, 2000

Entrepreneurship is necessary for the advancement of economy and society. This kind of corporate behaviour makes it despicable, and that in itself is to be deplored. The real guilt lies with the US PTO, judges and politician who will ruin the system by allowing its abuse. But having the right to do something is no excuse for doing it.

Bernard Lang


February 29, 2000

Amazing this was ever allowed. It makes a mockery of an already outdated patent system. This would be funny if it did not directly and adversly affect the freedom of the internet. This patent is stealing from those who were involved in the creation of the net and all those who use it in there everyday lives. The internet is about open standards - these standards are not then to be hijacked by companies such as amazon in a futile attempt to become an on-line monopoly.

Mark Williams


February 29, 2000

This 1-click patent is ridiculous. I feel it is an obvious application of the purpose of cookies as stated in the Netscape document which created cookies. The example in the document makes it very ovious that 1-click is exactly what the creators of the cookies had in mind. </i> I am in complete agreement with Tim on all he said and I wish to thank him for stating it so clearly. I just can't see how software patents are ever going to be more beneficial to the computing trade than their former absence used to be. Copyright law is more than enough protection for anyone's work.

Jean-Marc Libs


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com and it's associated sites have always had my respect for being a leading example of how to do business on the Internet - providing a user-friendly and forward-thinking browsing and purchasing environment. They have consistently innovated, and have lead the field. I have been proud to cite Amazon as an example to my customers. Amazon's successes have finally spawned credible competition. Amazon as a company has to respond to the change in environment to maintain their position. However, it is my belief that their current actions, viz. restricting the technology available to others through legal means, is absolutely the wrong way to go. There is plenty of energy within Amazon to meet the challenge of the expanding marketplace, without having to resort to attempting to cripple the opposition. Run an honest race, Amazon. It got you where you are today, don't turn your back on your own history.

Jim Cheetham


February 29, 2000

I will also no longer support Amazon.com until these petty patents issues are dropped!

Hidetaka YOSUMI


February 29, 2000

Ryan Richter


February 29, 2000

Alan Braggins


February 29, 2000

Glenn Handeland


February 29, 2000

I sympathise with Amazon: it's very easy to overestimate the originality of one's own ideas. Sadly, not only does the patent have zero technical merit, but it fuels distrust for & contempt of Amazon. I've stopped shopping there.

Andrew Forrest


February 29, 2000

Jos Backus


February 29, 2000

Iqbal Shamsul


February 29, 2000

Kari Asikainen


February 29, 2000

Steve Johnston


February 29, 2000

Brent McLeod


February 29, 2000

I was always taught that a patent could only ever be granted for non trivial innovations that contribute to the state of the art. Patents were originally created for a person to protect years of work and investement from being stolen by unscupulous people, not for someone with a bright spark to hold the world ransom. In this light I can only see your patents as a perversion to the whole spirit or the system, a perversion that will slowly rot the fruit from the inside. When patents are used like this, they demean the whole idea of patents, and that is a tragedy.

Marc Gimpel


February 29, 2000

Joshua Yambert


February 29, 2000

Nicola Turner


February 29, 2000

Amazon got the patents, their competitiors got my business...

Louis REINARD


February 29, 2000

I don't think I need add anything to the letter -- says it all, really. Cheers.

Stuart Lamble


February 29, 2000

I despise the 1-click patent and won't deal with a company that does such unethical things.

Peter Mutsaers


February 29, 2000

Its a shame that Amazon can gain so much from free technology and then slap the free technology in the face. What horrible greed.

Kevin Stelzer


February 29, 2000

Count me in, Mr. O'Reilly. I love your books, and I totally agree with your letter. I'll go to fatbrain.com to buy your books. ;-)

Glenn Arndt


February 29, 2000

Stopped using Amazon (UK) as soon as I heard about this. The great thing about the internet: an alternative is always close by.

Stephen Watkins


February 29, 2000

So I gave y'all the same email address that I use at your site, so that you can map the customer to the opinion. I completely understand patenting/attempting to patent petty/obvious technologies; if you don't do it, someone else will. But going after people for doing something that is obvious is not something I will ever support. It's bricks 'n' motar B&N for me until you wisen up, and behave fairly.

Dilum Ranatunga


February 29, 2000

Brendan Kehoe


February 29, 2000

It's a real kick in the teeth to see the poster-child of forward-looking, innovative Internet businesses behaving in such a short-sighted, backward-looking way.

David Salgado


February 29, 2000

While I have always considered Amazon a great company, this is too serious. As long as Amazon's position remains the same, I will support the NoAmazon initiative (www.noamazon.com).

Jonas Beckman


February 29, 2000

You have certainly lost my business until you end this foolish patent enforcement.

Craig T. Snydal


February 29, 2000

I am disappointed by the use of patents from Amazon who built the business upon the generosity of the people who made the web. i stopped buying anything at their place until they change their mind.

Guillaume PROUX


February 29, 2000

I want to like amazon.com because I feel like it's a hometown success story...after hearing about your "1 click ordering" patent, it seems that Amazon is too big and too powerful. I have shopped amazon.com in the past but not until I hear that this issue is resolved.

JB McDaniel


February 29, 2000

We no longer buy our books from Amazon as a result of their patent, and this is actually company policy (we use the Amazon site to look up books and info, but wil not buy anything from them until they drop the patent application). I am personally encouraging our associate companies to adopt the same policy.

Neil Newell


February 29, 2000

I've been a happy amazon customer since Jan '97 and have spent a lot of money with them. Right now I don't have an alternative to get US books at an acceptable price point in Germany, but that will change when other book sellers catch on. And then there's going to be one amazon customer less.

Dirk Reiners


February 29, 2000

Daniel Barrero


February 29, 2000

As a web developer I am all too familiar with what happens when proprietary interests get in the way of innovation. As a web developer I have purchased a lot of books, almost all from Amazon. I will no longer purchase _anything_ from Amazon, neither will my friends or family until they can pull their heads out of their asses. -Jonathan Younger

Jonathan Younger


February 29, 2000

The patents claimed by Amazon are clearly technically vacuous and trivial. I use Amazon regularly, but if its policy is to compete via pointless and clearly plagiaristic patents, which are clearly deposited in the most general terms possible, rather than on quality-of-service, I won't be doing so in future.

George Buchanan


February 29, 2000

Maybe a trademark would be appropriate for the term "One-click ordering", but there is no way this patent should have been granted or enforced.

Nigel Metheringham


February 29, 2000

As somebody who has made great use of Amazon either purchasing directly, or indirectly (as other friends have ordered), I shall not be involving Amazon in any future purchasing decisions. I shall also encourage all my friends and family to do the same. As somebody who has contributed (in a small way) to the Open Source community, I find it insulting to all those who have freely contributed their efforts, just so you can attempt to acquire these transparently trivial algorithms. To claim these as inventions is fraudulent, and I hope that you reverse your direction on this matter.

Jon Eaves


February 29, 2000

Dalton Serey


February 29, 2000

I just read the patent application - my first thought was 'yes, and?...' Maybe I should go and patent my idea of having pictures on a web site to make them more interesting :-)

Ian Buxton


February 29, 2000

Lennart Rasmusson


February 29, 2000

no comment

Marco Mariani


February 29, 2000

I don't believe in software patents, as the danger of abuse far outweigts the gains from use. Amazon enforcing the 1-click-parody, will surely jepordize whatever good use SW patents have in the first place.

Frank Stevenson


February 29, 2000

Andy Gimblett


February 29, 2000

Mickey Everts


February 29, 2000

Joop Boonen


February 29, 2000

Daniel Martinus Moelbaek


February 29, 2000

Have a care Amazon ...

Nick G


February 29, 2000

I have defended Amazon.com in public in the past when I felt that complaints against it were unwarranted. I was definitely a loyal Amazon.com customer. Now I am seeing my loyalty defiled in the shape of these patents. It is clearly time for me to stop supporting Amazon.com with my purchases, and to also cancel (and encourage others to cancel) Amazon.com affiliate relationships.

Stuart Whitmore


February 29, 2000

Like many other people signing this letter, I will not purchase from Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk until this patent is placed in the public domain.

Phil Harrison


February 29, 2000

Another former amazon customer

Struan Donald


February 29, 2000

100% in agreement. 1-click purchasing is hardly an innovation. Period.

Andy Key


February 29, 2000

Stefan Berglund


February 29, 2000

I stopped buying books from Amazon when RMS put the call out about the patent. Fatbrain, B&N, and the local Borders brick-and-mortar have received the โ-贶 I spend each month. I don't need Amazon.com to get my books, obviously, and I successfully encourage others to purchase books from other sources because of Amazon's patent stance.

Chris Jones


February 29, 2000

Count me in - I believe this patent thing is complete nonsense. --alex

Alexandre Takacs


February 29, 2000

Andy Gimblett


February 29, 2000

Even though you havn't called for a boycott I will no longer be buying from Amazon (or Amazon UK) until this matter is resolved.

Andy Guy


February 29, 2000

This case is an excellent argument for the European Community not to approve patents on software. This is maybe the only positive thing about it ;-)

Bernard Pinon (Paris, EU)


February 29, 2000

Until this patent is dropped I won't be ordering anything from you, which is a pity because I liked the service. Until then though I'll go to your competitors or a bookshop.

James Skinner


February 29, 2000

I was an enthusastic supporter of Amazon, but I condemn their approach to the community that has put them where they now are. The beauty of the internet is that as a community we have a combined voice that should be large enough to make a difference.

Lindsay Davies


February 29, 2000

I used to present Amazon as the example of how to create a successful business on your own merit, rather than by harming (potential) competitors. Now I can't even use Amazon myself in good conscience.

Per Abrahamsen


February 29, 2000

Crystal Trexel


February 29, 2000

Please give up your right to your business process patents -- they do nothing to serve your interests. Please compete on your own merits.

Thomas Lakofski


February 29, 2000

I used to love shopping at Amazon purchasing both books, cd's as well as other items. While I understand the need to protect your intellectual property, this patent does not cover IP owned by amazon. As such I will not be purcashing any products from Amazon until this patent has been dropped.

Antony Wuth


February 29, 2000

I'm not normally one to take this kind of stance. But it's time to change. I've watched too many of these things go by thinking that it would be a good idea to do something and finally I've come to getting off my ass and doing something about it. Bye bye Amazon. From now on my business is going elsewhere.

Kurt Olsen


February 29, 2000

Lets nip this nonsense in the bud now. Well said Tim.

Leigh Dodds


February 29, 2000

It's a shame. I really didn't want to stop shopping at Amazon, because the service has always been impeccable. You got your first-to-market advantage already, Amazon - I would never have considered going to any of the copycat johnny-come-latelies like B&N before. But by pursuing these (frankly untenable) patents you are not acting like the worst kind of corporate bully we've seen outside of the web, but also retarding the growth of the countless other web sites who are not even your competitors.

Andrew Clover


February 29, 2000

While this silly patent dispute gose on I will not buy anything from amazon.

David Fromosa


February 29, 2000

I have spent over 辎 at Amazon over the last year, and I love their site and service, but I will be buying elsewhere until they relent on this rediculous position that they "invented" the idea of attatching information to a cookie "key"--That's what cookies were designed for! As a web application developer, I truly feel that attempts like this one to appropriate (read steal) open technologies like the use of cookies is a direct threat to my livelyhood. Comon Jeff! Do you really think the "one-click" gimimck is all that stands between you and corporate death?! You got to where you are because of excellent customer service, vision, and excecution-- not a kindegarten level toy-grab.

Joel Boehland


February 29, 2000

I urge Amazon, a company which I have to date regarded highly, and whose services I have often used, to reconsider this short-sighted act, which I am sure will be counter-productive from their point of view, as well as generally harmful.

Brian Randell


February 29, 2000

PJ Hellyer


February 29, 2000

Jonas Olsson


February 29, 2000

Stephan Ichiriu


February 29, 2000

Samuel Marshall


February 29, 2000

Christine M. Lingenfelter


February 29, 2000

Nicholas Murphy


February 29, 2000

yet another former amazon customer...

Greg Brown


February 29, 2000

In solidarity with Richard Stallman, Tim Oreilly, and all others resisting Amazon.com's (Jeff Bezos) attempted abuse of what has become of an archiac perspective in regards to Intellectual Property. Amazon.com and Mr. Bezos, you and your co-conspiritors have produced, in your response to "the letter", a clearly shortsighted and arrogant approach that has resulted in a collective signiture on the death certificate of the model in question... RIP

radicalis - the roots of change


February 29, 2000

Michael Rozhavsky


February 29, 2000

The one-click patent is an abuse of the patent law and an insult to serious technology innovation. It is also a threat to all new entrants in the technology marketplace who do not have the legal resources to combat your racket. This move reveals that Amazon.com intends to employ the same quasi-legal mafia-style marketing techniques used by Microsoft to crush competitors. Consequently I will continue to use Amazon for identifying books but I'll take pleasure in purchasing them elsewhere. May all your stock be shorted...

Alec Permison


February 29, 2000

Ulrik Haugen


February 29, 2000

Hey Jeff: do you really like the idea that your cool new-economy powerhouse is acting like... Unisys? Your 1-Click patent isn't just questionable, it's absurd and will undoubtedly fail the first time it is challenged. It's a waste of everyone's time and effort, including your own. Until Amazon ceases to pursue frivolous patents I will shop elsewhere.

Neil Kandalgaonkar


February 29, 2000

Dick Middleton


February 29, 2000

Raymond Smith


February 29, 2000

Bye bye Amazon

Jack Huang


February 29, 2000

I fully agree to this letter!

Jan Rune Hogstad


February 29, 2000

I'd laugh at the whole thing if it wasn't so sad.

Garrett Coakley


February 29, 2000

Patenting old news and trivialities must stop.

Jan Roger Wilkens


February 29, 2000

Incredible how someone can be allowed to patent something so apperent /Tobias

Tobias Adamson


February 29, 2000

Jason Casey


February 29, 2000

Kim Mason


February 29, 2000

Keep the web open! Big thanks to im O'Reilly for expressing an opinion shared by many in such thoughtful words.

Tomas Perez


February 29, 2000

Thanks for hosting an area where we can be heard. Hopefully It will make a difference. Jeff: Stop This nonsense!!!

John Michael Keller


February 29, 2000

I urge amazon.com to reconsider the patenting of technologies that they by no means invented, that will only hurt small web based companies.

William Bunyan


February 29, 2000

Quit acting like a POS. Until you amend your ways I will personally ensure all my friends and family as well as anyone who will listen will not shop at your site.

Martin Jackson


February 29, 2000

Upon learning of Amazon's software patent activity, I ceased buying from them. Moreover, I am actively urging to not shop at Amazon, but to instead patronize one of Amazon's competitors.

Kevin Buettner


February 29, 2000

Colman Reilly, ex-Amazon Customer


February 29, 2000

I was a regular customer at amazon.com until these recent patent foul ups. Now I refuse to purchase there anymore. There are other online resellers and you are NOT as indespensable as you think.

Samuel Hazel


February 29, 2000

I heartily support Tim's views as expressed above. My on-line book orders are now going through BOL and Waterstones, and will remain that way until Amazon clean up their act with regard to software patents.

Tim Franklin


February 29, 2000

One more attempt at patent abuse = one fewer customer. I have today cancelled my currently outstanding order with amazon.co.uk, and will now buy exclusively from your competitors. Please reconsider.

Sean McGeever


February 29, 2000

Very much agreed.

Michael Goren


February 29, 2000

It seems sad that the company which created the concept of e-commerce as the vast bulk of the population know it, may also be the company to ultimately bring about the end of the same. You can't steal a basic technology and not expect to be noticed.

Fintan Ryan


February 29, 2000

Despite having made numerous purchases from Amazon and recommended it to both friends and family, I feel that I can no longer support such a company so long as they continue to use software patents in such a stifling and counter-productive manner.

Paul Holden


February 29, 2000

Today amazon lost another customer to BOL. Where does this patent thing end? Will yahoo patent the idea of a search spider? Why don't Amazon go all the way and patent the idea of a book E-Commerce store. That way they can kill ALL the competion in one go!

David Maddison


February 29, 2000

Tim brought up every point that could be made about your attempts exploit the ignorance of the US Patent Office, so I won't add to it. I'd just like to reiterate that the potential gains from these trivial patents are far outweighed by all the potential problems.

Rene Fromhold-Treu


February 29, 2000

Amazon - It's not too late to do the Right Thing and back off from these destructive patents.

Tony Mountifield


February 29, 2000

I felt that the original patent on 1-click shopping was a poor idea but this new patent on the affiliate program is adding insult to unjury. I have already stopped using Amazon for purchases and will now cancel my outstanding orders with them. I will also try persuading several of friends who run affiliate links on their websites to stop doing so. I would point out to Mr Bezos that he may "patent" himself out of business, just as fast as he innovated himself into it.

Alan Ward


February 29, 2000

first the 1-click, now the affiliates. result: I'm removing my wish list, and will be shopping somewhere else.

Morten Wang


February 29, 2000

Everyone that attached their names to this letter are doing so because they have a problem with your theft from the public domain. Do you need a slide rule to piece his together? AT THIS POINT YOU'RE YOUR OWN WORST ENEMY!!

Jann Rinken


February 29, 2000

amen, tim! i have switched ALL of my business to fatbrain, barnes, etc. i am not opposed to legitimate software patents however affiliate programs, reverse auctions, etc. are ridiculous and could really threaten the future of ecommerce.

mike wheeler


February 29, 2000

Amazon was the site which first truly showed how the web could make commerce easier and better - a simple, brilliant service. It makes me particularly sad that they are also one of the first to show how commerce may soon make the web another corporate "wasteground", where little guys are kept out of the market with "lawyer power", and anyone who disseminates information freely is stamped on. It's a short step from your patent lawsuit against a competitor to suing the W3C for publishing the cookie specs that 1-Click(TM :-) is based on. The intelligent people who are building the rest of the web around you - and who built many of the platforms on which your company depends - read a lot of books. Whilst you may have your sights set on selling trashy romances to every housewife in middle America, I believe that you can't afford to lose our support and our custom. I used to love Amazon - its a great, quick way to pick up the books I need, and I'm currently getting through 1 or 2 large, expensive technical tomes a week. I won't be spending any of that money with Amazon until they start playing fair, however. How many other customers are you losing?

Simon Batistoni


February 29, 2000

Amazon was the site which first truly showed how the web could make commerce easier and better - a simple, brilliant service. It makes me particularly sad that they are also one of the first to show how commerce may soon make the web another corporate "wasteground", where little guys are kept out of the market with "lawyer power", and anyone who disseminates information freely is stamped on. It's a short step from your patent lawsuit against a competitor to suing the W3C for publishing the cookie specs that 1-Click(TM :-) is based on. The intelligent people who are building the rest of the web around you - and who built many of the platforms on which your company depends - read a lot of books. Whilst you may have your sights set on selling trashy romances to every housewife in middle America, I believe that you can't afford to lose our support and our custom. I used to love Amazon - its a great, quick way to pick up the books I need, and I'm currently getting through 1 or 2 large, expensive technical tomes a week. I won't be spending any of that money with Amazon until they start playing fair, however. How many other customers are you losing?

Simon Batistoni


February 29, 2000

Boniface Young


February 29, 2000

Boudewijn Jong


February 29, 2000

Exactly !

Neil Marshall


February 29, 2000

Michael Sullivan


February 29, 2000

Bj¸rn Stenberg


February 29, 2000

joshua corning


February 29, 2000

Amazon has lost my business for as long as they continue with this futile, obstructionist ploy. That's quite a shame, as they do offer a convenient, useful service - but I for one am quite willing to go out of my way to give my business to a more responsible corporate Internet citizen.

Zac Stevens


February 29, 2000

Runo F░rrisdahl


February 29, 2000

I have already stopped buying from Amazon and exchanged e-mail with your company explaining why I have stopped ordering from you. From the time I stopped (in December) I have redirected more than 񘋰 of purchases that would have been made through you to other suppliers. I also convinced two friends holding your stock to sell it, not because of any potential profit or loss but because your actions were not ethical. If your company does not relent in its support of needless and wasteful patent-and-litigate tactics, your stock will have about as much appeal as that of a tobacco company -- perhaps profitable for a while but risky when a lawsuit finally goes against you. Now I shall start making sure my other investments do not hold your stock and start letting your associates know that if they carry product besides a link to you that I will be dropping them from any purchase considerations (after giving them a month to drop you.)

R. A. Burt


February 29, 2000

Neal Sidhwaney


February 29, 2000

Michael Bruun Petersen


February 29, 2000

Henrik Larsson


February 29, 2000

bookpool.com & fatbrain.com z.

Tinusz Nijmeijers


February 29, 2000

Good to see such involvment from O'Reilly.

Sven-Arne Reinemo


February 29, 2000

Boudewijn Jong


February 29, 2000

The only company that I had ever used to order books from was Amazon, until today.

Andy Tomlinson


February 29, 2000

Until this is resolved, I'll be buying my O'Reilly books from somewhere else. Neil Ford.

Neil Ford


February 29, 2000

Shame upon Amazon.com. I'll be going to FatBrain in future or, better still, my local bookstore.

Pete Cassidy


February 29, 2000

Greed will finally kill everything in sight. Let's hope we can kill greed before that happens.

Mathias Creutz


February 29, 2000

I am not going to order one more item from Amazon until they withdraw this ill-considered patent application. Simple as that.

Toby Poynder


February 29, 2000

I'm going to buy my books from Blackwell's or BOL in future; in the last year I must have spent over ˙100 at Amazon. Count yourselves one customer down....

Robin Stephenson


February 29, 2000

I'll not buy from Amazon until they will change their attitude on the "one click" patent and I'll diffuse these information to all my friend

michele michelotto


February 29, 2000

I have been a loyal Amazon customer for as long as the company has existed... However, patenting something that isn't patentable is somewhat ridiculous... Time to shop elsewhere...

david r. perry


February 29, 2000

I used to do all my onlne book shopping with amazon.com and amazon.de - and lots of it. But this patent thing is just ridiculous and has just cost amazon another customer - there ARE other places to buy books online.

Joerg Michael


February 29, 2000

Jeff, This is my real email address, unSPAMprotected, to show you how serious I (and we) are about you rescinding your 2 most recent patent claims. I will spend no more money with your company until you do. Yours, MCT

Matthew C. Thompson


February 29, 2000

A clear abuse of the Patent process, and a mockery of our freedoms as Americans. As I did with Circuit City and Divx, Amazon no longer has my business (or all those I influence) until this abuse stops. End of story.

Jason Hurdlow


February 29, 2000

Since 1997, I have had the following statement on my personal homepage "Web Technology has a great future. A lot of what will be considered normal in the following five to ten years is already possible in experimental form. For these experimental systems to reach their full potential, a number of important choices have to be made. I like to make those choices." With patents like this to be granted, I am starting to fear the future...

Kees Leune


February 29, 2000

I agree entirely with this open letter, and Tim's earlier letter of January 5th. This strategy of patenting obvious inventions and aggressively pursuing them against competitors is offensive and counter productive. I too have ceased my custom with Amazon from the day that the news of their 1st-Click patent broke. Having always appreciated Amazon's service, I hope that pressure of public opinion will convince them to abandon these patents, so that I can consider returning as a customer.

Martijn Koster


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, although you seem to believe that your patent application for One-Click ordering is a valid one, I think that the examples Mr. O'Reilly quoted are themselves enough evidence to prove prior art. I know I have build a system similar to yours in 1996. I am also sure the affiliate program has enough prior examples (not necessarily in the internet sector). Enforcing these to patents is a blow in the face of people who have always been willing to share their developments with others out of good will.

Maarten Boekhold


February 29, 2000

Thank goodness you didn't figure this whole internet thing out in 1994, if you had you would killed the web before it had a chance. I would much rather buy my books from a brick and mortar store, or barnesandnoble.com than to purchase anything from you. Doug

Doug Mandell


February 29, 2000

Amazon offer great service. I've used you to locate two out of print books that I could never have found any other way. Pity I can't do that again until you drop this dumb patent.

Paul Johnson


February 29, 2000

The behaviour of Amazon may appear to be smart in the short term, however like much of their behaviour it is so very short sighted. The book trade is changing, but not so fast that it will accept such antagonistic behaviour by one of its own. Beth Jenkins Blackwell Retail Ltd

Beth Jenkins


February 29, 2000

In my eyes, Tim's letter was very polite. I think that Amazon has received and will receive statements which are much less nice in the wording than this -- and justifiably so. Amazon prospered and still prospers from freely available technology and now tries to keep others from using techniques or methods which are trivial at best. To blame only the U.S. patent office for this is too easy -- not doing all I may do legally is what distinguished me from an asshole. That's called ethics.

Nils Philippsen


February 29, 2000

Gregory Rae


February 29, 2000

Joshua Bluestein


February 29, 2000

Diederik Willem van Liere


February 29, 2000

Yes, I protest.

Ivan Szanto


February 29, 2000

Mike Hale


February 29, 2000

Cees de Groot


February 29, 2000

I wholeheartedly agree with this letter. My firm, Ewing Data Incorporated, no longer uses Amazon for any book purchases due to their behavior in this matter. We are encouraging our colleagues and customers to do likewise.

James Ewing


February 29, 2000

Ditto, ditto. Boycott baby.

Kevin Johnson


February 29, 2000

Thomas Mailund


February 29, 2000

I think it is a shame if companies, instead of competing on equal grounds, start to abuse the patent system in order to prohibit their competition to do business. These Amazon patents are not about complicated innovations that needed years of research, they are about business ideas. Why should a company have the right to be the only one being allowed to do a particular business? This is in direct contradiction to the idea of a free market, where at any time a competitor may appear that can do the same thing better.

Claus O. Wilke


February 29, 2000

Now looking for somewhere else to do my shopping....

Lars Fastrup


February 29, 2000

I use to love Amazon, but now - no more shopping there!

Mikkel Rasmussen


February 29, 2000

This letter is right on target, and I completely agree.

┘rjan Reinholdsen


February 29, 2000

I use to love Amazon, but now - no more shopping there!

Mikkel Rasmussen


February 29, 2000

Raj Dutt


February 29, 2000

Amazon is a good company...these tactics are not necessary.

Doug Lane


February 29, 2000

In the past I have purchased books from and recommended others to use Amazon.com. Not any more.

Barry Wilkes


February 29, 2000

I've been boycotting Amazon and shopping at Barnes and Noble instead. Cease and desist, Amazon, or you'll never get my business again.

Wilson Yeung


February 29, 2000

Amazon's patent is ludicrous, indefensible, and should frighten shareholders: if they're depending on this weak ploy to help business, they're in a sorry state, indeed.

Ben Trafford


February 29, 2000

I used to order about 贄 worth of CDs per month from amazon. Until this absurd practice is stopped, cdnow.com will be getting this money. I prefer amazon as the prices and selection are better, but...

David Slorah


February 29, 2000

Amazon's prices are not all that interesting when you have the books shipped to France (even from the UK or Germany). I did however buy a book (about LaTeX) from Amazon. I try to support Internet-based shopping, voting, etc. whenever I can. I'll continue to do so, but not with Amazon.

Eric W Broneer


February 29, 2000

On behalf of my company, I've made purchases of more than USD 񘯬 from amazon.com last year. I will *not* spend a penny on amazon.com until they once again become the great internet company delivering the best customer service that they once were. Instead I'll spend my company money at an amazon.com competitor site. = tmk =

Tattoo Mabonzo K.


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, As a long time Amazon.com customer and supporter, I was highly dismayed to witness your recent patent actions. Your "one click" patent demonstrates a trivial application of HTTP cookies. To use this patent offensively is nothing less than an attack on the Internet infrastructure itself. Since December '99 I have been buying all my books from Fatbrain and I plan to continue the boycott until you apologise to the Internet community for this mistake.

Gordon Lyon


February 29, 2000

While I seldom perchase any books from Amazon on a personal basis, over the past couple years I've built up quite a library that I've made work order for me. Lots of O'Reilly books, lots of other stuff. Either way, that won't be happening anymore until such time as you give up wasting effort on the stupid legal games, Mr. Bezos, and get back to spending your time and money on improving service for us, your former customers. While I realize the loss of me personally won't affect you much, be advised that I am a very noisy and influential person. As such, I've convinced the president of the firm I work for to issue a memo to all 400+ employees stating that we will no longer be doing business with Amazon for any work related perpose, and encouraging them not to do business with you on a personal level outside work. To this end, I've reconfigured the corporate web proxy to transfer any web requests from any employees who may have "forgotten" about our new policy on Amazon ove! r to Barnes & Noble. Figure B&N could use the profits to help pay the unnecessary legal charges you're inducing!

Nathan D. Holmes


February 29, 2000

I was a loyal customer and have always highly recommended Amazon.com to my family and friends who have in turn done the same with others. The grassroots word of mouth buzzs is what helped propel Amazon to the top of the class. Why sabotage the good will with fear tactics and ill will. You have lost a good customer and the same word of mouth (and mass emailing) that I once did to support Amazon, I now turn towards encouraging family and friends etc to not buy from Amazon as long as the threat of patent action against others is retracted. You had a life, get it back!

Michael Graves


February 29, 2000

+


February 29, 2000

It's very sad when companies that are regarded as prime examples of the new Internet culture turn bad. Amazon, it's not too late! Your success is not relying on stupid patents, it's based on customer admiration, so please turn around quickly! Allow your customers to be proud of the place they shop!

Thomas Widmann


February 29, 2000

Amazon used to have my respect and my business. It now has neither. The web is the architypal success story of the open source community. To take that freely given corpus of code and knowledge and attempt to make it proprietory via some pathetic variation on an obvious theme is revolting and disrespectful to the many people who made the net a reality. These patents are wrong, insulting and bordering on theft.

Peter Ashford


February 29, 2000

Barbara Novak


February 29, 2000

I bought books for 663,38 DM (ca. 跩) during the last year at amazon.de. I appreciate the excellent usability of your website, it's far better than that of the other shops. I'm the coauthor of the book "Linux Kernel Internals" which has the sales rank 33.120 on www.amazon.com. I agree with Tim O'Reilly. Amazon-like patents will destroy the value of the Internet and create some kind of a Mononet, ruled by evil empires, that divide the world in the big and the poor.

Ulrich Kunitz


February 29, 2000

Augusto Roman


February 29, 2000

Dave Sieber


February 29, 2000

Forrest L Andrews


February 29, 2000

David McLean


February 29, 2000

Jon Harford


February 29, 2000

Marcus Adair


February 29, 2000

Eric Sharkey


February 29, 2000

Adam A. Smith


February 29, 2000

Alistair J Gunn


February 29, 2000

o'reilly -> fair move. amazon -> bad move.

benjamin deboute


February 29, 2000

Yet another ex-customer. Congratulations, Amazon.

Alan M. Evans


February 29, 2000

Please show your customers respect!

Hrafnkell Eiriksson


February 29, 2000

I'll gladly click more than once to order if it means not funding your patent lawyers.

Andrew M. Harms


February 29, 2000

The ill will that Amazon will instantly generate by this patent will far outway whatever monetary gain they gain. Shame on Amazaon.

Douglass Turner


February 29, 2000

Amazon has become greedy with it's "success". I hope they will join the community and be a partner and give back and not just take, take, take.

Clayton Hicks


February 29, 2000

CMW


February 29, 2000

I strongly oppose what Amazon is doing with their 1-click and associates patents. I will be taking my business elsewhere until they change their policies.

Robert Tsuk


February 29, 2000

Amazon's abuse of the patent system and the goodwill of the internet community repulses me. I have ordered goods from Amazon in the past, but I now use competitors and urge anyone I can influence to do likewise.

Paul Ashton


February 29, 2000

I have also mailed the Amazon helpdesk, informing them that I just canceled all in-progress orders, and that I would not be ordering from them again until they straightened this nasty business out.

Shaun Flisakowski


February 29, 2000

Tim is completely correct here. This is a ludicrous patent. Absolutely unbelieveable, this sort of nonsense will do great harm. And it is a particular bitter pill that amazon which became the model to which you could point to to show the success of online selling has become the model to point to as to how unscrupulous business destroys itself in an ill advised attempt to protect itself from fair competition.

Caolan McNamara


February 29, 2000

Even though I am (still) a big customer of Amazon (books/dvds, and toys for my nephews!) I resent this hijacking of a software technology. I do, however, believe that the main thrust of the campaign should be aimed at the US Patent office for allowing such a ridiculous patent to be filed in the first place, and secondly, for continuing to allow new stupid patents and thirdly for continuing to support existing stupid patents.

Yousef Syed


February 29, 2000

Arno Peters


February 29, 2000

hi

Fred Cheng


February 29, 2000

I think that without sharing, the Web would not be what we know it to be today. Enbracing a strategy such as patenting technology so trivial, and obvious is a move that has forced me to take my buisness elsewhere until Amazon.com decides to stop this silly pursuit. I urge other people to do the same.

David Britton


February 29, 2000

I'm both a very satisfied Amazon.com and Amazon.de customer, and a professional developer of software systems. Through the actions of Amazon.com on patent issues, I feel obliged to refrain from doing business with Amazon.com in the future, and from recommending Amazon.com to clients and friends, until Amazon.com changes it's stance towards patents issues.

Pierre Mai


February 29, 2000

Jussi Sarkkinen


February 29, 2000

Tom Baehr-Jones


February 29, 2000

Ben Byer


February 29, 2000

Martin Larsson


February 29, 2000

Dines Justesen


February 29, 2000

Shai Spharim


February 29, 2000

Dagfinn Stenberg


February 29, 2000

Andy Ball


February 29, 2000

Tim Massingham


February 29, 2000

No Web Patents!

Peter Wilhelmsen


February 29, 2000

What Vince Stratful said ;)

James Morgan


February 29, 2000

Wouter Hermans


February 29, 2000

"Pissing in the well" - what a wonderful summary of the situation, Tim :-)

Gervase Markham


February 29, 2000

The patent office needs more scrutiny of software patents!

Gareth McAleese


February 29, 2000

Bradley S. Ridnour


February 29, 2000

Sheesh, if I can code it, how can it possibly be patentable?! This is absurd. Amazon, shame on you.

Tim Murphy


February 29, 2000

The very idea of patenting this kind of system is blatantly monopolistic.

Justin Wilkins


February 29, 2000

What a picture: "In short, I think you're pissing in the well." That says it all... thanks, tim

Joe Rady


February 29, 2000

My opinion is that you should apologize to the community at large and admit that there is nothing new or non-obvious in this concept. Short of that, I see little reason to do business with you.

Gerard Pierce


February 29, 2000

For a company that makes such thorough use of the internet, you display so little understanding of it. Your patent is ridiculous! Do yourselves a favor and retract.

carlos cogen


February 29, 2000

I completely agree with Tim O'Reilly on this one. If everyone was to patent all new ideas and technologies even though it is considered common-knowledge we wouldn't have gotten as far as we are today. /David

David Hjorts░


February 29, 2000

New technologies and algorithms that took years of development: fine. Simple five-lines-of-code ideas already implemented thousands of times: not acceptable. Clean up your act, Amazon.

Roger Nesbitt


February 29, 2000

I can't believe that someone would try do something this stupid! Why? What does Amazon hope to gain? All that I can see this producing is a large profit for the lawyers involved. It makes me wonder what moron came up with this stupid idea.

Chris Babcock


February 29, 2000

Yes, all these patents be damned. Wether it's Unisys with their patent on a data compression _algorithm_ or Amazon.com with their patents on 1_click and such (if you look for 'amazon.com' on IBM's patent site, you get about 10 answers), they're all doomed. Sincerely Amaury

Amaury JACQUOT


February 29, 2000

I have spent next to nothing buying books from Amazon, thanks to fatbrain. My employer however, has spent thousands of dollars buying books from the company that seems intent on abusing the patent system for all it's worth. I will now ensure these dollars move elsewhere.

varun sharma


February 29, 2000

Great service. Great prices. Completely FUBAR attitude to the rest of the netizens. Until this ridiculous patent enforcing stops and is assured not to be repeated again, I will take my shopping elsewhere. I'd much rather pay a little bit extra and support a "fair player", than support Amazon when doing things like this.

Johan Mattsson


February 29, 2000

Jeff, try and remember the one big tenet of retail, THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS RIGHT. It's quite clear that the majority of your customers that have any idea what this is all about are totally against this patent. We're not in the playground anymore, no-one will laugh at you for backing down on this. Just put your hand up, say "I was wrong" and we'll all forget this happened.

Scott Keegan


February 29, 2000

I've recieved a few books through your service in the past, and was not disapointed with the speed and ease of your service. But you aren't the only bookstore in town and I (and many of my friends) believe in voting with our money, if you continue applying for and enforcing these absurd patents I will continue buying books at barns & noble and my neighborhood bookstores.

woodruff burley


February 29, 2000

A waste of time and money on a patent that will be rejected. r.b.

Richard Bottoms


February 29, 2000

I suggest in your letters to Amazon.com that you make explicit that if it takes a court ruling to overturn the patents, you will never be able to purchase from Amazon in good conscience again. The ONLY out for them should be to drop the issue of their own free will. Right now I bet they think that, whether the patents are upheld or not, any loss is short-term--maybe a year. Make them realize it's an extremely long-term issue.

michael jones


February 29, 2000

And I have recommended Amazon.com to others! You are a bunch of leeches getting fat on the labour of others. I am done spending my money at your site and I will encourage all I know to do the same.

Karsten Poulsen


February 29, 2000

While much blame for the batch of ludicrous patents we have been seeing can be placed on the shoulders of the USPTO, the old saying 'two wrongs don't make a right' holds true. While I understand that, had Amazon not patented the things they have, other competitors could have gone out and done so, the fact remains that Amazon has PURSUED other's uses of their patents in court. Were this not the case, I could easily blame the USPTO entirely. But this not being so, Amazon must hold a large amount of responsibility.

James L. Morton


February 29, 2000

If somebody from Amazon is reading/checking this, they can find I have bought a good number of books from them before... till now. I dont pretend to EVER buy from Amazon again until they stop playing this kind of stupid, greedy moves on us. I have to agree with Stallman, the only way to hit Amazon as hard as they are hitting us is to boycott them. So they will get no more money for me until they backoff and clearly say they will never do this kind of thing again (fat chance, now, with the associates program fiasco) and I urge all of you to do the same

Jesus Couto F.


February 29, 2000

I do not believe in software patents and agree that, in any case, there is copious prior art on this issue. I have, in the past, been a customer of Amazon and would buy additional items through your site except for this issue. I have spoken to many friends and co-workers, explained this issue to them clearly and encouraged them not to patronize your site. I pointed them in the direction of some alternatives. As you know, word-of-mouth is the most effective advertising. Should you void these patents and once again become a member in good standing of the Internet community, I would consider purchasing from you in the future and let my friends and co-workers know that you did The Right Thing (tm).

Russell Rowen


February 29, 2000

For me this is the straw that broke the camel's back - if we don't draw a line in the sand soon these ridiculous patents of intellectual concepts and prior art will do more to stifle innovation than Microsoft ever dreamed of. Until Amazon ceases this sort of behavior I too will take my network shopping bag somewhere else, and will advise my friends to do likewise. Amazon.com's stock value (and Jeff Bezo's selection as man of the year) is based solely on the hope of the current stockholders that someone else will pay more for their stock than they did. How else could a company that's bleeding money at the rate of 跌M a year be judged a success? The only thing that will change the minds of the people at Amazon who are trying to offensively enforce these patents is the perception that it will adversely affect their stock price. And the best way to do that is to let them know that it will lead to a decrease in revenue in the next quarter. Arguing that it's "the right thing to do" will have no affect. If that meant any thing to them they never would have started along this course in the first place.

Ken Jancaitis


February 29, 2000

Harvey Bowen


February 29, 2000

Dan Ports


February 29, 2000

Daniel Heinonen


February 29, 2000

David Nusinow


February 29, 2000

Austin Godber


February 29, 2000

I have also joined the boycott of amazon.com, and have encouraged friends and co-workers to do the same. The patents on one-click shopping and affiliate programs are just another example of a deceptive player in the Internet industry exploiting the technical ignorance of the Patent Office for short-term gain. In the meantime, it is the industry itself that suffers. I choose not to do business with a deceptive, exploitative company.

Charles Miller


February 29, 2000

Eric Heien


February 29, 2000

Jing Su


February 29, 2000

I think I'll have the time to click more than once at www.bol.de :)

Tobias Willhauck


February 29, 2000

I've bought from Amazon multiple times before (just do a search for Vidar Hokstad in your customer database - I'm the only person named Vidar Hokstad in the world), but I won't do so again if you don't give up your ridiculous patents. I'll be a Barnes and Noble customer from now on. I'm simply disgusted by your abuse of the patent system, and will make sure that my friends get to hear about it, and I will also suggest to the marketing people of the company I work for to stop using your associate program. Vidar Hokstad (a customer you just lost)

Vidar Hokstad


February 29, 2000

Seattle, Washington

Robert S. Mitchell


February 29, 2000

count one more vote against the 1-Click patent

Greg Matthews


February 29, 2000

I don't agree with patents

Vladimir T▀mara


February 29, 2000

Sorry Amazon, my company often purchased technical books from you, but now we will be using your competitors only. Give up these silly and unenforceable patent applications. You're losing goodwill at the fastest rate I've ever seen.

Jason Rhino


February 29, 2000

One more against Amazon's 1-Click patent...

Ryan Marsh


February 29, 2000

Lars Olof Norell


February 29, 2000

I've purchased material from Amazon in the past...needless to say I've since gone elsewhere.

Chris Friesen


February 29, 2000

Amazon's behaviour with regards to this issue has been nothing short of eye-opening. I won't be buying from them again.

Simon Cross


February 29, 2000

I am a big fan of the many features of the Amazon site. I will continue to use it to help me best decide which goods I should buy elsewhere.

Rob Hodges


February 29, 2000

As web-site creators we should have been customers of Amazon's technical books. Now, however, Amazon is positioning itself as an agressive competitor.

Pieter Nagel


February 29, 2000

Stuart Scott


February 29, 2000

I used to think Jeff understood. Apparently the money has helped to rot his brain. Sad. Looks like FatBrain (and others) will get my business.

Jeremy D. Zawodny


February 29, 2000

I agree entirely with Tim's letter and would like amazon to know that since I've started boycotting them I've baught for 400$ of books at fatbrain.com

David Bourget


February 29, 2000

I too, will not buy from Amazon anymore as 1-click ordering doesn't deserve a patent and Amazon are, as Tim O'Reilly put it, simple thiefs just glossing up a true invention.

Pawel Wiechowski


February 29, 2000

Software Patents are a bad thing.

Heath Albritton


February 29, 2000

I have recommended purchases by my firm of many hundreds of dollars at Amazon, both in the US and in Europe. Henceforth, when possible, I will direct my purchases elsewhere.

Luca Lizzeri


February 29, 2000

I am a big supporter of Amazon but a bigger supporter of a free and open internet environment. If there is no let up in the patent business strategy then I will take my purchassing power elsewhere.

Murray Littlejohn


February 29, 2000

It's amazing that such a great service should be acting like such total jerk-offs.

Jacek Surazski


February 29, 2000

As a customer of Amazon.com, a shareholder, and a 10 year veteran (is 10 years long enough) of the software industry (4 with Microsoft) I completely agree with the protest against Amazon's patent of a 'patently' obvious and existing technology.

Brian O'Grady


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com needs to learn to compete based on its merits, not with its lawyers. It's greedy abuse of the patent system is a threat to all e-commerce sites, and the Internet as a whole. I just withdrew my Home-Automation.org website from their affiliates program.

David Orr


February 29, 2000

I too have spent a tidy sum at Amazon.com over the past few years, and have had, until now, only good things to say about the company, but no longer. I believe there is a danger Amazon will eventually, with the US patent office's approbation, render "cookies" of little use to anyone but themselves, by continuing to patent trivial applications of their use.

James Bailie


February 29, 2000

I'm an Amazon.com customer, as are my wife and brother; we're all buying from your competition instead until you change your position. What's more, I'm an Amazon.com associate, and I'm withdrawing from the program until you reconsider. They say it takes a big man to admit when he's wrong. Will you be that man?

Scott Maxwell


February 29, 2000

As a firm believer in the opportunities afforded to entrepreneurs in the USA, it grieves me to see the patent system abused. Moreover, it is disappointing to see the ones who have benefited the most trying to shut the door behind themselves so that others may not enter. I too will take my business elsewhere.

Christian Price


February 29, 2000

I've recieved a few books through your service in the past, and was not disapointed with the speed and ease of your service. But you aren't the only bookstore in town and I (and many of my friends) believe in voting with our money, if you continue applying for and enforcing these absurd patents I will continue buying books at barns & noble and my neighborhood bookstores.

woodruff burley


February 29, 2000

O'Reilly have made more money from the Open Sores bigots and rabid morons on /. than anyone else. So its no big surprise to see the arch hypocrit Tim O-high-and-mighty-Reilly attack Amazon. When was the last time O'Reilly did something original. Tim's attack on Amazon is as typically hypicritical as the rest of the fucking morons chanting the Open Sores mantra

Anonymous


February 29, 2000

I've purchased a lot of books and CDs from Amazon.com since it was launched. I actually felt some loyalty to them because I'd always thought of them as pioneers of a new type of business. This loyalty factor was strong enough to keep me going back even though I knew of other online booksellers that had better prices for the same merchandise. But no more - this patent business disgusts me. I'm probably not going back no matter what happens from here on.

Chetan Rai


February 29, 2000

</i>I have spent and directed thousands of dollars towards Amazon.com since 1997. I am very disappointed in Amazon's behavior and abuse of what's left of the patent system. I encourage you to release the patents for trivialities to the public domain. I will be taking my business to <a href="http://www.fatbrain.com">FatBrain</a> and other competitors of yours in the future. Thanks, Tim, for providing such an eloquent voice to the issue.

Steve Watt


February 29, 2000

Since I've become aware of this issue, I have placed all of book orders with a competitor.

Thor Sigvaldason


February 29, 2000

Integrity is an important matter and something that shows through in a million forms, especially if you don't have it. You can bet Amazon would be howling like a banshee if Barnes & Noble managed to snooker the PTO with a similar unconscionable patent claim. If they'll act this way on patents why should we expect better of them in the book selling, credit card handling, or employee handling arenas where we are asked to trust in their good sense and consideration for what's good, right, and true?

Brian K. Yoder


February 29, 2000

I've spent far more than I can afford over the last two years at amazon.com and amazon.co.uk, but I will not be spending any more until this silly patent idea is dropped. Amazon: You're brilliant, and I'm going to miss you. PLEASE drop this action, and go back to beating the competition on your own merits. You can do it, easily. Your prices, service and attitude have been outstanding even to countries as far away as New Zealand, and we're really going to miss the convenience and cusstomer service that you have offered in the past.

Bernadette Mooney


February 29, 2000

I completely agree with Tim (O'Reilly)that upholding the 1-click patent will be causing a wind of very ill will towards Amazon. Amazon is one of my examples which i used to point out that the web is a viable commerce platform. All the commotion around Amazon patent filing is getting in the way of this. People i speak to are only seeing the troubles around Amazon and not the company behind it. So now i use Amazon as an example how NOT to do bussines on the web. I'm not happy with that because i'd rather speak good about others. I hope you will turn back on your track and find the right road again. Make me speak good things about Amazon again...

Walther Ligtvoet


February 29, 2000

I am an internet "old timer." I have been using the internet at school and in my personal life for what is now half my life; and I have just recently gotten over my reservations about online commerce. Needless to say, I was disgusted by your company's attempt to patent such a simple, non-proprietary concept. Before I had heard of your patent, I had only purchased one item from your bookstore (An O'Reilly book, by coincidence.) Now, needless to say, I will refrain from purchasing anything from your company at least until you drop your attempt to appropriate this idea. I am a forgiving person by nature, so when you finally come to your senses and drop this pointless venture, I will likely have business with your company again. Until then, I implore you to look at what you are doing, and how it is affecting your customer base. While even bad press is some press; I have noticed in my time that politically-minded geeks are among the most strong willed individuals out there.

Ed Hurtley


February 29, 2000

Stephen Judd


February 29, 2000

R. Joe Cooper


February 29, 2000


February 29, 2000

Gert Steenssens


February 29, 2000

Steven L Fines


February 29, 2000

I endorse the open letter.

Tom Backer Johnsen


February 29, 2000

It is unfortunate that an innovative company such as Amazon.com has to resort to such obvious and distasteful business practices. I stopped giving you my business when you patented the 1-click purchase idea. I encourage others who have not already done so, to do the same.

Craig Kohtz


February 29, 2000

George Baptista


February 29, 2000

I was trying to think of something funny and witty to say. Then I realised, I don't need to. I'm a valid and funny person anyway. Witty comment or no witty comment. I think I reached a higher plane of existance tonight, thank you, Amazon.com, for driving me to this higher level of existance. Now, could you too, rise yourself above what the PHB's (Pointy Haired Bosses) and marketing-type-people tell you and reach my level of existance? Rise above the moronic and highly stupid patents on implementations of cookies! Become enlightened! Oh ... And ... Pull the stick out of your butts and look at the big picture, the picture you're attempting to strangle ...

Vince Stratful


February 29, 2000

NC, USA

B. Kelly


February 29, 2000

Amazon's attempt to create artificial barriers to e-commerce is detestable. I had a book order in transit when I first read about it -- when the books arrived, I promptly sent them back. Mr. O'Reilly's position on this issue is a perfect summation of the facts. While I admire Amazon's *true* innovations (one-click is not one of them), I cannot and will not buy from a company that abuses the patent system and stifles innovation.

Art Cancro


February 29, 2000

After the RMS announcement I've stopped buying from amazon. This equates out to ~250/mo in books/cds.

Mike Skoog


February 29, 2000

Darlene Wallach


February 29, 2000

Joona Koponen


February 29, 2000

Magne Alvheim


February 29, 2000

It is disturbing to see that the "Man of the Year", and his company, are doing their best to stifle innovation and creativity. If this patent nonsense continues as Amazon would have it, internet development will slow to a crawl. Mr. Bezos, please walk down the hall, talk to your developers, and listen to what they have to say. As members of the IT community, I'm sure they would agree that agressively "defending" this patent is not in Amazon's (or the world's) long-term interest.

Kevin Miller


February 29, 2000

IP protection is an inherent part of a healthy free economy, but spuriously patenting mere implementations of currently existing technology is harmful to that goal in that it dilutes the value of the system. Such patents are a short term goal with an eventual destructive end.

Christopher Hallaxs


February 29, 2000

Jess Have


February 29, 2000

I was thinking of getting a cd from Amazon.com. That is untill Hank the Angry Drunken Dwarf told me that they went and patented 1-Click buying. "How LameÍ", I thought

DLS


February 29, 2000

Tov Are Jacobsen


February 29, 2000

Anthony Botrel


February 29, 2000

Jon Gilkison


February 29, 2000

Martin Hepworth


February 29, 2000

It is unfortunate that an innovative company such as Amazon.com has to resort to such obvious and distasteful business practices. I stopped giving you my business when you patented the 1-click purchase idea. I encourage others who have not already done so, to do the same.

Craig Kohtz


February 29, 2000

The use of these patents will create acid rain in the Amazon basin...

Richard Mazzaferri


February 29, 2000

It's rather disappointing that Amazon chose to resort to these methods.

Lyle Tagawa


February 29, 2000

agreed

ryan schmidt


February 29, 2000

There are better ways of making money than patenting and inforcing blatantly simple processes.

Matt Greenfield


February 29, 2000

This is a great opportunity you are providing to voice our protest over ridiculous patents.

Roberto Pavan


February 29, 2000

This petty attempt at a not so petty theft cannot succeed and can only serve to damage Amazon.coms relations with its customers.

Mike Rose


February 29, 2000

Lawrence Green


February 29, 2000

As a programmer and former Amazon client I feel that their 'patent strategy' is unethical and damaging to me. As a result I won't buy any more goods from Amazon until they abandon this line of conduct.

Ottone Maurizio Grasso


February 29, 2000

I've been boycotting Amazon.com since I heard about this. I have ordered, on three seperate occassions, from an online competitor and will continue to do so; even if I do have to type in my billing and address information each time.

John Ford


February 29, 2000

I have purchased hundreds of dollars worth of books and CDs from Amazon. Even though I value the service provided by Amazon, I will instead opt to purchase from its competitors if 1-click and affiliates patents are not licensed in the public domain

Jonathan Graehl


February 29, 2000

Andreas Mattern, Karlsruhe, Germany


February 29, 2000

I have bought alot of stuff from Amazon but I will reconsider any burchase from now on.. You are loosing a customer here Jeff. Peter J¸nsson

M


February 29, 2000

A good reason to look for alternatives

Peter Hopfgartner


February 29, 2000

Jonathan Moore


February 29, 2000

Until the recent issues with your patent claims came up, I didn't even consider going to your competition - frankly, it wasn't worth the time and energy, not to mention the risk of doing business with an unknown, just to save a few dollars. Congratulations, you've found the only way I can think of to drive me away as a customer without resorting to gross incompetence. In the last 8 months, I've spend over 躀 at amazon.com (I checked). I hope you will reconsider your stance on this issue before my next major book purchase. Once I've taken the time to research and go with another vendor, I'm unlikely to go back. You may not miss my money, but when you multiply it by all of the other business you stand to lose, I suspect it adds up...

Tom Bortels


February 29, 2000

Makes me very discouraged from doing anything for free for the Web, when billionaires feel *they* aren't rich enough to be ethical. Boycott doesn't make people ethical. It makes greedy people behave better for practical reasons. But that's still something.

Alexander Chilsenko


February 29, 2000

I was dismayed to learn from http://cnnfn.com/1999/10/22/bizbuzz/amazon/ and http://slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=99/10/22/0959240 that you are suing barnsandnoble.com for the violation of your frivolous 1-click patent. I have used your service on several occasions in the past and found it relatively convenient, but not particularily cost effective. Now you are attacking a competitor which does a better job, in my experience, of sourcing hard to find books. On what charge? A violation of a patent which takes the idea of calling up a store where I am known, asking them to send me an order and bill my account, and translates that idea into an internet context. The engineering side of the picture is no doubt of high quality, but was never worthy of a patent. Granted it was the USPTO which granted this valueless patent, and I understand it's value for defensive purposes, but to take this patent and use it for attack purposes subverts the intention of patents in a system of free enterprise, particularly with respect to the open architecture of the Internet. I find myself with no choice than to stop using your service unless and until you withdraw this lawsuit. I may not come back even if you do stop the lawsuit. As you may have noticed, your competitors are actually _competing_ instead of trying to bully themselves into a dominant position with underhanded tactics.

Michael Cope


February 29, 2000

I have purchased numerous books and other items from amazon.com in the last year or so. I was a loyal customer to amazon because they provided a convienient way of shopping and a reliable service at very competitive prices. In the last month alone I have purchased several hundred dollars worth of books from amazon's competitors due to my disgust with this patent on 1-click "technology." Amazon, I request that you stop abusing a faulty patent system and embrace the community that made you what you are today. If you do that, you will regain my loyalty as a customer. -Matt Elder

Matthew M Elder


February 29, 2000

I have been a strong supporter of Amazon (through lots of purchases), but believe very strongly that their 1-click patent was wrongly granted. By enforcing it they are just compounding their error. The only way I can show my displeasure that will actually affect Amazon is to stop buying from them. So, I have done this. I am finding many other excelletn providers of the services that Amazon offers. They may not bundle it all up in one nice site, but they are out there. I hope, for Amazon's sake, that they give this patent to the public before they lose too many customers to competition.

Scott Hinckley


February 29, 2000

Just wanted to let you know that I will cease my habit of buying 贄+/month from Amazon, and will attempt to dissuade my friends from doing so as well until you demonstrate an interest in the furtherance of the community which has made your entire business model possible. Where would you be without Apache, Perl, Bind, HTTP, and HTML?

Michael Granger


February 29, 2000

I also in the past have spent quite a bit of money at Amazon, but not a dime since I heard of their patent policy. I have instead spent several hundreds of dollars at other stores, and will continue to do so as long as Amazon continues these policies. Pity that when I expressed my concerns to Amazon all I got back was an auto-reply.

Jeremy Blosser


February 29, 2000

I used to support Amazon because they were the underdogs, and were doing something completely revolutionary, and upending the monopoly of horrific bookstores like B&N etc. Now they're just another corporate bully, they have become what they conquered. I think it's really sad, and I'm personally going to be doing all my book buying from www.powells.com instead..

Bryan Burns


February 29, 2000

I feel sorry for Amazon, I'm sure that there are lawyers right now sharpening their class action knifes.

Bill Pickett


February 29, 2000

You've lost another customer......

Benjamin MacIntyre


February 29, 2000

I spent well over 񘈨 at amazon.com last year but I refuse to spend another dime until they rethink their patent strategy.

John F. Dumas


February 29, 2000

Damn near every CD and book I've bought in the past couple of years has been ordered from Amazon.com. Not after today. I just opened accounts with fatbrain.com and Barnes and Noble. Amazon has lost my business.

Bill Beal


February 29, 2000

Dear Mr. Bezos: A great man once said that if he saw further than other men, it was because he stood on the shoulders of giants. Sounds to me like you just want to stand there to block the view of the folks behind you. I sincerely hope you see that you are doing the wrong thing. If you don't know why it's wrong, please reread RMS's and Tim O'Rielly's letters on the subject. BTW, you wouldn't happen to have the URL of a mirror for the DeCSS, would you? Thanks for your attention in this matter, and I look forward to the news that you've come to your senses. Too bad I won't read about it, or anything else, on amazon.com.

Jim Sullivan


February 29, 2000

Being a web developer myself, I find your "One Click" patent to be one of the sillier things I've seen in quite some time. Patenting the blatantly obvious serves no purpose except to erode the openness and free exchange of ideas that are so central to the success of the Web. If this sort of thing continues, it will only come back to haunt you, as your competitors will file their own "defensive" patents for equally un-original ideas and continue the vicious cycle. The only sensible thing to do is to stop the potential madness before it begins by dropping this and other e-commerce patent applications and let the Web remain the open environment it has always been. You have also lost yet another customer, Mr. Bezos - thanks, but no thanks.

Bryan Dyck


February 29, 2000

Dear Jeff, I use Amazon a lot, especially amazon.co.uk for UK books not published over here yet. I wholeheartedly agree with all of Tim's points. How about just keeping it as a defensive patent (cf IBM) if you aren't willing to drop your patent claim ? Although I must admit the comments about prior Art and trivial would seem to be true. I would hate to have to withdraw my custom, so please do the right thing. Winton

Winton Davies


February 29, 2000

Jeff - As one of the two programmers you hired to create Amazon.com, I am dismayed that my fears about the use of software patents by the company are coming true. Patents on trivial technology only force other people to waste time working around them, and 1-Click is nothing if not trivial. Please stop using software and process patents to stifle competition. See http://www.op.net/~pbd/amazon-1click.html for a longer statement. Paul Barton-Davis

Paul Barton-Davis


February 29, 2000

If Windows hadn't been so crash prone and so obtuse and obscure when it came to fixing problems, I probably wouldn't have bothered to start over and learn another OS from the ground up. I'd still rent from Hastings if my drivers license hadn't been rejected and the clerk had at least been able to explain why Hastings would no longer accept 'my' cash. Likewise, I'd still buy books from amazon, if I hadn't been annoyed there as well. I have always done this with businesses and will continue to voice my vote with my purchases. And it does work. Out of business in my town after I started boycotting them: Smiths Home Furnishings, Futureshop, Egghead, Divx, etc. I was just one of many who took our purchases elsewhere, and it is obvious to me that we make a difference.

Kel Hausken


February 29, 2000

David Sirrine


February 28, 2000

Emmanuel M. Dëcarie


February 28, 2000

I am sure amazon.com, like the rest of us, has benefitted from the freedom and the expanse of the opensource universe. Most likely they used some of those building blocks to develope one-click. Why wouldn't they release this little idea to be freely implemented by others? Their attitude indeed will inhibit my shopping preferences now. A shame because I really enjoyed to shop at amazon.

Claudio Peredo


February 28, 2000

My personal website will be using fatbrain.com links for all resource links and I'll be encouraging my employer to make the same bold choice. If they don't I'll edit the web pages for them.. but anywho we will be actively directing traffic away from Amazon.com.

Chris Scharff


February 28, 2000

As a frequent customer of Amazon.com, I strongly encourage you to rethink your 1-Click patent.

Michael Jennings


February 29, 2000

Chris Tilden


February 29, 2000

While I believe the real tragedy is with the misinformed patent office, I support this letter in full.

Frank Schmittroth


February 29, 2000

Frederick Feiger


February 29, 2000

John Hurst


February 29, 2000

How m$ of you, as there is Linux, there is www.noamazon.com

D. Nehring


February 29, 2000

It's unfortunate that Amazon feels it must stoop to such low levels in order to compete. You have lost another customer.

Jeff Larsen


February 29, 2000

Great letter Tim. O'Reilly makes some great books, I own several :) Anyway, I just handed in a paper for my entreprenurism class regarding Amazon's ludicrous patents. It's a shame to see things like this happen on the internet.. I hope that they realize their ignorance and desist from enforcing these patents (though unlikely).

Greg Fodor


February 29, 2000

Hey kids, it's Haiku time: Hey mister Bezos My cash is going elsewhere Your attitude sucks

J. Brian Shumate


February 29, 2000

hey fatbrain.com, here comes another new customer!

Beth Usouski


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com has always acted predatory toward "the little guy" but this really shows their true colors. Patenting the 1-Click system is absurd. Patenting the Associates program is even more so. I was planning to sign up as an Amazon.com associate when I re-designed my web site, but not any more!

Sheila Addison


February 29, 2000

Sean Crowe


February 29, 2000

You need a monopoly if you want to act like Microsoft. I have been a very satisfied Amazon.com customer, and hope to be again, but will not buy from you again until you give up this farce. I have a friend who owns a bookstore. I am advising him to sue you for stealing his idea of selling books.

Mike Paparella


February 29, 2000

Ron Allen Hornbaker


February 29, 2000

I have informed Amazon by email, and will state again publicly here, that I will not do any further business with Amazon until they renounce enforcement of their patent on one-click ordering.

Alexander McKinnon


February 29, 2000

It's absurd to think this even could be patented.

David Breakey


February 29, 2000

The rules of Law and the Courtroom should not be a REPLACEMENT for COMMON SENSE, but rather an extension. Common sense tells us that certain things are the property of Man as an intelligent species. Imagine if Trek patented the process of pedalling a bike or if IBM patented the layout of a keyboard. This is dangerous ground.

Joseph Paulchell


February 28, 2000

Carl Chu


February 28, 2000

Mary Chu


February 28, 2000

Tim Sloan


February 28, 2000

K Friesen


February 28, 2000

Mike Soto


February 28, 2000

Don Walker


February 28, 2000

Robert Roy


February 28, 2000

Ben Parees


February 28, 2000

Mike Hardy


February 28, 2000

Philip Suh


February 28, 2000

Don Kukral


February 28, 2000

Avi Bryant


February 28, 2000

Abraham Ro


February 28, 2000

Kevin Wong


February 28, 2000

Billy Teng


February 28, 2000

Lev Bishop


February 28, 2000

Sam Tregar


February 28, 2000

Matt Dalby


February 28, 2000

Seth Yalcin


February 28, 2000

Matz Kolsch


February 28, 2000

Aldo Cimino


February 28, 2000

Mark DuPrey


February 28, 2000

Josh Eckels


February 28, 2000

John Donoso


February 28, 2000

Alex Shiels


February 29, 2000

Looks like I'm shopping bn.com from now on.

Arthur Hart


February 28, 2000

Dan Yagudin


February 28, 2000

Tom Lokovic


February 28, 2000

G A Michael


February 28, 2000

Jeff Bailey


February 28, 2000

Justin Palk


February 28, 2000

Chris Turner


February 28, 2000

Steve Garber


February 28, 2000

Jeff Mayrand


February 28, 2000

Dragan Tubic


February 28, 2000

Paul Telford


February 28, 2000

Jimmy Rimmer


February 28, 2000

Adam Clefton


February 28, 2000

David Whedon


February 28, 2000

Michael Tsai


February 28, 2000

Peter Wiggin


February 28, 2000

Robert Spier


February 28, 2000

Dylan Hasman


February 28, 2000

ronan cremin


February 28, 2000

Richard Croy


February 28, 2000

Craig Watson


February 28, 2000

Brian Albert


February 29, 2000

I fully support Tim O'Reilly's position on your very ill-advised use of patents. By curtailing freedom on the Internet you directly affect your customers, which by definition are internet users. Pissing on your customers has never proven to be a wise marketing policy, not has a chance to become so in the future.

Stefano Lassini


February 28, 2000

Harold Crayon


February 28, 2000

Matt Morrison


February 28, 2000

Daniel Abrams


February 28, 2000

Jeff Klingner


February 28, 2000

Preston Smith


February 28, 2000

Zoltan Sandor


February 28, 2000

John Barnette


February 28, 2000

Stephen Evans


February 28, 2000

Josh Crockett


February 28, 2000

James Bielman


February 28, 2000

Jake Peterson


February 28, 2000

Jody McIntyre


February 28, 2000

Steve Shucker


February 28, 2000

Sten Drescher


February 28, 2000

Steve Lussier


February 28, 2000

Geoff Crompton


February 28, 2000

Gregg Thomason


February 28, 2000

Kevin McCarthy


February 28, 2000

Eric Schneider


February 28, 2000

Ianiv Schweber


February 28, 2000

Jeremy Hedley


February 28, 2000

alex verhoeven


February 28, 2000

Patrick Hunter


February 28, 2000

Stephen Taylor


February 28, 2000

Timothy McKane


February 28, 2000

Stephen Bowman


February 28, 2000

Dominic Carney


February 28, 2000

Mark McWhorter


February 28, 2000

Dave Liebreich


February 28, 2000

Reuben Partida


February 28, 2000

Mark Chaikelson


February 28, 2000

Dan Orzechowski


February 28, 2000

Brian Naberhuis


February 28, 2000

Nicholas Lawler


February 28, 2000

David J. Wilson


February 28, 2000

Jennifer Gurbin


February 28, 2000

Peter Lundqvist


February 28, 2000

Michael Dowling


February 28, 2000

Nathaniel Price


February 28, 2000

Mark Drzycimski


February 28, 2000

Steven Versteeg


February 29, 2000

I also will boycott Amazon until the give up their patent.

zachary sung


February 29, 2000

I've bought a lot of stuff from them in the past, but I support RMS's boycott of Amazon and won't buy anything from them until this problem is resolved.

Daniel M. Carolin


February 28, 2000

Jonathan Paulett


February 28, 2000

Nicklas Karlsson


February 28, 2000

Roberto Castillo


February 28, 2000

David G. Churchill


February 28, 2000

Enough.

Mark Silvia


February 28, 2000

Kevin Micheal Smith


February 28, 2000

Daniel Craig Giffen


February 28, 2000

Simon Anderson

pranshu


February 28, 2000

Well said.

Scott Sotka


February 28, 2000

Todd Yocum


February 28, 2000

Dr. George U. Zimmerman


February 28, 2000

Till Otto


February 28, 2000

Amy Link


February 28, 2000

Mark Atwood


February 28, 2000

Paul Nakata


February 29, 2000

I made my last Amazon purchase---until this patent insanity is curtailed. Thank goodness it's easy to take my business to Barnes & Noble. What's more, I'm going to do my best to convince my family and friends to do likewise. With customer goodwill the only real proprietary commodity on the web, is Amazon's strategy a good one? I doubt it.

Steve Strickland


February 28, 2000

Jay Schomer


February 28, 2000

August Mueller


February 28, 2000

Vlad Podgurschi


February 28, 2000

Daniel Leinker


February 28, 2000

Bob Harman


February 28, 2000

Rob Walker


February 28, 2000

Daniel Leinker


February 28, 2000

Gene Novark


February 28, 2000

Richard Li


February 28, 2000

Chris Lynch


February 28, 2000

Carter Page


February 28, 2000

Brian Cocks


February 28, 2000

Sandy Lopez


February 28, 2000

Greg Brown


February 28, 2000

down with Amazon!

Nick Roth


February 28, 2000

Steve Ivy


February 28, 2000

Jim Evins


February 28, 2000

Eric Norige


February 28, 2000

Andrew Eiler


February 28, 2000

Matt Grommes


February 28, 2000

Tommy Williams


February 28, 2000

Sam Black


February 28, 2000

Rima S. Regas


February 28, 2000

Ben Prater


February 28, 2000

Chris Wright


February 28, 2000

Sam Black


February 28, 2000

Sam Black


February 28, 2000

Sam Black


February 28, 2000

Brett Roper


February 28, 2000

Thomas Joynt


February 28, 2000

Craig Gulow


February 28, 2000

P. Rogers


February 28, 2000

Matt Dew


February 28, 2000

Jason O'Brien


February 28, 2000

Ben Johnson


February 28, 2000

Morgan Jones


February 28, 2000

Greg Titus


February 28, 2000

Michael Birk


February 28, 2000

Perry Lorier


February 28, 2000

John Dunn


February 28, 2000

Daniel Brooks


February 28, 2000

Fight the Power!

John Kasinger


February 28, 2000

Alan Jaffray


February 28, 2000

Jim Matthews


February 28, 2000

Samuel Gibbs


February 28, 2000

Derek Warren


February 28, 2000

Fidelis Orozco


February 28, 2000

Geoff Janjua


February 28, 2000

Gerry Chu


February 28, 2000

Jeff Noxon


February 28, 2000

Mariano Belinky


February 28, 2000

Luke Stroven


February 28, 2000

Tero Turtiainen


February 28, 2000

Kenneth Baker


February 28, 2000

Luke Shulenburger


February 28, 2000

Martijn Pieters


February 28, 2000

PJ Fancher


February 28, 2000

Barry F Margolius


February 28, 2000

Piotr Kaminski


February 28, 2000

Dr. Edmund Weitz


February 28, 2000

peter dapkus


February 28, 2000

Tod McQuillin


February 28, 2000

Chris Recoskie


February 29, 2000

Jeff, Since you've already made a bundle and a half for yourself, maybe you should start thinking about the legacy thing.

Ken Losey


February 29, 2000

Turnabout or no, I will never become an Amazon customer now.

Stephen Krauth


February 28, 2000

Michael Spriggs


February 28, 2000

Greg Dunlap


February 28, 2000

Ben Buchwald


February 28, 2000

Brett Poulin


February 28, 2000

Mike Champion


February 28, 2000

Ryan Goldberg


February 28, 2000

Shaji Sebastian


February 28, 2000

RJones


February 28, 2000

Mars Saxman


February 28, 2000

Joe Hootman


February 28, 2000

Mike Hansen


February 28, 2000

David Radcliffe


February 28, 2000

Jonathan Blow


February 28, 2000

Justin P. Miller


February 28, 2000

Paul Lavelle


February 28, 2000

Kenton Varda


February 28, 2000

Anthony Ramos


February 28, 2000

Robert Walsh


February 28, 2000

Mark Frazer


February 28, 2000

Stephen A. Smith


February 28, 2000

Brian Deitte


February 28, 2000

Evan Jeffrey


February 28, 2000

Conley Roberts


February 28, 2000

Geoffry Dison


February 28, 2000

james lorenzo


February 28, 2000

Matthew Finnigan


February 28, 2000

Ross A Knepper


February 28, 2000

Peter Merholz


February 28, 2000

Dane Jackson


February 28, 2000

James Rickard


February 28, 2000

Dan Horwitz


February 28, 2000

Kenneth L. Hamer


February 28, 2000

Michael Hall


February 28, 2000

Michael Hall


February 29, 2000

Jeff, Your firm is a great firm, first in the market, and in my opinion one of the best. I love your small touches, such as the notepads and bookmarks. As you already have heard, a lot of people are not happy with Amazon.com. A lot of loud, talkative people, as evidenced above. I'm one of them. Please stop this if you expect me not to tell everyone I know not to ever buy from you again. Sincerely, Jamie Becker

Jamie Becker


February 29, 2000

Steve Rice


February 28, 2000

Gary Bland


February 28, 2000

Nick Popoff


February 28, 2000

Colin Rowsell


February 28, 2000

Keith Burdis


February 28, 2000

Eddy Talvala


February 28, 2000

Stephen Hamel


February 28, 2000

C. W. Fields


February 28, 2000

Justin B. Smith


February 28, 2000

Andrey Mirtchovski


February 28, 2000

Albert Geyser


February 28, 2000

James Street


February 28, 2000

Keith Calvert Ivey


February 28, 2000

Jonathan R. Schwanbeck


February 28, 2000

rob casson


February 28, 2000

Ben Slusky


February 28, 2000

Kris J. Zaragoza


February 28, 2000

Angus Davis


February 28, 2000

R. Long


February 28, 2000

Aaron Kimball


February 28, 2000

Dan Bowman


February 28, 2000

Chuck Boyce


February 28, 2000

Lukasz Salwinski, PhD


February 28, 2000

Sumit Daftuar


February 28, 2000

Brendan Humphreys


February 28, 2000

Antony Courtney


February 28, 2000

Abraham Thomas


February 28, 2000

Jeff Wiegand


February 28, 2000

Luke Tymowski


February 28, 2000

Christopher Volz


February 28, 2000

Jon Schweitzer


February 28, 2000

Theodore C. Csernica


February 28, 2000

Jon Hamkins


February 28, 2000

Brad Cavanagh


February 28, 2000

Olivier Pelletier


February 28, 2000

Bill Barth


February 28, 2000

Keith Howanitz


February 29, 2000

Ryan Robbins


February 29, 2000

What can be said that hasn't been said, and even shouted, by many other people? I believe in patents; I think they're a good thing. However, trying, successfully at that, to patent well-known prior art is ridiculous. In fact, it's theft and should be illegal.

Matthew Julius


February 28, 2000

Galen Silversmith


February 28, 2000

John Van Voorhies


February 28, 2000

Scott Benish


February 28, 2000

Daniel Arbuckle


February 28, 2000

Aaron Moshiashwili


February 28, 2000

Charles Ballowe


February 28, 2000

Daniel Morrison


February 28, 2000

Joseph Reves


February 28, 2000

Robert Impollonia


February 28, 2000

Michael Nunamaker


February 28, 2000

Michael Sheldon


February 28, 2000

Jacob Childress


February 28, 2000

Glenda R. Snodgrass


February 28, 2000

Chuck Lundgren


February 28, 2000

Andrew McCormick


February 28, 2000

Michael Strasser


February 28, 2000

Alan Grossfield


February 28, 2000

Paul A. Armstorng


February 28, 2000

David C. Mills, Esq.


February 28, 2000

Dave Wilkinson


February 28, 2000

Eric Beaurivage


February 28, 2000

Good letter tim!

Rick Segal


February 28, 2000

Matthew Franklin


February 28, 2000

Well said, Tim.

Chris Maroney


February 28, 2000

David Aspinall


February 28, 2000

Maurice C. Parker


February 28, 2000

it has got to stop!

Robert DeFusco


February 28, 2000

Very nice letter. Right to the point.

John SMith


February 28, 2000

see also http://www.nowebpatents.com

Micah Alpern


February 28, 2000

Down with stupid patents!

emad


February 28, 2000

What Tim said.

David Boroditsky


February 28, 2000

David B. Harris


February 28, 2000

Relent. It's making you lose customers.

Matt Willis


February 28, 2000

<AOL>me too</AOL>

Randall Hansen


February 28, 2000

Might as well patent the question mark.

Andrew Burton


February 28, 2000

End the patent bogosity!

Shaun Lawson


February 28, 2000

Absurd!

patrick breitenbach


February 28, 2000

Others have said it all ...

Don Wright


February 28, 2000

I agree with all of Tim O'Reily's points.

marc mandel


February 28, 2000

remember, you sell because of sympathie!

Stefan Berndt


February 28, 2000

Paul Turpie, Brian Dunn Ford


February 28, 2000

information should be free

Neil Harrington


February 28, 2000

Amazon... come on... get a clue!

Mark Wagner


February 28, 2000

Web patents are evil and shouldnt be awarded.

Brandon Johnson


February 28, 2000

This is ridiculous! I think I'll patent rendering HTML!

Eric Pree


February 28, 2000

I have bought my last book from Amazon.

Tim Josling


February 28, 2000

I do not believe in software patents.

Mike Tocci


February 29, 2000

Sean Hannan


February 28, 2000

www.fatbrain.com www.bn.com

Chris Kuklewicz


February 29, 2000

Looks like I'll be shopping and barnesandnoble.com for the forseeable future! Too bad ... your site used to be one of my favorites.

M. McLoughlin


February 29, 2000

The internet has always been so enticing because of its lack of set boundaries and limits. This patent could go a long way to changing that for the worse.

Evan Eckersley


February 29, 2000

What Amazon is doing is retarded. How many enemies are they waiting to have before they realize this isn't a good idea? We're not likely to easily forget this.

Mark Cidade


February 29, 2000

The Amazon patents will not stand up under a review of prior art. I encourage a moratorium on software patents until new guidelines for the review process have been put into place.

Kent Dorsey


February 29, 2000

I count myself among those who have chosen to boycott your company and I continuously urge others to join this boycott. Please reverse your stand on the patent issue so that I can once again feel good about the service you offer customers like myself...

Jack William Bell


February 29, 2000

I, like most of the people on this list, am a technology buff. I read books and I work with computers, specifically web application developement. However, I won't be buying my computers books from Amazon any longer, and if I can help it, neither will any of my friends, associates, or family. Amazon, come on now, are you guys serious? 1 Click Order?

Aaron Johnson


February 29, 2000

It's discouraging that a www pioneer like Amazon would behave in such a petty, greedy way. I remember when buying a book about Linux or Perl from amazon.com felt like a revolution, an amazing experience of access to technology, information, merchandise via the web and all the technologies that built it. Now buying the same book from amazon.com would feel like a betrayal.

Brenda Haugaard


February 29, 2000

The 1-click patent evokes a "this can't be" sentiment that is the flip side of the notion of a "miracle" attached to a truly landmark new invention. Trivial - as in basic, fundamental - things indeed can be patented IF they are new and if they involve an inventive step. The more fundamental the claimed invention seems to be, the more everyone needs to ask the question: was this unknown to mankind, is there genius at work here ? The sooner someone forces a court to respond to that question regarding the 1-click patent (and many other overarching "software" or "business method" patents), the better. Intellectual property is an exception from the regular rule of free-for-all competition. Its scope must be kept in check.

Timo Ruikka


February 29, 2000

Christopher Smith


February 29, 2000

Igor Shpak


February 29, 2000

Adam Glass


February 29, 2000

Igor Shpak


February 29, 2000

Tracy Boland


February 29, 2000

Sven Riedel


February 29, 2000

Dan Newman


February 29, 2000

Joe Robins


February 28, 2000

I think this is a horrible misuse of USPTO.

Al Brown


February 29, 2000

Michelle Brose


February 28, 2000

So sorry to see the well being poisoned!

William T. Hole


February 29, 2000

Brandon Harris


February 28, 2000

</i></b>Such a great example of Hypocrasy.

Brett Nash


February 29, 2000

Dmitri Poujlivyi


February 29, 2000

Michael Pullen


February 29, 2000

Andrew Lenharth


February 29, 2000

I have changed my name in amazon.com's database to "No One-Click Patent". If others do the same, their database admins can easily see how many of their former (and present) customers oppose this action.

Jonathan Sari


February 29, 2000

Boycotting Amazon.com AND Jim Bezos indefinitely.

Johan Bager


February 29, 2000

Brad Wallace


February 28, 2000

As Tim O'Reilly says, stop pissing in the well.

Rafe Colburn


February 28, 2000

Well said, Tim, keep up the good work!

Bruce Linton


February 29, 2000

Giles Lean


February 28, 2000

Absurd! Patrick Breitenbach

patrick breitenbach


February 29, 2000

I've been boycotting Amazon for over a month because of this issue. Sigh.

Jessica Perry Hekman


February 28, 2000

Software patents? Maybe... but not for something obvious.

Stefan Burkhardt


February 29, 2000

Remember that your 'early adopters' CAN make or break a new paradigm. Remember DIVX?

Douglas R. Oosting


February 29, 2000

Christopher Jordan


February 29, 2000

Patrick Wolf


February 29, 2000

Pride and greed come before the downfall. I hope to never be forced to purchase from a company working hard snuff out competition.

Triston Whetten


February 29, 2000

Amazon, remove my cookie from your oven! Amazon should not indulge in jungle warfare by trying to kill the entrepreneurial development of e-commerce by using the US Patent Office and miring the industry in the typical US over-dependence of lawyers and their kin. I started e-shopping with you at Christmas and will now divert to Barnes and Noble who do not employ such draconiam measures to stultify trade and pad the pockets of attorneys even further.

Barbara Watson


February 29, 2000

The Amazon patent is a sad abuse of an old system which cannot move fast enough to keep up with the current advances in technology.

Jason Alexander


February 29, 2000

You've lost my business to B&N

Irfan Mohammed


February 29, 2000

Your company has benifited immensely from the open architecture of the WWW. Why are you now trying to destroy this openness?

Martin O'Connor


February 29, 2000

Your company has benefited immensely from the open architecture of the WWW. Why are you now trying to destroy this openness?

Martin O'Connor


February 29, 2000

Fred Boak


February 29, 2000

Taylor Cavnar


February 29, 2000

Amazon = "Microsoft Jr". Come on guys, are these patents really necessary? I've been an Amazon fan from day one, but this has radically changed my opinion.

Mike Stamp


February 28, 2000

Free code and free information == free market and free America

Bart Cilfone


February 29, 2000

I refuse to be held up by exploitatitive practices. Because the administration of the law is an ass, does not give you the right to destroy this medium.

Michael Merwitz


February 29, 2000

Like so many others, I find Amazon's recent mis-use of the patent system to be offensive and short-sighted. I have not ordered anything from Amazon since I heard about the 1-click patent.

William Dyson


February 28, 2000

A noble effort, Mr. O'Reilly. Best of luck.

Carlos Salgado


February 29, 2000

Another formerly satisfied Amazon customer who'll be driving down to Barnes and Noble, or clicking to fatbrain.com for my book fix. Hope you guys don't mind losing the extra 񘈨 a year. Drop it. Drop it now.

Kris Newman


February 29, 2000

I've been a huge supporter of Amazon.com and I prefer them over B&N, etc. Not any more. This patent is ridiculous and is obviously just a money-making scheme. Amazon.com will no longer get my business.

Carl Johnson


February 28, 2000

Please act like adults - you should be ashamed of yourself.

Norman Richards


February 29, 2000

Since this patent issue was raised, I have stopped buying at Amazon.com. I have now spent close to 赨 at alternative book sites, and will continue to "vote with my pocketbook" until Amazon.com stops this foolishness.

Brent Fulgham


February 29, 2000

Well...I can tell you I won't be buying anything from Amazon.com anymore. It is sad that things have come to this point in the internet community, which used to be so open. I'm making sure everyone I know doesn't use amazon.com again.

Andrew Lewis


February 29, 2000

Until amazon.com changes its patent policies, it is no longer an asset to the net...

J. Bradford DeLong


February 28, 2000

I agree. I am no longer an amazon.com customer.

George Hart


February 29, 2000

I now use other vendors to purchase products that I might have purchased from Amazon. This will continue until they stop, period! I urge others to boycott the Amazon Web Site and any affiliated Web Sites. I hope that Amazon "feels" this where it hurts. On their bottom line.

Sean Rolinson


February 29, 2000

I had recently considered joining the affiliate program. I will not be joining that program, and I will avoid shopping at the amazon.com site because of the improper patent requests and approvals.

Matthew D. Rider


February 28, 2000

Jeff, count me off your customer base until you come to your senses.

Alan Morris


February 29, 2000

As Tim stated, the most shocking aspect of this is how insulting these patents are to the thousands of people who built the web and the Internet. Amazon must realize that if any one of those people had not believed in an open system of free exchange, Amazon would simply not exist.

Dan McCormick


February 28, 2000

I agree with Scott McCoy; put the patent in the public domain.

Yoritaka Sakakura


February 29, 2000

Why should I bother with this crap when Fatbrain is around and is just as good, if not better? I have purchased from Amazon before, but will not do so again. You still have a chance to redeem yourself before the world; take it before you lose any more business.

Mark Stanford


February 29, 2000

I've spent well over ũ,000 on Amazon in the past year. Not any more. Sorry, Jeff, but that inane laugh just can't cover up you limp business model and the rapacious greed the rush to patent everything from electricity to magnetism. You have been de-boomarked and un-favoritized. Change your ways and we can talk.

Gerard Van der Leun


February 28, 2000

Yet another successful company conveniently forgetting its roots...

Dave McLaughlin


February 29, 2000

I won't be giving my credit card to Amazon until they drop this insanity. Patents on cookie applications and affiliate programs are like copyrights on words in common usage. The patent office and Mr. Bezos need to pull their heads out and recognize what is common, obvious and simple application of existing, public domain technology.

Linda J. Laubenheimer


February 29, 2000

As an Amazon customer I am appalled at your total disregard for your customers. Since you insist on pissing in our well (the internet), I will do everything in my power to piss in yours. I will dissuade everyone I know from buying from your company. There are plenty of other reputable companies to do business with and they are only "1-click" away on the net.

Robert Lee Gage


February 29, 2000

I, like many IT professionals, buy a lot of books. In the past, I have been pleased to visit Amazon.com for most of my purchases. Since this patent issue has come up, however, I have ceased buying from your site(as have my friends and associates), and will continue to do so until this issue is resolved in a rational manner(ie. You reliquish this silly patent and cease your injunction against B&N.)

Forest Zachman


February 29, 2000

Wholesale patent-grabbing of web marketing methods that are obvious and non-innovative is not only greedy, but short-sighted as well. Amazon is already a strong competitor and a leader in its field; why resort to underhanded techniques that will only garner a mountain of bad publicity and ill will? Drop the patents and help foster the openness of the net that has been its hallmark since its inception.

Claude Martins


February 29, 2000

Mr Bezos: The US Patent office has shown itself time again to be unable to understand the complexities of computer science and development. Given that situation it is perfectly understandable that a company would patent any idea or technology coming out of its own development shop to avoid patent infringement suits from less scrupulous competitors. When a company such as yours uses one of these obviously bogus patents as a weapon against another market player then it ceases to be a competitor and becomes a predator on the entire market place

Chuck Ford


February 29, 2000

I am disappointed in Amazon.com's lack of concern for the effects of their actions. The action of even filing for such a patent, and patents like is, is sheer pettiness. Amazon.com is exploiting a weakness in US Patent Law. The laws were not intended to be used in this manner. Until this patent is overturned, Amazon.com has lost my business as well.

Amy Schechter


February 29, 2000

I agree that the patents that Amazon.com has received are anti-competitive and violate the principles upon which the internet is founded *if* they are enforced. I can understand filing the patents to prevent the techniques from being locked down, but to use these patents to stifle competition is unethical. I have purchased from Amazon.com in the past, but all of my online book purchases will go to their competitors until they reverse their policy of intimidation and anti-competitive behavior. I will also do my best to influence those around me to do the same.

Greg Shoults


February 29, 2000

I have shopped exclusively for books at Amazon since I made my first web purchase years ago. Over the years I've spent quite a bit of money, and have referred countless people to your service. Now it seems that you've gone the way of the soulless book chains (Barnes and Nobles, Borders, etc.). It was bad enough that you let your publishers write the "staff reviews" of books, but this patent nonsense takes the cake (both the 1-Click and Affiliates programs). Until you rescind these lawsuits and give up your spurious patents, I'll be shopping at FatBrain and Powells. - Jesse

Jesse Ephraim


February 29, 2000

As a developer working within the Open Source Movement, I am discusted with Amazon's heavy-handed abuse of the trust relationship we all try to build and benefit from. It shows just what truly motivates Bezos & crew. I'm disappointed and will am showing my support through the purchase of books, music, etc. via resellers.

Brant Fagan


February 29, 2000

I have been a fan and regular customer of Amazon.com in the past. I love your customer service, your site is extremely well laid out and easy to use. A shining example of e-commerce. But I cannot accept your recent actions with regard to these frivolous patents. I cannot imagine what you hope to accomplish by this. You know very well that these patents should never have been granted in the first place, and will not be upheld in the long run. Your actions remind me of a particular dove in a nearby park where I go to feed the birds sometimes. This one dove is so intent on having it all for himself, he spends all his time running around chasing off the other birds, and thus never gets anything to eat! Knock off this inane pettiness and concentrate on what you do best.

Alan Little


February 29, 2000

I have bought books worth about Ū,700 from amazon in the last 3 yrs. Amazon has provided an amazingly convenient service at an affordable price (I value the service more even if some of the books might be over-priced compared to other sites). I agree with Tim that for this reason, Amazon should be able to stand on its own feet without resorting to enforcing trivial patents. It goes without saying that I will no longer buy from Amazon. Ironically enough, the last book I bought from Amazon just before knowing about the patent issue was the O'Reilly published "Open Sources". To all the people who think we should fix the patent system in this country first, I agree with you. However, I guess the rest of us expects Amazon to show some leadership until the time the system does get fixed. So much for a net pioneer! The laws in this country may be so screwed up that you may be able to get away with murder, but the question is would you do so ? Only when you are desperate and have no concern for what your former admirers think of you anymore. Shyjan Mahamud Carnegie Mellon University

Shyjan Mahamud


February 29, 2000

I was (note "was") an early Amazon customer and an early adopter of 1-click. I admit, it's convenient. However, I see *nothing* in this technology that could not have been produced (I certainly will not write "invented") by me or many other software engineers. To consider your appropriation of the cookie mechanism as patentable is patently ludicrous. That the Patent Office actually issued your company a patent for this is a canonical example of governmental cluelessness. If you really want to make lots of money, I suggest you start selling lotion and chapstick to lawyers -- they will need vats of the stuff to heal their chafed skin from rubbing their hands and lips so greedily over this. In the end, you will win little but ill will over this issue. Personally, I urge you to stop. We stand on the shoulders of giants. You could not do what you do had it not been for the free contributions of many, many people. Please respect and support the tradition of free sharing of ideas that has made your success possible. Please do not squander your most precious inheritance. John Tobler

John Tobler


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezoz, what were you thinking??? This cheap attempt to grab the gold given to us all by the pioneers of the internet. Shame on you!! I am including a quote submitted by Mahlon Hollway because it bears repeating, and will surely be quoted and referred to when you are taken to court, as you surely will be. The loss of your business will be your reward. A nice quote from the US supreme court: It was never the object of patent laws to grant a monopoly for every trifling device, every shadow of a shade of an idea, which would naturally and spontaneously occur to any skilled mechanic or operator in the ordinary progress of manufactures. Such an indiscriminate creation of exclusive privileges tends rather to obstruct than to stimulate invention. It creates a class of speculative schemers who make it their business to watch the advancing wave of improvement, and gather its foam in the form of patented monopolies, which enable them to lay a heavy tax on the industry of the country, without contributing anything to the real advancement of the arts. It embarrasses the honest pursuit of business with fears and apprehensions of unknown liability lawsuits and vexatious accounting for profits made in good faith. ¨U.S. Supreme Court, Atlantic Works vs. Brady, 1882

Paul Phillips


February 28, 2000

Wonderful letter, Mr. O'Reilly. Thank you for speaking out.

Robert Neely


February 29, 2000

Jeff, I appreciate the service that Amazon provides to book-readers. However, as an IT professional, I must take issue with your patent on "1-click shopping." It seems such a trivial technology, and I am willing to bet that your site was not even the first to develop it. While I can not completely boycot Amazon due to the wide variety of books that I read, when possible I will be diverty my business to www.bookpool.com and www.fatbrain.com as much as possible. Please reconsider your stance on this issue. You stand to lose a lot of money and gain infamy(not a Good Thing). Jacob Woldstad

Jacob Woldstad


February 28, 2000

Just wanted to add my support against this stupid patent. Fernando

Fernando J. Zapata


February 28, 2000

Amazon is trying to hack off the tree they climbed on.

Ori Pomerantz


February 28, 2000

I am Boycotting Amazon.com until you drop your frivilous patents.

Chris Nelson


February 28, 2000

I value Amazon's services, but I will not buy from a company who acts like this.

Adam Hull


February 28, 2000

Until Amazon stops this nonsense, I'll buy elsewhere. Two words....Prior Art!

Rob Robinson


February 28, 2000

Embarrassingly ridiculous patents being issued to embarrasingly greedy people.

Len MacDonell


February 28, 2000

I'm seriously thinking not buying any book from Amazon.com from now on.

Tao Lu


February 28, 2000

Fatbrain, Barnes and Noble, Borders..they are all looking pretty good right now.

Frank McPherson


February 28, 2000

Biting the hand that feeds you. Even my dog knows better than that.

Tom Jenike


February 28, 2000

I will never purchase items from Amazon. I believe that what you are doing is wrong.

Normand Robert


February 28, 2000

while ($OneClickPatent = $enforced) { $IBuyBooksElsewhere = 1; }

Brian E. Fisher


February 28, 2000

Tim O'Reilly pretty much communicated my thoughts exactly on the issue.

Scott Gray


February 28, 2000

I find myself browsing the brick-and-mortar stores more and more...

Jamie Manley


February 28, 2000

No business from me until enforcement of patents like this one are dropped.

Deke Clinger


February 28, 2000

I believe "one click" ordering is so trivially obvious as to be unpatentable.

Scott Schram


February 28, 2000

Just about a perfect letter. I can't add anything except: "hear, hear"!

Steve Newman


February 28, 2000

Not obvious.. what is amazon thinking? proud user of http://www.noamazon.com

Ken Hahn


February 28, 2000

I have spent well over a thousand dollars at amazon.com; but not any more.

Craig Kelley


February 28, 2000

I hope you realized that you really don't need to play this silly game.

Nicol▀s Lichtmaier


February 28, 2000

Amazon did not develop this technology; Amazon does not own this technology.

Tim Hurley


February 28, 2000

sigh. I ordered quite a bit from amazon - but I guess I'm on to other retailers.

Lawrence Wright


February 28, 2000

i have nothing much to say...it's already been said, and better than i could put it.

Jared Nied


February 28, 2000

I just looked at the patent. Are you kidding? Please do the right thing.

Patrick J. Melody


February 28, 2000

I still can't believe a second lame patent (on the associates program idea) was filed, even after this..

Stuart Lowes


February 28, 2000

This whole pattent deal has made me stop buying from Amazon, and I can only hope that more will do the same.

Cyrus Hall


February 28, 2000

The patent is ludicrous. It shouldn't stand, but if it does, then Amazon should put it in the public domain

Scott McCoy


February 28, 2000

It was a real mistake making Jeff Bezos man of the year. The world needs a different kind of rolemodel.

Marcus Ahlfors


February 28, 2000

What an outrageous abuse of the patent system! I will never EVER buy from amazon.com again.

Chris Baer


February 28, 2000

This is yet another reason to spend your money with local booksellers whenever possible.

Galen Seitz


February 28, 2000

Mr Bezos, I hope your firm's truculence helps consumers reacquaint themselves with their local bookstores.

David Emile Lamy


February 28, 2000

A sad abuse of a simple and obvious idea. I personally wont be shopping at amazon in the future.

Perry Vais


February 28, 2000

Too bad I can't patent the number 1. Then I could slap a hold on Amazon's 1-click bull.

Brian Mihulka


February 28, 2000

One Word: BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT! BOYCOTT!

Jim Bruer


February 28, 2000

Tim, I concur wholeheartedly. http://davenet.userland.com/2000/02/28/noMorePesosForSenorBezos Dave

Dave Winer


February 28, 2000

Jeff, Sorry to see your lawyers have overtaken your good sense about how to take good care of customers.

Dan Lynch


February 28, 2000

Why be a bully? You don't need this patent to win. Take the high road and give back to the community that bred you.

Jerry Asher


February 28, 2000

Amazon has lost several hundred dollars in sales from me, due to their short sighted piggish behavior.

Matt Michie


February 28, 2000

Nothing more can be said, except "Thanks" to O'Reilly for giving our voices a forum in which to be heard.

C. Colin Guest


February 28, 2000

I am an instructor at NYU. I will be explaining this situation to the students in my class. They care!

Evan Korth


February 28, 2000

I am in complete support of Tim O'Reilly. The patent is rediculous, and has no right to be enforced.

Jefferson Knox


February 28, 2000

You've captured exactly what I would want to say to Amazon; you have my full support, and my signature.

Brent J. Nordquist


February 28, 2000

I *really* like Amazon and the services it offers, and it's a shame that I can no longer shop there due to things like this.

John Cramp


February 28, 2000

I am honoring the boycott, and will not do business with Amazon.com until they stop this patent madness.

Mike Shimanski


February 28, 2000

My business is going to fatbrain and local specialty stores until this silliness ceases.

Thomas B Harris


February 28, 2000

Amazon.com must get with the programme, or we will be them irrelevant, well for technical books anyway...

Evan Summers


February 29, 2000

Rune Nielsen


February 28, 2000

The amazing things that people will do. This sounds like Divx. I have just one thing to say: "WTF, man?" Alan

Alan Fraze


February 28, 2000

Patenting things this trivial will lead to the downfall of the World Wide Web and e-commerce!

Blair Stilwell


February 28, 2000

I am appalled by the attitude that Amazon has taken, and wish them more losses until they repeal this patent.

Brenden van Stolk


February 28, 2000

Congratulations Tim for your courage. Shame on Amazon for even attempting to defend this silly patent.

John A. Simkiss, III


February 28, 2000

I've stopped buying from Amazon since I've heard of this patent, and will not buy from them as long as they try to enforce it.

Philippe Troin


February 28, 2000

I do hope Amazon will act to redeem its reputation. I admired them greatly at one time, and hope to do so again.

Rick Moen


February 28, 2000

This is deplorable and will, if anything, drive anyone with any knowledge of the issue away from your company.

Marc Raaphorst


February 28, 2000

I have erased your cookie and deleted your bookmark and will not allow them on my computers again until you drop that silly patent.

Bill Barry


February 28, 2000

Though I like the service very much (actually I'm a customer in Germany - amazon.de) I will switch to a competitor, namely bol.de.

Lothar Hegebart


February 28, 2000

Amazon doesn't deserve my effort in crafting an eloquent comment on their pathetic behaviour. Down With Amazon!

Nathan M. Morse


February 28, 2000

Amazon's actions represent a clear abuse of the patent system. Fortunately, they are not the only bookseller on the web...

Tim Voght


February 28, 2000

Great letter, I have used Amazon in the past but again will not do so until they drop the issue of patenting

Rich Spadaccini


February 28, 2000

This assertion augments my current boycott of all Amazon.com related services. Do the right thing for the web!

Bryan Klingner


February 28, 2000

Until this 1-Click fiasco has come to an acceptable end, I will be taking my business elswehere, and I will encourage others to do the same.

John Watson


February 28, 2000

I had never really considered looking elsewhere for books online, until now. Now I will do my best to find an alternative.

Jonah Peskin


February 28, 2000

I've bought books from amazon in the past, I was going to again. Continue this idiocy and I'll go somewhere else.

Christopher Werner


February 28, 2000

Jeff Bezos, I stopped purchasing books at Amazon since your injunction against Barnes & Noble. Barnes & Noble gets my business from now on.

Ronny Brekke


February 28, 2000

The Amazon.com patents are ridiculous and threaten to destroy the Internet as we know it. They should be immediately withdrawn.

Rob Keniger


February 28, 2000

Until Amazon.com backs away from these ridiculous software patents, I will not be a customer, and I will urge others to act in the same manner.

Patrick Dubroy


February 28, 2000

Please copyright your name, which is indeed an interesting concept. But, to patent a few lines of easy CGI code is criminal.

Rick Cogley


February 28, 2000

In my IS department I tell them where to order computer books from when I order a group of them. The patent is unethical and I will boycott Amazon.

Marcus Brody


February 28, 2000

The geek girl population is rapidly rising. This would be a terrible time to alienate us! Drop your obscene patents, and we'll stop boycotting.

Julie Montgomery


February 28, 2000

I purchased 16 O'reilly books from Amazon last year, which amounted to 蹢. This year I plan to buy none from them. Good luck Tim.

Cory Wright


February 29, 2000

One who denies oxygen, which doesn't belong to it, cannot ask for it. But, trying to suffocate amounts to *Internet Crime*.

abass alamnehe


February 28, 2000

Jeff Bezos. You are attempting to strangle the Internet goose that laid your golden egg. This is not merely wrong, it is stupid.

Eric S. Raymond


February 28, 2000

I'd love to purchase from Amazon, and I did before, but after the patent I stopped and I've urged several people to stop also.

Joseph Guhlin


February 28, 2000

Hey Jeff, you piss off the whole e-commerce community. Job well done!!! By the way, check out NOAMAZON.COM, they got better prices and more slections.

Eddie P


February 28, 2000

As a professional internet systems integrator, I have read the patent and recognize it as a technical statement of the obvious.

Eric Rachner


February 28, 2000

We don't need no stinking bloodsuckers. I'm buying my next books for more at the local Borders, rather than support your crooked schemes.

Bart Aronoff


February 28, 2000

OpenMarket lost in any attempt to enforce their shopping cart patent. Assuming the US judicial system has half a brain, Amazon will lose this one as well.

Tom Gross


February 28, 2000

Tim's eloquence and stature in both the internet and literary communities is a great asset to those who are opposing software patents.

Adam Lynch


February 28, 2000

Time to do something about this! I have advised all my friends who are buying books from the web to boycott Amazon! They were very supportive of this gesture.

Soo Guan


February 28, 2000

I am personally avoiding the use of Amazon's services until this entire morass is settled. The patent issue is an offensive joke.

Howard Melnick


February 28, 2000

I find it disgusting that such a patent was ever passed, even more disgusted that someone would attempt to file for it. This is a cheap cheap move by amazon.

Greg Nelson


February 28, 2000

Over the years I've bought many books, cds, and audio books from amazon, but no more. I doubt I'll ever buy anything from amazon.com again... :(

Jim Woodgate


February 28, 2000

I bought a few books from Amazon this summer. In the last few months I've bought quite a few more books online- from Barnes and Noble.

Tagore Smith


February 28, 2000

I am disheartening to learn not only one patent but two that abuse the patent office. I feel amazon is stealing from everyone on this planet.

Kent Nguyen


February 28, 2000

Amazon's recent patenting actions, if continued, may turn the internet into an ugly, vicious, commercial place. Please rethink your strategies.

Drew Bell


February 28, 2000

Amazon purchases: ũ,180 in 1998 Ū,660 in 1999 趶 in 2000 so far. Nothing more. John Pettitt Co-Founder Beyond.com, software.net & CyberSource

John Pettitt


February 28, 2000

It has been said that a patent is really just a license to litigate. Commit your company to the creation of value, not unnecessary litigation.

David R. Johnson


February 28, 2000

Don't believe for a minute that we don't take RMS's call for a boycott seriously. There are many other sellers of books out there.

Kris Warkentin


February 28, 2000

I will hereforth use the Amazon.com website only as a research tool (which it definitely is), but will take my book buying business elsewhere.

Raja R Harinath


February 28, 2000

1-Click buying and associates programs aren't just examples of reinventing the wheel. Amazon is reinventing it, and then slashing everyone else's tires.

Tom Cunningham


February 28, 2000

I buy several books a month online. And due to Amazons business practices, I will not be purchasing books from them any longer. Hello Barnes and Noble!

Jason Nichols


February 28, 2000

I will not use Amazon.com again until this is resolved in a reasonable manner. This is as silly as the patent for the 'cat toy' laser light pen.

Kathy Christian


February 28, 2000

Please reconsider your 1-click patent application. By pursuing this patent, you are hurting the very openness that made the web such an explosive force.

Alexander Chiang


February 28, 2000

Yet another (former) Amazon customer... drop the patents and I'll come back. BTW, I'm applying for the Click-and-buy-from-anyone-but-Amazon patent...

Paul Lee


February 28, 2000

Hoping you'll reconsider your pursuit of these damaging patents. I will not be purchasing any items via the Amazon.com web site until you address this issue.

John Walker


February 28, 2000

I just bought my first book from Fatbrain. A sale that would of gone to Amazon.com even just a few weeks ago. No more. From now on I go to www.noamazon.com Mark

Mark Staben


February 28, 2000

Thanks for the opportunity. And thanks for a great letter, Tim. And for what it's worth, all my online book purchases have been going to Powell's and Fatbrain.

Tim Trendall


February 28, 2000

Go Tim ! This is the right message, one that those who think they can win by bully-pulpit tactics need to hear, and implement. 100% behind this message.

Ken Knull


February 28, 2000

For anybody with even a fraction of a clue, the Amazon patent is a blatantly obvious land-grab by a company thatĂs already the 800-pound gorilla on the block.

Bob Dively


February 28, 2000

I'm tired of software and "process" patents. Instead of sitting back and simply signing petitions and whining about the state of affairs, it's time to act.

Jonathan Koren


February 28, 2000

I think that Amazon's 1-click patent is absolute rubbish. As a consquence, I too am boycotting Amazon, as well as getting my friends, colleagues, and associates to do the same.

Michael Lee


February 28, 2000

More than prior art, this is about precedents. What Amazon is trying to do will not lead to the kind of net community or practice of openness that I want.

Josh Rosenberg


February 28, 2000

Amazon has no right to patent the basic tools of ecommerce. If Amazon continues to press for patents on commonplace technology I will be forced to boycott.

Jef spaleta


February 28, 2000

I do not plan on patronizing amazon.com again until they change their approach to patents for trivial applications. My local bookstore will see a lot more business.

John Canning


February 28, 2000

Tim, Thank you for the stand against this trivial patent. I hope that Amazon sees the light, either now or eventually when the Patent Office gets a clue.

Deana M. Holmes


February 28, 2000

Jeff, I can't believe that you honestly feel One-Click is a valid technology worthy of a patent. Thank God Tim Berners-Lee and others weren't as short-sighted as yourself.

Terrence Coccoli


February 28, 2000

I regret that I will not be purchasing anything from Amazon until the CEO removes his head from 6 inches underground and realizes how stupid his patent is.

Aviv Keshet


February 28, 2000

I think both the 1-Click patent and the Associates patent were not very well researched since they made it through. That's like me trying to patent putting pants on before shoes.

Adam DuVander


February 28, 2000

The web is a technological gift to humankind. It would be very short of the spirit of this gift to try to 'own' it. Please do not try to crush this wonderful gift through greed.

William J. Burgos


February 28, 2000

Jeff, I personally have spent hundreds of dollars at amazon.com, my company has spent thousands. These tactics may well lose you this revenue. Wake up. Sy.

Simon Anderson


February 28, 2000

Since I can squash behaviour like this by clicking twice at some other retail site, I will. Conduct like yours would have strangled the Web at birth. Ingrate.

Nick Brooke


February 28, 2000

Jeff, Ever since amazon has started this 1-click nonsense, I have vowed never again to use your service, and am encouraging everyone I know to do the same. - Eric

Eric Raible


February 28, 2000

I have nothing to add to Tim's letter. I've just sent the URL of the letter to several of my friends as well as the entire staff of the successful small software company I founded.

L. Peter Deutsch


February 28, 2000

Anyone who's ever worked with JavaScript knows how laughable this "patent" is. Technology of this basic level cannot, and should not, be proprietary. I will join the boycott of Amazon.

Greg Campbell


February 28, 2000

Mr. Bezos, Consider me an ex-Amazon.com customer. I've discovered the joy of www.fatbrain.com. Wishing your company all the worst. Mathew Thomas Software Engineer

Mathew Thomas


February 28, 2000

I buy scores of books every year and online purchasing is much more convenient than local book stores... but I won't buy any more from Amazon until they demonstrate a little common sense.

Michael Sims


February 28, 2000

establish market leadership by providing unequalled quality, not by trying to pull off bullshit patents like this. actually innovate, don't isolate and alienate.

matt harrison


February 28, 2000

I've purchased books from amazon.com, and I think that it's a great realization of a great idea - but I won't be buying from them any more until they apologize for patenting 1-click.

Ross Morgan-Linial


February 28, 2000

I was a frequent amazon.com customer, but have not bought anything from them since I heard about their One-Click patent. This kind of parasitical behavior must not be tolerated.

Jamie Zawinski


February 28, 2000

This patent must not be upheld and should be invalidated. Software patents are doing the software industry a disservice and should be thrown out of the patent system. Regards, Tom

Tom Gall


February 28, 2000

no tiene rason tal treta por parte de su compa▒ia para acaparar el mercado, ya han crecido de una forma somprendente y hasta el momento lo han hecho eticamente.

santiago valverde


February 28, 2000

I expect the next big 'innovation' from Amazon to be allowing users to read their site from left to right! Best stop now while you still have a scrap of dignity. Jeff Gatlin

Jeff Gatlin


February 28, 2000

I fully support any effort to show Amazon that what they are doing is wrong. I have not and will not purchase any products from Amazon until they cease enforcement of this patent.

Erick Woods


February 29, 2000

James K. Huggins


February 28, 2000

I hope amazon will come to their senses regarding both the propriety of their recent patents and their needlessly agressive stance regarding what is, at root, a trivial and obvious technology.

steven smolinski


February 28, 2000

Frankly, I'm disappointed in Amazon descent into abuses of the patent system, and there isn't more I can say without repeating what everyone else crying at the top of their voices.

Daniel Root


February 28, 2000

The beauty of the web, there are always choices....I have chosen booksellers other than Amazon for some time, I encourage others to do the same until they drop the absurd patents.

Patrick Ludwig


February 28, 2000

Amazon's claim is "patently ridiculous" and offensive to every principle of the open, global Internet. The Patent Office is obviously lacking in adult supervision.

Jim Warren, columnist & advocate


February 28, 2000

Amazon is using a governmental artifice in an effort to stifle competition and intimidate the marketplace. I will not purchase any more products from Amazon until this problem is fixed.

Will Cate


February 28, 2000

Please come to your senses, Mr. Bezos. Let the ideas develop independant of your company... and they may grow into something far more powerful and useful to you and your customers.

Ross Karchner


February 28, 2000

Please reconsider this short sighted action. I also have admired your company and business dealings for a long time but trying to build fences around the Web is something that I doubt anyone would admire.

Leigh Scott


February 28, 2000

Come on Jeff, loosen your grip on this patent. Let it go before your brand erodes due to negative publicity. This thing will get bigger faster than you think. Look at what happened to etoys.

Eddie Codel


February 28, 2000

As a long-time Amazon customer, I am very concerned. I spend 񘈨+ every year on your site. That stops today! When you cease your one-click jihad, I will come back Jeff. Yours, B Griggs

Bobby Griggs


February 28, 2000

Tim O'Reilly has summed the issue admirably. Until Amazon releases these senseless patents, I will conduct my business elsewhere, and encourage anybody else I know to do the same.

Russell Gordon


February 28, 2000

I am dismayed by Amazon's application for and defense of such an obviously trivial application of existing technology. Shame on you Amazon. My book buying dollars will be spent elsewhere

R A Lichtensteiger


February 28, 2000

I think the 1-Click patent is a fraud. Amazon is a terrific company, but your use and modification of a technology that was Open Source, then patented by Amazon is W-R-O-N-G! -dave

Dave Jackson


February 28, 2000

Any company that has to resort to trivial software claims is clearly a company that is an investment that is headed to the dustbin. Someday Bezos will be the same as Ponzi. Alan Meckler

alan meckler


February 28, 2000

Any company that has to resort to trivial software claims is clearly a company that is an investment that is headed to the dustbin. Someday Bezos will be the same as Ponzi. Alan Meckler

alan meckler


February 28, 2000

Ths is the height of frivolous web patents. You might as well have patented selling books over the web. Hopefully, you will change your position. I will not be purchasing any books from Amazon.

Ravi Ramkissoon


February 28, 2000

yes, the patent office made mistakes and granted patents that came nowhere near meeting the standards for novelty and nonobviousness. and no, you don't have to enforce them. i'm happy to buy elsewhere for now.

colleen reilly


February 28, 2000

Due to Amazon's stifling & restrictive practices they have lost me as a customer. I used to purchase close to 贄/month from them before this patent fiasco occured. B&N and Borders now get my business.

Net Llama


February 28, 2000

I, too, have spent a lot of my money at Amazon in the past. But also like many others, I feel I can no longer support a company that is blatantly abusing a warped patent system that is still stuck in the early 1900s.

Bill Moore


February 28, 2000

Mr. Bezos et al.: Just remember that "Those who can, Innovate. Those who can't, litigate". Too bad you've fallen into the latter clause. The more you litigate, the more I'll diversify my purchases. Your move...

Ted Bardusch


February 28, 2000

Nothing much to add. There are other online book stores, and I'm happy to spend my money elsewhere while Amazon continue with this behaviour. Amazon are far from alone in trying such tactics, but that's no excuse.

Philip Sainty


February 28, 2000

As uncounted others have stated before me, these patents are insults to intellectual freedom, perpetrated in the name of illogical greed. That does not, of course, reduce the importance of saying it once more...

Robert Himberger


February 28, 2000

Until Amazon.com stops this "land grab" of trivial software patents, I wil stop using there service. Further, I will recommend to all of my clients that do stop supporting Amazon.com as well.

John Worthington


February 28, 2000

I'm not against software patents per se, but one-click ordering is completely obvious. Amazon.com built a great reputation based on customer service; attempting to enforce silly patents is a step backwards not forwards.

Scott Lawton


February 28, 2000

Well, nothing much can be said that hasn't already been. . .But it's disappointing to see a pioneer in our industry bite the hand that has fed it so well. Amazon. . .Goodbye, Gerald Former good customer

Gerald Anderson


February 28, 2000

Silly or obvious patents should not be granted in the first place, but the USPTO doesn't seem to be doing the job. Therefore I sign the open letter. Let the community fix the patent system!

Mike Guidero


February 28, 2000

I have probably spent 񙇈 on books from Amazon over the past couple years. Pursuing ridiculous software patents, aparently with your full understanding and consent, is pushing me to other companies.

John Carmack


February 28, 2000

Thank you for making this effort, Tim. Amazon's attempt to exploit the patent office's technological deficiencies with moves that can so badly hurt customers and the innovative landscape of the web is disgusting.

Evan Williams


February 28, 2000

This so-called patent is really nothing but the theft of others work... Seems like that's all the computer revelution has done; from xerox park to amazon, one does the work, someone else takes the credit.

Sam A. Kersh


February 28, 2000

While I like Amazon's layout and system, I cannot abide such anticompetitive acts as these software patents. I will be sorry to move my business elsewhere, but it's the least I can do until this nonsense stops.

Chris Gomez


February 28, 2000

To Amazon: Please listen to your customers. We value your great service and excellent use of the Internet, however your actions in software patents on obvious ideas is silly. Please come back to Earth.

Scott M. Dier


February 28, 2000

I wholeheartedly agree with tim. My grandfather built his business on LEGITIMATE patents for LEGITIMATE innovations in packaging machinery, but Amazon's blatantly bogus patents should not have been granted in the first place.

Richard Kurtzer


February 28, 2000

The patent office needs the help of technologically adept individuals to help fight this sort of thing. Support your local neighborhood Open Source developers. They are your base of support and innovation.

Aaron van Meerten


February 28, 2000

The patent office needs the help of technologically adept individuals to help fight this sort of thing. Support your local neighborhood Open Source developers. They are your base of support and innovation.

Aaron van Meerten


February 28, 2000

Dear Amazon, i appreciate your service and I praise you guys for your innovation. However, I believe that this patent is "pissing in the well." I as a customer of amazon am asking you to retract your patent.

John Hwang


February 28, 2000

I have been following RMS' guideline in boycotting Amazon, which I used to used frequent for books and CDs. I will resume buying from their site only when they choose to not pursue software patents in court.

Greg Chappell


February 28, 2000

Patents are for new and non-obvious ideas. 1-click and affiliate programs are not new or non-obvious. The U.S. Patent Office is obviously incapable of determining what are really novel ideas. Amazon, please don't abuse the situation.

Mike Rain


February 28, 2000

Well said Mr. O'Reilly. I also pledge my support to help send the message that we as consumers must not allow the patent process to be abused. I will challenge everyone I know to do the same, and boycott amazon. -Eric

Eric Gonzalez


February 28, 2000

I spent over โ per month at amazon last year. I haven't been there (except just now to check my order totals) since November 27th because of the ridiculous patent claims. I won't go back until the claim is dropped.

Jason Majors


February 28, 2000

As long as amazon.com is going to persue such grossly general patents I will both refuse using amazon.com AND i will go out of my way to convince friends and faimly to use alternative sites for their online book purchases.

Matt Knopp


February 28, 2000

I was an early customer of Amazon's and have purchased several hundred dollars worth of books from them over the years. I'm sorry to have to terminate my relation with Amazon, but I'm afraid it's the only ethical thing to do at this point.

Jonathan Badger


February 28, 2000

I find http://www.bookpool.com perfectly good for purchasing technical books, and of course I've been giving Barnes and Noble my business lately as well. I wish there were legal consequences for frivolous patents like this.

Mark Allen


February 28, 2000

Mr. Bezos One-Click is great. A patent fight is the wrong way to demonstrate Amazon's customer benefits. This is the wrong way to get market attention. Please demonstrate to your customers that you are interested in making their lives better.

Jeff Litherland


February 28, 2000

Jeff: I like your store. Don't screw it up by being a schmuck. These patents and attempted enforcement of them is just negative marketing. Your customers, even many of the non-techies, are now looking at your competitors.

David Merrill


February 28, 2000

I do participate in the Amazon.com boycott called by Stallman and constantly urge people to buy from Barnes and Noble to help fund their legal defence of this farce. I don't think I'll ever buy from Amazon.com again, in fact.

Javier Heredia


February 28, 2000

Amazon.com has established its success by looking always one step further. Patents like these are just relying on what already exists, i.e. looking back to old successes. It's gonna be a definitive mistake for an innovator.

Alessio F. Bragadini


February 29, 2000

I have bought several thousand dollars worth of goods from Amazon.com in the past. I have also been an Amazon.com affiliate, and thus made many more thousands of dollars for Amazon. No more. I have removed all my links to Amazon.com books and Associates, and will no longer shop there. I hope that Amazon.com will reconsider their position on these patents.

Kristina Pfaff-Harris


February 28, 2000

When the government comes to help you, hold your wallet. The PTO is in over their heads in the area of intellectual property and the patents in question should never have been granted. I support an open and competitive environment.

Betsy Garfield


February 28, 2000

I'll no longer be suggesting Amazon as an easy place to get books on every subject. There are other places to go, and my friends and collagues seem to feel the same way. So much for our plans to participate in those affiliate programs!

Iain O'Cain


February 28, 2000

This 1-click patent is the silliest thing I've ever heard of. This is obviously either the product of an corporate idiot, or a corporate tyrant. Which one do you want to be perceived as, Amazon? Show some forward thinking.

Brandon Bickford


February 28, 2000

The patents are bogus. If tried in court it could easily be shown that there was prior art. Plus even if there were no art, this is a bad patent and Amazon's use of it is evil. I will not buy from them until they give a public apology.

Edwin Purvee


February 28, 2000

One small step would make you a hero. Reveal that you got the patent so that nobody else ever could then publicly swear that it will NEVER be enforced. That way you would be praised as the protector instead of reviled as the destroyer.

Eileen Wharmby


February 28, 2000

I agree with Tim. Software patents can have value, but only when they are for truly novel inventions. Amazon's patents are among many that the PTO should never have been approved. (I am one of the inventors of software patent 5,055,998.)

Ray Lischner


February 28, 2000

I was on the verge of entering into the online purchasing world with Amazon as my portal; but upon careful review, I've decided against it because of their reckless use of patents. Other vendors will reap the benefits, until Amazon sees things differently.

Marc Directo


February 28, 2000

Amazon's patent tactics have prompted me to boycott the company, turn down a job offer from Amazon.com, stop wearing my Amazon.com t-shirt, and remind my friends and co-workers that Amazon is evil. I now buy all my books from Barnes & Noble.com.

Liam Quinn


February 28, 2000

I think that this case is a good focus for reviewing the entire software patent process. This was much needed in the light of the completely ridiculaous patents that have been granted of late. I will also cease buying from Amazon until they recant on this.

Udhay Shankar N


February 28, 2000

Don't try to be oversmart and steal others work. You'll go down the drain by doing this..cause you can't live without the support of millions of people who helped build the internet... Don't be a fool....wake up!!!! -Wilson

Dionysius Wilson Almeida


February 28, 2000

I miss being able to shop at Amazon (which my conscience no longer permits), but I miss the days when I could use technologies for the purposes for which they were designed without fear of teams of rabid lawyers snapping at my heels even more.

Brent Spillner


February 28, 2000

Amazon seems to be run by a bunch of greedy suits. I'm not going to do any business with Amazon until they withdraw their patent. I like Tim O'Reilly's phrase "they're pissing in the well". Soon there will be more that will piss in their well too.

Andrej Gabara


February 28, 2000

Amazon seems to be run by a bunch of greedy suits. I'm not going to do any business with Amazon until they withdraw their patent. I like Tim O'Reilly's phrase "they're pissing in the well". Soon there will be more that will piss in their well too.

Andrej Gabara


February 28, 2000

I just bought two books from B&N. I compared B&N's prices and availability to FatBrain. I did not include Amazon in the purchase process at all. When Amazon states that they will not enforce their patents, I will again consider them when I make purchases.

Andrew C. Bertola


February 28, 2000

Jeff, it's just a cookie! You have so many other battles to fight and so many other features to create that I really hope you let this one go and get on to more important matters. If you pursue this you're making Billy G look like an easy-going guy!

Adam Pratt


February 28, 2000

I have bought many books from Amazon in the past and was quite impressed with their level of service. However, I am now boycotting them. I advise others to try the following excellent sites: barnesandnoble.com fatbrain.com bookpool.com textbooks.com

Sean C. Rhea


February 28, 2000

Boycott or not, Amazon has insulted my intelligence with this patent. I will no longer shop or support their site until such time as they publicly state they will cease these activities and a full apology to the web development community has been made.

Joseph E. Trent


February 28, 2000

You realize, I hope, that we aren't suprised that that such a trivial patent is being enforced. We are suprised that it is being enforced by YOU. Most of us respect Amazon for being a pioneer. That kind of respect is hard earned, but easily lost.

Chris Siegler


February 28, 2000

You wonder how the patent office approved of these but then you find that they patented a laser pointer for the use of a cat toy... http://www.patents.ibm.com/details?&pn=US05443036__ Makes the same sense. Not enforceable and should have never been granted.

Tim Pozar


February 28, 2000

I agree with Tim that there is no need to cheat at a race you are winning. Just before you finish the race in first place, you turn around and attempt to trip over the other players. In regards to the free software thing. Amazon itself is using Apache.

Brock Henry


February 28, 2000

I agree on the stupidity of these software patents for trivial items. In addition, I found the 'purchasing circles' program to be an incredible violation of privacy, to the point that I am no longer a customer of Amazon. Mr. Bezos, this is your loss.

Peter Brooks


February 28, 2000

I believe that Amazon has a substantial lead in both name recognition and customer base over competitors on the web, and that this is a ridiculous ploy. I will happily shift my business to borders.com or booksamillion.com if this sort of nonsense continues.

Raymond Forte


February 28, 2000

What can I do but add my voice to the chorus? I have been a happy Amazon customer in the past, but until the company stops trying to use the USPTO as anticompetetive muscle, I will take my business elsewhere, and encourage my friends and associates to do the same.

Dan Martinez


February 28, 2000

Amazon is a great service which I have used many times in the past, mostly because of the convenience, but also because the prices for good computer manuals tends to be cheaper than in my local bookstores. However, I will not be using Amazon again unless this issue is resolved.

Robert Norris


February 28, 2000

Patents were meant to protect something that took much time and effort to invent and create, not a simple system such as 1-click shopping. It seems that the patent offices also need some education in this matter as well. They seem to be handing out software patents much too freely.

Mr. J. Moody


February 28, 2000

I support the Amazon boycott, and will continue to do so until they drop their patent suit against Barnes and Noble (note: drop, not have it thrown out by a court). Ironically, we may be doing them more harm than good, since they loose money on every transaction...

Luke Francl


February 28, 2000

On an MSNBC program on the evening (EST) of 2/28 ("Silicon Valley Summit"?), Mr. Bezos seemed to be saying that there is no 1-Click patent. Very disingenuous in light of other evidence. I certainly agree with the sentiments expressed in Mr. O'Reilly's very thoughtfully crafted letter.

Jay Gerard


February 28, 2000

Thanks Tim. I've been told that my home looks like an O'Reilly warehouse. <g> I spend a significant portion of my discretionary income on books and recommend many of them to clients. Amazon won't be seeing any of that anytime soon unless they change their ways.

Bill Duncan


February 28, 2000

I would like to be able to recommend the IMDB web site to people, but I don't since I don't want to support amazon.com until they change their attitute about overly broad and nasty software patents. Amazon, please clear your name and stop making an ass of yourself.

Peter Cordes


February 28, 2000

I had other reasons for never ordering from Amazon in the past, primarily that I prefer to support my local book store, Powells. When news of this patent came to my attention, it only solidified my feelings about Amazon. As long as they hold this posture, I will continue to avoid them.

Hagen Amen


February 28, 2000

Jeff, I know you want to do what is right. You are a technical person at heart. Please do what you can and stop enforcing these patents. I really want to buy books and software from you again, yet I cannot as long as you enforce these unfair patents. Jonathan Geach

Jonathan Geach


February 28, 2000

I'm so annoyed, I don't know what to say. I *used to* to be an Amazon customer. My friend *used to* send Amazon certificates for my birthday. I *used to* tell people to try Amazon. No more. This is madness. What next, Amazon? Patents on double clicking?

Maggie Brazeau


February 28, 2000

Mr. Bezos, You are presented with a wonderful opportunity here to apologize and gain respect for doing so. We all know in our hearts, you included, this patent is wrong. Do the right thing(tm) before you suffer more embarassment at having the patent thrown out.

William R. Swaney


February 28, 2000

Dear Jeff, As a tech professional and avid book buyer/reader I am reluctant to stop frequenting your service, but your open flaunting of the very environment that allowed you to thrive pains me so that I can no longer in good concience buy from you. Sincerest regrets

Alex Russell


February 28, 2000

Selden's attempted patent of the automobile, Compton's attempted patent of the multimedia CD, and now Bezos' attempted patent of Web basics. Who says the Web has been commercialized? It's been humorized. Come on Jeff, give up the comedy and get back to selling my books.

Joseph T. Sinclair


February 28, 2000

Jeff, a patent was granted to your company for a technology that is both trivial and not of your own invention. Holding this patent is fraudulent, and until you deregister it, myself and everyone I know will be buoycotting Amazon.com. I think you will find a lot of people hold this same view.

Geoff Smith


February 28, 2000

I have purchased many hundreds of dollars worth of technical books from Amazon. Now I regret every penny spent. I am sad that I can no longer support Amazon while they pursue these patents. If they ever pull their heads out of their posteriors I will consider supporting Amazon's services again...

Jeff Soule


February 28, 2000

Amazon.com is a good company, on the verge of being great. I don't know what their problem is these days, but this patent ridiculousness has got to stop. I really liked my coffee mug I got from them as a Christmas present, but not enough to continue to buy books from them.

Chris Lindsay


February 28, 2000

I would be redundant to say that "patents" like this undermine every effort of the development for the better of internet and the world together. I can just hope that Amazon will stumble upon their own game once they try to implement something trivial that someone else patented.

Ugen Antsilevitch


February 28, 2000

I've used Amazon since they started, and I love what they provide. I own their stock, and use their service, but no more. This is truly insane and out of hand. There are plenty of competitors now, so why perpetuate this madness by supporting a company that is so clearly insane.

Shawn Gordon


February 28, 2000

come on this is retarded. One-click ordering as a _patent_?!?! Please regain some of your sanity, I really value the service that amazon.com provides and have ordered off the site several times because I would rather patronize a web retailer than someone else, but this is going way too far.

Karl Shea


February 28, 2000

Go Tim! Keep up the good work publishing the best computer technical books in the business. Bad Jeff! Where would you be if standards such as HTTP, SMTP, and DNS upon which your business is based had been patented and kept proprietary? Yeah that's what I thought. No biscuit! Jason H. Reeves

jhr_at_net-noise.com


February 28, 2000

Thank you Tim for taking a stand! I means a lot because it is obvious that you benefit from Amazons presence, yet you have decided to speak up! I have long since decided to no longer use Amazon.com for my online book purchases. Now only if O'Reilly would sell direct...

Frank Xavier Ledo


February 28, 2000

It takes a big man to admit making a mistake. Be a big man. You won't look bad if you back off this; it's easy to be seduced by lawyers. If you push it, you'll not only lose the patent and lots of money but you'll lose the hard won respect of the technical community. It just ain't worth it.

Dana Trantham


February 28, 2000

Jeff, by all appearances Amazon's patents are a frivolous abuse of a perhaps overly trusting patent system. Amazon's interests are not served by enforcing these patents, and your reputation can only suffer. These questionable practices have certainly altered my online buying habits.

Craig S. Kaplan


February 28, 2000

I thought a boycott over the 1-click issue was maybe a bit extreme. But now I think the Associates Program patent should be a big wake-up call for everyone. It obvious that Amazon 'just doesn't get it' and I, for one, will have to think about it a bit before I order from them again.

Michael Caplinger


February 29, 2000

Mr Bezos, For however long you hold and attempt to enforce patents on obvious or trivial techniques, I shall boycott Amazon.com and all subsidiary sites. Further, I will always lobby my family, friends and co-workers also to use alternative services. David Weil

David Weil


February 28, 2000

I am in the market for 3 new books this week and was planning on going to Amazon to make the purchases. This issue has changed my mind. I am voting with my wallet. Bezos, show some common sense about the direction your company is going in. Now before it's too late. Del Gillogly

Del Gillogly


February 28, 2000

A satisfied customer of Amazon, I do feel that the two most recent patents should not have been pursued or granted. The letter written by Mr. O'Reilly adequately sums up my sentiments. I will be forced to purchase from Amazon's competition until this situation is remedied. Christopher Horn.

Christopher Horn


February 28, 2000

I was buying several products/month from Amazon before they attempted to enforce this frivolous patent. Since then, I have bought nothing (not even at Christmas) and will continue to buy nothing so long as they pursue this strategy. Thanks, Tim, for providing a nice focus for this protest.

George Reese


February 28, 2000

I am an author of a book which is sold on Amazon. I would rather lose income than be associated in any way with a company such as Amazon which cannot make a profit through hard work, but must instead exploit the sorry state of the U.S. patent system. I am utterly disgusted with Amazon.

David F. Skoll


February 28, 2000

I would like to officially patent my "2-clicks and a jump" purchasing where two clicks followed by a page redirect to a secondary will complete a purchase. Hopefully, I can patent a whole gamut of these obvious methodologies and make a mint off of lawsuit settlements. Thanks Jeff Bezos!

Jonathan Jason Sy


February 28, 2000

I agree with Tim. Amazon is acting foolishly, and (much as it pains me) I will shift my business to fatbrain.com and barnesandnoble.com until Jeff & co. understand just how wrong they are. I sincerely hope that either they will change their minds or find their business sincerely damaged.

Carl C. Farmer, Jr.


February 28, 2000

I will not be buying anything more from Amazon. There are many alternative online resources that are not trying to fence in their own little corner of the internet. If more people join us, hopefully Amazon will be come just that - an insignificant little corner of the 'net. http://www.noamazon.com

Eric Sandeen


February 28, 2000

You sent me email asking why I haven't purchased anything recently---this is why. Since I became aware of your acts of bad faith I've bought all my books at fatbrain.com, and will continue to do so. I don't know whether you need me, but I sure don't need you. "No more pesos for Senor Bezos."

Benjamin Ogdon


February 28, 2000

I've decided not to support Amazon.com in their efforts to dictate not content, but methodologies used on other's web sites. Amazon.com has lost about 跌 worth of my business to BookPool in the last 2 months. I wish the general public had a better understanding of Amazon's tactics.

Brian McLaughlin


February 28, 2000

I also agree that software patents are making a mockery of the U.S. Patent Office, and would like to see this practice ended before it does any greater damage. You are exercising very poor business ethics, and I also have refused to purchase any product from amazon.com until this comes to an end.

Ryan Sackenheim


February 28, 2000

Amazon, please open your eyes and see that a patent like this is a hindrance to everything that made you what you are-- a thriving e-commerce company using the open standards of the Internet. I urge you to destroy this patent, and gain back many of your technically-adept and freedom-friendly customers!

Michael Proto


February 28, 2000

I find the idea that you have patented such self-evident concepts as one-click ordering and affilate marketing both absurd (within the context of the objectives of patent law) and injurious to the internet. It is impossible in these circumstances for me to continue to do business with your company. Fred

Fred Hapgood


February 28, 2000

It is clear to me that Amazon will not have my business until these patents are officially overturned. I have also strongly encouraged associates, colleagues, friends and family to avoid purchasing goods from Amazon, and to seek other channels to acquire books, gifts, electronics and audio/video media.

Paul C. Bryan


February 28, 2000

I've spent several thousand dollars at Amazon. I've encouraged several thousand more as an Amazon Associate. As an author, I've sold quite a few books via Amazon as well. Until this stupidity stops, I'm done. No more purchasing, no more Associate, and I'm going to urge my readers to purchase elsewhere.

Mike Gunderloy


February 28, 2000

The 1-Click feature would not make or break my decision to shop on Amazon, but your use of a failure of the patent system to bludgeon competitors, among other monopolistic practices, does compel me to stop doing business with you. Until the bullying stops, I will stick to brick-and-mortar bookstores, thank you.

Elson Liu


February 28, 2000

I wholeheartedly disagree with your tactics. Your patents are obvious, and an obvious abuse of the patent system, and can only act to stifle the development of the web as an open palce for commerce. I urge you to rethink your strategy. I can and will go elsewhere. And I never use the one-click anyway.

Russell Miller


February 29, 2000

I'll vote with my pocketbook. I spent several hundred dollars this past Christmas at amazon -- and it's not something I'll do again. Others will be getting my business this year -- all throughout. kbs

Kyle Sparger


February 28, 2000

Mr Bezos, I've been a frequent Amazon patron and greatly enjoyed the convenience of your Web site. However, your patent policy has greatly disturbs me and it has cost you a repeat customer. I've elected to make my last four purchases at a local bookseller and will continue until this matter is resolved.

Brian Sauls


February 28, 2000

I firmly believe that it is in the best interest not only of the Internet user community at large, but of Amazon.com's shareholders, that Amazon.com give up their claim to this frivolous and ill-conceived patent rather than waste a great of everyone's time and money fighting it in court, whether they win or lose.

Graham West


February 28, 2000

I needed a book today. I was in front of my computer when I realised this fact. Instead of ordering via Amazon (which I would normally do), I got in my car and drove to Borders. Will you now be patenting the process of getting in a car and driving to a bookstore in a vain attempt to discourage this behavior?

James Ludlow


February 28, 2000

Amazon: Welcome to the world of grassroots activism. I hope you enjoy your short stay on the Internet. You couldn't figure out how to use cookies to maintain session state until 1997, then you have the gall to try to patent the idea? May all your future innovations be pre-emptively patented by Barnes & Noble. Snakes.

Cameron Huang


February 28, 2000

Amazon - Stuff like this makes you hard to love. Stop pissing off the community that supports you. What if the brick and mortar Barnes and Noble tried to patent the plastic bags customers use to carry out their purchases? What you're doing is just as ridiculous, and it's only patent-department ineptitude that allows it.

Jason Hickner


February 28, 2000

I was shocked when I first learned about Amazon's patent land grab. It seemed so out of character--something I would have expected to come from Barnes & Noble after their "world's biggest bookstore" protest. I want to thank Tim O'Reilly for providing this opportunity to do more than just quietly redirect my money.

Doug Schafer


February 28, 2000

Granted, I only spend 躔-񘈨/year on your web site, but as Mr O'Reilly said, doing nothing lets you win. I will make no more purchases from your site until you stop this nonsense, and grow up. The World Wide Web is NOT your playground to dominate. Stop trying to be another Microsoft, it is very unbecomming.

Nathan Tallack


February 28, 2000

Tim's letter summarise wonderfully our concerns about Amazon's patent. Thse patents are not doing justice to the people who build the Internet and Web as a free Open Medium for everybody. What they have build is order of magnitude more complexe and a trivial use of cookies, and still they have offred it to the world.

Khalid HASSANI


February 28, 2000

I'll never again buy anything from Amazon unless this patent enforcement action is halted very soon. It's not only a very bad thing to do, but it's an indication of what kind of people there are at Amazon. This is a thing that only very bad people would do, and I won't buy from very bad <insert strong language> people.

Michael Ward


February 28, 2000

I would like to add my voice to the list of those urging Amazon to decline to enforce their patent on "one click ordering". I agree with Tim O'Reilly's points about the triviality of the application, the potential effect on the Internet, and the likelihood the patent will not be upheld. Curtis Frye Professional Writer

Curtis D. Frye


February 28, 2000

I stopped shopping at Amazon the moment the news of your abuse of the patent system made it on to Slashdot. I now routinely tell people to avoid purchasing products from you. For your demographics, I'm a 25 year old computer professional. I really don't think that I'm in the demographic group that you want to alienate.

Eric Esposito


February 28, 2000

I have already stopped making purchases from Amazon.com in protest of the enforcement of this obnoxious software patent. I have also encouraged others to make their purchases through other sources and will continue to do so while this nonsense goes on. Patents should protect implementation and not the outward effect.

Jason V. Morgan


February 28, 2000

It amazes me that Jeff Bezos would do such a thing. It's not that I object to his profit motive. I'm just amazed that someone who has been running in front of the pack so hard for so long would bother with something so obviously beneath him and so obviously doomed to failure. How small. How very small.

Mark Draughn, Chicago, Illinois


February 28, 2000

Amazingly dense behavior for someone trying to cultivate a popular image of being a technically savvy company. Anti-marketing attitude that betrays disdain for the efforts of others who provided the tools that made your original strategy possible and who provided much of your original -- and perhaps definitive -- clientele.

David Howson


February 28, 2000

I have ordered from Amazon in the past, and I had a good experience. However, because of the recent patents on obvious applications of web technology, I have stopped ordering from your company. Barnes and Noble has already received a 趚 order that could have been yours. Please cease this foolishness so that you can reclaim my business.

Benjamin Thomas


February 28, 2000

Those boycotting Amazon should consider doing as I've done: Buy your books from Barnes & Noble, and tell Amazon why you are doing so. Since B&N is the most direct target of their bogus 1-Click legal action, taking your business away from Amazon while giving it to B&N adds a touch more leverage to your act of protest.

John Callender


February 28, 2000

I believe I had the essence of this 1-click patent going long before Amazon did, with MiniVend. I find this patent nonsense to be a bar not to the truly innovative, but I hereby proclaim that I have given my new 0-click purchasing mechanism to the world. <META HTTP-EQUIV=refresh CONTENT="60; url=/cgi-bin/place_order">

Mike Heins


February 28, 2000

I've admired Amazon's foresight and intelligent business practices in the past, but I cannot accept the enforcement of such a meritless patent. Even though Amazon provides a convenient one-stop (and one-click) shop on the web, I will take my business elsewhere (www.bn.com, www.x-radio.com) until this issue is resolved.

John Reeves Hall


February 28, 2000

I think that patenting something obvious should not only be disallowed, but considered as a crime, just like stealing is. Unfortunately, boycotting isn't the solution. We need to convince Amazon (and other companies with similar tactics) that what they're doing is wrong, not convince them that it is just bad economically.

Michal Karczmarek


February 28, 2000

I find it unfortunate that Amazon, a company I have done business with in the past and might have in the future, has opted for this kind of corporate direction. I not only agree with the statements in the letter to which I am signing, but I strongly believe in the original 'Ask Tim' open letter. Please turn around before your clientele turn away.

Lynn Pye Jr.


February 28, 2000

I've never bought a thing from Amazon, and I never will, until they stop using patents as weapons against their competitors and all who dare to challenge them in the future. My favourite local bookstore can have alllll my book business. They've earned it. http://www.bolen.bc.ca/ (PS to Tim: I have 17 ORA.books! You're the best!)

Jim Roepcke


February 28, 2000

Amazon is sowing the seeds of their own demise. If only they were wise enough to see the long term effects of this whole fiasco, they might change their strategy. Laying claim to something that you do not own, especially in this case, is no different than stealing. This is much worse, though. It is stealing from a common trust.

Jonathan Shook


February 28, 2000

Tim said it far more eloquently than I could ... taking what doesnt belong to you has always been called stealing. Taking advantage of the US Patent Office for a service that is global in scope is not only inappropriate it should (and eventually will) be illegal. Personally I now shop at Barnes and Noble for my books.

James C. Diggans


February 28, 2000

These really are bad patents. 1 click and associates programs are *so* blatently obvious. I really hate to boycott Amazon, because my wife and I really love the site. But I don't feel like I have any other choice. Barnes and Noble and FatBrain will be getting my business from until Amazon publicly drops these rediculous patents.

Bob McCormick


February 28, 2000

As a published author who helped Amazon by recommending that my book be bought through them, and by filling out an interview (presumably thus enhancing their content), I'm dissappointed. As a softwar engineer, I'm annoyed that a trivial idea was patented. As a taxpayer, I'm upset that the Patent Office is so apparently inept.

David Ascher


February 28, 2000

Patently arrogant behaviour on Jeff's part - he is named in the affiliates patent. It is a true insult to those that are creating bonafide innovations. Furthermore, it is hypocritical for him to encourage a legal bureacracy that he surely despises (every reasonable entrepreneur does) - a very poor role model for entrepreneurs indeed!

Steve Pappa


February 28, 2000

While i believe that true innovations are reasonable candidates for patents, i see nothing innovative or new about the 1-Click technology that would justify its earning a patent. By setting a precedent for aggressive patenting, you are laying yourselves open to be victimized by the exact same tactics with the next round of incremental development.

Daniel Steinberg


February 28, 2000

I believe that Amazon's actions are a slap in the face of the pioneers that created and sustained the World Wide Web. As these patents are likely to be overturned anyway, I urge Amazon to discontinue pursuit of these patents. Until such time as they do, my business and my recommendations to collegues will go to their competitors.

Rich Shappard


February 28, 2000

It's a shame that it has come to this... Yes, Microsoft is one of the richest companies in the world, but it is disgusting to sink to their level just because of greed and desire... Amazon is already the greatest. Why can't they be satisfied with a competitive market in which they are the leaders... Why do they have to be the bully?

J Derek Wilson


February 28, 2000

As a Senior Software Engineer and Architect for a business to business e-commerce firm that provides an automated web partnering service, this particular patent claim strikes close to home. I have been a loyal customer of Amazon's ever since they started their business, but their predatory approach to the e-commerce market has left me with a very bitter taste.

George Feil


February 28, 2000

I have been in support of the boycott since it first came to be, and will refuse to have any dealings with Amazon until their stance on the above mentioned patents is reversed. This playing field is no longer Amazon only -- there are many alternatives available now for consumers to get the products they need over the web. I vote with my feet.

Brian Loudon


February 28, 2000

Although not quite on the level of RMS, i do believe that these kind of software patents are wrong in the moral sense, and will lead to a loss of revenue in the long term. If you come up with something new; fine, great, be the first one to capitalize on it, but if you just use a cookie to store user information, keep your laywers to yourself!

Ben Cummings


February 28, 2000

There is nothing new to add except for the fact, that not only is 1 click shopping a trivial patent, its also very dangerious. Your opening the doors wide open on this one. So I sit down on my neighbors computers and buy a few things, and what do I know, I didn't have to pay for it. Smart guys, really smart. Derek Young President GS Data Design Inc

Derek Young


February 28, 2000

It is absurd to me that someone can patent such a thing as this. This which has been around since the beginning of business on the web. This would be like me patenting Links between webpages. Nope sorry you have links on your page pay me! It's absolutely insane to think that the patent offices are so oblivious as to grant this patent. Well thats my .02

Jared


February 28, 2000

It is rather offensive that such a trivial patent has been granted and that Amazon is attempting to enforce it. Amazon *was* my favorite place to get books before the lawsuit against B&N. In the future I hope I can purchase from Amazon again, however, as long as this patent (and the affiliates patent) stands I shall be forced to shop elsewhere.

Andrew Sharp


February 28, 2000

I have bought one book from Amazon -- until you publically announce that you will not pursue infringement claims on any of your patents, I will be shopping elsewhere. I would also strongly urge you to announce a royalty-free license to anyone who wants to use your patents. In this way, you can begin to regain the good will that has been lost here.

David Carter


February 28, 2000

As other's have stated, Tim has drafted an excellent letter summing up my feelings. I have purchased hundred's of dollars from Amazon.com, I have since purchased hundreds of dollars elsewhere. Any more I just use your site to get a rough idea on price and doing product searches. I no longer make purchases. I didn't even use you 1-click system. Joe kline

Joe Kline


February 28, 2000

The 1-Click patent is a mockery of the patent system. This lawsuit has ensured that dvdexpress.com, fatbrain.com and buy.com now receive the considerable portion of my income which had previously been spent at amazon.com. My only hope is that your abuse of the patent system will bring it's credibility in the software field into review. Kevin D Way

Kevin Way


February 28, 2000

Gee, Jeff didn't answer my letter--I just got a robot... Tim's wimping out by not advocating a boycott. Many of us are not going to be so charitable. What we really need is a free book ranking list. Once it got up and running (and was free of Amazon or any other company), I wouldn't miss your company at all. For now, I browse, then buy (and post comments) elsewhere...

Jason Duell


February 28, 2000

I gave Amazon all my book business because I thought they "got" the Internet. It appears I was wrong. I now use B&N for all my mass market book buying and resent Amazon that little bit more for every needless extra click I have to use. I will own no Amazon stock and recommend against to all my friends. After 200+ orders in 18 months, goodbye Amazon!

Christopher Schanck


February 28, 2000

Tim O'Reilly has said it well. I want to add my protest to the use of trivial patents to stifle competition and innovation. If the purpose of patents are to encourage innovation, your patents make a mockery of the system. The only benefit that I can see from your actions, Amazon.com, is that you may hasten a much needed overhaul of the patent system.

Chris O'Hare


February 28, 2000

I invested in and used Amazon.com because I thought it was a novel idea and philosophy. Until Amazon resolves this issue, I will continue to explore other means of purchasing internet goods. C'mon, Jeff, give it up. At least Al Gore later admitted he didn't invent the Internet! You're not fooling anyone aside from some myopic patent office clerks.

Gregory Harrison


February 28, 2000

I really liked the tremenous services that Amazon.com provided and have bought many books over the years. Because of this clear beginning of corporate greed harming the public and innovation, I am following Richard Stallman's call for boycott and am telling others about it. Until I see some signs that you are going to be a responsible corporate citizen, I will continue to do so.

Jason Yoon


February 28, 2000

I used to shop at Amazon.com. I no longer do so because of the patents that they have filed. The patents abuse the patent system and allow Amazon to use anti-competitive practices against other e-commerce companies. I find that unacceptable. I no longer shop at Amazon.com and I am urging everyone I know to shop at the other book vendors on the web.

Mark E. Boudreau


February 28, 2000

Amazon, As a consumer of your services I implore you to reconcider your position on the 1-click patent. I dont want the web to become a place where I have to look behind me everytime I use a technique on a web site that should be free to be used by everyone. I value the free spirt of the Internet and your actions are killing the way to our Information Society.

Scott Larson


February 28, 2000

i have exclusively used Amazon so far but now because of this silly patent stuff i have moved my purchases (+encouraging/educating others)somewhere else. i find Amazon to be better than my new vendor but i am willing to go thru the inconvenience because i feel very strongly about the issue. Hope you see (business) sense + moral obligation ...reverse your stand and be 'Open'.

Nikhil Jhingan


February 28, 2000

I will never buy another book from you. This is because you show the capacity to spend the profits of my patronage trying to destroy something that I use every day: the web. If you wish to provide a service, you may start by not being a barrier to your customers. The only investment of yours that this patent protects is the time you have spent filling for it.

Adrian Johnston


February 28, 2000

Amazon, this is a rather foolish thing you have done. Don't you realise that this is just inviting MickeySoft to invent and patent no-click technology, where all of your financial details are transmitted immediately to Redmond, Washington. Where Micro$oft immediately charges you for all software you may or may not have purchased, and all future upgrades/versions of said software.

Matthew Wallis


February 28, 2000

I've dropped out of the Amazon Associates program, removed all links to Amazon from my site, and signed up with Powell's Books. I will do no more business with Amazon -- though they are far and away the best in their field -- until the company moderates its aggressive deployment of bogus software patents. My public stand is at http://tbtf.com/blog/2000-02-27.html#1 .

Keith Dawson


February 28, 2000

I have long been a customer of Amazon and in your associates program. The 񘐜 or so per quater in orders that you receive from our web sites participation in the associates program will cease at the end of this quater. I will be terminating our membership in the associates program and joining in the boycott of Amazon unless you change your policy on this issue.

R. Steven Rainwater


February 28, 2000

I've spent quite a few bucks buying books from your company over the past 2 years, because it was convenient and because I liked the way you did business over the Internet. These feelings have changed with your ridiculous move toward these rather trivial patents. Until you change your stance on these patents, all of my business will be redirected to your competitors.

Mike Richardson


February 28, 2000

I have been boycotting Amazon since I heard of this ludicrous patent claim in early January, and will continue to do so. There has been no public statement from Amazon that remotely justifies their actions, and with the passage of time, it has become even more clear that even Amazon cannot justify the patent. Perhaps it is time that Amazon looked at how amoral their actions are.

C. Bryant


February 28, 2000

Leave it to humans, supposedly the most species on the planet Earth, to once again deficate where they eat. Jeff, cease listening to the power hungry, greed obsesed, lawyers of the Dark side and come back to us. We are the one's that made you. The AOL horde is too sheepish to support you for long. In the words of Kiki, "Stay good, Jeff! Stay good!!" (Thanks Pete)

Todd Metcalf


February 28, 2000

You and your company disgusts me, I will not buy from you again, and I will persuade my friends to choose another vendor to purchase from, until you give up this childish crap. Dont forget your roots! http://www.noamazon.com is a good site to start with, it lists all the alternatives to amazon. I strongly encourage all to go there right now and bookmark it for later use.

robert soros


February 28, 2000

Gee, Amazon... this letter is getting a tad large, don't you think? On a less flaimbaitish note, i do support the boycott of Amazon while they engage in practices which engender such badwill on the part of it's customers. I've done my part to discourage my friends and family from using Amazon in their online purchasing and i encourage everyone to spread the word. Paul Young

ephemeral at operamail dot com


February 28, 2000

I've shopped quite often at your website. I even bought christmass presents there this year for my neices and nephews. I will no longer shop at your establishment. When you come to your senses it will probably be to late. Look at the etoy etoys fight. Next time I want a book I'll get it from Barnes and Noble. Think about what you're losing compared to what you are gaining.

Steve Baugus


February 28, 2000

Even if these patents were not enforced by Amazon, I think this form of thinking when it comes to technology can lead way to stifling progress. The example that Amazon sets is going to be carried on by others, and if enough people do that, or enough people do it strongly enough, then we may be in for trouble. We've come so far, and it's sad that marketing and gimmics are threatening that.

Adekunle Olonoh


February 28, 2000

What is being done to patent law is distasteful and offensive. Its truely pathetic that company as large and ubiquitous as Amazon would need to resort to this kind of lowbrow tactic in an attempt to fend off their rivals. In the past I used amazon frequently. Since this case was opened I would rather spent longer and pay more to get the books I want than to use Amazon.

Aaron Tavistock


February 28, 2000

Today I reject Amazon.com, IMDB and any other sites which exist as part of, or to support Amazon. Until the patents on One-Click Shopping and the Amazon Associates program are repudiated by Amazon, I will no longer shop at Amazon. Whatever value that Amazon offers the Internet and the world at large pales in comparison to the potential havoc caused by absurd patents.

James Mitchell


February 28, 2000

I couldn't agree more Mr. O'Reilly. If and when I see an associate or friend on Amazon's site, I always take a moment and explain to him/her the one-click patent and how it suppresses creativity on the 'net. Then I usually point their browser to bn.com or thinkgeek.com. <br><br>Not b/c bn.com is necessarily better, rather because of principle. I just hope Jeff realizes this in time.

Joshua Staples


February 28, 2000

I understand business motives behind filing for a patent. However I urge Amazon.com to give up it's software patents as they represent something truly trivial. In my opinion it is only a matter of time before these patents are overturned. All the ill will that these patents are generating is surely not worth whatever benefit there is to holding on to them until they are overturned.

Steven Pulito


February 28, 2000

Trivial and obvious patents are an unethical means by which large companies stake out portions of the market place, obstruct the activities of competitors, and deny individuals the benefits of our rapidly expanding publicly developed technology. We, your customers, are not blind to the advantage you take of us. Your trademark's "good name" is its most important asset. Don't waste it.

Daniel R. Strick


February 28, 2000

And by the way, why is the patent office so overwhelmed by current software technology? Who is running that office?? Your average tech-spec person should be able to understand the universality of cookies. Its the patent office that needs a real overhaul, and we should press that point to the elected officials who can do something about it. Let's send them and the office an open letter, pronto.

Colin Rudd


February 28, 2000

I am furious about the 1-click patent and Amazon's attitude about it. I have been an Amazon customer since the early days, and until now I have bought a couple of thousand dollars worth of books and CDs from Amazon. No more. Since RMS's call for boycott I have stopped buying from Amazon, and unless Amazon voluntarily gives up the blatant abuse of the patent system I will not buy from them again.

Jĺrgen Botz


February 28, 2000

When the patent office finally gets up to speed -- perhaps even catches up to the 1990s, muchless the next decade -- it will laugh all Amazon patents into legal oblivion. It's too bad. I liked Amazon. But I will never, ever use it again. And I know a lot of people, folks who I will urge to do the same. B&N and Borders run pretty good sites. So does Walmart. With my help, they'll get even better.

Steve Abatangle


February 28, 2000

Amazon: You are behaving poorly. Your judgements are unsound, and your ethics in this issue are questionable. To patent the '1Click' ordering process is ridiculous. If you can offer any reason why it isn't, I will immediately stop complaining. In the world of e-commerce, public perception is everything. And despite what you may think, your public perception is not invulnurable. Dont risk it.

Ryan Abrams


February 28, 2000

I could not agree with you more, Tim. Amazon is pissing in the well, and they will receive no more of my business unless they do an "about-face" on this issue. I am a book addict, and I buy a book every other week, but I'll buy them from a company that has my (and the whole Internet's, really) best interest at heart. I don't think I can afford not see things this way. Sorry Jeff, Troy Johnson

Troy Johnson


February 28, 2000

Amazon's patenting of the one-click ordering system is a blatant abuse of their power as a major internet company. They are purposely using it to impede the progress of all web commerce that neither merges with them nor pays royalties to them. Because of the ineffectiveness of the current US patent system, I believe that the only way to correct this abuse is a total boycott of amazon.com

Marissa Hoftiezer


February 28, 2000

It's hard for me to simply stop using the valuable service that Amazon provides. I've bought numerace dvd's and countless books from them since their inception. However, the anti-competitve nonsense that this patent signifies has got to end. Now, it is my turn to look elsewhere as I purchase technical books and films. Other options are available, even if I do have to "click twice" to order from them. ;)

James Scott Olsson


February 28, 2000

To attempt to own and exclude all competitors from using the bloody obvious "1-click" ordering process has shown the world your true colours. Not only have you alienated your technical customer base, you have sent out a clear message that amazon will resort to any dirty trick to keep its monopoly... you may win a few battles this way, but you will certainly lose this war yet another x-amazon customer.

Jim Clark


February 28, 2000

It is disgraceful that Amazon has chosen to try to take open standards that made the WWW grow so fast and try to subvert them to their own purposes. Thanks to their predatory and ill conceived patent filings, they have lost my business. Apparently, they are too close to Redmond, and have taken lessons from their neighbor about "Big Brother" ambitions. I'm very appalled and disappointed at their behavior.

Peter Schilling


February 28, 2000

I used to look to amazon first for any product that they offered. I was there in the begining buying hundreds of dollars worth of books for a business when amazon was just developing. I beleived that amazon was different, a beleiver in the new way of doing things. I now see that as soon as amazon had the chance, they joined the establishment. They joined not as a reforming party, but as a supporter of the party line.

Piotr Misztal


February 28, 2000

To Mr. Bezos and the shareholders of amazon.com: As a web developer I find your tactics ghastly. Therefore, my wife, myself and members of my family will no longer make purchases from your company. I will also educate everyone I know of what amazon is doing and urge them to look elsewhere for on-line shopping. I hope this boycott will be a lesson to all corporations everywhere that attempt to abuse 'the system' in a 'free-market' society.

Dean Williams


February 28, 2000

On top of the absurdity of digitizing a widely popular and age old business model (the running account), a trivial application of a widely used feature is responsiible for this alleged "invention". The whole reason behind the "cookie" is that you need not identify yourself on a regular basis to the web sites you frequent. I no longer frequent Amazon, and I actively encourage my friends to abstain from using your services.

Eric B. Mitchell


February 28, 2000

It is not only discourteous and bad business practice to take a free technology and make its use proprietry, but plain thievery. It is disgusting that people would even have the gall to consider such a thing, let alone go ahead with it. Please do not set a precedent for the rest of the Internet community, which has thrived because it is an open community where technology enriches the lives of all, not just one selfish player.

Andrë Pang


February 28, 2000

I have purchased several books (all technically related) and have been very happy with the service. I have enjoyed the ability to be assured that the book that I purchased would be worth the money, and how I could find exactly what I wanted. However, since hearing of Amazons' patent filings I have not visited their website, nor will, until the matter is resolved to my satisfaction. That is, they drop their efforts to patent.

John Hayes


February 28, 2000

Mr. Bezos: Since I chose to quit purchasing from Amazon.com after the Spamazon debacle, your most recent episode of dishonorable behavior has not lost me as a customer. Rather, it has gained me as an enemy. I, too, shall be recommending to my friends, family, and associates that they cease doing business with you. I sincerely hope that your stockholders spend a good deal of time thinking over whether dishonesty constitutes due diligence.

Karl A. Krueger


February 28, 2000

I cannot say enough about how apalled I was by not only the *grant* of this baseless patent, but the fact that it was *Amazon* who filed it! So Jeff using his old office door as a desk was just a ploy to ingratiate himself to the public! I'm a techie: the kinda guy parasites like you *need* in order to flourish. Don't piss us off. Your org WILL die, without cheerfully willing brains to propell it. Get on the clue train, Jeff!

Peter r Schmitt


February 28, 2000

I read and learn much from looking, examining and trying people's code: Code that has been freely shared with others for that purpose. We better ourselves through sharing what each other has learned including the mistakes and successes. If we are not able to learn from each other; if our thoughts and ideas are fenced behind legal barriers surrounded by paranoia and fear of not getting credit then we might as well remain in the stone age.

Dan T.


February 28, 2000

To Amazon.com, You have already lost business from myself and other associates of mine over the ridiculous issue of patenting 1-Click ordering. Why do you continue to foster such ill will? Our business isn't lost forever, however. I enjoy using Amazon.com, and I will place an order the day you announce that you are abandoning this absurd abuse of the patent system. I imagine you will get a lot of free publicity by "doing the right thing"(TM).

Eric Jones


February 28, 2000

It's questionable logic to conclude that, through a collection of technologies otherwise not belonging to Amazon and some of their own development, one could patent any apparatus that would lead to an individual clicking on something. The click is a fundamental aspect of computing via GUI. I wonder if Amazon would be willing to accept all customer support issues relating to problems that sourced from or involved a click at some point.

Tyler Regas


February 28, 2000

Take any old normal sales medthod and add the words "with a computer" or "over a network" and suddenly that's original? Not likely. We are moving more and more non-computer business practises to computers. It's called automation. What Amazon is doing is abusing the legal system to take money for our pockets. I have stopped using them and now go to the conner store. Thanks for the nice little kick in the teeth. -- James Dornan

James Harry Dornan


February 28, 2000

Mr Bezos, I admire what you have done with amazon.com, and I was a frequent shopper there. However, since hearing of the 1-click patent, I haven't oredered a single item from your web site, and I don't plan too again until this abuse of the patent system is ceased. Thanks for all you've done for the web so far, I just hope that you see the light soon, and continue to make the medium a better place. Thanks for your time, Ben Stanfield

Ben Stanfield


February 28, 2000

The Amazon executives should read and heed www.cluetrain.com if they ever hope to survive. The Internet has given us customers new power to communicate instantly and effectively with each other in our own community. We can easily and instantly select ANY available vendor based entirely upon our own whims simply by typing in a different URL. Either play the game the way we want it to be played or you simply won't be invited to the next round.

Jim Gunkel


February 28, 2000

Amazon used to be an innovative company; now these ridiculous patents show that it has become a typical mindless corporation. The time for such dinosaurs is over. Customers don't have to take this kind of thing any more - Bezos of all people should know this. Whoever advocated this move at Amazon should be fired immediately, because they've killed the company. Amazon shares now represent a piece of the past. Goodbye, Amazon, it was fun while it lasted. V.

Viveka Weiley


February 28, 2000

Amazon used to be the perfect example of the new era: a small internet company challenging the established world of bookselling dominated by Borders and Barnes and Noble. Sadly, as so often happens, once the oppressed gains power, it turns around and does the same thing that was done to it. Amazon is becoming a perfect example of the old era: a stodgy company able to compete only by manipulating the government and stifling competition. You've lost my business.

Henry Towsner


February 28, 2000

I was one of the first members of the associates program, and i've been shuttling book reviews to your sites for years now. I used to be a regular customer myself, too: one or two orders each month. But when the One-Click patent was announced, I slapped a big "stay-away" warning on my recommendations pages, and now that "Associates" are patented, too, I am redirecting visitors to other sites. You've lost my business and my trust.

C. Scott Ananian


February 28, 2000

I think its about time that the entire community spoke out with regards to patents like this. We also need to encourage the patent office to wake up, and prevent these types of patents. If I remember correctly, Yahoo pulled a few of these some time ago (although, I don't recall the end result). The Amazon patents are just a symptom of a larger, much more dangerous problem, the patent system. Perhaps an open letter to the patent office is also in order.

Troy Poppe


February 28, 2000

It's very disappointing to see a company that was once an innovator of the web become an abuser of the US Patent system. I've shopped at Amazon for a couple of years now, but I no longer do any business whatsoever with Amazon, and I encourage others both in person and through my website to likewise avoid Amazon. Until Amazon stops using legal harassment and lies, claiming they invented obvious uses of software that they didn't, I will go elsewhere.

Michael Gusovsky


February 28, 2000

Before your software patent, I considered B&S and old world company that was just out of touch with the new technology of the web. Now I am once again their customer, totally disheartened by Amazon's enforecment of software patents and by their email reply that basically snubbed me when I protested to them about it. Now instead of comming off like a pioneer on the web, you are comming off as a one time deal that just lucked out, but really doesn't get it.

David Christy


February 28, 2000

The Amazing Amazon is worthy of several accords and praise. But, their stance on patents should be loathed and driven six feet under. I would seriously like to challenge both their patents, for I too (along with several other internet developers) have invented 1-click-click ordering, and affiliate programs (in the form of banners) long before Amazon was registed as a domain. Right now, Amazon might be not even be worthy of a nicely chewed tobacco spit.

Mohamed Ishan


February 28, 2000

To whom it may concern: I am president of Dataway Inc, a security consulting firm based in San Francisco. I have used Amazon several times personally and for business. I strongly urge Amazon to give up on this reckless 1-Click patent strategy as it is patently (excuse the pun) ridiculous and will hurt Amazon and the Internet community in the long run. Dataway shall not be purchasing any items from Amazon until this silly game is stopped. Sincerely, Simon Lewis

Simon Lewis


February 28, 2000

Not only will I no longer buy books from Amazon.com, I have put an end to all use of your site on our corporate intranet. I also take it upon myself to educate my peers and friends to not use your site and recommend other sites at which to buy books. As programmer of web technologies, I am very concerned about your short sighted and selfish behavior regarding this issue. My boycott and related activities will continue until you change your policy.

john napiorkowski


February 28, 2000

Just yesterday, I was defending amazon.com to a friend of mine as "the only company I've run into on the Net that doesn't piss off its customers - the only one that consistently 'gets it.'" Which, so far, has been the case - at least once the problem has been brought to amazon.com's attention. Software patents (patents in general, in my opinion) are bad things. Worse than spam, I'd say. I would hate to have to join the boycott. I really *do* enjoy buying from amazon.com.

Jack Rigley


February 28, 2000

Mr Bezos, what are you thinking? If ARPANet had not been opened to .com access for the price of registration and a POP connection, Amazon.com would not be. If Tim Berners-Lee, Larry Wall, and Linus Torvalds had acted (with much more justification) as Amazon...there would be no Amazon.com. So now you shun the very ideals that produced the World Wide Web on the Internet and alienate the very architects upon which your empire is founded. Have you no shame?

Robert Taylor


February 28, 2000

To amazon: This patent is both an abuse of a system designed to protect genuine innovation instead of obvious applications of exisiting technologies as well as an insult to the Internet community at large; it is a remarkable about-face of a company many believed to be genuinely interested in fostering growth and innovation on the Internet instead of stifling it. Regardless of what happens in this patents case on a legal level, this disrespect of the roots of your success will come back to haunt you.

A. W.


February 28, 2000

I had already written to Amazon, as a very early customer, stating that I am boycotting them because of this patent action (even quite a bit before RMS made his public statement). Of course, I am just some guy who bought a couple dozen books, not an influential publisher like Tim O'Reilly. But it's good to do what you can. I would encourage all other Amazon customers to both sign this public letter, and write individual comments to Amazon stating the same general sentiment.

David Mertz, Ph.D.


February 28, 2000

Patents should be reserved for truely innovative ideas that need protection. Such trivially obvious refinements as 1-click ordering fall far short of the bar. As a 17 year software developer with experience at IBM, Apple, and 10 years at Microsoft (most recently as an Architect), the "innvention" of 1-click ordering is so obvious it's banal. It is certainly not the kind of innovation I would suspect from the company that made Web-based retail a reality. Sincerely, Brendan Dixon

Brendan Dixon


February 28, 2000

This is my second letter to Amazon.com in 12 hours, but there are certain acts of stupidity that can't go unnoticed. The US Patent Office, Amazon.com, RIAA, DVDCCA, Unisys, and the MPAA come to mind. As I stated in my earlier email, Amazon's competitors have received all my business since this patent nonsense started. My 趚 my not account for much, but when we start multiplying it by the thousands the numbers will get noticed. Stock holders tend to notice these things.:)

Gregory Stooksberry


February 28, 2000

Amazon is great for me - I've always used it as a perfect example of e-commerce, back when that phrase wasn't mainstream like it is today. Right now I use it as an example of how stupid a company can be, losing money from customers because of a trivial patant. This issue will slowly grow and grow, and at some point it will get Jeff Bezos on the front of Time again. But this time, he won't like it. Such a pity, Amazon is a great concept. The good thing is, it gives competition a chance..

John Sinteur


February 28, 2000

Take from the poor, give to the rich. It seems that the poor do get poorer and the rich do get richer. I can not believe that there is NOT a system in place to allow for review of patents that are under consideration. While I know the patent office must be busy as a bird in spring with the on slaught of new software patents, this stinks of needing a website devoted to just that. I'm glad Tim O'Reilly has decided to do something about it and not just talk about it. Down with Amazon, long live O'Reilly.

Troy Muller


February 28, 2000

This 1-click patent business is simply crazy...Give it up Amazon. I have purchased from Amazon in the past, and I would have purchased other items in the future since their service, speed, and prices were all superb. But I will be certain to purchase from your competitors until the time comes that you have agreed to give up this silly patent. Also, I will be certain that my family and our business are aware of your shenanigans and their purchases will be made elsewhere as well. Give it up.

Mark Tomich


February 28, 2000

I have emailed them asking them to remove all trace of my "customer identity," etc from their databases. I have not heard back. I *WANT* to know that they will remove all trace of my credit cards, shipping info, and email addresses from their databases. What a regret. I quite enjoyed shopping with them and making use of their consumer feedback. I even used to cite them as a shining example of good site design. Tsk tsk that it comes to this b.s. example of greed and legal shenanigans.

Jason P. Stanford


February 28, 2000

I hope that Amazon.com's new patent-centric business model helps them in their quest for that ever-elusive profit. It's a shame, because the original plan (you know, the one that just involved pleasing customers) seemed like such a good bet. The great thing about the Internet, besides the fact that that the technology isn't patented, is that it costs me nothing to shop at a different online retailer. Which is exactly what I have been doing ever since learning about the 1-Click patent.

Alexander Kourakos


February 28, 2000

It isn't like Amazon has some unique product or service we all HAVE to have. Jeff Bezos isn't Bill Gates and he needs to wake up, smell the coffee and realize that we ain't about to allow him to BECOME another Gates. It's easy, and often less expensive, to purchase from other online booksellers so that's what is happening with anyone with a clue about things 'Net related. This boycott isn't even a minor hardship for those of us joining it so it can and probably will continue as long as needed.

John Morris


February 28, 2000

The Amazon patent, like many other recent United States software patents granted for 'inventions' that do not meet the criterion of being 'non-obvious', is an alarming and potentially crippling travesty. Amazon - as one of the largest beneficiaries of a network born out of open and competitive intellectual endeavour - should be ashamed to be associated with the crappy tactics of patent bargaining and harrassment. Up till now I had no particular reason to feel positive about Barnes & Noble.... Peter

Peter Gallagher


February 28, 2000

While I haven't been a large customer of yours, I have purchased over 贄 at your store between O'Reily books for the ISP I work at, and books for myself at home. If I thought it was remotely possible I would ask to return these items so I could purchase from one of your compeditors. Since the emergence of your patent I've purchased ์ from your compeditor, Barnes & Nobel. I will continue to boycott your website until you reverse your decision, even if it meant loosing the ability to buy online.

Tom Forsythe


February 28, 2000

I agree with virtually everything Tim O'Reilly has said. Perhaps the most galling and outrageous aspect of all this (and surely the most ironic) is that Amazon depends upon *unpatented* open source software for their very existence -- and they repay this debt with preposterous patents on algorithms they did not invent. I will not spend a dime at Amazon (and I will discourage my friends from doing so) until/unless Amazon changes its course. Free your patents, Mr. Bezos. Stop listening to your lawyers.

Fred W. Noltie Jr.


February 28, 2000

I am a former Amazon customer and have purchased more than 񘈨 worth of books from the site. I have also recommended the site to others and linked to it. Not any more. Not only am I boycotting Amazon, I will patronize and actively recommend any company you sue. "One-click ordering" was one of the suggested SAMPLE APPLICATIONS in the original Netscape page on web cookies. Art can't get much more prior than that. Your patent is utterly bogus -- did you hire your lawyer from an email spam or a bus bench ad?

Don Marti


February 28, 2000

Ariving somewhat late onto the online-book scene, I have purchased all of my books (in the multiple hundreds of dollars) from Barnes and Noble online, specifically because of this Amazon.com nonsense. It will be interesting to see if Amazon wishes to lose more and more business to try to enforce a patent that is essentially ridiculous. So I have to use Barnes & Noble's 2-click purchase method. Big deal. I haven't not purchased a book because of the inconvenience of that extra click yet.

Christopher T. Lansdown


February 28, 2000

At one point in time (internet decades ago) I was pulling for Amazon because I thought they had a better idea. In the far distant past I was pulling for Microsoft because I thought they had a better idea. Dumb, Dumb, Dumb . . . The pattern should be clear: innovate -> thrive -> dominate -> bully And if there weren't people such as Mr. O'Reilly, and many other fine individuals, to call the bluff; what would happen? The images I can conjure up are dire. Not buying my books at Amazon, Jonathan Moran

Jonathan Moran


February 28, 2000

I had never even thought about buying a book anywhere besides Amazon before this. I didn't even know Barnes and Noble had a site, and even though I go to their retail stores religiously, Amazon.com was my first choice for online books, the service is THAT good. Tim makes many excellent and eloquent points, all I can say is DROP IT. I admin 20 web-servers and work with this stuff daily, we wouldn't even THINK of patenting this kind of thing. Concentrate on service, and maybe, someday, you'll make a PROFIT.

Chris Curtiss


February 28, 2000

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Software patents are, in general, a necessary evil; and once their evil outweighs their necessity, they must be done away with. There is no necessity which the "1-Click" patent serves, and a lot of unnecessary evil which comes along with it. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: PGPfreeware 6.5.2 for non-commercial use <http://www.pgp.com> iQA/AwUBOLtTS5gOGKeCwjkrEQJoiwCeIJtwu02uzNgqSbOdnHiOsfxk7DgAn1JB J6EasDYya/fkriWk/0ohdohc =vOsn -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

Robert J. Hansen


February 28, 2000

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 I've officially been boycotting amazon for almost 2 months now. And have bought several books from competitors in the meantime. Hey Tim! could you add comment numbering to this page, so we can easily count how many signatures. Anyways to make this official! -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: PGPfreeware 6.5.1 for non-commercial use <http://www.pgp.com> iQA/AwUBOLtOFmVupIrBSmvQEQL7NACbBKo2AK03mvQcTnGujS2jrEKHSkQAoMqf AsiVPTeRynSAcUyt3vkMzYgU =qJ+L -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

John Larsen


February 28, 2000

The mere thought of this patent makes me sick. The only word that I can think of for it is obsurd. What's next? Is somebody going to patent the English language and then expect royalties from every person that uses it to communicate? Amazon.com has just lost all respect that I ever had for them. Their only hope for regaining that respect is to publicly appologize for this slap in the face to the software development community. The management of Amazon must have attended the Microsoft University of self-interest and greed.

Len Huppe


February 28, 2000

I am boycotting Amazon <em>forever</em>. There is no redemption for their actions. Even if they stop enforcing this patent, and/or if it is overturned, I will never again purchase anything from Amazon. <p>Likewise, I am boycotting all products from Xircom, Diamond (and S3 who bought them), American Power Conversion, Iomega, etc. Even if these companies have finally been hit by a clue by four, their previous hostile actions to Linux and Open Source, before Linux and Open Source was cool, have earned them a place on my blacklist.

Kenneth J. Hendrickson


February 28, 2000

Come on Jeff! You did it all man, you started the company that became the poster child of internet business. I cannot imagine how it must feel to look at the world each day, and the huge number of people trying to build on the frontier *you* helped discover. But you're not using that mind to innovate any more. Or perhaps you are, but by subscribing to this farce, no one will ever know it. You are now helping to destroy that which made you succeed. Can a man of such potential have become that short sighted?

Johnathan Nightingale


February 28, 2000

Amazon's patent should never have been allowed due to prior art. The management should take heed of the well-reasoned arguments presented above and abandon this method. Who cares if it takes one click, two clicks or many clicks? It makes no difference to a customer. What the customer wants is good prices, reliable service, and fast delivery. The patent has nothing to offer to satisfy these needs. Many people will not purchase from Amazon due to these tactics. Please add my name to the group. Regards, Michael R. Monett

Michael R. Monett


February 28, 2000

I glanced over my orders, about 赨 for me. I glanced at orders from my deptartment at work(8 people) and they ammount to well over 񘈨. I will not, and I will recommend my employer no longer support amazon by purchasing books there. I now go to the BN store about 20 minutes away and get them that way. It costs a bit more, but I feel that saving money (change) worth less then princepal. I will not return to amazon until they show that they will no longer use their patents as a tool to retard web and internet advances. Scott

Scott Alexander


February 28, 2000

I am a programmer and online consumer of many books including technical manuals and recreational readings. I think that Amazon has monopoly power in the area of internet distribution and is sadly mistaken if it thinks its current actions are morally right or good for the increasing growth of the Internet as a medium. Because Amazon wishes to bully with their monopoly powers and not allow competing companies to stay in business on genuine merits, I will be temporarily ordering my future purchases from barnesandnoble.com.

Jeffrey Pierce Henderson


February 28, 2000

Jeff, I'm saddened to see you resort to such tactics to stifle the competition. I _was_ a fairly regular customer of Amazon until the "1-click patent" issue came up - but you changed that. Now I frequent Fatbrain and the local Softpro store instead, and that will continue as long as your company persists in this ridiculous and harmful behavior. Until then I'll visit your site ONLY when I need to help the lunchtime crossword puzzle crowd with hints about authors and books - and you won't get any revenue from _that_ sort of visit. Sigh ...

Calvin Dodge


February 28, 2000

I have been a long-time Amazon customer, but I have recently taken my business elsewhere, as well as urging friends and family to do the same, because of Amazon's unethical and nearly-fraudulent tactics in this matter. To take the freely-given work of others and to leverage it into your own crass commercial advantage is nothing better than thievery. You are sowing many seeds of ill will for very dubious gain. I urge you to reconsider, for your own good and the good of the community, before permanent damage to electronic commerce and your own good name is done.

Philip Kim


February 28, 2000

Jeff, You are a good guy who has done a great job. Don't make a huge misstep with this silly patent thing. If you are a technical guy-- as you yourself have claimed you are-- then the good engineer force will triumph within you and you will not let this stand as it is. At the very least we know you realize how trivial the "technology" behind your patents are. The ideas themselves have been around a lot longer than amazon. Compete, don't foreclose,. Two brothers who have easily bought two VW bugs from your site, Antonio & Andres Rodriguez

Antonio & Andres Rodriguez


February 28, 2000

Having been involved with the web since it's infancy, I worked closely with one of the first, if not the first web site to allow readers to publish comments and reviews about software games. Perhaps we should persue a patent for online reader reviews using our earliest published date and point several attorneys Amazon's way. It's a real shame that so much work by so many people has gone the way of the IPO and money grubbing late commers. Amazon has seen the last 'unique impression' from our company network. Steve Gerencser - CIO - NeoTek Computer Systems

Steve Gerencser


February 28, 2000

I rebustly applaud the efforts of Mr. O'reilly and Mr. Stallman, in addition to numerous others. Sadly, I feel Mr. Bezos will be unswayed by our objections. It appears from the 'gist' of his response to Mr. O'reilly, as well as public statements/conduct, that he has no intention of altering course. I have never bought, nor shall I ever, any merchandise from Amazon. I do, however utilize their website and reader reviews/comments to base my purchasing decisions at competing retailers. This is, in my opinion, a rather ironic use of their services. Michael S. Oski

Michael S. Oski


February 28, 2000

The way companies compete in a free market is by originality and price. Amazon has not shown me either lately, and instead will capitalize on an already widely used technology by cheating. Cheating in the sense that lawyers with their crypticly worded patents can manage to fool over a patent board to own something that is not owned by anyone. Amazon.com will no longer get my business, which was pretty steady until the patent lawsuit Richard Stallman called for a protest on, which I also strongly agree with. Wise up Jeff, Adam Alexander Network Engineer Nexus Networks

Adam Alexander


February 28, 2000

I use Open and Free software because of the control and power it gives me over my machines. Much of this software was written by volunteers who can't afford high powered attorneys. The offensive and defensive uses of patents are formidible reasons for a talented volunteer coder not to release software. Neither defense or offense were among the original intents of the patent system which is now being sorely abused by proprietary software developers and e-businesses. I will not do business with Amazon as long as they hold and enforce these patents. I will urge others to do the same.

David Maxwell


February 28, 2000

i was a satisfied customer of amazon.com, but have been actively boycotting amazon for the past three months. that is i am using all of amazon's search facilities to find books and then ordering them at a competitor. i am doing all of this because i am appalled at patenting trivial technology as '1-click shopping' for online shopping. had similar trivial ideas been patented before, i don't think that the web would have become (and amazon.com with it!) what it is now. this has to stop and i will refuse to buy anything from amazon.com until amazon gives up on patenting trivial technology.

Patrick Decowski


February 28, 2000

I've ordered dozens of books from Amazon over the years, not because of one-click shopping (never used it), not because of the affiliate program (never used that either), but because Amazon had a robust web site, great selection, terrific customer service and prompt delivery. And you would have had me as a customer for life were it not for this ill-advised grab at other people's innovations. Mr. Bezos, please do the right thing and release these patents into the public domain. Please don't make the courts decide this issue, at which point you'll have lost my business for good.

Ken Wood


February 28, 2000

i officially quit shopping at amazon.com when the 1-click patent was revealed, and the associate program patent has only served to drive home the fact that i made the right decision. i will not begin to consider revoking my decision until both patents are released and a public statement/apology is made by bezos himself - in short, i'm never going to shop at amazon again. barnes & noble, dvd express, and ebworld will be happy to take the 1k+ per year i spend on movies, books, cds, and software. sincerely, another unsurprised ex-customer p.s. i use ebay for auctions, too ;]

Justin Honold


February 28, 2000

While I understand why Tim O'Reilly cannot support a boycott of Amazon, I feel that a boycott is appropriate. For those of us who agree, may I suggest trying the following online booksellers? I have been pleased with them and I think you will probably find better prices than at Amazon: www.bookpool.com www.1bookstreet.com I seem to recall that Amazon gained a reputation as a spammer in its early days. It seems to me that the company continues to have little or no respect for the internet or the people that use it. Amazon is an opportunistic plunderer. Please don't support them.

Kevin Cheek


February 28, 2000

Two months ago I had a fairly substantial book purchase to make. I researched all the books on Amazon, and then purchased them through Indigo.ca. I emailed Amazon to let them know that they lost the sale because of their ridiculous patents, and would continue to lose my business until they smartened up. In two months I've spent nearly 躔 on books, in each case using Amazon as a research resource, but purchasing through Indigo. I'm sure I'm not the only one doing this sort of thing, and I will continue to let Amazon know how much money they're not making off me and why.

Richard Lee-Morlang


February 28, 2000

As someone who has seen the evolution of computers since before Apple made a debut, I've seen my fair share of abuse against innovation and progress. For the last 5 years I have been deeply involved with a number of Internet activities, and so far have been using, recommending and supporting Amazon myself. Today I have to take side with Tim against these patents. It's my professional view that this is a grave mistake with long term effects that neither one of us desires. Please reverse your stance and stand up for innovation and progress. We need you! Steve Szmidt

Steve Szmidt


February 28, 2000

These kind of patents only hurt the industry (and your own company) in the long run. It has been said that in America, the rich get richer but the poor come with that rising tide as well. If the tide can rise even faster (by, for example, not patenting extremely obvious ideas) the industry can grow even faster and all can benefit. I acknowledge that you may have acquired the patents to protect yourself from other companies. If this is indeed the reason then state so and do not sue those who are indirectly helping you. Any other reason only serves to harm Amazon as well as the industry in general.

Kevin Hoffman


February 28, 2000

I think what Amazon is trying to do with not letting any one appart them to use the "one click shopping" technologie it's a stroke to the whole Internet community, it affect all of us, as developers or as simple persons that are looking for a good service not only in Amazon. You don't are where you are for free, it is because the people, the Internet community that have trusted and purchased in your oonline store, without them you would be no one, so why don't give something in return to them? FREE THE PATENT!!!!! COOKIES FOR ALL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Juan Luis Baptiste


February 28, 2000

In a world with a US Patent Office that didn't give out patents like jellybeans you would have never obtained a patent on the non-novel and obvious "1-click" idea. After benefiting to the tune of billions of dollars in Market cap from the Internet, you now have the hypocritical gall to obtain and use this patent to legally intimidate and bludgen other potential competitors. You do a disservice to the image and brand that you've attempted to create over the past few years. I've signed my name to the BOYCOTT AMAZON site at http://nowebpatents.org/, and will no longer do business with you.

Neal Nuckolls


February 28, 2000

Over the last year or so, the sight of a UPS package from Amazon.com has been a common and welcome sight at my house. I have no desire, based on the service and convenience I have received from Amazon.com, to quit buying from you, but I cannot abide the stifling and anticompetitive use of trivial software patents. I write open source software for a living, and if everyone took your attitude to patent acquisition and enforcement, I would be unable to continue without a team of lawyers. Thus, my next few book and dvd purchases online will have to come from someone other than Amazon.com.

Jonathan Abbey


February 28, 2000

I previously mailed Amazon with my complaints/boycott letter, and while I was pleased by the (if possibly mechanized) response's promptness, I was appalled by its patronizing tone. What could make Mr. Bezos think so many of his customers are so unsavvy? And unprincipled? I am more than happy to tell (twice) a once bold and inventive company that they have slid off the deep end and shall have no more of mine (or my family's, or anyone else I may persuade) business until the patent is disolved. I am also pleased to second every one of the points Mr. O'Reilly made in his letter. There it is.

Michael Fischer


February 28, 2000

I previously mailed Amazon with my complaints/boycott letter, and while I was pleased by the (if possibly mechanized) response's promptness, I was appalled by its patronizing tone. What could make Mr. Bezos think so many of his customers are so unsavvy? And unprincipled? I am more than happy to tell (twice) a once bold and inventive company that they have slid off the deep end and shall have no more of mine (or my family's, or anyone else I may persuade) business until the patent is disolved. I am also pleased to second every one of the points Mr. O'Reilly made in his letter. There it is.

Michael Fischer


February 29, 2000

How can you patent an associate program when others have been doing this for some time? It's time for you to become a good citizen of the community that has been so good to you and not steal from those that have made you a millionaire.

Grant Johnson


February 28, 2000

I have ordered several hundred dollars worth of books, etc. from Amazon, but I have not ordered _anything_ from your site/company since you started to enforce your "One-click" patent. Nor will I order from you ever again, until you admit that your patent is nothing more than a trivial implementation of cookies, which where in widespread use long before you filed your patent application. Amazon will continue to lose customers, especially web savy, customers, until you admit that this patent was wrongly granted, since it is just a catchy marketing phrase tacked on to prior art. Raffael Cavallaro

Raffael Cavallaro


February 28, 2000

I have long been a customer of Amazon, since almost day one. I have supported them both by purchase and promotion. I'm sorry that this should have to end, but proprietary, whether by closed systems or patents (which is the ludicrous concept of a state mandated secret) is antethical to the Net, and it's current success which Amazon is now seeking to exploit. Shame on you Bezos, you begin more and more to resemble not an Internet pioneer, but a Barnes and Noble like bricks and mortar monopolist wannabe. You wouldn't be Time's Person Of The Year had you pulled this stroke a little earlier.

Hamish MacEwan


February 28, 2000

We have supported Amazon.com for over a year now, and we will continue to do so. I still feel comfortable buying from Amazon, but now I shop around because I feel betrayed by its recent actions. This has cost Amazon.com sales of ฽ to CDNow.com, ์ to Electronic's Boutique's online store, and ๖ more to a technically oriented shop with discounts on O'Reilly books. That's 赏. Perhaps such a small amount of revenue or the cost of losing an enthusiastic supporter isn't important to Amazon, but if they wish for me to purchase books and music as often as before then they must change their priorities.

Sean Crago and family


February 28, 2000

I have been a very loyal customer of yours. Since I learned of your web site in the Fall of 1997, I have purchased books from your site almost exclusively. Shopping at your site was much more convenient the hour I would have to spend in the car to shop with your competitors. I also strongly believe in supporting e-commerce whenever I can. However, your actions regarding the patenting of cookies is outragious. Unless you reverse your position on this matter and apologize to the online community (as well as to the true inventors of cookies whose ideas you have stolen), I will continue to take my business elsewhere.

Chuck Reese


February 28, 2000

I have spent untold dollars at amazon.com - but no more. Not even the cute Christmas commercials could hange my mind now. Mr. Bezos, until you voluntarily withdraw your patent, I will voluntarily withdraw from purchasing anything from your site. I will recommend to all my friends and associates that they not purchase anything from amazon.com until this patently absurd (pun intended) patent is withdrawn. I would also advise any and all investors in amazon.com stock to sell the shares and donate the profits to the Free Software Foundation as they lead the call for the amanzon.com boycott. Fatbrain here we come!

Eric Wayte


February 28, 2000

As a college student, I don't have the most money in the world to spend, but I used to spend a lot of my expendable income at amazon.com. Well, I haven't for months now and I will continue to NOT buy anything from amazon until you cease such frivolous behaviour AND take steps to make amends for your transgressions (I would suggest 贄,000 each to the FSF and EFF). Anyway, I now buy books locally and get all my DVDs from DVDExpress, and have told all my friends and family about what you're doing. Not all of them see my point, but 2 or 3 have and now they are no longer your customers either. Do the right thing, please.

Shawn Boyette


February 28, 2000

You may not care what a bunch of geeks think - I wouldn't be all that surprised if the whole boycott is so far absolutely undetectable in your sales numbers - but you're swimming with the big sharks, these days. Imagine some state's Attorney General deciding your head would look very nice on your wall, and launching a suit against you and your ridiculous patent on 'behalf' of all the startups that won't generate wealth for her state because of your patent. More scarily, perhaps, imagine some other bubble-riding ecommerce company deciding to throw a few million into fighting your patents instead of into Super Bowl ads.

Jon Shemitz


February 28, 2000

As a college student, I am always short on miney and strive to look for the best deals. More than once my sights have set on Amazon.com. I appreciate what you have done for the e-commerce industry, and what you have done for your customers. But when you start to throw your weight around and patent things that are not unique to you and not new or very inovative, then you start to hurt yourself in the minds of the people who love you most. We are showing you a message of tough love here. I personaly will not shop at Amazom.com until it drops the one-click patent and the affiliates program patent. Amazon.com can be successful without these patents.

Martin Burgess


February 28, 2000

What a wonderful concept: Take a prior art, make an insignificant change, and call it a patent. Using that same line of thought, this could make car theft legal. Think about it - steal a car, change the tire's , now you own your own car. You took the original idea, make a small change, and called it your own. No different than my (perhaps weak) analogy but the idea remains, theft of public property (or idea) is still theft - period. Add my name, my son's name, my wife's name, my brother, his wife, son and daughter, my sister and her 2 kids, and my Mother and Father's name to the list of people who will no longer be purchasing from Amazon.

Ron Gage


February 28, 2000

Are you guys really that cheesy to patent something as silly as this? How many non-trivial technologies did you have to build upon to make Amazon? How many of these were patented? What if you had to wrangle with thousands of different companies, one of which patented the concept of transferring data, one of which patented the concept of the hyperlink, one of which patented the concept of exchanging money for goods and services? When you try to enforce patents such as these, it appears to many to be an act of desparation from a highly overvalued company that is expanding too fast, becoming breadth-first shallow rather than depth-first rich.

Martin Hock


February 28, 2000

Isn't strange...our parent's hard-earned income is taxed by Uncle Sam who invests that money into the Defense Department; who strategically creates an international network; who entrusts it to the universities of the world; who equip our youth with the tools needed to tap this valuable resource; who develop the tools and shares these tools with everyone; only to have a guy name Bezos say it belongs to him. Maybe this patent should have been given to the folks that made it all possible, not to some guy name Bezos. Buy your books from fatbrain.com. They are a great group of folks to work with because they put the customer first!

Robert Barksdale


February 28, 2000

E-commerce sites, Amazon customers, and Amazon affiliates should take a stand in support of the continued expansion of the internet, which Amazon is obviously seeking to ruin for everyone. Mass boycotting of Amazon's website and the products sold there, Amazon's affiliates websites, and any of the websites that link to or are associated with Amazon is in order until such time as the lawsuit against bn.com is dropped and the patents are abandoned by Amazon and placed safely back into the public domain. It's high time that Amazon learn to profit by implementing good and sound business practices, not just from, or at, the expense of others.

Deborah Ann Logiacco


February 28, 2000

This approach by amazon.com is (a) short-sighted; (b) ill-founded; and (c) a slap in the face to all who have embraced the company -- and its origingally superior philosophy -- since its earliest days. I have long held amazon.com as one of the best and most shining of e-commerce sites, one which could rise above the pettiness and cut-throat habits of established brick-and-mortar shops. The current attitude of the company is simply repugnant. Although it will be less convenient to seek out new sources for the various content I choose to purchase, it is a sure thing that I will no longer use amazon.com for my information purchase needs.

Bernard HP Gilroy


February 28, 2000

The growth of e-commerce allows us to focus more on the company than on the product. As is the case with most items, one can purchase a book from any number of websites. A company stands out based on its ease-of-use or customer service or good-faith-measures. Amazon chooses to stand out by attempting to squelch the foundations of the Internet. An overall poor marketing choice AND an abuse of the laws governing our country AND preying on the ignorance of the patent office. Shame on you. I am joining the ever-growing boycott of Amazon. And I will not return as a customer unless the mistake is admitted and amends are made--publicly and immediately.

Susan Petracco


February 28, 2000

I once extolled the great thigns that Amazon.com did. Buying books online, a geek's dream! It was a service to the community, and the world at large, truly a breakthrough idea. But now, after the crud Amazon is pulling, I've decided that any company that pulls a stunt like this may well pull a similar stunt again. As such, I am never shopping at Amazon again. Chapters.ca for my books, cdnow.com for my CDs, and if I need anything else Amazon offers, I'll take a walk to the mall. Amazon has, in the minds of many people, permanantly sullied their reputation with many people, and anyone with a memory won't easily forget these incidents. I know I won't.

Daniel Udey


February 28, 2000

I've purchased a large number of items from Amazon, including a number of gift certificates to friends as a way to introduce them to online shopping. With this type of obscene abuse of the patent system, I can't bring myself to shop at Amazon any longer. I'm also a stockholder of AMZN and I'm leaning towards selling my holding because of Amazon's less then admirable business practices. Also, I really don't like 'one click shopping' and would much rather opt out of such a feature. I've already had my credit card number stolen thanks to the cduniverse mess. I'd much rather type my credit card # in every time then risk having it stolen due to inadequate security.

Clem Taylor


February 28, 2000

I am a software developer by profession, and have bought thousands of dollars worth of books from Amazon. If you check my customer profile, you will see that I speak the truth; I enjoyed Amazon, in the early days. However, I sign my name to Tim's letter, in sadness, to signal my distaste of the way you are choosing to handle your patents. Did you have a conscience, you would be ashamed. FatBrain has received thousands of dollars from me in new book orders since I made the decision, months ago when you went after Barnes & Nobles. If you could check my profile there, you'd see that, again, I speak the truth. This _is_ affecting your bottom line. I promise.

Jeff K. Hoffman


February 28, 2000

To the people who know, Amazon's actions are clearly nothing more than a cynical attempt to bash competitors. What you, Mr. Bezos, should remember is that such technical people make up a large portion of your market. You can still redeem your company and regain our business if you admit your mistake and promise not to engage in this kind of monopolistic, anti-free-market maneuvering in the future. Please do so, and set an example in the moral sphere of e-commerce, as you have so spectacularly done in the sphere of content. PS: I have been boycotting Amazon in all my purchasing decisions, including the many I make at work, since this patent was filed. I won't stop until you do.

Quinn Weaver


February 28, 2000

While I believe that Mr. O'Reilly should have gone the whole hog and agreed to participate in RMS's boycott of Amazon, I can see how that would affect his business (and possibly open him up to shareholder lawsuits, if O'Reilly Books is a publically-traded company). I, personally, have made purchases at Amazon in excess of $US550, and currently have over $US250 worth of purchases that I would like to make there. Because of their actions, I have decided not to go ahead with these orders at Amazon, and I will instead take my business to other Web-based vendors. I will continue doing so until Amazon backs off and makes a public apology for its misuse of the patent system.

Bruce Harada


February 28, 2000

I am disappointed to find that one of the pioneer's of Internet commerce feels it necessary to resort to dubious patent claims to maintain their business and stifle the competition. Cookie technology, as used in 1-Click technology, is nothing new or terribly innovative. It's particularly disappointing when considering the points made in Tim O'Reilly's open letter: that the majority of the technology that even allows Amazon to exist is from people who had the foresight not to restrict the technology they had created. Technically, I can't boycott Amazon, since I've never purchased from you. But I will not purchase from you or your affiliates until this issue is resolved.

Craig Bull


February 29, 2000

Pity. I will now be forced to take all my business elsewhere.

Kent Crispin


February 28, 2000

As a customer of amazon.com and an internet developer from pre-web days. I find your patenting of the "1-Click Order Process" First of all greedy to the point of sillyness I dont believe you originated an idea so obvious and to be damaging to the internet community at large not only because it it stops others from using a simple order interface but bnecause itencouages similar patenting of obvious Ideas denying people the right to innovate. I hope that if you dont give up your patent that it is struck down in court. Untill one of these things happens you have definately lost a customer. O'reilly however will still get my patronage through a different vendor. Jason Conway

Jason Conway


February 28, 2000

Jeff, It's tough admit you're wrong. IĂm sure it seems less humiliating to have a patent claim rejected that to turn around and withdraw it after all this fuss. The patents youĂve obtained on ˘one-click technology÷ and the ˘associatesĂ program÷ are frivolous and the attempt to enforce the ˘one-click÷ patent is a shameless grope for a competitive advantage you have no right to. To admit this and to withdraw these patents and lawsuits would be a favor to yourself and the internet community that your success is built on. I firmly hope that youĂll do the right thing. For what itĂs worth, my last on-line book purchase didnĂt come from Amazon; I just couldnĂt bring my self to do it.

Michael Askew


February 28, 2000

As a regular book buyer, and a regular web shopper, I find this patent offensive. It is equivalent to patenting spreading your peanut butter in a swirl. It may be innovative to you, but many many folks have been doing it for years. Net cookies are simply configuration and documentation files. Having your particular set of info in there is just another obvious use of the storage. Oh, and the Associates program is also pretty cheesy. That's just like the companies that gave you a coupon if you got a friend to join up. Old Hat. In the long run, these patents will change your bottom line not at all, especially in comparison to the revenues brought on by the Amazon brand name, a name you are now sullying.

David C. Todd


February 28, 2000

Unbelievable. The idea that patents such as the "1-click" and "affiliates" were ever granted was hard enough to believe. The fact that Amazon is actually tried to enforce them is amazing to me. I had been a faithful Amazon customer. Quicken tells me that prior to my joining the boycott, I spent over 񘧸 at Amazon. I recently went looking for almost 10 O'Reilly books. My search never went near Amazon. At one shot almost 跌 was lost. Unless Amazon stops all litigation involving their ludicrous patents I will not only send all of my business elsewhere, but I have and will continue to explain to everyone I know why they should purchase from just about any company other than Amazon.

Rick Friedman


February 28, 2000

I tried for a few minutes to come up with analogies for this patent, but they all seemed ridiculous (Our innovation uses the number 'two' to allow our customers to order more than one but less than three or more units...). Then I realized that was not inappropriate. I guess being a laughingstock is easy with a full swag bag o' loot slung over your shoulder, eh Mr. Bozos? Well, word gets around and all the 'savvy media consultants' money can buy will be left trying to help you figure out how it becomes cool to hate some megacorp and how it happened to you. Brad "Don't wanna 'just do it'" Gregory (patron of local independent AND Barnes and Noble bookstores, and spreadin' the word...)

Brad Gregory


February 29, 2000

If the only way Amazon can figure out how to become profitable is making some silly patent and suing the pants off everyone else, why bother investing in the company?

Jon O


February 28, 2000

As this "One-Click" system is so easy to be made by any web developer and as I am able to reproduce its effect in 4 differents language (ASP, Perl, PHP, C/C++) in less than 5 minutes, I request you to hold any action against anyone creating it. This system use a wide-open way to store an ID number inside a client computer and match this number when needed against a database stored inside the server. Millions of E-Commerce site use this system to store the client progress during the shopping cart checkout/credit card authentification process. Amazon and only Amazon would hold the right to be able to retrieve those informations AGAIN, when the client come back ??? This is just nonsense.

Simon Huet


February 28, 2000

<b>I urge everyone who considers themselves open-minded to familiarize themselves with the possible dangers of frivolous software patenting. The internet, in this world has a chance like no other medium to be truly democratic and natural. Its as close as we can now get to connecting millions of brains together for common benefit. Amazon, do you really want to go into the book of history as one of the pioneers of free expression, or as as another Corp.com that can shove dollars into people's faces as proof of your achievement? The age of the internet/Open Source Software/Linux etc. is perhaps the only time in our collective existence when we begin to realize that MONEY isn't everything!</b>

Tom Bradford


February 28, 2000

I'd like to add my voice to Tim's in opposition to Amazon's recent business practices involving software / business-model patents. None of the benefits the Internet brings to society would ever have been available to anyone -- including Amazon.com -- if the 'Net's original developers had shared Amazon's rapacious, anticompetitive corporate attitude towards intellectual property. Amazon's strategy appears to be insidiously simple: reap the advantages of an historically-open development process, then slam the door shut on everyone else's access to the same benefits. Here's hoping that at some point, it will occur to Mr. Bezos that <i>he's</i> the one who Just Doesn't Get It.

John Miles @ RAD Game Tools


February 28, 2000

I am a longtime customer at Amazon, and have a lot of loyalty to them for their minimal, clear, dependable interface. But I am also a web developer, and absurb patents on obvious techniques threaten my livelihood. There are many developers like myself who implemented cookied logins long before Amazon, and any of us would have considered it idiotic to attempt to lock down that vital resource. Maybe we're like the indians who sold Manhattan - unable to believe that anyone could be foolish enough to think they can own such a thing. Or maybe Amazon is smart enough to know you really can buy the Brooklyn Bridge. Either way, if they make themselves my opponent, there are other stores just a click away.

Lucas Gonze


February 28, 2000

I found out about Amazon's actions concerning patents shortly after my first purchase from them. If the book I bought wasn't sitting at work with my name written in it, I was going to return it and demand my money back (and a restocking fee would have been a small price to pay for my conscience to be eased). Hopefully, some government agency with some leverage will do something about the USPTO's incompetence (as an organization, I'm sure the individuals are doing the best they can with what they've got). Just as Congress came down on the IRS, perhaps the Executive branch will come down on the USPTO, Clinton loves extolling the virtues of e-commerce. But will he back it up and let it grow at it's true capacity?

Ryan Grange


February 28, 2000

I, like many others it seems, once thought amazon.com was a wonderful example of a company that had struck the balance between convienence and service. I found and bought quite a few unusual books, too; however, you made my black-list the first time I saw one-click ordering (do NOT remember my credit-card number!) and doubly so when I saw that you had patented it and were trying to sue others over it's use. It's such an obvious application of cookies, I'm not sure even what to think of a patent office that granted such a patent. Actually, I take that back - thanks for patenting it, you've made an example of yourselves and made sure that no-one else tries anything as obnoxious. But I'm never buying a book at Amazon again.

Kevin Puetz


February 28, 2000

Amazon.com is an example of business people being business people. There goal is to make money. Simple as that, and they feel the best way to do that is to shutout everyone else from something they feel will give them a market advantage. The patent office needs to realize that they have little idea of how the Internet works. And they don't have qualified people looking at these patents. Why would a qualified person work at the patent office with their pay when they can get a job in industry. It's a shame of how Amazon.com has turned it's back on the Internet community which helped to make it a success. The Internet is not about making a profit, and destroying your competitors. It's about inovation which Amazon.com has helped eliminate.

Dan Nguyen


February 28, 2000

Mr. Bezos: Openness built you. Every time you make a sale, you're relying on countless open technologies: from the bare-metal wire protocols you ultimately use to talk to your cutsomers to the intricacies of HTML markup, your revenues are dependent on technology that's free for the use of all. Your company has rejected that openness. Your "one-click" patent lawsuit is a farce, and a slap in the face to the community whose efforts allowed your business to grow to its current stature. You aren't required to be considerate; you aren't required to show any form of respect or gratitude for those whose efforts made the technical basis of your enterprise possible. But I'm not required to buy anything from you. Neither is anyone else. Keep that in mind.

David Price


February 28, 2000

A few days ago I bought my first book online, usually just get them at the bookstore, but sometimes you cant find the right ones local.. anyway, due to the recent fact that amazon.com thinks they can patent html code and the use of cookies, I bought my first book from a different online store: We're pleased to let you know that the following has been shipped and is on its way. In the meantime, you can check the status of your order online; just go to your account and look under order status. Should you --barnesandnoble.com Customer Service This will be the only place I buy books from now on, until amazon figures out what they are doing and puts a stop to it.. Josh Bright

Josh Bright


February 28, 2000

I have to agree with many others who have signed this open letter that the folks at Amazon.com have provided an invaluable service to its customers worldwide. I am a poor college student who has considered purchasing books from Amazon.com because the prices are better than the on-campus bookstore. However, due primarily to the foolishness of the actions taken by Amazon.com against anyone using something even remotely similar to the "one-click shopping" mechanism, I cannot justify choosing Amazon as a vendor of choice for my textbooks. My ethical standards would not allow me to do so. This case is very similar to the MPAA case against the young Norwegian boy over the reverse-engineering of CSS. I sincerely hope you reconsider your actions.

Charles Scheidecker


February 28, 2000

It is unfortunate that a company whose enormous market capitalization is based on taking advantage of the work of others should decide to use the government's patent system to try and prohibit others from using what are to most anyone in the business community an 'obvious' idea. Unfortunately, due to this abuse of the patent system to try and corner the intellectual market on obvious ideas, I will be forced to make all future purchases through the chief competitor, Barnes & Nobles, and will encourage all of my customers and company to move all their purchases. These "land grabs" are offensive to the creativity of the community and will, in the end, set a bad precident which at some point Amazon will be on the wrong end of, with no supporters.

Christopher Petrilli


February 28, 2000

I think these patents are totally absurd. Amazon is misusing an incompetent patent system in order to steal the works of others, given out in good faith as an open standard, for their own gain. With greedy corporations such as the RIAA and MPAA attempting to steal our freedom for their own profit lately, I and many like me have been very sensitive about companies trying to do something similar. I simply cannot stand for such an obvious misuse of the system, broken or not, and I will deffinately be boycotting Amazon as long as these rediculous patents are still held. I will also continue to derecommend them to everyone I know, as there are quite a few people who often ask my opinion of technical things like this. Check out www.noamazon.com for a list of alternatives.

Adam Lassek


February 28, 2000

I first started using Amazon.com for virtually all my book shopping way back when it first surfaced on the net. I thought it was the best thing ever. Other booksellers' sites have appeared on the net since then, but I never wanted to use them. Until now. Mr. Bezos, I find your pursuit of these absurd patents to be absolutely disgusting. Perhaps it was naive of me, but I had hoped that the Web's early innovators would be people of more character than you have demonstrated in this blatant and arrogant abuse of the trust and loyalty of your core customers - the tech crowd that drove the Web in the first place. Until you give up trying to patent obvious applications of basic Web technology (that you didn't even invent!) I will not spend another penny on your site.

Christian Allred


February 28, 2000

Dear Jeff, I have three shelves full of technical books (over a dozen of them O'Reilly) and hundreds of CDs in my personal library. I add books and CDs regularly, spending easily โ - 贄 per month. I am quite comfortable with purchasing these items over the Internet, and have done so on many occasions. But I will not purchase them from Amazon. Not until you listen to what Tim and the entire technical community is telling you and drastically change your patent strategy. There are many vendors out there, and though your service may be excellent, I will accept some inconvenience in order to uphold a principle I believe in. The 1-click and associates program patents are just plain wrong, and your continued aggressive enforcement of them will ensure that I continue to shop elsewhere.

Carl N. Miller


February 28, 2000

I regret to inform you that I will refrain from ordering any books or software via Amazon until you "cease and desist" from your patent pursuit. I will watch for a public announcement that your company has granted a free public license to the existing patents, and at that time will inform the e-mail list I am building that you have corrected your error. I have been a customer, albeit not a large one, of Amazon in the past, but will find other sources for my books, software, and online auctions until you have reversed this unfortunate trend. Regarding enforcement of your patent, I intend to advance the idea of a class action lawsuit that has as plaintiff class the group of consumers that are financially penalized by the enforcement of patents that are non-substantive.

Raymond J. Johnston


February 28, 2000

I used to be a steady customer of Amazon.com, buying most of my books online due to both the convenience and pricing. When Borders.com and BarnesandNoble.com started challenging their dominance in the online book ordering business, I stuck with them, as I value competition. I even purchased books from Amazon that I could have gotten cheaper elsewhere, in order to prevent the large bookstores from using unfair business practices to eliminate competition. After the one-click fiasco, however, I realize that Amazon is no better, and I have decided to speak out with my purchasing power. I have not purchased from Amazon since, and I doubt I will ever buy from them again. The ironic part about all of this is I now save quite a lot of money on a regular basis by boycotting Amazon!

Douglas Rudd


February 28, 2000

In my many quests for technical materials on the internet, I have arrived many times on Amazon's page. But I have decided never again to shop at the site; they have taken all that has been given to them; TCP/IP, cookies, GIF, JPEG, and - now this is the motherload - from netcraft's page: "amazon.com is running Stronghold/2.4.2 Apache/1.3.6 C2NetEU/2412 (Unix) on DIGITAL UNIX". Even their web server, probably one of the most important parts of their success, has been a gift from the internet technical community. And now they attempt to copyright and steal all that was given to them, for purposes that are - I couldn't say any less - stupid. I hope that this is the end for Amazon, and that it presents a message to all of today's "wired" corporation: do not bite the hand that feeds you.

Colin Stanners


February 28, 2000

Last year, I spent a large chunk of my disposable income on (O'Reilly) books, CDs, and DVDs from Amazon. Then they started collecting (and publishing) statistics. If they want to use the information to present a new item I might be interested in (based on prior buying decisions), that is fine with me because *I* am the only one who sees it. If they are going to publish my buying decisions without my consent, that's a strong reason for me to go elsewhere. And now Amazon is trying to enforce a patent that is similar to me patenting style sheets! (Oh wait, that was already done... http://www.patents.ibm.com/details?pn=US05860073__ ) I'll be taking my business to http://borders.com/, http://reel.com/, and especially http://www.barnesandnoble.com/ until Amazon ceases and desists. PKG

Pete Gale


February 28, 2000

I will join the legions of IT professionals that are disgruntled and dismayed with both Amazon and the Patent office, which ought to be shut down until they can figure out how to step into this century. I am a Chapter Leader of the Houston Webgrrls, and this has been a hot topic on our mailing list as it should be. I also own a web design company, and have a vegetarian cooking site which is an Amazon affiliate. I will no longer make my purchases from Amazon, and will stop promoting them on my site as an affiliate. I will also inform all visitors to all my sites about this issue and my clients, some of which are Amazon affiliates, and most are Amazon customers. This is a big, big, costly mistake Amazon. You think you're in the red now? Just wait. Kristi Sadler Fresh Pages Web Design Co. www.freshpages.com

Kristi Sadler


February 28, 2000

Amazon: I am a student, an exceptionally poor one. As such I haven't bought much of anything, either off the net or in regular markets, as of late. I did, however, purchase three Neil Stephenson books from Amazon last summer(June or so). I don't like these patents that you are applying for, for so many reasons that have already been listed by many others here. THUS, the next time I purchase a book, or anything else online, that you may have provided for me, you can bet your bottom dollar it won't be from you. I've heard it said that this corporation has yet to turn a profit. You are in the red, so to speak. Whether or not you ever do manage to turn a profit, you are slitting your own wrists before the technical community with this move. That's one shade of red that's not easily washed off.

Josh Duncan


February 28, 2000

As have many others, I have spent numerous personal and business dollars at your web site. I was prepared to do considerable christmas shopping at your site as well, and then this sad excuse for "good business" came to light. I understand you have shareholders to answer to, and that they expect you to maximize profits. But understand that there are a core group of people that make recomendations with regard to technical issues (and in this respect shopping on the internet is still considered a technical exercise by many), previously I had mentioned your sight. Due to its easy navigation and use, but I now instruct friends and family to shop any number of your competitors, because a company that does not act responisbly, cannot be trusted. And your abuse of the patent system is irresponisble.

Patrick Hurley


February 28, 2000

I support this letter both in its request and its intent. Further I would like to suggest several reasons that this patent is harmful to the nation as a whole. The international nature of the Internet in comparison to the limited nature of patents, will simply make it possible for corporations external to the United States to use this simple technology, while creating an unfair burden on American companies. While this nationalistic viewpoint may seem beside the point it is one more example of how unduly unfair the application of such a patent, and the legal costs involved with it will be. The end result is that we shall become the laughingstock of the world, spending billions of dollars protecting ideas that are apparent to the world, while they reap our innovation. Thanks Tim for being a leader.

David Lorin Goldstein


February 28, 2000

Dear Amazon, As a past customer i can tell you without a doubt that I will NEVER order from you again. I can't really add anything more than Tim O'Reilly hasn't already said in his open letter to you but, i can assure you.. as a fellow engineer I am deeply offended at your blatent disregard and disrespect for what has essentially been given to you in many respects. How arrogant do you have to be to think you can patent something as trivial and widespread as cookie utilization? I hope for the sake of your company's reputation with the technical community that you revisit your decision regarding these patents. Lastly, I've passed along this information to every colleague of mine in the hopes that they will see the same reckless behavior in Amazon and discontinue using your company's services.

Brandon Shoemaker


February 28, 2000

As a supporter of the Open Source Movement, and a Cisco Certified and Redback Networks Senior Instructor of some note, I wish to register my dismay with the choice that Amazon.com has made in attempting to enforce the aforementioned patent. You know all of the arguments for and against, and I won't bore you with repitition of facts of which you are already aware. I will simply cut to the chase: The actions of Amazon in this matter will eventually harm themselves and the Internet and software development community at large. Please take the feedback of myself and thousands of others to heart and stop the defense of this process before it has a chilling effect on the entire software development community. Sincerely, Michael J. Golub Senior Instructor / Instructor Developement Redback Networks, Inc.

Michael J. Golub


February 28, 2000

I can't understand why we even have to bother with shit like this. There are real problems out there in the world and someone like Amazon should have enough sense to not make us all waste our time fighting over idiocy like this. This is a no contest joke. Amazon, pull your head in and enter the real world. No one will support the kind of actions you are taking here. If you think you are in the right, conduct an anonymous survey of your own staff and see what they think. I imagine that you will be surprised by the results. And when you've recovered from the shock, a reasonable penance for your malicious intentions would possibly involve the donation of schoolbooks to somewhere like, say, East Timor. I think the kiddies down there are more in need of the books than Amazon is in need of the money that these patents might have bought in.

Michael Abramovich


February 28, 2000

Amazon has been a great resource for me as a CS student in researching and purchasing numerous technical books on a variety of subjects. However, this patent nonsense has put an end to my use of Amazon for now. There are many other outlets available to purchase the same books at equivalent prices. I previously chose Amazon because of the good experiences I had with their service, and also because of their apparent commitment to the technology and culture that helped bring them their success. This patent nonsense is, as has been stated, an insult to those who created and distributed the technology to the community in the beginning. I will no longer be ordering from Amazon and I can assure you many of my peers share the exact same sentiments. Amazon, it is time to swallow your pride and do an about-face on the patent issue. Eric A. Whitfield

Eric A. Whitfield


February 28, 2000

Jeff (Mr. Bezos), I stopped shopping at Amazon some time ago. Computer Literacy (now FatBrain) gets my and my co-workers book orders at work. I went so far as to get a corporate account at FatBrain, just so that everyone else in the office wouldn't use Amazon for purchasing (reimbursed) books. Counting up texts, I bought 12 O'Reilly texts in 1999, 4 Oracle books and 3 more security texts. Ok, so I still haven't cracked that Camel book. The 10 other programmers in the office buy alot of books every year. We *get* it - you don't. In a market where there is little differentiation between sites, all that it takes is one (seemingly) little thing to cause me to set my bookmark at a different site. Did I mention that I also buy CD's online too? Coders tend to listen to CD's a good bit of the day ... but that's another protest email. Paul Drake

Paul Drake


February 28, 2000

To all the folks at Amazon, I was one of your first customers. I was happy to shop at Amazon and directed lots of people to your site. When you took out the 1-click patent, I thought that you were merely trying to build up an inventory of patents to avoid being bullied by others: a sort of Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD) doctrine applied to software. It was shocking to find Amazon actually start acting like a bully. It is easy to try to shift the blame to the US Patent Office, but that is no excuse for your shameful conduct. By analogy, the failure of a teacher to keep her students well behaved does not excuse the actions of the class bully. There is a difference between what you should do and what you can get away with. You can rest assured that until you publicly reverse course, I will never purchase anything from amazon.com. I have already removed all the links I had pointing to your site.

Anant Sahai


February 28, 2000

I bought a couple of books from Amazon (O'Reilly books, actually) before this whole mess started. Now I don't even consider buying from you. What's more, I urge my friends and relatives - my coworkers and associates not to buy from you and I tell them why. That "why" is because you are not playing fairly. You are not heeding the common law of the land. Anytime I hear the words "amazon.com" spoken by anyone, I immediately tell them not to buy from you, under any circumstances whatsoever. But it's more than that - I'm a network administrator and, having that position, I'm able to use a little part of the Linux kernel called "ipchains"... Maybe you've heard of it. It's not a large network - only about 100 people, but none of them can get to your site - to them it appears dead. At least from work. Yes, I'm willing to risk reprimand for this because what you're doing is WRONG! Stop it! ps - I urge other admins out there to do the same.

Michael Kroh


February 28, 2000

You may look at this patent as a situation where you were freely given the ingredients and then built your own solution with them, but Tim is right. The technology is trivial and basic and very likely was done before you did it, so the patent will probably be thrown out. It's more like you tried to patent the flour so no one else could make a cake. I would argue that the flour was not yours to patent. As Tim said, many people helped to plant the wheat and grind it. You may say they were the fools for not patenting their own work, but if they had you and many others would not likely be in business. If you had stuck with just the one patent you might have been ignored. But, now you have established a pattern by patenting Associates programs. The technological community may have sloughed off initial outrage at your single patent, but I think if you continue this trend you endanger your profit margin far more than you protect or enhance it. Dee-Ann LeBlanc

Dee-AnnLeBlanc


February 28, 2000

I doubt anybody will be reading an entry on the bottom of the list, but nonetheless, I'll take the opportunity to go on the record. I buy a few hundred dollars of books and music online a year, and since Amazon filed suit against Barnes&Noble none of it has been from Amazon. I've just recently found out about the noamazon.com site, which has lists of Amazon's competitors in all markets. The advantage to noamazon.com is that all click-throughs to Amazon's competitors are recorded, so that Amazon can be provided accurate figures as to how many customers they are using through this boycott (by the way, noamazon.com does not receive any money from amazon's competitors for the click-throughs). So if you are boycotting amazon like I am, please use noamazon.com where your effort will be recorded. (btw, I'm in no way affiliated with noamazon.com, which is totally non-profit anyway) -- I am not Montel Williams.

Andrew Cady


February 28, 2000

Before this whole 1-Click mess, I had ordered from Amazon several times, most recently purchasing some Christmas gifts for friends and family. I was, on the whole, more than satisfied with my purchases, with the ease of ordering, the price, and selection...Amazon was all that I could have asked for. I've probably spent between 贄 and 贶 there. I would have spent more, recently, but this nasty patent business has definitely put a damper on my ardor for Amazon. While I don't actually see myself as being an active part of a "boycott," the idea of patenting something so trivial has had a distinct chilling effect on my desire to do further business with Amazon. I have found myself looking in other places and making purchases elsewhere that might otherwise have been from them. I strongly urge Amazon to reconsider their use of patents in light of the larger community of which they are a part. At such a time, I will be glad to order more books from them.

Christopher E. Meadows


February 28, 2000

My my! I don't know what all the hub bub is over. I belive that this is wonderful news! I belive that the precedent is being set, and it could benefit all of us greatly. I will set to work immediatly tomorrow at first light to go about contacting the patent office for a number of things that I should hold the patent on: Air, sunlight, noise, the letter "e," (oh wait, that one is taken by another monopoly wannabe..) why, the mind simply reels at the potential that all these things we take for granted can be owned, and used exclusively by us! Neato! Dirt! How about dirt? Yes, and a patent on water too... Thankyou Tim, and also all of you who have railed against this utter folly. As Tim stated, you are pissing into the well, but it sounds like in the long run, reasoning like this will cause you to fall into it as well. I honestly regret that I will curtail my Amazon habits as well until you come to your senses, finding other suitable vendors for the book needs of myself and the enterprise for whom I purchase technical publications. Please reconsider!

Christopher Fee


February 28, 2000

As a developer of what I hope are innovative applications for the web, I get a knot in the pit of my stomach whenever I think about software patents, especially the dumb, obvious ones like Amazon's. Am I infringing on some idiotic "sooner" patent when I write this line of code? How about this one? We're a very small company, and can't afford to defend against even inane patents. Should I file for my own portfolio of dumb patents? This concept here looks patentable, maybe that one, that one there for sure. But why should I? Sure, I've worked hard to make things work the way they should, maybe I should be protected. But come on, this isn't rocket science, it's not like I'm the only one that would ever think of it... so I let it alone. Actions like Amazon's make me re-think this position. Yes, maybe I should give 跌,000 a year to lawyers so I can have something to trade when the big boys come knocking. Bah. I may as well be paying the mob not to break my windows. Can't we just compete based on the quality of our service, our ease-of-use, our innovative features, rather than the size of our legal budget?

Gary Teter


February 28, 2000

I had bought probably thousands of dollars of books from Amazon, but that stopped with the "fun" publicizing of companies' purchases, and the ludicrous response I received when I complained about this disrespectful violation of privacy. And then came these idiotic selfish patents, spoiling the commons for every other web citizen. The sheer arrogance and gall necessary to see these as proper is beyond belief. I had thought Amazon was a very clever innovative company. Nice web site, good review structure, good links to related purchaes, gift wrapping, many nice things. And 1-click was certainly a reason for buying more books than I care to admit :-) But since boycotting Amazon, I have found several price comparison web sites, and don't regret the extra clicks at all. I save much too much money to go back. Amazon, Senor Bezos (or is that Bozos?) -- you may think you can protect your turf by lawyers, but the reality is the opposite. You have lost a good customer for good, and no doubt many more. I haven't been to your site in ages of Internet time, and I don't even know what markets you have expanded into. I don't care. I simply will not support the greed you show.

Felix Finch


February 28, 2000

As a graduating Computer Science student at the University of Waterloo, I was recently contacted to set up an interview for a position with Amazon.com. However, due to the defence of the 1-Click patent, I feel that I had to decline, and I urge other students in my position to do the same. It's a sellers market right now for top students. We all have options. Amazon needs to realize that they cannot afford to offend the community on which they depend. Below is a copy of the email sent in reply to Amazon. ====== Dear Jenn, I was interested in possibly pursuing a career with Amazon.com, unfortunately I'm in agreement with the rest of the internet community regarding Amazon's defence of the 1-Click patent. Thus I'm going to have to decline the interview. I would urge you to inform 'those in charge' that they have offended the talent pool that Amazon depends upon. I don't mean to offend you personally. And I'm sure you'll be tempted to delete this email and move on to the next candidate :) But _please_ understand that this patent fiasco could genuinely affect Amazon's ability to draw top talent. If you could pass this on it would be appreciated. Sincerely, -Brendan Sterne

Brendan Sterne


February 28, 2000

I am historically a frequent customer of Amazon, but I am appalled by the "one-click" patent and I think that Amazon has lost its way. In the search for immediate competitive advantage, Amazon will kill the goose that laid Amazon's own golden egg. You must rethink this strategy, which will ultimately spell your own end as well as that of your competitors. If one company can close off internet commerce to others by throwing some scrim on top of universally utilized protocols, consumers will never adopt internet as the equivalent to the telephone or the car. You have made a short-sighted and poor business decision, and those of us that are against you have your own future as well as other dot.coms at heart. If you were to prevail and establish a legal precedent, some other company could throw some scrim on top of your supposedly unique system and preclude YOU AMAZON from using it. Or could throw some scrim on top of TCP/IP and become an internet monopoly. We do not want t! o see you and other companies that have brought so much value and convenience wiped out by a monopoly, yours or anyone else's. Please stop your efforts to establish a legal precedent which will ultimately strangle internet commerce and your future profits.

Lisa Kerr


February 28, 2000

I am in total agreement with you on this Tim, and thought I would quote the email I just fired off to Amazon: Dear Sir or Ma'am, I am writing to request that you cancel my account immediately. I have been a customer of Amazon since July of 1997 and have always been admired your wide selection, prompt shipping and excellent customer service, however I can no longer support you in any way due to your 'one-click' and 'associates program' patents. I am currently a web programmer (due in no small part to the books I have purchased from you) and the audacity that you have shown in attempting to patent ideas that are immediately obvious to anyone who has knowledge of how http works is quite ridiculous. When I first heard that you had applied for and were granted a patent on these ideas, I had grave misgivings, but now that you are attempting to enforce them I feel it is time for us to part ways, before you do me and the internet as a whole a grave injustice. As I have said I am a web programmer and am aware that you have various information about me in your databases. This information belongs to me, and I am hereby rescinding your rights to it. Please delete all references to me immediately. Thank you, Nathan Stitt Webmaster

Nathan Stitt


February 28, 2000

I use Amazon from time to time to order books and also use other methods. Amazon provides a useful service however Mr Bezos does need to reconsider his patenting of something patently unpatentable as the one-click carrying of information. Business depends on goodwill most of all and Mr Bezos is sailing very close to an ill wind in this his company's patent action. It irritates me...there is no need for such an attitude...Amazon will need goodwill when it tries to convert its expansion into steady profit. Would it not be a pity if it were boycotted at that point? There are other ways of buying your books...don't forget the *apparently* cheaper prices are offset by additional postage costs...you have less opportunity of handling the merchandise...the reviews are suspect... Now we have this greed extended...a little like the Gates/Case arguments over instant messaging protocols...only more insidious. Mr Bezos...please release this patent...it is valid...but only because of a technicality...it is no intellectual property, but a method of cornering the market. To insist on your rights would not be the action of a gentleman. Please - play hard, but play fair. Not to do so would seriously irritate not only myself but many other potential customers.

Ian Clark


February 28, 2000

Mr. O'Reilly and Mr. Stallman, thank you for speaking out against Amazon's patenting of 1-click and Associates. Mr. Bezos, I'm very unimpressed by the fact that the company lawyers have overtaken your true grasp of financials and the web. It would be much better if Amazon were to grant these patents to the community as a defense against the "patenting" companies that are scouring around the corner. Furthermore, you must have better things to think about (esp. in the way of site design, additional stores, financials, W*Mart, etc.) than this proprietary side-show. Your site is one of the great compendeums that has naturally cropped up; please do not spoil what the community has entrusted to you. The Associates patent is a case in point. Imagine the number of people who are removing links and who will think twice before pointing to Amazon---for some and I would agree, it is a break with an unwritten rule: you do not own the process or control such a critical portion of "linking". BTW, I believe this will also happen with your Z-Bubbles program...nobody will entrust you with their opinion (or at least any opinion worth reading) unless you serve the community rather than exploit it by patents, privacy invasion, and proprietary database building. Sincerely, A concerned developer and Amazon shareholder.

K Trivedi


February 28, 2000

To the folks at Amazon: As a bestselling author, book enthusiast and strong supporter of online commerce, I am ashamed and outraged by the actions of your company. I have repeatedly cited Amazon as a model of great customer service in many industry seminars and classes which I have taught over the years, and have been a loyal customer since your earliest days. Your current actions are calling my own integrity into question, and I feel morally violated. Your attempts at using the patent office as an offensive legal weapon are simply heinous, and will NOT be tolerated by the technical community which helped build your business. The vast wealth generated by your early lead in this climate of loss-driven IPO madness has clearly gone to your heads, and given you the impression that you can simply get away with murder. This must end NOW. I gladly join the chorus of voices demanding that you stop trying to strongarm OUR continued efforts to expand and improve this great invention, the Internet, which you DO NOT OWN and without which your people would not have jobs. Until you retract this ridiculous patent claim, I will personally cease giving any further media-buying business to your firm, and will recommend that all of my clients and students do the same. Shame on you! David Biedny IDIG, Inc.

David Biedny


February 28, 2000

NOTE: My views, not my employer's NOTE: Amazon.com is not the only offender. My views on Patents, Copyrights, and Licensing I have very strong feelings regarding software patents, copyrights, and licensing. Software should NOT be patentable. As software developers we constantly solve new problems and previously unsolvable problems as well as develop new processes on a DAILY BASIS. We are engineers. It's what we do. A patent is intended to protect a company's work not to provide revenue as so many companies use patents for (due to the inherent lack of value in their patented products, extortion under the guise of patent law is their only source of income). Companies that abuse patent law only serve to retard technological development which I believe is a Bad Thing(TM) for society and generally pretty damn anti-social. Copyrights are intended to protect the intellectual property of teh author. Since software and algorithms are written software should be copyrighted NOT patented. Licensing is a right that any product developer may use and enforce. Many companies abuse this right by licensing products that possess no intrinsic value. This shifts revenue from the product to the license which will ultilmately harm the abusing organization by causing consumers to seek out alternative products with less restrictive licensing and better value.

Jonathan Chaillet


February 28, 2000

I've discussed this with my father before and he actually told me his perspective which I find interesting. When starting off people had small local mom and pop shops that sold goods or delivered goods. Then franchises took over and where beating the competition by out numbering them and where able to buy products at lower prices because they could buy in high quantities so they could lower prices enough to kill competition (the local mom and pop shops), and I've heard of the Walmart studies where they have shown that the Walmarts where strip mining local economies of money instead of helping them, so it makes sense. Now the internet companies are going against local franchises by aiming for a larger audience, and they too are lowering their prices to drown competition, Amazon is a perfect example, but my fathers perspective on this was that eventually companies like Amazon would die at the hands of publishers and publishers would shrink to simply provide services to authors a! nd everything old would be new again. This happening because once publishers realize they do not need the middle man any more (Amazon) would start marketing on their own and with the internet its much easier to do this and have customer bases of people whom like their books. I believe this is what Amazon is afraid of, and why they are not listening to publishers, I can see this happening and seeing O'Riellys position on this I can see its starting to happen already...

Leyland Needham


February 28, 2000

I think Tim's "Ask Tim" column hit the nail right on the head. Anything I say will just be anticlimactic -- though that's never stopped me before. Amazon/Bezos is raping the good will of those who came before him. What I don't understand is how they can weather this bad PR. I suppose the majority of web surfers don't really consider this an issue, but I (a former Amazon customer) definitely do. As was stated in Ask Tim, "One-Click" is such an obvious thing to patent. Bearing in mind the flood of negative criticism Amazon must have received after the "One Click" patent, I just plain don't understand why they went ahead with yet-another-obvious-patent, namely the Affiliates program (By the way, I have been a member of CDNOW's Cosmic Credit Affiliate program since Feb. 1997. I would guess that qualifies as prior art). What does amazon hope to gain from these patents? They surely will not hold up in court, so what is gained by them? Why, why, why do you insist on doing ! this, Mr. Bezos? WHY would you want to anger and/or alienate the people at the core of the medium on which your business, the Internet/IT professionals? The people with all the money now? Why would you do this? How can you simply not care? We all care, you do not. I mean, because of you (and choice others) there is a "Patent Pending" section of Slashdot, devoted to stupid patents. You are really the star of that section. Come on, you should know better!!!

Evan Hoffman


February 28, 2000

Despite my youth, I am someone who could easily be considered an early adopter of the web, if not an old-timer. Many millenia ago (by web standards) I can recall grabbing the first public release of Jim Clark's Mosaic browser. I was so fascinated and amazed by the implications of a network such as the web that I immediately began to learn all I could, from frontend HTML to backend serving, so that I could participate in this great medium. Since that time, I have watched the web bloom, then skyrocket. I watched the browser wars with amusement and fear. I remember one of the first web-protests, wherein all webmasters were encouraged to change their background colors to black. I honestly don't recall what the protest was for, but I remember the sites of large corporations going black for a day, to join in. It is that spirit which draws me to the web, of freedom and individual empowerment. Amazon.com gave consumers a new, easier way to shop. Although it was only a matter of time before an amazon.com came to light, I still appreciate its presence. It is in that spirit that I ask that you release your 1-click patent into the public domain, as its use is vital for the growth of the web. Only with such basic technologies can e-commerce thrive. This was not your invention, nor is it your right to own such a basic component of e-commerce. Again, I urge you to release your 1-click and Affiliate Program patents into the public domain. Doing so would be to the world's mutual advantage.

Ian James Wessman


February 28, 2000

The roads of history are littered with the dessicated corpses of exploitative nations and corporations that pursued short-term gain with nary a thougt of long-term implications or the shoulders of giants on which we all stand. As has been said before, how many billions of dollars have been made by Amazon.com and other Internet-based ventures ... every cent of which was only possible due to the "gift economy" from which we have all benefitted? As a (former) customer, I am annoyed -- you are actively stifling innovation that may benefit me. As a professional Web developer, I am enraged -- how *dare* you encourage the patent avalanche that will prevent me from contributing back to the community! 1-Click-like technology is trivial to conceive and implement, as are affiliate programs. I have implemented both in the past, and I lay no claim to membership in an elite corps of developers. I doubt that the loss of my thousands of dollars per year in online shopping will keep you up lat!

Bill Kunz Jr.


February 28, 2000

Jeff, I have always admired your vision of what the web could be. Years ago, when everyone was proud of their brochure site, you decided to try commerce over the web. That was your innovation. Being first, you reaped the rewards, as I believe you should have. However, your success could not have happened if not for the selfless work of others who came before you. You didn't invent the Internet. You didn't invent the HTTP protocol. You didn't even invent cookies. Yet you use all of these things in your day to day business. What would the web be if someone had patented the idea of HTTP and cookies before you got started? Could you have made it? Would you have tried? Now that you are successful (Man of the Year as well as financially) do what the other giants in the field have done before you. Stand up for what's right. Be the person who builds the base for the next great man or woman who comes along with a brilliant idea. I understand that sometimes patents are used a defensive measures. I understand that, albeit sadly. If you must patent these technologies to protect yourself, please publicly announce that you will never enforce them. Please show the world how things *should* be. If you are patenting for other reasons, then shame on you. I was hesitant to support the Amazon boycott in the past. I really like purchasing from your company. The affiliates program is the last straw. I will no longer purchase from your company until these issues are resolved. Best regards, David Joham

David Joham


February 28, 2000

It is well understood in the dog eat dog world of corporate America that you'd better get it or someone else will. It is also understood that you have to defend what you have lest someone else can legally claim it. The problem lies not with getting patents, but with the patent system as a whole. Where at one time it was intended to protect inventors from people stealing their inventions and claiming them as their own, nowadays patents ONLY serve to stiffle innovation and benefit ONLY the business and NOT the customer. In Russia you only had one source of toilet paper - it's much like sandpaper. Why improve or innovate? It's one thing to protect against exploitation through theft of ideas, but totally another to exploit the system to fight off competitors. This is bad for the people, and because this is bad for the people it will eventually be bad for the corporation. Copyright your code, but don't prevent others to develop similar or even better technology. In the spirit of co! mpetition - if theirs is better, make yours better. Then you'll have a better product and we'll all benefit. Otherwise your product will stagnate while you're busy sueing potential competitors and we'll all suffer - us, you and you're competitors. The patent system is in a sad state and in need of a complete overhaul if not totally scrapped for a better method to protect against theft of ideas while still promoting innovation... If you really care about your customers, then lead the fight for patent reform rather than participate in it's exploits...

Michael V


February 28, 2000

To whom it may concern at Amazon (*if* you're concerned at all), why do you insist on doing this? You are alienating some of your best customers. Joe Sixpack might not care about such issues, but it should be ovbious that people like us, people who are comfortable with shopping online, your technically-minded clientele, *do* care *deeply* about these issues. You're making a mockery of the Internet by persisting with this. I'll grant you that the Patent Office is partly to blame for issuing the patent in the first place, but don't try to hide behind that. *You* are ultimately responsible for your business decisions, and we don't appreciate greedy squatters trying to grub all they can from this wonderful thing that some of us built. If you're interested, I've put the following in my .signature file: "Stop abusive software patents! Start typing http://www.noamazon.com" This is attached to every email I send, and I subscribe to some mailing lists with high membership. I've not bought anything from you yet, and if you keep this up, I never will. Others have said that they'll boycott you for the duration of your assertion of this patent; you may have made a lasting mistake with others, though, as I'm not sure if I'll *ever* purchase anything from you at all. To my fellow comrades-in-arms, http://www.noamazon.com/ is a good reference point to find alternatives to this madness. If it's technical books you're after, I've heard http://www.fatbrain.com/ spoken very highly of. There's always bn.com, of course, to send a louder message to the powers-that-be at Amazon. Someone else had mentioned that they use Amazon only for their reviews on the books, now. I encourage you not to do that, however, because even though, yes, you're using some of their bandwidth, you're still generating page views for them which ups their profit through the sale of banner ads. Add me to the list of people publically calling for a cease and desist of this odious business practice. Have a nice day.

Bill Jonas


February 28, 2000

A patent used to stand for some noteworthy, worthwhile innovation. The outcome of some serious investment of time & effort, if only to thoroughly understand a field in enough depth to be able to create something that extended that field. This patent clearly shouldn't have been granted - it doesn't pass any of the tests described to me by the patent lawyers I've worked with. It is clearly 'obvious to one skilled in the art', the most basic yardstick. Frankly, I wish there were some grave consequence in granting such frivolous patents for the Patent Office - the potential for damage and the legal costs of overturning even an obviously bogus patent like this one are huge. I'm amazed that Starsight (now Gemstar) still holds, and even worse, has successfully defended, some similarly frivolous patents related to on-screen program guides. This just reeks of opportunism. Who benefits from this kind of behavior? These kinds of anti-competitive practices are in no-one's interests, not even Amazons in the long run. In a sense, Amazon is indirectly showing contempt towards their customers. I'm glad to give a company my business when it is won fairly. But gaining my business by eliminating my choice of who to do business with? I won't stand for that, and that's how I interpret Amazon's attitude. As for now, you've lost my business and my advocacy. Perhaps one customer doesn't mean much to you. But it should - great reputations are built by taking care of each individual with the same high level of respect and service. Each happy customer becomes your advocate. Your current actions are rapidly tearing down a reputation that was once the envy of many. Sure, you still have great brand recognition, but what it represents is starting to change... I urge Amazon to sprint ahead, maintain their edge by innovating and leading the industry, as they began. If you stop & try to defend your position - particularly with the poor weapons you've chosen - people will just innovate around the roadblock you create, and you'll become irrelevent.

Paul Chambers


February 28, 2000

An Open Letter to Jeff Bezos We are writing to request that Amazon stop all attempts to enforce the patent that it has been granted on "one click ordering" (Patent number 5,960,411). It is our belief that this patent was granted without adequate review of prior art, and further, that even were it ultimately found valid, such broad patents serve only to hold back further innovation. One-Click ordering is a clever marketing slogan. However, your patent fails to meet even the most rudimentary tests for novelty and non-obviousness to an expert in the field. The fundamental technology on which Amazon's one-click implementation is based is the use of "cookies", a small amount of data placed on client computers to add state and session management capabilities to the World Wide Web, which was introduced in 1994 into Netscape Navigator 2.0 by Lou Montulli, Marc Andreesen, and others, at the urging of none other than Vint Cerf. The technique had been deployed on thousands of sites well in advance of your 1997 patent application. We believe that the rapid innovation on the World Wide Web and Internet platform that has created so much new value for the public (as well as for Amazon and its shareholders) will be choked off if companies take the short-sighted route of filing patents on commonly accepted and obvious techniques in an attempt to keep competitors from using them. Ill-advised patents and other attempts to limit the use of web technology for private advantage have put the whole software development and standards process into a precarious state. We understand that you may feel a need to file such patents for defensive purposes, to keep unscrupulous squatters from keeping you from doing business on the web, but if you use these patents offensively, as you have done in obtaining an injunction against Barnes & Noble's use of one-click ordering, you are striking a blow against continued innovation in the medium that has proven so successful for you. Given that you've now also received a patent on your Affiliates program (patent number 6,029,141), as well as several other critical patents relating to e-commerce, we urgently request that you clarify your intentions with regard to software patents, and avoid any attempts to limit the further development of internet commerce on the basis of the patents you have already been awarded. I'm hoping you'll give me quick permission to attach your names to this letter. However, it will be up on our site as an open letter to which our customers can subscribe, starting this evening.

laura


February 28, 2000

Here is the copy of an email I sent directly to Amazon.com, which had a very apathetic reply from a Titus G.: Subject: Your monopolistic attributes Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2000 01:32:40 -0500 I used to support Amazon.com. I have even shopped at the place. Now I am even offended to type those words. You represent everything that is commercial and wrong online. What you believe is right and protective, is nothing more than posturing for domination of the market through monopolistic means. You're no better than Microsoft pushing its products through its grip of its operating system. Your patents on technology that has been around long before you were even a concept is not only wrong, but outright insulting to all who use the internet. You propose to patent everything and anything, not because it protects you from others doing the same, but to shut down your competition and try to earn money where your business obviously cannot. One-Click Shopping was broad enough that anyone who tried to implement any easier shopping methods to their website for their customers would either have to pay you a fee for something you did not create or have a hand in developing, or they would have to chance a lawsuit based on this terrible abuse of the patent system. Now you propose to include affiliate programs as a patent. Again, this was a concept long before you were even in business. Affiliates existed back with mail order companies when the telephone became a more important sales tool than door-to-door sales. Thousands of sites have used similar methods of attracting new business and paying those who help them out, far before you filed for the patent. How dare you consider yourself the creator of this patent. It is insulting to think that I once bought from you. I only support those businesses who have an ideal I share. I now only shop online for North American books through Barnes & Noble, the very company with whom you decided to throw your legal weight around. The more you try to pull stupidity like this patenting of ideas that have long existed before you existed, especially on the internet, the more business you will lose. You should check out www.noamazon.com. It has a lot more support than you think. And if you ever want to consider having a quarter where you make a profit, this is NOT the way to go. I suspect you will be bankrupt in a few years, if the stockholders don't sell out to someone else who knows how to run a proper business online. Someday you may learn. Right now, it's evident you don't. A customer you have lost forever, Christopher Bair

Christopher Bair


February 28, 2000

I have already written to Amazon.com customer support and received a number of emails from them. Here is the last email I sent them, which they never replied to. (Excuse any formatting errors, please). ----- Original Message ----- > The copyright we obtained for 1-Click ordering was for a specific > implementation of the technology. We do not seek to prevent others > from offering such a feature, but simply want to prevent the pirating > of specific code. The concept of clicking once cannot be copyrighted, > only the code behind it. Many stores has implemented their own > version of this idea, without mirroring ours. This is not what is implied by the patent that has been awarded to Amazon.com, nor does it explain why Amazon.com is suing Barnes & Noble for patent infringement (as is my understanding). I was not under the impression that B & N stole any code or implementation from Amazon, just that (like all electronic commerce sites) they implement a similar 1-Click ordering concept. As you said, the concept cannot be copyrighted, so why then the lawsuit? By your own admission there are a number of other sites with the same concept as B&N but no lawsuits have been brought against them. To many, including myself, this is a rather detestable way to compete in the marketplace. After reviewing the patent and information cCutchen's site its seems to me to be a question of semantics. What you are describing as an implementation (assuming your lawsuit against B&N is just) I would generally describe as the concept of 1-Click ordering. The general idea (as outlined in the patent) is the concept, the implementation is the actual code and hardware involved, is it not? The patent should be more specific to your implementation, not just general overview of the standard practice of using cookies to keep track of customer information and matching it with your product database (the patent is even more vague and conceptual than this!). If B&N stole your implementation, then by all means, let them meet their fate in court. However, if Amazon.com thinks that it can leverage a better market position through abusing the antiquated legal system, you (Amazon.com) must think very little of your customers. These practices are no longer acceptable, and your customer's are not ignorant of your business practices. In any case, I expected much better from Amazon.com, as one of the foremost new Internet companies they should be setting an example and leading the market into a new era of corporate responsibility and accountability. Your thoughtful replies to these emails reaffirms my suspicions that Amazon could be something special. However, concern for us, the consumer, must be taken at all levels of business, not just customer support.

Ryan Kelln


February 29, 2000

Kevin Ma


February 29, 2000

I have been a customer of Amazon.com from very early on and they have been my preferred source for books, videos, and CDs. While I disagreed with the 1-click patent, I continued to buy from Amazon. However, the new affiliate patent broke the camels back. It is clear that Amazon is aligned against the public good and seeks to make as much of the eCommerce revolution Amazon proprietary as possible. I can now no longer, in good faith, patronize a company that is actively engaged in undermining the benefits bestowed to all via a free, open market for electronic commerce.

Christopher Everett


February 29, 2000

I am certainly not against Amazon turning a profit. However, ridiculous software patents are not the way to do this. I am the primary source of my companies book purchase. With a book budget of several hundred a month. You have lost my business and I now use FatBrain as my bookstore of choice. Not because they are not out to make money, but because they are not out to monopolize the market through bully techniques. I am ashamed of you and your company.

Derek Neighbors


February 29, 2000

I too buy a lot of books, and mainly from the Amazon web site. But I will boycott the website until this patent is dropped or redefined. The use of cookies to preserve client information (of any kind) is so elementary, that it seems impossible to me that the patent office actually granted a patent. It is clear that this patent was not well researched and will not stand up in court. This patent sounds to general. I currently have client web pages on which I use cookies to preserve client information. I wrote these pages _before_ Amazon existed. Those of us who have already written these pages should file a class action lawsuit against Amazon....if this idea is truly patentable, then any web page developer who saved purchasing information on a client via cookies is owed money to them by Amazon.

Mary Thomas


February 29, 2000

I've just convinced my web-designer friend to join the boycott, and he's clued his design-major brother in on it. You see how the information spreads? I'm taking my business to www.powells.com. //Miles witness the comic: http://isometric.spaceninja.com

Miles Johnson


February 29, 2000

Please stop this nonsense now !

Paula Batey


February 29, 2000

Bruce Labbate


February 29, 2000

I ordered from something from Amazon once. Rest assured that until you cease your egregious abuse of the patent system, I will not even consider a second purchase from your company.

Ian Rowan


February 29, 2000

It is time for you to give up this silly attempt to stifle the web economy. I will still use your site to find the books on your site (you offer a great service), but in the future I plan on multi-click ordering them from your competitors. Joel Baumert

Joel Baumert


February 29, 2000

There is no way patents like this should exist. Open standards are the most crucial element in computing.

Nathan Howell


February 29, 2000

Patenting trivial and well-established Internet 'technologies' will stop innovation dead in its tracks. Amazon should know better.

James Byers


February 29, 2000

John Buie


February 29, 2000

I've been a loyal Amazon.com customer for the past year or so, but I think that I too will join the boycott. Although I value the service that Amazon provides, I can not condone this ridiculous patent. Like someone else has said, the term "1-click shopping" could be trademarked, but I fail to see any redeeming value or legitimacy in this patent. If Amazon decides to change their tactics and honor the open source movement that they have built their empire on I will gladly renew my business with them.

Seth Petry-Johnson


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com is losing my potential business, and O'Reilly is gaining an even stronger foothold as my publisher of choice.

Josh Klun


February 29, 2000

What's wrong with the patents office? The unscrupulous actors in this business always attempt to monoplolize the gifts that have been freely given by the open community - we shouldn't be too surprised by Amazon.com's attempts, perhaps Jeff Bezos' fortunate and unprecedented success has made him feel that he can operate under a more fortunate and unprecedented set of rules than more ethical actors would. Personally I think he's just 'trying it on' because he has the time and resources. I don't believe the patent will stand once scrutinized. I do believe the US patent's office deserves critical scrutiny as well as Amazon.com and others who try to patent 'breathing' when they act complicitly, whether out of ignorance or for any other reasons.

Nick Murray


February 29, 2000

I did not order anything from Amazon yet, because they wanted too much personal information about you. Then, some time later when I hadn't much time to get them, I wanted to buy books worth some hundred dollar there. That evening, I read about their one-click-whatever patent and that they _really_ want to enforce it. Guess what. I bought the books somewhere else and will continueing to do so. In my opinion, Amazon is getting less and less trustworthy.

Johannes Teve×en


February 29, 2000

What's the deal with this patent thing? All I can say is: "No soup for you!" {Soup being business and you being Amazon, of course}

Sarah Lamont


February 29, 2000

Noel Franus


February 29, 2000

Noel Franus


February 29, 2000

I find it incredulous that a company can be awarded a patent on technology that was in existence before the company was registered. The US patent office did not adequately research or understand the patent they issued to Amazon.com (if this is the case, who knows what else will be patented - anyone up for XML?) If this is the direction in which these companies choose to protect their interests which, in reality, comprises research and work done by people other than themselves, then I'm forced to mass with the side against them and support open innovation. Nicholas Oddson

Nicholas Oddson


February 29, 2000

You know, attempting to patent an idea that's not yours in the first place is wrong. And trying to patent something that is an intrinsic part of Net Commerce is just plain stupid. Amazon.com, you're more intelligent than this. or, at least, you should be. I will boycott the use of Amazon.com until you return to your senses.

Seth A. Sher


February 29, 2000

I bought a video from Amazon this year. It was my first order and I was delighted with the service. I probably would have ordered a lot more, if it wasn't for this patent issue. I am strongly against software patents, and until you stop using them against your competitors I'll be taking my business to them.

James Simmons


February 29, 2000

I used to buy books from Amazon, because I found their web site entertaining, engaging, and a real help to buy better books. However, when I found out about their abusive use of the patent system, I decided to boycott. I now use www.chapters.ca for most of my book purchases. Shame on Amazon.

Ben Damm


February 29, 2000

Bah. It is hard for people to admit when they've done something wrong. If Amazon admits they were wrong, doesnt that open them up for counter-suits?

Nicklous Roberts


February 29, 2000

Andrew J. Lillie


February 29, 2000

Sorry Jeff, Amazon used to be a nice place to browse but, my money is gong to Fatbrain and Powells from now on.

Michael M. Craig


February 29, 2000

Similarly to Tim, I am immensely impressed by Amazon, both as a consumer and as a (past) shareholder. And, I too am disappointed to see Amazon using the (clearly outdated by events) patent system to their (short term?) advantage. I think, or want to believe that, Amazon is a better comapny than that. Perhaps Amazon feels it is compelled to apply for this 'protection' given the actions of others in the e-commerce world. I would disagree - be better than them.

michael bushman


February 29, 2000

I concur whole heartedly with the sentiments expressed in this letter.

Herb Gentry


February 29, 2000

I agree with all the points in you letter.

Edward Murphy


February 29, 2000

A fool and his business are soon parted. I see a fool and have no wish to do business with him. Guess we now know the plan on how to make Amazon finally turn a profit, eh!

Jamie LeBreton


February 29, 2000

Derek Vadala


February 29, 2000

barnes and noble is starting to look better and better.

christopher chan


February 29, 2000

Benjamin Gordon


February 29, 2000

I've been an active Amazon customer for a long time, promoted the site like crazy, and this is one of the silliest uses of the patent office I've ever seen. Maybe a group of "us developers" could get together and patent the words "Button" or "Click" or "Book"... This is an embarrasment to the industry, and most inane. Please, Amazon, stop this.

Larry D. Wilson


February 29, 2000

Please give up on this terrible patent. Because the patent system CAN be abused, doesn't mean it should be. Please show your ethical side, as well as your respect for those who have made your entire web presence possible in the first place.

Robert Hendelman Jr.


February 29, 2000

Wake up, Amazon!

Drew Parsons


February 29, 2000

I am really disappointed that Amazon.com feels it needs such restrictive trade practices to compete. You have been every thing that is great about the net and now you are debasing yourselves. Please reconsider and return the Net to us all. Iain Wyder, Delta, British Columbia.

Iain Wyder


February 29, 2000

Since Amazon's anticompetitive and abusive software patents have come to my attention, I have turned my business elsewhere. In the past 3 months alone, I have purchased over 踰 of textbooks and other reading material from fatbrain.com and sundry brick-and-mortar stores -- instead of online at amazon.com, where I used to do all my shopping exclusively. A disappointed former customer, John

John Fisher


February 29, 2000

Since Amazon's anticompetitive and abusive software patents have come to my attention, I have turned my business elsewhere. In the past 3 months alone, I have purchased over 踰 of textbooks and other reading material from fatbrain.com and sundry brick-and-mortar stores -- instead of online at amazon.com, where I used to do all my shopping exclusively. A disappointed former customer, John

John Fisher


February 29, 2000

Chris Klimas


February 29, 2000

C'mon, this is like patenting idea of storing information in computer memory. What next, patenting the for loop?

Anthony Castelletto


February 29, 2000

Amazon seems to be suffering from lawyeritis..too bad. If they insist on this and other similar patent applications. I for sure will not buy from them anymore, and will actively discourage others from doing so.

Michael Comerford


February 29, 2000

Denis Zorin


February 29, 2000

I agree with Tim here. For the record, until this issue is resolved, I will take my purchases to FatBrain. When it's over and Amazon decides to play fair, I'll probably be back. Too bad too. I do a lot of business with Amazon. This stance by Amazon is ridiculous.

Billy Dunn


February 29, 2000

John V. Martinez


February 29, 2000

Say bye to another customer

Jim Fredrickson


February 29, 2000

I think I'll file for a patent on the English spellings of names of major rivers around the world. I figure I've got about as much prior art as Amazon.com does for their patents. Maybe I could even sue Amazon.com and Tigris Corp (Tigris.com) for patent infringement! In any case, I won't buy from Amazon.com until they mend their ways.

Daniel L'Hommedieu


February 29, 2000

And you thought greed died in the eighties? Sadly, I've ordered several times from amazon.greed in the last few months. While I'm happy with the service, including the ordering technology, I won't be ordering from amazon.greed again until they put their customers first. A boycott worked for Yahoo when they tried to steal the rights to their users content, and I hope it makes Mr. 'I'm man on the year' Bezos wake up as well.

Dave Matthews


February 29, 2000

It pains me to avoid giving business to Amazon, a company that I in general have quite liked and whose technical achievements (mostly pertaining to the level of interoperability between amazon and other systems) I respect. Seeing Amazon abuse the US patent system for a non-novel application of this sort saddens me.

Devin Carraway


February 29, 2000

Timothy W Thiele


February 29, 2000

J. Bruce Fields


February 29, 2000

I just saw the patent on the IBM patent server. Besides agreeing with Tim O'Reilly, I was stupefied by seeing that such an obvious thing could be granted a patent.

Dirk De Bruyker


February 29, 2000

Yongsheng Zhu


February 29, 2000

Eric Olander


February 29, 2000

Personally...I've been pissed about the commercialization of the WWW for a long time.... CLICKING ON ANYTHING + GETTING A RESULT = THE FOUNDATION OF THE WWW (as developed by Berners-Lee) Dave Kaplan

David Kaplan


February 29, 2000

What a shame, another customer down the drain. :~(

Kenneth W. Hall, AIA


February 29, 2000

Eduardo Morales


February 29, 2000

I was a happy customer of amazon and hope that you make it possible for me to do business with you again. Until then I will go elsewhere and will encourage everone I come into contact with to join the boycott.

Frank Pittel


February 29, 2000

Rachel Dixon


February 29, 2000

Graeme Hewson


February 29, 2000

Richard Ashby


February 29, 2000

Gregory Pindris


February 29, 2000

Tristan Lawrence


February 29, 2000

Bradley J. Sandidge


February 29, 2000

Brock Adamchak


February 29, 2000

I cannot support a vendor whose business model is based on theft and monopolization of others' works.

Jim Hood


February 29, 2000

As of today, I am a former affiliate of Amazon.com. I have removed the links, and I will buy and sell elsewhere until Amazon.com comes to ots senses. Share the web.

Chris Carr


February 29, 2000

Amazon greed is a threat to global freedom and innovation...they must be banned until they vhange their ways

Mikkel Bruun


February 29, 2000

It is shameful that Amazon would have the audacity to seek enforcement of a patent so obviously lacking in technical merit, and I find it equally insulting that they would so incomprehensibly underestimate the intelligence of their customer base. I can buy my books elsewhere.

Graham Blake


February 29, 2000

bookpool.com

Ed Daniels


February 29, 2000

You can still come out of this as the good guy if you publicly and sincerely admit that you have come to the understanding, if indeed you do, that your pursuit of this lawsuit is a losing situation for everyone, including yourself.

Ken Engel


February 29, 2000

It's all too easy to stand on the shoulders of giants. However, from up there, everyone can see you making an ass of yourself.

Jonathan Cole


February 29, 2000

I have purchased from your site in the past but will not support these types of business practices. My work is centered on bringing new people to technology and not only will I not use your site as a model of innovative Net technology but I will use it as an example of how companies can go wrong and then teach how we as a community can take corrective measures. I make it my mission to work toward, and lead toward, open standards and innovation. I will, as long as you pursue these philosophy's, lead people away from your site. Regretfully, Clifton W. Hyatt ComputerWorks

Clifton W Hyatt


February 29, 2000

just goes to show that even "cool" places will get greedy once given the chance. Very sad.

phil baird


February 29, 2000

Jeff, I have been an Amazon customer and shareholder since day one. No longer. Your use of patents on core, simple technologies that make the web cool offends me. I have never even looked at BarnesandNoble.com, but I'm heading there next for another 贄 order... Surrender the patents, compete in an open field, and run like mad. That's what the rest of us do.

J. Clark Venable


February 29, 2000

John Thompson


February 29, 2000

As a college student and frequent online shopper, I have bought about 踰 worth of merchandise from amazon.com. Service was great; nice looking website; I enjoyed it a lot. Unfortunately, their recent patent nonsense shows a clear lack of concern for the consumer, obviously favoring Big Business greed over the sense of community that the internet was built on. Fortunately, as an internet user I don't have to be forced into the arms of Big Business. I have lots of other options: Fatbrain.com has a great selection of technical books. Barnes & Noble has about everything. Ebay has much better auctions. And buy.com has better prices and shipping specials. 1-click purchasing is obvious. As a web developer, as soon as I saw the name "1-click purchasing" I knew exactly how it worked and how I could implement the same thing. Affiliate programs are nothing new, either. I remember reading Boy's Life (boy scout magazine) as a child -- the back cover always had this program where you could sell products for commission. Applying this idea to the internet is no big conceptual leap -- and I know for a fact it takes absolutely no new technology to implement these affiliate programs, either. I don't agree with software patents in general, but this sort of trivial "innovation" is beyond even the most desperate interpretations of patent law. I liked Amazon.com, but if they continue to act this way, there's no need for me to return. Sincerely, Tom 7 Carnegie Mellon University

Tom 7


February 29, 2000

I had become so used to browsing and buying at amazon that I recently forgot that I was boycotting them and made a purchase. I look forward to the day when they drop this and the associates patent and I can again be a regular customer (I've even lowered myself to shopping in meatspace as an alternative, shudder). bob

Robert Bushman


February 29, 2000

Only time will tell, but I predict you will lose this battle and will regret having fought it. rr

Ron Rice


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, this is a terrible mistake you are doing. I hope you realize this sooner than later ... Or is this deliberate ignorance on your part?

MadKAT


February 29, 2000

I will no longer purchase anything from Amazon.com Typically, it has been once a week for me but no more. There are more than enough competitors. What's next? A patent on ctrl + alt + del?

Shane Miles


February 29, 2000

I am saddened and dismayed at Amazon.com's actions. I fully agree with this open letter and hope Amazon.com changes its tactics soon.

Linda Howard


February 29, 2000

Amazon, if you have to resort to such anti-competitive measures to protect your business then you are not the the sort of company that I wish to deal with.

David J. Williams


February 29, 2000

I used to be a customer of Amazon.com until I knew about the utterly rididulous patent you are trying to enforce. I now find it morally unacceptable to do buisiness with you. Please reconsider your position.

Arturo Galvan


February 29, 2000

Prior to learning of Amazon.com's behavior in this 1-Click patent affair, when I was considering buying a new book, your website was the first place I would check. Since then, I have begun shopping at barnesandnoble.com, ThinkGeek, and other companies whose patent policies are not offensive. I believe that your actions in this matter are harmful to the continued technological development of the web as a platform for commerce. Please consider reversing your stance on this patent. You have already lost me and countless other customers over this issue. Don't risk losing more.

Nathan Sandver


February 29, 2000

Tim said it all: if there is one person who deserves to be a gazillionairre, it is Tim Berners-Lee, rather than some dime a dozen book merchant like Bezos. You build off of a platform provided to you free and open source and then decide to sh** on it like Microsoft. Complete shame on you.

Henry Bradford


February 29, 2000

I found this trend disturbing. Next someone will patent the process of squeezing a lemon by hand. No longer will I support Amazon.com or others who have taken similar actions.

Sean Farren


February 29, 2000

Though I have bought several books through Amazon in the past, your aggressive pursuit of frivolous web patents is unacceptable for a good corporate netizen. Therefore, I will buy no more of your products nor link any of your books to my website until you abandon these patents. Someday we're going to have to figure out a way to make corporations aware of more than their own bottom line.

Wayne C. Westerman


February 29, 2000

Your greed is not going to get you where you think it will. Chances are, you think that even if you loose a number of customers, there are millions of other unknowing people out there who would never know better. This is unacceptable, and represents how bad we need another company who can do what you do, that concentrates on customer satisfaction and corporate fairness (whatever that is these days, due to companies like yours.) rather pure personal wealth and growth. I hope you enjoy your quickly-becoming-hated empire of poor business decisions, I know I will not as long as you maintain your ways.

Raymond W. Lucke IV


February 29, 2000

kevin montuori


February 29, 2000

Stuart Cheshire expressed this very well 6 years ago: http://ResComp.Stanford.EDU/~cheshire/rants/Patent.html

Kevin Marks


February 29, 2000

I've been an Amazon customer since its early days, but am resorting to www.noamazon.com these days to find alternative vendors. As a longtime member of the Internet community, I resent Amazon's tactics with regard to both the 1-click and Affiliates patents. They have lost me as a customer, and the only way they'll get me back is if they stop this foolishness. If they continue to pursue it in court, they'll have lost me permanently. There will always be alternatives.

Matthew E. Newton


February 29, 2000

This is severely disappointing. My company purchases a few thousand dollars in books from Amazon each year; the (significant) portion of this that I'm responsible for will be going elsewhere. We've been universally happy with Amazon's service in the past, but this is just silly.

Adam Michaud


February 29, 2000

Seth Vanderdrift


February 29, 2000

Josh Adams


February 29, 2000

I have boycotted Amazon.com for several weeks and will continue to do so until it stops its blatant abuse of the patent system.

Dan Copeland


February 29, 2000

It certainly makes the blood boil.

Suresh TV


February 29, 2000

I have chosen to boycott Amazon due to this bogus patent, and I have been urging everyone I know to do likewise. Please come to your senses.

Ian Lance Taylor


February 29, 2000

You know, Amazon has been doing some really hideous things, but this tops them all! I hope this boycott really takes a bite out of them. It will be bad for the Affiliate business, and for E-business in general. Think about it. IF their patent works and they keep beating up on other businesses with it, it won't be long before "EVERYTHING" is patented and/or copyrighted, and then what? We have to pay fees just to write an HTML page? I think not! Hopefully this boycott will hurt enough that they will take a step down!

Cynthia Kimball


February 29, 2000

I've been a loyal customer of Amazon.com for four years, and I've been happy with their service. In spite of that, I will no longer do business with them until they give up their strategy of patenting everything they can think of. They have no right to claim exclusive ownership of technology that was *given* to *everyone*.

Mike Cummings


February 29, 2000

I have spent considerable money at your website over the last few years, and have introduced others to your business. Now I find myself in the regretful position of reversing both my habits and my recommendation. Your attempt to monopolize the World Wide Web, or at least part of it, by patenting such an obviously public domain idea is counter to the philosophy associated with the medium from which your business sprang. Dogs are taught to "not bite the hand that feeds," and so shall you be taught. Yes, many of the "newly connected" mainstream do not understand or appreciate the potential negative impact your patent will have. They are happy to just "1-click" their way to new books. The people whom you are alienating are some of your most valuable customers, as well as some of your best marketing instruments. These are the people who are comfortable with the net, who develop software and websites, and are the people others come to for advice on where to buy online. Your patent has the most impact on them, and they will be the ones who will spread the word far and wide on the net that buying from Amazon poisons the web. Jeff, do the Right Thing, and earn the "Man of the Year" moniker.

John Meyer


February 29, 2000

I am glad to see that there is a forum where Amazon will be able see the overall stupidity of what they have done and the community's reaction to that. I can only hope that they (Amazon.com and the patent attorneys retained by them) will put aside their egos and look at the actual problems with what they have done and not let a lawyer saying "but we got the patent, so we obviously deserve it" be the guiding voice in what is already an obviously misguided and short-sighted approach to e-commerce. It would appear that Amazon.com is afraid to face its competitors based on selection/quality/price and will only face them on service at the checkout counter and only then by taking control of common e-commerce practices so that their competitors won't be able to compete on equal footing. Interesting way to do business, but it reeks of fear and tells me that they don't think they can compete in any other way. Needless to say, I too have boycotted Amazon and have had the pleasure of steering five other people away from Amazon in the past two weeks. I hope someday to be able to purchase books and other items from Amazon again. But as long as I can't shop at their site with a clear conscience, I wonĂt shop there at all.

Chris Riley


February 29, 2000

I have to add my 2 cents...Does Amazon.com have to resort to this kind of greed because they haven't made a profit selling their products? You are embarrassing yourselves before what you obviously think is a gullible lot. Please change your mind about this patent nonsense!

Scott Tate


February 29, 2000

As an early fan of yours, I will not order from you again until you change your ways of trying to cash in on other's original ideas. What are you trying to gain. Just let people order stuff and you ship it and let the development of software fall where it may.

Kenny G. Dubuisson, Jr.


February 29, 2000

I purchased at least 躔 in books off of Amazon last year, fatbrain.com here I com.

Ethan Post


February 29, 2000

Molly Des Jardin


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com, Do The Right Thing (tm), please...

Jason G. Aults


February 29, 2000

I am forced to agree with the technical community on this issue. I cannot believe that the patent was even granted, much less that Amazon is attempting to enforce it. There have been many events in recent years that have caused me to realize that the patent office has seriously gotten out of control, and this is further proof. Their inability to understand the issues at hand is simply providing fodder for lawyers and inhibiting the growth of the Internet. As a technical professional myself, I encourage Amazon to abandon this effort. I believe that it is doomed to failure in any case, and they could avoid the enmity of people that have supported them in the past and are deeply interested in their overall success.

Tony Lindquist


February 29, 2000

I feel that software patents in general and the 1-Click patent in particular are a threat to the continued growth of the internet. Software patents are a mounting threat to Free (as in speech) Software, whose spirit has brought the world such benefits as the Internet, commodity PC hardware, and Unix (to say nothing of Linux, FreeBSD, Apache, and the like). I further assert that "aggressive" patents are an abuse of the patent system, a system that has repeatedly demonstrated its inability to cope with the ever accelerating speed of technological growth.

Mark Storer


February 29, 2000

DON'T FORGET TO VOTE WITH YOUR WALLET!!

DOUGLAS SAUBY


February 29, 2000

Wow, these folks are really something. I hope they try to enforce this on someone and that someone contests their patent and the whole thing blows up in their face. That would be a fine mess.

Alexey Zinger


February 29, 2000

Rev. Eric Maultsby


February 29, 2000

I completely agree with Tim's position on this issue. Just because the patent office is slow enough to (for the time being) allow such patents doesn't mean any respectable company should try to take advantage of it. I will not be purchasing from Amazon until it learns to respect the industry and people that made its existence posssible.

Jeff Oplinger


February 29, 2000

Most amazon customers do not care about software patents. Think, however, how much influence an open software advocating Database Administrator can have among his/her co-workers.

Dr. Boris Fain


February 29, 2000

Peter House


February 29, 2000

After learning of the odious "one click" patent a couple of months ago, I told Amazon I would do no more business with them until they stopped their patent madness. Not patronizing Amazon has been no great loss because there are plenty of other internet merchants out there. In a business that so depends on brand name, Amazon has distinguished itself, negatively.

Timothy P. Egbert, J.D., Ph.D.


February 29, 2000

Jeff, I admire much of what you have done. I can only assume that you hold the patents just to keep others from trying to work it against you. I will offer that I refuse to purchase from Amazon until you make a public statement about the ridiculousness of your patents, and your true motivation of getting them. I'm not much for threats, though I am one for history. I beleive your options are to make your statement of patent enforcement inactivity clear, or prepare to be the sacraficial lamb that you will become. The throngs of people wanting you down for your antics are growing to hundreds of thousands. I myself will continue to spread the information until you smarten up. Thanks for being there. Goood luck. Jen

Jen Ronner


February 29, 2000

Rob Wiseman


February 29, 2000

please come to your senses.

Robert Thorsby


February 29, 2000

There are lots of other booksellers on the web, and I will frequent them instead of Amazon. <a href="http://www.fatbrain.com">FatBrain for nerd books!</a> <a href="http://www.bn.com">Go shop at Barnes & Noble (Amazon will love that!)</a> <a href="http://www.fatbrain.com">FatBrain for nerd books!</a> <a href="http://dir.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Books/Shopping_and_Services/Booksellers/">Go to Yahoo! and pick your own BookSeller</a>

Alan Field


February 29, 2000

As someone who has spent thousands of GBP at amazon.com and then amazon.co.uk I'm extremely saddened at Amazon's short-sighted attitude but am happy to take my business elsewhere.

Ralph Corderoy


February 29, 2000

David Robb


February 29, 2000

This is a very disappointing turn that Amazon has taken. I strongly hope that they reconsider this course of action.

Todd Knealing


February 29, 2000

I will not buy from Amazon.com until these ridiculus patents are stopped.

Eric J. Knapp


February 29, 2000

Just say no!

Robert Van Horn


February 29, 2000

Kirk Patton


February 29, 2000

I am an avid reader. I ordered several books from Amazon in the past and was happy with their prices and service. I will not order from them again until they change their tune.

Doug McNaught


February 29, 2000

I'd say go and read up on Anarachism Triumphant. These are, or should be, the ways of the past Amazon. http://old.law.columbia.edu/my_pubs/anarchism.html

Michiel Ettema


February 29, 2000

This is ridiculously trivial. You can't seriously expect this patent to amount to anything when opposing lawyers are comparing stacks in the negotiation rooms-- this has "prior art" written all over it.

Robert Eckstein, Author


February 29, 2000

I will buy my technical books (and I buy many) solely from Amazon's competition until Amazon renounces this patent. Regards, Jeremy Allison, Samba Team.

Jeremy Allison


February 29, 2000

The patenting of this idea is akin to patenting the idea that you can use a glass to put water in to drink, instead of lowering your face to the faucet. It is something that everyone does already because it is a simple use of existing tools which someone else created. Until and unless Amazon drops the enforcement of this ridiculous patent, I will cease to use Amazon.com for any purchases, both personal and work related.

Paul D Fottler


February 29, 2000

I have yet to purchase anything from Amazon, and it looks like it's going to stay that way.

Andrew Hamilton


February 29, 2000

Imagine, if a Chemical Company President was polluting the Great Lakes with material that he/she knew was carcinogenic even though the law said it was "legal". Once we found out we would be outraged. We would petition the Chemical Company into bankruptcy and sue the President and Board of Directors. There is no difference between what Amazon and Jeff Bezos are doing with these patents. They are polluting the Internet with carcinogenic patents. We are outraged. Lindsay Moir

RightsMarket


February 29, 2000

I used to admire and enjoy Amazon. I have taken my business to B&N since you targeted them. I have also spread the news about the apparent brain hemorrhage suffered by Amazon. Remember Amazon - for each signature listed here there are likely several more that are also no longer buying from you. Please stop this injustice and let's get things back to normal.

Wayne Speir


February 29, 2000

It's becoming distasteful to order from Amazon. If all these patents are upheld, there won't be any new Amazons on the scene.

Paul Lane


February 29, 2000

Silly amazon..

Ian Main


February 29, 2000


February 29, 2000

I agree fully and completely with the content of the open letter to Jeff Bezos =eas=

Earl A. Stutesq


February 29, 2000

Stacey Edwards


February 29, 2000

I would prefer to work with Amazon. However, now the value they provide is not enough to cover for the damage that they are doing. I will take my business and my recommendations elsewhere.

Miles Johnson


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, Consider the benefits you have received through the use of open source tools. And please reconsider these foolish attempts at market domination. I have spent thousands of dollars on Amazon. No more, however.

Dave Warner


February 29, 2000

I'll be buying my tech books from fatbrain.com or bookpool.com until they too do something stupid. Hopefully that won't be for a while.

Jude Nagurney


February 29, 2000

I'm a long time Amazon associate. Over the years I've invested a lot of time in making my site attractive and useful based on the legacy of sharing ideas, resources, source code, etc. that made the Internet what it is. I've started my site long before Amazon announced its associate program. I feel increasingly uneasy with Amazon's grabby and selfish attitude vs. this open and friendly Internet spirit. The money I make out of commissions is definitely not worth all the work I invested in my site I refer people to amazon, not for the commission, but to provide broader relevant experience in the form of related books. Both the "one click" and the "associates" ideas are way too broad and obvious to patent. They are definitely not Amazon's original ideas. I call upon Amazon to stop this ludicrous patents campaign. Amazon's tactics are alienating its best partners. We've chosen to be Amazon associates when Amazon attitude was different. We're giving much more than we're taking. I suggest to every Amazon Associate to try the following: Divide the commission money by the number of hours invested in building your web site. How does this compare with the minimum wage? Any one of Amazon's associates can switch to be B&N (or any other company) associate. It is a choice anyone can make. Amazon's attitude is making this choice increasingly easier with every patent they file. We are not ``eyeballs'' or ``clicks'' or ``patent items'', we are human beings who care much about freedom, fairness and sharing. I would like to commend Tim O'Reily once again for his leadership and stand on this issue.

Ariel Faigon


February 29, 2000

Greed is not an attractive trait Mr Bezos. I bought three books from Amazon this week, but they will be the last I buy if you continue in this ridiculous endeavour.

Mary Comber


February 29, 2000

Craig Kattner


February 29, 2000

Yes, another boycotter. Not only do I no longer purchase from Amazon, I also drop the boycott into any reasonable conversation on related topics. I know I've convinced a few others not to buy from them, and not just tech people. Hopefully, others are working similarly. http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/amazon.html

Jason Riedy


February 29, 2000

I will join in the boycott until Amazon learns to appreciate and show more respect for its open source heritage.

Scott Annett


February 29, 2000

Jon Lapham


February 29, 2000

amazon customer from 1997 to today, until 1-click patent is abolished.

Teresa Hsu


February 29, 2000

Since the dark day you enforced your 1-click patent against B&N, I haven't bought anything from you. It won't change until you finally open your eyes. You can fool lawyers and judges pretending you invented how to use cookies... not your customers.

Antoine Duchéteau


February 29, 2000

I am a former Amazon customer -- however, I refuse to support a company that would abuse the crippled patent system to unethically damage the market.

Aaron Malone


February 29, 2000

I agree that Amazon is in the wrong here. Our company has bought plenty of books from Amazon but we will be buying from a competitor until Amazon publicly drops all claim to this technique.

Avi Flax


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com *used* to be where I went first to purchase books online...

Matt J Cwanek


February 29, 2000

The one-click and affiliate program patents are egregious and flagrant abuses of the patent office's ineptness. Their enforcement is an insult to anyone who uses the web. But the (in my opinion completely disingenuous) claim that these patents cover non-obvious innovations is empirically testable. If the innovations are non-obvious, then a naive programmer designing a new e-commerce system without any exposure to amazon's web site, should be extremely unlikely to come up with either idea. To be conservative, let's say that even if as many as half the subjects in this experiment were to come up with the idea (given minimal cueing as to what they were designing), we would still consider it non-obvious. We all know how this thought experiment comes out. Over half the people reading this message probably did think of one-click ordering before Amazon had it. Certainly I would certainly be willing to bet my entire net worth against a thousandth of that of Jeff Bezos that, if we could find a thousand appropriate subjects, perhaps ten might never come up with the idea of one-click ordering, and fifteen might never think of affiliate programs. I think Jeff will get a lot of takers for this bet, though.

Daniel Y. Kimberg


February 29, 2000

Uhmm I purchased around 蹢.00 worth of books, CDs, and videos from Amazon.com I also was one of of the first few that believed in Amazon.com's e-comerce model. I must say that buy.com, fatbrain.com, bn.com, and bookpool.com are going to get all my business. Being a developer I am disapointed that you are defending a patent based on an open standard such as web cookies.

Stefano Santoro


February 29, 2000

I agree and stand firmly behind all the points you have made in your letter, Tim.

Matt Quail


February 29, 2000

Finished with Amazon until this silly patent is dropped.

Chris Winkler


February 29, 2000

I regret that I will be unable to shop at or even visit amazon.com or any of its subsidiary sites until this policy is reversed. I'll also make an effort to inform friends and acquaintances of the strong necessity of protesting software patents in a similar fashion. These companies are providers of service whose business owes completely to the free exchange of ideas, and this sort of theft from the common good cannot be ignored.

Marc Sira


February 29, 2000

I think everyone has said everything there is to say. The biggest travesty is that the rest of us programmers are deprived of what is rightfully ours. I mean really! Patenting cookies! How outrageous is that!!! You should be ashamed of yourself, Amazon. I have bought hundreds (maybe even thousands) of dollars worth of books for me and my company and I have always spoken so highly of you. This is the last time I buy your products or even think about whispering your name to another person until you stop this ludicrous abuse of power.

Adria


February 29, 2000

Come on Mr. Bezos, you know better than this. And so do we. Success is a great thing, and you have achieved a very large measure of that, but this 1-Click thing is not yours and you know it. It's a cute little name for technology being used the world over. I'm also afraid I'll have to close my associates pages if your company persists in this ridiculous notion. Be careful, the ice gets very thin where you're walking...

Ken Barrett


February 29, 2000

I agree, these patents are bad for all. Amazon is a PERL shop and if Mr Wall decided to revoke your licence, you would have no service for weeks and perhaps months as you would be forced to re-design (how would investors like that?). How about those gif images? They belong to Unisys but I am sure if they told you to replace them with a less efficient file format, you would be pictureless for days and perhaps weeks. Hope there are no Apache services on your network also. And wouldn't it be nice to offer your customers the option of naming their own price on excess inventiory? Can't because of another dumb patent. Maybe you could be forced to remove shopping carts because another dumb patent covers maintaing state. So as you can see, if all people enforced these bad patents, Amazon.com would not have fast downloading pictures, no shopping cart, more complex code, higher labor costs to maintain it, higher legal costs to maintain complience and no company spirit because the right to innovate is being smothered by corporate giants like yourself. I respect your company but not the robbing of ideas of the people that made your existance possible. Join us in making the web better and more open. If you don't, you may be shooting yourself in the foot like another Washington company.

Michael DeVivio


February 29, 2000

I'm another book collector that will be avoiding amazon.com. I buy a lot of books, but patents like that suck and I can't support a company that uses them. I will also spread the boycott, and recommend amazon's competitors to all my friends, who recognize me as "the computer and internet expert". Think again Mr. Bezos!

Torrey Hoffman


February 29, 2000

Let's see Amazon come up with some original ideas first, then try and use them for a competitive advantage. These trivial patents are an admission that Amazon's technical staff is being mismanaged.

Richard Anderson


February 29, 2000

Wrong move. Tell your lawyers you have no fiduciary obligation to enforce a patent that ought not have been issued and in any event ought not be enforced. Jerry Pournelle Chaos Manor

Jerry Pournelle


February 29, 2000

steven morgan friedman


February 29, 2000

All Amazon has (or any e-tail entity) is their reputation. You're blowing it.

Mason McDaniel


February 29, 2000

Please wake up, Amazon. Stupid stunts like this just make your customers go elsewhere. I won't be shopping at Amazon again.

Curtis Porter


February 29, 2000

It's a sad day when something that has always been free, such as the internet, becomes cluttered by irresponsable coorporations such as Amazon. I believe in the freedom of the `net, and the technology that it was built on, and I cannot support any company that attempts to limit that freedom.

Kenneth E. Lussier


February 29, 2000

happy to say that i just turned into a proud owner of 赨 worth of books from fatbrain.com oh and clicking more than once was SUCH a chore! *chuckle*

tomasz konefal


February 29, 2000

I buy a *lot* of books in a year. (My technical books alone, stacked on end, are already taller than my 5'9", and I've only been in the habit of buying tech. books for 3 years now.) Of late, I've begun to buy more frequently from Amazon. Your website is a technical marvel. I am astounded at the breadth and the relevance of your website's features. You have truly created a business of which to be proud. Why do you have to debase your technological achievements by pretending that certain of them are more important than they are? Rather than concentrating on expanding your offering, or incerasing the convenience of making a purchase, you expect to stay ahead by patenting the obvious? Come on. On the Web, there is more than one way to do it, and you can be quite sure that the other ways will be found. I can't conscience supporting a business that persists in stalling the progress of the Web. I will make future book purchases from Barnes & Noble (online and offline) Fatbrain, and O'Reilly direct. When Amazon backs off from its preposterous defense of a worthless patent, I will revisit my decision.

David Hand


February 29, 2000

David G. Doster


February 29, 2000

Jan Rune Holmevik


February 29, 2000

I am bothered by your use of what I view as an illegitimate, so much so that since reading of it, I have exclusively used bn.com. I would prefer to use Amazon, but cannot in good conscience unless and until you stop this egregious behavior.

Keith Piepho


February 29, 2000

D.C. Lawrence


February 29, 2000

I know you are falling victim to your lawyers but wake up and smell the tech. Do you really think anything as basic as 1-click is your invention? Really? Come on. The same paradigms , except for crypto, have been reused since we had sparse array binary trees for use as databases in MUMPS in 1965. Grow up and compete. Sincerely Robert D. Silvetz, M.D.

Robert D. Silvetz


February 29, 2000

Curtis Layton


February 29, 2000

While I have purchased a few books from Amazon, I stopped when I heard about this bogus patent. I won't buy anything at all from Amazon any more until you retract all software patents. Meanwhile, I strongly urge all my friends to do the same.

Stephan Niemz


February 29, 2000

Kevin T. O'Brien


February 29, 2000

Shame on you, Amazon!

Jenny Fain


February 29, 2000

Corey Benninger


February 29, 2000

Chris Lusena


February 29, 2000

I entirely agree with this letter.

Greg Galcik


February 29, 2000

As I recall, greed was not one of the cardinal virtues...

John Deighan


February 29, 2000

Applying patents for a way of using cookies is not protection of innovation. It is sheer stupidity. Shame on you Amazon.

Dury Arnaud


February 29, 2000

I have cancelled all my outstanding Amazon orders, and will not buy from Amazon again until the patent litigation is completely abandoned.

Ron F.


February 29, 2000

I have a very large technical library---over a thousand titles---many of which have been purchased at Amazon.com. As long as Amazon.com attempts to enforce marginal patents, I will not patronize their establishment.

Jeffrey Aguilera


February 29, 2000

As of now consider me an ex-customer. You should be ashamed of exploiting the work of so many (mostly unpaid) others who have developped the technology that enables your existance. In the long run this will do you much more harm than good.

Martin Fuzzey


February 29, 2000

I have purchaced several books from you & fatbrain.com, I think I'll be continuing my business with fatbrain unless you wise up, you are just too greedy ( tell us again how much you are worth in stock ?????? ). Sincerely D.J. Barrow. Member of Linux for 390 developer development team.

DJ Barrow


February 29, 2000

Bobby Woods-Corwin


February 29, 2000

I purchase several books a month (about 贄 worth). Sometimes with you. If you continue to exploit an idea you claim as your own, I will terminate my business with Amazon. And I will encourage everyone I work with and know to do the same. Maybe when your shareholders start feeling the effects, you will realize the mistake you have made.

Ken Koors


February 29, 2000

I used to buy books approximately weekly from Amazon.com. I haven't bought a single book since the beginning of December, because of this patent silliness. In addition, I always recommend that people wishing to buy my recently published book avoid Amazon. Jeff Bezos, stop the nonsense! I really do like your site best, but I'm not going to frequent it if you insist on strangling the industry with legal harassment. -- Larry Gritz

Larry Gritz


February 29, 2000

I will never purchase any products from Amazon while they continue to hold the one-click and associates patents, or any other similar patents that use bully tactics in restraint of trade to make obvious and prior technology unavailable to the software community. These patents should be overturned, and the Justice department should investigate Amazon for its abuse of the free market. I'd love to know if anyone in the patent office got a nice Christmas present from Amazon for their careful perusal of these patent applications.

Dan Childers


February 29, 2000

Vote on this issue with your dollars. There are plenty of other merchants out there that would gladly step into the space the Amazon.com may currently hold for you. A few of them include, but are not limited to: http://www.bn.com barnes and noble http://www.fatbrain.com fatbrain books http://www.powells.com Powell's Books in Portalnd, Oregon (the "true" Largest Bookstore in the World). It sells new and used texts together and many of the "hard to find" books on Amazon are actually bought from Powell's and resold to you (at a good sized markup). Skip the middle man, buy from Powell's Books!

Jim Jones


February 29, 2000

Dear Mr. Bezos: A great man once said that if he saw further than other men, it was because he stood on the shoulders of giants. Sounds to me like you just want to stand there to block the view of the folks behind you. I sincerely hope you see that you are doing the wrong thing. If you don't know why it's wrong, please reread RMS's and Tim O'Rielly's letters on the subject. BTW, you wouldn't happen to have the URL of a mirror for the DeCSS, would you? Thanks for your attention in this matter, and I look forward to the news that you've come to your senses. Too bad I won't read about it, or anything else, on amazon.com.

Jim Sullivan


February 29, 2000

I started boycotting Amazon when they patented 1-Click(tm). BOOKPOOL.com has amazing prices on technical books and for anything else I go to one of the sites listed on NOAMAZON.com. Shame on you Jeff Bezos.

Brien Voorhees


February 29, 2000

As a developer, I have made my living off of open source software, and technology and techniques which had no or open patents. I previously bought the majority of my reading material from amazon.com in the efforts to support the internet economy - an economy I hoped would be based on openness, respect, and freedom. Instead, the leader in e-business has proven that they are just interested in business as usual. As a result, I am no longer purchasing from amazon.com I applaud Tim O'reilly for his courage to speak out with the ideals that he believes in!

Praveen Sinha


February 29, 2000

Michael Sander


February 29, 2000

Justin Lawler


February 29, 2000

Worried (past?) swedish customer...

Anders Hedborg


February 29, 2000

Come on guys, why do you want to pollute the patent system with such dreck as the On Click patent? It is not that I am opposed to patents; in fact I have several in submission at the moment, but you need something stronger then the use of a cookie to make a case for one! Your approach is really a slap in the face to those people who have worked to bring you, without patents, the technology that you use everyday. I used to be a heavy (and happy) user of your company, but I have shifted over to fatbrain and, ugh, bn.com. I will not support your position on these patents.

Murray Smigel


February 29, 2000

Many racers fall to the paranoia of watching, and sabatoging those who follow, instead of clearing the next hurdle. Did you start, and grow amazon by *focusing* on what the competition might do ? I doubt it, you *were* much too clever during your startup. Why stop showing the competition how to create the best shopping experience on the net ?

Marty Davis


February 29, 2000

Bad Amazon! No biscuit!

Kai-yuh Hsiao


February 29, 2000

Amazon has lost another customer.

Matthew Templeton


February 29, 2000

I agree with Tim wholeheartedly. Amazon will not see any more business from me until they drop the patent nonsense.

Chad Marshall


February 29, 2000

Maybe you (Mr. Bezos) will get the idea that those of us who have built this medium which you are exploiting don't appreciate it when you take our ball, write your name on it and then decide to not let us play with it anymore! I am joining the boycott and recommending to everyone I know to do the same!

Richard Bastedo, President GygaBite.com


February 29, 2000

I really like Amazon service but this patent business forces me to choose some other book seller.

Alex Kravchenko


February 29, 2000

Michael Calabrese


February 29, 2000

Douglas Lewis


February 29, 2000

It is well known that software patents have become more of a vicious land grab than a protection for the rights of innovators. In the absense of a patent-providing body that can tell the difference between these two scenarios, it is up to the patent submittor to only pursue original and innovative ideas/algorithms for patent, even if the submittor is a corporate body. Otherwise, the land grab will continue until true software innovation is throttled to death. By applying for and utilizing the "1-click shopping" patent, Amazon.com has violated this rule, and is thereby hastening the demise of innovation for short-term corporate gain. This stinks.

Matthew Ford


February 29, 2000

I've allready bought books at Amazon UK, and I won't again until Amazon decides to stop pattenting computer usages in its businness process.

Olivier Berger


February 29, 2000

Marko Aalto


February 29, 2000

Arwen O'Reilly


February 29, 2000

Unlike Tim, my feelings on this are so strong that I will participate in the boycott. To write an open letter decrying this practice and refuse to boycott when there are apparently equivalent providers is too mamby-pamby for my taste. I intend to urge friends, family and co-workers to participate in the boycott. I intend to add an informative sig to all personal and corporate communications about this insidious practice. If our eyeballs are worth even a small fraction of the value the market accords them, the names on this list and those they communciate with will be significant.

Wayne Durden


February 29, 2000

Tom Kyle


February 29, 2000

I have set up Amazon affiliations for several of my web design clients and was impressed by the assistance I received on a programming question by email within a day. BUT as a result of these two patents I will not be reccomending Amazon to clients or using Amazon personally because I feel what you are trying to do is harmful to the future of the Internet. Take a look at your nearby neighbor Microsoft and the ill will they have created by their negative and abusive actions. What goes around comes around, and if you operate your company from a defensive and negative postion you will eventually reap the results of that.

Rich Ward


February 29, 2000

Dan Debertin


February 29, 2000

As an internet old-timer (I have been there since 1984), I have been purchasing books at Amazon.com for quite some time. These times are over. I will not buy another book from Amazon until they clearly signal that they will stop taking undue advantage out of a failing patent system. Jean-Denis

Jean-Denis Muys-Vasovic


February 29, 2000

I oppose your patents for "1-Click Shopping" and "Affiliates" technologies and I will no longer shop at Amazon.com as long as you lay claim to them. I am confident that, if necessary, the courts will eventually revoke these patents. By that time, you will have created such ill-will among the web community that your business will surely suffer. Or you could admit your mistake now and save yourself a lot of grief.

Sam Choukri


February 29, 2000

You are killing the goose that lays the golden eggs. As with the fairy tale, you will end up with a bloody mess.

Chris Rasley


February 29, 2000

As an internet old-timer (I have been there since 1984), I have been purchasing books at Amazon.com for quite some time. These times are over. I will not buy another book from Amazon until they clearly signal that they will stop taking undue advantage out of a failing patent system. Jean-Denis

Jean-Denis Muys-Vasovic


February 29, 2000

The Amazon patent is as absurd as someone patenting a coupon. 1-click ordering was a clever marketing innovation, but nothing more. We must tell Amazon in no uncertain terms that they're wrong. Vote with your dollars, folks. It's the only communication Jeff Bezos seems to understand.

John Kaufeld


February 29, 2000

Neil Robertson


February 29, 2000

Michael Osterlie


February 29, 2000

Like hundreds of others who have already signed this letter in the past day and a half, I'm a techie who has spent a good thousand or two on Amazon stuff. Amazon used to be one of my favorite companies. I sorrowfully join the boycott. When you mend your ways, I'll be back...

Michael Peterson


February 29, 2000

David Solum


February 29, 2000

one less amazon customer here...

K. Brant Niggemyer


February 29, 2000

Peter Lieverdink


February 29, 2000

Daniel Howard


February 29, 2000

I have bought from Amazon.com before, but wont buy anymore till they relent on such bogus patents. fatbrain or maybe even bn..

Saikat Dey


February 29, 2000

Benjamin Gilbert


February 29, 2000

I buy around 3-4 books a year from Amazon.com. I have an extreme dislike of software patents - I believe they stifle this industry more than they help it. The Amazon 1-click patent is more obnoxious than usual. I may have to take my business elsewhere if Amazon insists on following this ridiculous patent policy.

Steve Anichini


February 29, 2000

Jeremy Epstein


February 29, 2000

I'll not buy a thing from amazon until this is cleared up. It's too bad too, I'd prefer to shop amazon, but i'm stuck visiting bn.com or my local bookstore.

Aaron Hope


February 29, 2000

D. L. M.


February 29, 2000

Darryl A. Peterson


February 29, 2000

I recently purchased a couple of hundred (Canadian) dollars worth of books from a competitor to Amazon, a sale that, until recently, would have gone to amazon.com. I'm saddened that amazon.com would take such a trivial bag on the side of existing net tech and make it into a patented 'invention', effectively stealing what is in the public domain. However, I just have to hope, I guess, that amazon's engines are written in Perl, so that they would :. fall under the GPL. Grin. Dave

Dave Bradshaw


February 29, 2000

Laura Chiles


February 29, 2000

I have purchased quite a few books from Amazon, and had planned to purchase quite a few more in this year alone. But until Amazon stops this insane patent on One-Click and promises not to try to enforce the Associates program patent, I will spend my book money at other online businesses.

Denise Loving


February 29, 2000

Jon Ault


February 29, 2000

James P. Steiner


February 29, 2000

Stephen Mendrzychowski


February 29, 2000

San Dinh


February 29, 2000

I agree with most everything stated, your current business practices have me sickened and I will no longer shop at amazon.com I think I will get all my books from Barnseandnoble now.

Ryan Fuerst


February 29, 2000

Hey, Bezos! Have you ever thought of teaming up with Macroshaft, AOHelL, and Time-Whore and seeing if you guys could patent stupidity? Oh yeah, I just thought I'd mention this-I'm an avid gamer (who $pends on such books), a true-crime novel afficionado, and aspiring detective with a reputation for accumulating LOTS of books..I was going to place a 贄+ order with you, Amazon, but the chance of that happening now with that bogus patent shit is less than the 0% chance of me switching to AOHelL. <click> -Nitro

Denise "Nitro" Lee


February 29, 2000

I will not utilize Amazon.com and I will infor others as to the reasons why until Amazon self-revokes the patent on the 1-Click purchase.

Greg Corwin


February 29, 2000

Until such time as Amazon ceases to use their silly patents as a bully stick, their competitor have my business. 'nuff said.

Matt Bandy


February 29, 2000


February 29, 2000

I suppose we and, especially, you, Mr Bezos, are thankful that the descendants of Guttenberg aren't pursuing cases of patent infringement on the printing press! I wonder, were I to hurry, if I could still be granted a patent on the fonts typically used in the printing industry? *chuckle* Well, my friends, I've not yet purchased from Amazon, although I've considered it. Certainly, though, I have no intention whatsoever of purchasing from Amazon now. Thanks, Tim, for your forthrightness in this matter.

Dave Fluri


February 29, 2000

Paul Reynolds


February 29, 2000

As a customer at Amazon.com I have to rethink my way of dealing with you as a company. Even that you provide a very fine service, I have to turn you down if you do not stop this no sense patent war. It damage the Internet on the long run. Sorry I have to do so. Steen Talmark

Steen Talmark


February 29, 2000

Dear Sir, I will not buy another book from your company. I will not recommend anyone else do either. I have bought many books from your company in the past, as have my relatives. I have been treated fairly, and found that the people who work under you to be excellent, prompt, and dilligent in finding hard to locate, or out of print books. Please do not insist that you invented something that has been available for long before your claim. (I hope to be able to shop with you again in the future (if the pattent application is dropped)) Sincerely, Kelly R. Black (Ex. Amazon.com shopper)

Kelly Black


February 29, 2000

Get real.

Muni Schweig


February 29, 2000

Tadas Osmolskis


February 29, 2000

Until this issue is resolved I refuse to buy from your site. I have several associates that regularly purchase from Amazon, I will inform them as well. I run the IT department here and may implement blocking of amazon.com on our corporate network. Rick Parker

Rick Parker


February 29, 2000

I was a happy Amazon customer, buying several books anually, until I read about their patents. I have gone as far as boycotting. I urge everyone to do the same. Not only have they lost my business for the past few months, but I've found other book resources such as bookfinder.com . check it out.

Michael Adler


February 29, 2000

I used to be an Amazon customer. I no longer buy at Amazon for two reasons: One is their patent policy, the other is their policy to send email advertisements even if you asked them no to do.

Walter Hofmann


February 29, 2000

I too have purchased numerous books at amazon, but if this issue is not resolved quickly, amazon will never see my business again.

Dan Greer


February 29, 2000

Ian Goodrich


February 29, 2000

Josh Eno


February 29, 2000

Given the fact that Bezos refuses to acknowledge his mistake, I guess I'm going to have to start going to his competitors.

Lamont Granquist


February 29, 2000

Excuse me, But what's next as far as ignoring prior art??? You thinking of patenting the button next?

Steve Sherwick


February 29, 2000

Until Amazon.com reverses itself on their attempts to enforce an un-enforcable patent, I will be going to the local bookstore, or Barnes&Noble.

Todd Ojala


February 29, 2000

Sadly, I will have to find another source for books. I hope you come to your senses soon. I am making sure everyone I know joins this boycott.

Jeff Sewell


February 29, 2000

I have been your customer in the past. I'm sorry that I cannot support anymore a company that doesn't have any respect for the common good of the society.

Timo Pakkala


February 29, 2000

Amazon, you will not receive any more of my business until you relinquish this feeble and unjustified patent on common technology. You are now considered a technology squatter. Sincerely, Bob Roberts.

Bob Roberts


February 29, 2000

Eagerly grasping for proprietary rights to commonplace technology is something I've come to expect from Microsoft. Good to know that if MS is cut down to size, there'll be no shortage of techno-corporate audacity.

Casey Boettcher


February 29, 2000

You have a patent of something that anyone and has created. A bunch of cookies and a button that tracks you. Ridiculous.

Michael Goodman


February 29, 2000

I've been a faithful Amazon customer for years; half of my technical library and a large portion of my other books have come from Amazon. I also work in the industry, building websites, and feel that both the 1-Click and the associate patents are abusive. Amazon needs to abandon those patents in order to regain the confidence of their technical customers.

Robert Crawford


February 29, 2000

Until this is resolved - I will not even visit the Amazon site. I will purchase all future books from FatBrain or another competitor. John D.

private


February 29, 2000

I pledge to avoid in every way doing business with Amazon.com so long as they continue trying to enforce ridiculous patents. And I will work to inform my friends and coworkers concerning this issue, so they can respond as they see fit.

Robert C. Woodbury


February 29, 2000

As a college student I spend hundreds of dollars a year on books, but there's no way I will consider purchasing from you until you stop abusing your patent and the community that allowed you to exist in the first place.

Chris Vazquez


February 29, 2000

Until this is resolved - I will not even visit the Amazon site. I will purchase all future books from FatBrain or another competitor. John D.

private


February 29, 2000

Carl W. Powers


February 29, 2000

douglas de Marco


February 29, 2000

I will be urging my friends and acquaintances to avoid Amazon until Amazon sees the light on this important issue.

Frank Woodward


February 29, 2000

Since this first became an issue I have purchased all online books from www.bookpool.com.

Ben Beuchler


February 29, 2000

Tim Pierce


February 29, 2000

I applaud Tim for his attempt to shed light on this issue, and I hope that whether or not Mr. Bezos possesses the intelligence to realize the possible adverse effects of Amazon's actions, that it will be realized that there is nothing original deserving to be patented in the first place.

Chris Shiflett


February 29, 2000

I've been on the net since '89, and worked as a professional web developer since early '94. Ever since these early days, a big part of my job was to educate customers about the culture they were about to get involved with - the Internet. Needless to say, most had a hard time getting it. What does that have to do with the topic at hand? Well, over the last year, I bought about 軸 worth of books at amazon.de for my private use, and authorized company purchases for more than five times that amount. Why? Because I thought that you HAD understood how the net works, and how to do business not just on the net, but with the net. Boy, was I wrong. Here's hoping that fatbrain.com doesn't catch corporatism any time soon. Otherwise, where would I shop for books?

Daniel Schmitt


February 29, 2000

I'm against the abuse of patents, which deserves freedom and innovation.

Laurent Kestemont


February 29, 2000

I've been on the net since '89, and worked as a professional web developer since early '94. Ever since these early days, a big part of my job was to educate customers about the culture they were about to get involved with - the Internet. Needless to say, most had a hard time getting it. What does that have to do with the topic at hand? Well, over the last year, I bought about 軸 worth of books at amazon.de for my private use, and authorized company purchases for more than five times that amount. Why? Because I thought that you HAD understood how the net works, and how to do business not just on the net, but with the net. Boy, was I wrong. Here's hoping that fatbrain.com doesn't catch corporatism any time soon. Otherwise, where would I shop for books?

Daniel Schmitt


February 29, 2000

John Griffiths


February 29, 2000

I will not buy a single book on Amazon because of this patent, and I encourage the boycott in every other similar case.

Hervë Eychenne


February 29, 2000

What is it that you are so afraid of? Stop looking for clever ways to take advantage of an antiquated patent system and go make some money.

William Wechtenhiser


February 29, 2000

I no longer buy books from Amazon. Nothing more to say expect to clean up your act.

Bryan Whitehead


February 29, 2000

why affiliates program, such a widely used process, can be patented? i think i should patent my keyboard typing style (use right index finger to type "i") Anti-Amazon!

Harry


February 29, 2000

I will not buy from Amazon again until these patents are released.

Tim Thompson


February 29, 2000

I have bought several books from Amazon in the past but will not do so again unless they stop trying to patent everything that moves. I am saddened that the whole US & worldwide patent system has shifted from protecting real inventions to monopolising all trade in the hands of a few rich and unscrupulous corporations.

Matthew Moncaster


February 29, 2000

I have spent thousands of dollars on books at amazon - but will not do so any more until Amazon declares it will not enforce these ridiculous patents.

Robert Whitehurst


February 29, 2000

I still remember how exciting it was when Amazon first came to the Internet, and how much I enjoyed your selection and service. I also was impressed at the way you built the business from one room to a major corporation with a great idea, and lots of grit and determination. It saddens me to see that you feel you need to comandeer existing technology in lieu of innovation and legitimate competion. I no longer have the heart to buy from you, and have taken my business elsewhere.

Scott Davis


February 29, 2000

I believe that if the one click patent is successfull the competition of Amazon will have no alternative to act in a similar fashion, and soon there will be an avalanche of software patents. I don't really want to be a programmer if every line of code I write must be checked by a legal department to ensure it doesn't infringe a patent or two. Is this really the future Amazon wants?

Peter Harrison


February 29, 2000

I've long since recommended Amazon to friends and collegues. No more, as long as they continue this abuse behavior.

Joshua Kronengold


February 29, 2000

I have bought several hundred dollars worth of Items from amazon.com so I think i have mroe then enough right to dictate their actions (as an active customer) I think it's immature and stupid for someone to patent the associates and 1-click /no brainer/ ideas. It does make sound business sense however, and I respect this. Perhaps what amazon.com needs to do is release the patents under an agreement that they(or similar patents) cannot be re-registerd. My 2 cents, I think I've paid enough for them to listen to me.

Keith McCartney


February 29, 2000

Tim, I'm all for boycotting Amazon if they exercise their rights to this patent, but are you going to pull your books from their virtual bookshelves?

Ron L.


February 29, 2000

I've bought books, cds, and DVDs from Amazon.com. I won't buy any more until they drop the patent assaults.

Patrick Tullmann


February 29, 2000

Francisco Neira


February 29, 2000

I have been a customer of Amazon.com but will decline to continue as one unless it joins the internet community as opposed to the e-commerce community. It is one thing to offer a service that people find useful enough to pay for, it is quite another to try to finagle an advantage and avoid straight ahead competition.

Thomas J. Keller, Ph.D.


February 29, 2000

As a consumer and tech, I am very disappointed in Amazon. I have purchased books and other merchandise from their site as well as recommend them to my friends and family. I feel that I can no longer do either. Amazon was a shining example of the promise of the internet and e-business. Now, I fear that it will be an example of a turning point in internet history. A point where the internet's promise was put to rest.

Chad Holbrook


February 29, 2000

As a consumer and tech, I am very disappointed in Amazon. I have purchased books and other merchandise from their site as well as recommend them to my friends and family. I feel that I can no longer do either. Amazon was a shining example of the promise of the internet and e-business. Now, I fear that it will be an example of a turning point in internet history. A point where the internet's promise was put to rest.

Chad Holbrook


February 29, 2000

As someone who manages a web development team which maintains an ecommerce application as well as an affiliate program, I am saddened to see Amazon make their patent claims. How is one click shopping any different from storing credit card informaiton? Where is the invention? How does an affiliate program differ from a bounty for referals? These were not new ideas. Amazon pushed the envelope for e-commerce applications, but when I look at their site I see a checkout process stolen directly from eToys, and an interface that becomes more Yahoo-like everyday. I plan on taking my business elsewhere until the patent issues are addressed.

Ian Siegel


February 29, 2000

Eric Weese


February 29, 2000

Robin Bandy


February 29, 2000

As someone who manages a web development team which maintains an ecommerce application as well as an affiliate program, I am saddened to see Amazon make their patent claims. How is one click shopping any different from storing credit card informaiton? Where is the invention? How does an affiliate program differ from a bounty for referals? These were not new ideas. Amazon pushed the envelope for e-commerce applications, but when I look at their site and see a checkout process stolen directly from eToys, and an interface that becomes more Yahoo-like everyday.

Ian Siegel


February 29, 2000

While I am not completely taking part in the boycott, Amazon.com is no longer my first stop when shopping online. Much of my business that you would normally have received has gone to competitors such as Fatbrain, BN, 800.com, toysrus.com, etc... I do think you provide a great service. I especially like the user comments on products, and I have had pretty good luck with your recommendations, at least on fiction books. I normally like to reward such companies with my purchasing dollars. However, your patent on 1-Click ordering seems so ridiculous that I cannot support such a company. If you can provide a reasonable public response as to why your patent should be valid, or drop the patent altogether, then I may change my position. Until then, however, Amazon.com will never be at the top of my online purchasing list.

Rob Anderson


February 29, 2000

Tim Neu


February 29, 2000

Amazon, you had all of my business before your silly power-grab. Now you have none. I also influence my employer's purchases, who I know spends many thousands of dollars on books anually.

Jim Saxman


February 29, 2000

Kevin Landers


February 29, 2000

I find it offensive that a company which has benefited so much from the 'open' nature of innovation on the internet would misuse patent law in such a shameless fashion. I will quite happily find another outlet for my book purchases. I've been quite satisfied with Amazon service and have used it for probably 50% of my book purchases for the last 4 years, but this is too much of an insult to overlook. I hope that Jeff Bezos will show that he is worth the accolades he has been receiving as an internet visionary and not simply another one of the same old crowd. Issuing an apology and retracting the patent would go a long way towards restoring my confidence and will spare you the embarassment of having the judge throw you out on your ear when he realizes that you are effectively claiming to have invented cookies.

Chris Gottbrath


February 29, 2000

Software patents are often abused since the patent office is not able to keep up with current technological progress. Patenting such an obvious idea is ridiculous and reflects badly upon the company.

John Kugelman


February 29, 2000

It's all been done a million times before -- how is Amazon's use of the tech any different and deserving of a patent? All this can do is scare other people out of entering the market or trying to develop the tech. Bad!

Chuk Goodin


February 29, 2000

I feel a company should keep it's competitive edge trough innovating instead of trying to claim a very simple principle, that's explained in almost any CGI site, as their own. This seriously screws the development of the WWW as a whole and I sincerely hope Amazon will give it up for the greater good of the internet community, and in the end, for themselves. -- Eric

Eric Loos


February 29, 2000

I fully agree with Tim O'Reilly on this issue. It's exactly this kind of behavior that annoys Amazon customers like me. Make that former Amazon customer. There are other places I can shop, and they're only a few clicks away.

James Graves


February 29, 2000

Ben Tindale


February 29, 2000

Amazon should do what it does best. Do business, not patents/lawsuits.

Chris Hanson


February 29, 2000

I would at least like to know _why_ Amazon considers this to be a worthwhile patent, when it seems pointless and malicious to such a large number of people.

Brian Wisti


February 29, 2000

I strongly urge Amazon.com to behave like the market leader that they are and to drop enforcement of this ridiculous patent. In no way did Amazon.com create the technology employed in 1-Click. By enforcing a sham patent they are setting a fallacious example for emerging companies in their industry. I have been a loyal and frequent customer of Amazon.com and I am surprised by Mr Bezos's apparent inability to remember that just a few years ago his company was merely one server located in his garage. According to netcraft.com, Amazon.com runs on Apache 1.3.6. Amazon.com is a lousy and irresponsible participant in the open source movement.

George Runnells


February 29, 2000

Ronald Pottol


February 29, 2000

As a fairly early user of the web, and a professional who works in Internet based technologies, I find it deplorable that companies, like Amazon may try to appropriate parts of the Internet and its technologies. This is truly theft of the many, many intellectual ideas and ideals that created the Internet. I am frequently consulted by friends and co-workers about Internet purchasing issues. While Amazon maintains its current thinking about the so-called "1-touch" patent and the new 'associates' patent, I will not recommend Amazon as a reputable vendor of any sort, and will recommend competitors for purchasers. If Amazon rethinks its position, I may rethink mine.

John Fulmer


February 29, 2000

I think Amazon would reap enormous financial benefits from the public goodwill that would be generated if it dropped this patent voluntarily.

Andrew Robertson


February 29, 2000

As a long-time and loyal customer of Amazon, I am sorry to see this patent issue come up. I support the statements that Tim O'Reilly has so eloquently made against your abuse of the patent system.

David E. Wheeler


February 29, 2000

The biggest issue regarding these patents (One-click and Affiliates) is not that Amazon should NOT have tried to file them (although they shouldn't have), but rather that the Patent Office in its own stupidity actually thinks they deserved them. This is fairly reminscent of Gates, Barksdale and Nealy trying to discuss browser monopolies with the Senate Congressional committee; they try to understand but they have simply been overtaken by events and are unwilling to admit that they aren't as smart or wise as they should be to handle today's market issue. Long story short, Amazon doesn't realize that they really don't provide any great value, they are a product aggregator and little else. Given the choice between continuing to shop at their site or click (even if its a just one-click) away to a competitor ... I think I'll choose the latter (and recommend the same to as many people as I know).

Peter Petracco


February 29, 2000

I used to be a loyal Amazon customer. However, until these patents are dropped, I'm making it my mission to see to it that everyone on the Internet - even newbies - knows about this and how it is severely limiting our freedoms and innovation. There are plenty of great places to buy stuff on the Internet. Believe me, it's no problem at all to use your competitors. But if you drop these ridiculous patents quick, I may come back.

Micah K Yoder


February 29, 2000

I'll be using my local influence to encourage people to avoid Amazon.com >From my perspective, your trivial patents are poison to the well of internet innovation.

Frank Hage


February 29, 2000

When recommending books, as a Java instructor I do that, I used to link to amazon. Now I send Java newbies to Fat Brain because of the 1 click patent suit. If you felt you needed the patent for defense that's one thing but going on the offence was too much. -Peace Dave

Dave King


February 29, 2000

Legal gangsterism should not be part of Amazon.com's business plan.

Alan Watson


February 29, 2000

It is moves like this that companies make that will one day destroy the entire spirit of the internet. The internet's foundations are in openness and freedom, and huge companies (even ones started on the internet) see this as a threat to their own survival. I beg of the companies to see the foolishness of this.

Geoffrey Cohen


February 29, 2000

Jeff Myers


February 29, 2000

I for one would like to thank Mr. Bezos. His patenting of something as rudimentary as cookies has inspired me to get off my ass and finally send in my patent for the Earth's atmosphere. You scum having been breathing my air long enough. Sarcastically,

N. LaThotep


February 29, 2000

I couldn't have said it better and will not attempt to. I agree in full.

Jeremy Miller


February 29, 2000

This power play by Amazon is ridiculous. I have completely stopped buying from them, I steer all my friends and family away from them, and I will continue to steer my (and everyone I come in contact with) purchases towards Barnes and Nobles and Fatbrain until Amazon rethinks this egregious act. I used to hold Amazon up as an icon of the power of web-based marketing. Now I can only point to it as a perfect example of hubris. Get real, Amazon. Your programmers were neither exceptionally clever nor inventive when they set your 1-click ordering up... and if they convinced you that it was hard or innovative or even particularly clever they hoodwinked you.

Gary D. Foster


February 29, 2000

Applying patents to software is a misinterpretation of the waning utility of patents in general. The intent of government-backed patents is public good not personal profit. We all benefit from others ideas. To say that you are the sole originator of an idea and prevent others from having and using that idea is socially offensive and only allowable if there are clear benefits to society. The Amazon "patents" do not benefit society, they and others like them, severely hamper it.

Travis Oliphant


February 29, 2000

Peter Sinnott


February 29, 2000

If a piece of new software technology is truly a new invention, I have no problems with granting it a patent. However, 1-Click ordering and associates programs are gross caractures of inventions. They may be new from a marketing standpoint, but from an engineering perspective, they are neither novel, innovative or new. As a longtime customer, I urge Amazon to relinquish all rights to these patents. The proliferation of meaningless software patents has reached epidemic proportions, and Amazon is leading the way. Taking a falsely courageous stand on trivial and obvious patents only weakens those patents that are truly deserved.

David Johnson


February 29, 2000

There's an old saying, politely translated as "don't poop where you eat." Amazon's efforts to pursue these misguided patents will ultimately stifle the innovation that they themselves rely on to grow and thrive. What is worse, we will all suffer the consequences of their short-sighted patent strategy.

Marc S. Merlin


February 29, 2000

James McCusker


February 29, 2000

Rëgis Rampnoux


February 29, 2000

Please cease and desist from trying to patent obvious web technologies which are/have been already in common use.

Kevin Little


February 29, 2000

Renaud Deraison


February 29, 2000

I can't believe that a company that thrives on user feedback and reviews could choose to pursue a path that will adversely effect those some customers. I have refused to buy anything from Amazon until they drop this patent.

Daniel Weber


February 29, 2000

You just lost a long-time customer for any future orders...

Patrick Lawrence


February 29, 2000

Until such time that the patent request for one-click ordering is reviewed then I will no longer use the Amazon site for purchase of any materials.

Matt Moots


February 29, 2000

The ability to get patents on such feeble innovations does not make it ethical to do so. I'm informing my friends and family of your patent activities whenever the subject of computers comes up.

Eric Buddington


February 29, 2000

Sam Buchanan


February 29, 2000

Daniel Barragan


February 29, 2000

Mike Gollub


February 29, 2000

This patent is lame, and I don't intend to spend any more money at Amazon.Com until they change their evil ways.

Peter Blum


February 29, 2000

One more satisfied Amazon customer... now shopping at BN.com.

Eric Ding


February 29, 2000

Keep true innovation alive on the web by not patenting common applications of widely used technologies.

Tim Jones


February 29, 2000

I have stopped using Amazon for my book purchaces. This patent does not belong to them. I agree with Tim O'Reilly that this patent belongs to the internet entire community.

Gary Virene


February 29, 2000

Amazon *and* the especially the PTO should be ashamed of themselves.

Joseph Kiniry


February 29, 2000

For as long as Amazon.com continues on this path, I will take my business elsewhere, namely to bn.com and to my local Barnes & Noble bookseller.

Pedro J. Cabrera - former Amazon.com customer


February 29, 2000

Good site design, good prices, good selection, but I won't shop there because of this. Sad, really.

Christopher Yates


February 29, 2000

I have purchased many many books from Amazon.com. However, I feel that since there is competition and the competition does not employ these patent tactics that I must take my business elsewhere. Amazon does not offer me anything their competitors do not, so its a simple switch and one which I am sure is being made by people every day. Amazon, you are eroding your customers faith in your company, and therefor, will erode investors faith in this company by wasting resources on protecting this rediculous patent.

Micah Nerren


February 29, 2000

As a freqent purchaser of books on Amazon and a referer of many friends and family I will have to add my protest to this list and state that I will be advising all the folks that I can to use a competitor until Amazon ceases this sensless pursuit.

Rick Drake


February 29, 2000

Shame on Amazon to pull such a 'land-grab' on an obvious patent. If someone should own any of it it's Berners-Lee or the other pioneers who built the web. Hijacking the web for profit may keep the shareholders from noticing you haven't turned a profit, but it is a slap in the face to everyone else on the web.

Boon Sheridan


February 29, 2000

As a co-author of a book which has sold many copies on Amazon, I am reluctant to bite the hand that feeds me, but as a citizen, I feel I must speak out. Amazon should never have abused the USPTO by applying for a patent on something as trivial as 1-Click. This action has debased the Amazon name and brought it into disrepute.

Tom Snee


February 29, 2000

Chris Waters


February 29, 2000

Steph Tomlinson


February 29, 2000

I beleve that this ludicris patent of Amazon's is a manuver that is to Microsoft like for my tastes

Adam Jenkins


February 29, 2000

Merci pour une aussi belle invention ! Non mais vous n'avez pas honte de faire des brevets la dessus ? (je vais brevetter le concept comme quoi les voitures roules !!!!)

Eric Seigne


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com provide an extremely convenient and competitive service, so it is some regret that I have stopped utilising their services. This will benefit quantumbooks.com by about 񘈨 in technical book purchases in the next 12 months, so perhaps Amazon.com will also regret it.

Gregory Ball


February 29, 2000

Merci pour une aussi belle invention ! Non mais vous n'avez pas honte de faire des brevets la dessus ? (je vais brevetter le concept comme quoi les voitures roulent !!!!)

Eric Seigne


February 29, 2000

I refuse to purchase anything through Amazon.com until this matter is settled fairly.

Craig Agamemnon Magaret


February 29, 2000

I suggested that my students might use Barnes&Noble (www.barnesandnoble.com) for general items until these claims are overturned.

James P Bennett


February 29, 2000

Harry Moritz


February 29, 2000

I agree that the patent was not given the necessary consideration by the patent office. It is basicly a technique commonly used on a great number of E-commerce sites...

Damon Childs


February 29, 2000

I'm an author, an Amazon Associate, and a heavy-hitting Amazon customer. I'm moving my 赨/month book purchases to other vendors and dumping my Amazon stock until Amazon abandons its litigious ways and rejoins the internet community in spirit and good netizenship.

Jerry Muelver


February 29, 2000

Gary Almes


February 29, 2000

Lynda Jones


February 29, 2000

I've purchased from Amazon in the past, but will not in the future, as their patent has already made my life more difficult in ordering from other web vendors.

Howard J. Poe


February 29, 2000

Just so you know, I have been boycotting Amazon ever since the "one click" patent was announced. This means that so far nearly 赨 which could have been part of your bottom line has gone to competitors such as Fatbrain.Com, and Barnes and Noble. Regarding the "associates" patent: At one point I was thinking of signing up one or more of my websites as part of your Associates program. I am dumping that as well, which may cost your company a lot more money if and when my site become popular. Perhaps you should rethink your position on these and any other patents you might be considering.

Paul Ellsworth


February 29, 2000

It is too bad that I can no longer benefit from Amazon's solid customer service, and incredible selection now that I am boycotting them because they are patent mongers.

Sam Borgeson


February 29, 2000

a couple of Words can't be bought by a company it spoils people of their most important common point that is language

alexandre bon


February 29, 2000

I have been a frequent buyer of technology books over the web. Though I haven't patronized Amazon in the past, I certainly will not do so in the future unless Amazon reverses course on this silly and blantantly greed-inspired patent.

Jon Keene


February 29, 2000

I completely agree with Tim about this issue. The patent is based on a trivial development and may even violate one of the first principles of patent application - that the development must not be obvious or already in the public domain.

Meyrick Chapman


February 29, 2000

I am sure many of the letters above have already stated that they will not shop at Amazon or recommend that others do either, and the philosophical and legal reasons behind their actions. Ditto. This has already cost your company several hundred dollars from me and my family. It will continue. I am angry at the US Patent Office, but ashamed of you.

John Gwinnell


February 29, 2000

Jeff Bezos has long been the idol of the Internet masses, a popularity perhaps abetted by his not being Leo Riggio [CEO of Barnes & Noble]. However, it looks as if he is not so dissimilar as we might like to believe, doing his best to dominate and monopolize an open market.

Derrick Schneider


February 29, 2000

No es lŹcito apropiarse del trabajo de otros. No compremos de Amazon hasta que retiren la patente.

Francisco Montero


February 29, 2000

bert van capelle


February 29, 2000

I agree with the letter wholeheartedly. This is analgous to a grocery store trying to patent check out lines, and is a ludicrous idea only made valid by the idiocy of our Government. Amazon invites government intrusion into the internet through actions like this, which I strongly disagree with.

Arin Sime


February 29, 2000

Cortney R. Michael


February 29, 2000

I will be shopping through Amazon's competitors until Amazon abandons this patent.

Paul Holt


February 29, 2000

Chad Englin


February 29, 2000

Sign me up as another ex-Amazon customer. I have shopped at Amazon since their inception. When Barnesandnoble.com arrived on the scene, I continued to make my purchases through Amazon. Not any longer. BN will get *all* of my business, and if I can help it, all of my company's business, until such time as Amazon drops this patent nonsense. Mr. Bezos, you have done a great disservice to the Internet community.

Steve Lammert


February 29, 2000

James Simmons


February 29, 2000

I'm an engineer and developer who buys plenty of books and would buy at least 2 today from Amazon if not for this petty 1-click baloney. Instead I'm gonna go elsewhere for my "Pragmatic Programming" book and that new Kernihan book.

Gerald Svenddal, Minneapolis MN


February 29, 2000

I won't be buying from Amazon. But more than Amazon, I blame a patent system that invites abuse.

Ken Ross


February 29, 2000

No comment ...

Jërčme Benoit


February 29, 2000

As a system administrator and programmer, I find the 1-click ordering concept trivially obvious. Only a pathetically oput-of-date Patent Office would have granted it. I have spent quite a bit of money at Amazon over the last few years - the latest being British editions of Harry Potter for my Anglophile sister (not cheap in the States). I will continue to use Amazon's web site to look up information about books - it is very helpful and well organized. However, when it comes time to buy I will take my business elsewhere.

Dave Lorand


February 29, 2000

You can't say it any better than Tim O'Reilly already did. I'll just say that Amazon will not be getting any of my business until it reverses its position on these patents.

Eric M. Winslow


February 29, 2000

I believe that the patent chase started by Amazon for the 1-Click and Associate programs is indeed wrong and flies in the face of the Internet and that which actually made Amazon popular. An open, functional, cost-effective experience. To patent some so simple as cookie-use on a site is to say that the many other aspects of customizing and experience - from SSL to cookies to browser detection should also be targets. I urge Amazon to put down this effort and get back to the task at hand; building a successful and profitable company.

Stephen Wynkoop


February 29, 2000

Jesse Boyes


February 29, 2000

Vladimir Khait


February 29, 2000

David Fuller


February 29, 2000

I hope Amazon will go back with this...

Jean Gillaux


February 29, 2000

David Reiss


February 29, 2000

Laurent Rathle


February 29, 2000

Dommage!

Daniel Malgorn


February 29, 2000

B L Franco


February 29, 2000

This is very troubling behavior from Amazon.com, poisoning the very well that made them viable. Thanks for speaking out about it, Tim.

Dave Polaschek


February 29, 2000

Ruiming Zhang


February 29, 2000

Jim Gumm


February 29, 2000

Lynn Manhart


February 29, 2000

I think that this is a perfect chance to test the power of the voice of the internet community. I'm only hoping that it is a succesful one...

Adam Ribaudo


February 29, 2000

As a representative, among my peers, of the "technological community", and in defense of said community, I now intend not only to avoid Amazon.com in lieu of its competitors, but to recommend such a course of action to all of said colleagues and peers.

Richard Hestilow


February 29, 2000

I have always liked Amazon, and have been pleased with the innovations that you have introduced to your site over the years. My approval does NOT extend to the patenting of 1-click ordering. Let us know when you stop enforcing the patent, and I will resume my ordering from you. Thanks.

Joe Wagner


February 29, 2000

Phillip W. Hutto


February 29, 2000

Tuomas Luttinen


February 29, 2000

I'm an early adopter who buys for about 5,000$ books a year... allthough i haven't boycotted amazon.com - their actions has severely damaged my perception of the company and if it continues i'll stop using them.

Thomas Madsen Mygdal


February 29, 2000

As a professional software engineer, I would welcome the opportunity to testify against Amazon regarding the blatant lack of novelty in their patent and the overwhelming quantity of prior-art.

Timothy M. Shead


February 29, 2000

RENARD Jean-Marie


February 29, 2000

I am another satisfied but former customer of Amazon. I have already convinced serveral friends and clients not to do any business with Amazon until you mend your ways.

Steven Farnham


February 29, 2000

Steven Jones


February 29, 2000

First one-click, then affiliate sales. On the one hand Amazon is to be congratulated for trying to think "outside the box". However this is too far outside. Will we see a patent on electronic commerce that utilizes an IP address? Unfortunately this is likely to be tied up in court for quite some time, all the while casting a shaddow over the industry.

David H. Janson


February 29, 2000

I won't buy anything from Amazon until the patent is given to public domain.

Rodrigo Feher


February 29, 2000

Jason Haas


February 29, 2000

I have been buying books worth several 100s of dollars each year from your store. I have always been very happy with the speed and quality of your service. Unfortunately, because of this ridiculous patent application, I will not be using your store; in fact, just this past week I ordered books worth ๛.80 from Fatbrain.com.

Zerksis D. Umrigar


February 29, 2000

Weston Cann


February 29, 2000

This whole affair is something that never should have had to come about. I had just started to use Amazon, but unless they change their ways in regards to this then I will not buy from them again.

Simon Michelmore


February 29, 2000

Joseph Makuch


February 29, 2000

Amazingly short sighted effort on both your part and the patent office. I have been online since 1985, started the first commerical ISP in Canada and develop software for a living. Your one click patent is not an inovation. I have ceased to buy online from Amazon and will not buy from Amazon again until and unless this patent is found to be invalid or dropped. I will instead my business to another online service such as chapters.ca or bn.com which may appreciate my annual book buying budget.

Stuart Lynne


February 29, 2000

hy !!! just for freedom

berkane


February 29, 2000

Kurt Mosiejczuk


February 29, 2000

First Amazon patents "open" or what should be open source. Now it is has patented multi-level marketing (a.k.a. Associates Program)??? When Amway finds out they are going to be pissed. I hope that this is a chess-like move on Amazon's part to keep other e-commerce sites from claiming these patents and using them for harm. More than likely, when the patent office and courts get a technological clue, they will be overturned anyway. Amazon has resorted to dirty tricks way too early in the game. The barriers to entry are few and word spreads quickly. One last thought. It's only going to take "1-click" to submit this message and never buy from Amazon again.

Steve Cummings


February 29, 2000

Ari Olson


February 29, 2000

While I have indeed informed friends and family of the facts surrounding this debacle, I should note, Mr. Bezos, that Amazon's patent notoriety (and I do beg that you forgive the pun) has spread to many laymen in my community with little assistance. Your company's transgression is so readily apparent and understood that this could easily billow into a vastly more public issue. Like all these others, I urge you to repeal this ludicrous patent and clarify the company's intentions. Such action lies within your best interests and the best interests of the technical community as a whole.

Adam Augusta


February 29, 2000

As a senior-level internet developer and consultant at a successful consulting company, I would simply like to add my voice to the aleady deafening symphony of people whom you have foolishly alienated. On behalf of numerous other professionals I have spoken with personally, and countless others whom I see represened in these comments, I humbly remind you that our thoughts and reccomendations are respected by hundreds of thousands of clients, business associates, friends, and casual acquaintances. Other than perhaps the media, we are the front line of information on abuses such as this. So please continue on with this blatant attack on the very principles which drive the internet, and let us demonstate the breadth of our influence on your customer base. Tim may have issues on supporting a wide-scale boycott (due, I would imagine, to his unique situation in the matter), but I assure you that the vast majority of webmasters, developers, consultants, et al. have no such reservatio! ns. Interestingly enough, I am also the co-founder of an online Writers' Guild, speaking on behalf of numerous writers as well; and we writers do tend to be ferocious readers as well. Just a thought.

Christopher Cain


February 29, 2000

Aaron D. Haney


February 29, 2000

I strongly agree with O'Reilly's position.

Sean Gugler


February 29, 2000

Evelyn G. Eldridge


February 29, 2000

Andrew Johnson


February 29, 2000

Looks like Amazon has bitten off the hand that feeds it...

Tom P


February 29, 2000

O, reform it altogether. -W. Shakespeare, Hamlet

Tara McGoldrick


February 29, 2000

Jeff, You seemed like a really nice guy on TV - was it some evil lawyers that made you do it?

Oz Kologlu`


February 29, 2000

Fulko Hew


February 29, 2000

Shani Ferguson


February 29, 2000

Keith Bigelow


February 29, 2000

I've used Amazon in the past, but will avoid them until they see the error in their ways.

Brian Nicolucci


February 29, 2000

Dear Mr. Bezos, I'm now a happy customer of Barnes & Noble. You won't see another penny of my money unless this patent crap stops. Sincerely, J. Scott Farrow

J. Scott Farrow


February 29, 2000

Getting a patent on one-click ordering and affiliate programs is ridiculous. Bye, bye amazon. Besides, BooksAMillion has MUCH better prices.

Corbin


February 29, 2000

You are creating a lot of ill will by trying to enforce a patent for a feature (one click shopping) that I am ambivalent about. The most important element of a customer relationship is trust. If you feel free to do something ethically questionable to your competitors and compatriots I would expect the same treatment of customers.

Michael Gauley


February 29, 2000

I will be forced to conduct my online purchases with anyone but Amazon until this foolish endevor is discarded. I will have to request the same from all of my friends, clients and any others that will consider my words. For your own peace of mind Mr. Bezos, get back to the business of being a great online retailer!

Stan Smith


February 29, 2000

Feel free to review my account. You'll see I've spent several hundreds of dollars at Amazon. Until you repeal the patent, all my business will go to Bookpool and Fatbrain. Stephen Webster

Stephen Webster


February 29, 2000

This is not the behavior one expects from a world class organization. Please show us that you want our business by admitting this mistake, and getting on with the business of superior customer service and convenience.

James Post


February 29, 2000

Neil Fitzgerald


February 29, 2000

David Butts


February 29, 2000

How very unfortunate that someone who has had such good fortune... has pulled such a boner.

B. Mudd


February 29, 2000

Robert W. Kelley


February 29, 2000

I trust the 'system' will overturn this ridiculous claim. I also feel Amazon should publicly apologize for even starting this fiasco - otherwise we ought simply boycott them to their competitors advantage.

Geoff Tolputt


February 29, 2000

I have canceled my three outstanding Amazon orders, and will not place another one until Amazon ceases attempts to enforce the patents in question.

Marek Behr


February 29, 2000

Stanley HM Lam


February 29, 2000

I bought lots of books and DVD from amazon (I received three books yesterday again). But what they are doing with these patents makes me feel sick. I am a Linux geek for 7 years now and I am advocating OpenSource every day. May be the RMS boycott proposal is the way to handle this. But first let's see the results of this open Letter, just to give Amazon a chance!

Christophe Prud'homme


February 29, 2000

Michael Vieths


February 29, 2000

I have stopped using Amazon. It's that simple. I now use Borders and Barnes & Noble because I believe that the web should remain free and that stupidity in business should be rewarded with a loss of business. I have advised my family and friends to also stop ordering from Amazon and will continue to encourage everyone I know to stop ordering from Amazon. What Amazon is doing with their patents is wrong and must be opposed.

Brian G. Fay


February 29, 2000

As customers our most powerful mean of action is to stop using Amazon and spread the word around us ... I saw somebody proposing to dump the stock: that's an excellent idea too ;-) If each of us refer half a dozen friends to this site, we will make Amazon feel sorry for this. The sad thing is that this is just another example of a corporation putting ethics at the bottom of the priority list.

Daniel FAUXPOINT


February 29, 2000

Hello Amazon and Jeff, I am an avid computer scientist, who reads VERY VERY many technical books. Many, which I have bought from your site. I believe in certain software patents, however, your 1-click patent just doesn't make the case if you ask me. A patent is a novel idea that is unobvious. 1-click has been around for years and is pretty darn obvious considering the technologies in place for it. Amazon did not invent this, so it shouldn't pretend that it should to try and make more money. Its just flat out ridiculous.

Lonne Osborn


February 29, 2000

The longer you wait to abandon the ridiculous patents, Amazon.com, the less chance you have of ever doing business with me again. Rest assured that not only does my business go away but also that of the all the people who look to me for technical guidance.

Jon M. Gohr


February 29, 2000

A buzzword does not an innovation make. I am considering boycotting your associates as well.

Mark Balitsky


February 29, 2000

Goodbye Amazon... hello Fatbrain.

Hans Frederickson


February 29, 2000

caleb clausen


February 29, 2000

I used to use Amazon all the time, but your legal action over this 1-click "patent" made me furious. I've pointed out the issue to all of my friends and asked them to shop elsewhere until you agree to stop this nonsense. D. McBride, Silicon Valley programmer and reader

Doug McBride


February 29, 2000

Warren Young


February 29, 2000

I can't believe that you think this will help you competively. It will only drive your customers away.

Tim Gruen


February 29, 2000

Why patent the obvious? Didn't you realize that your customers, disgusted by your behavior, would turn to one of your many competitors?

François Gouget


February 29, 2000

I will not buy anything from Amazon until the one-click patent is abandoned. I have been using Amazon's competitors (Barnes and Nobles,...) quite happily since this issue came to light.

Dan Sandberg


February 29, 2000

Nope. Not gonna go there.

Julian Doherty


February 29, 2000

Justin Freitag


February 29, 2000

Hasn't Microsoft done enough of this stuff already? The sheer idiocy of some of the patents granted them boggles the intellect. Amazon need not follow in these misguided footsteps. Patents like this do nothing but exacerbate the problem of a already hideously litigant society. Repent.

Greg Baumgartel


February 29, 2000

Gerald Jensen


February 29, 2000

Chris Sutton


February 29, 2000

Amazon is taking a coward behaviour. Amazon likes the One-Click patent concept. I prefer the One-Click boycott concept.

Jean-Luc Leclercq


February 29, 2000

Amazon, I already told you not to do this. You should have listened.

Larry Mulcahy


February 29, 2000

Troy Wollenslegel


February 29, 2000

Rupert Weber-Henschel


February 29, 2000

I have been a satisfied customer of amazon.com and in the process of becoming a "loyal" long-term customer. I am willing to pay the "price" for loyalty, but my loyalty also needs to be earned by value-centric.

Chung-Mei Corey


February 29, 2000

I fully agree with Tim's letter. Amazon's e-commerce patents do not fulfill the definition of patents laid down by the Constitution and the Supreme Court. They are neither non-obvious nor a leap forward for the field. Thanks, Brad Neuberg

Bradley Keith Neuberg


February 29, 2000

As I understand, patents are useful to young startup as a means to prove that they have some intellectual property on which to build business. By doing this they might succeed at attracting venture capital. I see this use of patents as legitimate. Amazon doesn't seem to be in need of VC at this stage. Rather they use their patents as a defensive weapon against their competitors. Unfortunately the 1-click patent doesn't seem to cover a lot of innovation. People say it will be eventually overturned. Meanwhile Amazon is hurting its PR with technically minded people. In the short term the patent enforcement is probably good. In the long them it will not be so.

Hugues Talbot


February 29, 2000

Jarle Stabell


February 29, 2000

Karl Smith


February 29, 2000

How rude! I am taking my online shopping elsewhere, even if I have to click twice.

Jeremy Shaw


February 29, 2000

Not only will I not shop there anymore, but more importantly, I will be asking everyone I know not to either.

Jim Smith


February 29, 2000

Michael Jarvie


February 29, 2000

Matthew Enger


February 29, 2000

Sanjay Patel


February 29, 2000

I am a former Amazon.com customer. Because of the use of the suit filed against Barnes and Noble, I now shop at other sites for my books, music, and movies. I tell my acquaintances about this patent abuse whenever I get the opportunity. This is a trivial application of cookies and will eventually be overturned anyway. Cut your losses and drop the suit.

Anthony E. Greene


February 29, 2000

Matt Wilson


February 29, 2000

With all these patents flying around, how am I ever going to make <i>my</i> ".com" millions?

Dan Folkerts


February 29, 2000

Very Sad.

Eric McGlohon


February 29, 2000

Wow. I guess I'll go apply for a patent on the use of the fork in a process called "eating."

Riad Wahby


February 29, 2000

Ronald Cogswell


February 29, 2000

Marcus Rugger


February 29, 2000

I will not support any company trying to appropriate what is basically a trivial technique. The whole internet protocols and space has been designed as an open, collaborative effort and should be kept that way. I will boycott amazon.com, not do any business of any kind with amazon.com, and urge all my friends, relatives, and anyone I may be in contact with to boycott amazon.com, and to further disseminate the same ideas and opinions to all their friends and relatives.

bruno schwander


February 29, 2000

Sigh... Amazon should be better than this. They don't need the edge this patent gives them, and it only makes them look petty.

Chris Dunphy


February 29, 2000

When I first started using amazon.com, I thought they were innovators; not for imaginary technical "accomplishments" like one-click shopping, but for having put together an online company that provided excellent customer service. Hint: it's about the customers! Thankfully the open market hasn't been despoiled yet, so I can shop at fatbrain instead of supporting this anti-competitive insanity...

Chris Castiglione


February 29, 2000

Roland Trique


February 29, 2000

Joe McCann


February 29, 2000

Leonard Bartkus


February 29, 2000

The Internet belongs in the public domain as most of its contributions come from it. To patent certain technlogies that are develeoped from it -more specifically - thinks derived from cookie technology infringes on the foundations of the internet.

Jason Petrie


February 29, 2000

for shame!!!!

Jamie Stellini


February 29, 2000

Petros Raptis


February 29, 2000

Alan Sparks


February 29, 2000

Dont'confuse trade and racket !!!

Jarillon


February 29, 2000

William J Maggos

wjmaggos


February 29, 2000

William J Maggos


February 29, 2000

I have purchased several technical books from Amazon, but no more! This patent is ludicrous!

Ed Dunkle


February 29, 2000

I wish Amazon will listen and learn to behave!

Michael Andersen


February 29, 2000

What comes around goes around Mr. BOZOS....particularly to companies that thrive on greed. I'll take my book buying elsewhere. Eric Weiss

Eric Weiss


February 29, 2000

Jason Lines


February 29, 2000

I, my parents, and several of my aquaintences no longer do buisness with Amazon.com as a direct result of this. You are too easily replaced to regard the good will of your customers so lightly.

Chris Raser


February 29, 2000

Dear Amazon Employees- Raise this issue internally, discuss it widely, and pursue a consensus on how pursuing a "cookie patents" expresses the purpose of your organization. We eagerly await the results.

Tom Danaher


February 29, 2000

I was an Amazon.com customer from nearly the beginning. It is only with this recent bout of pattent nonsense that I have stopped using them. If the maddness does not stop soon, they will never be able to regain me as a customer. I am fully against software pattents, as I believe that they are abused more often than not, and Amazon.com simply reinforces this belief.

Will Fife


February 29, 2000

David Blum


February 29, 2000

Peter Thompson


February 29, 2000

Jeff Mickle


February 29, 2000

Great letter Tim. Thanks for speaking up, going out on a limb, and saying something about this. I'm an Amazon shareholder, so hopefully they realize that there are some of us in this bunch. Shareholders that stand against this kind of thing (particularly developers involved in, interested in, and using the open source community) may be few, but I'd bet that we are some of Amazon's best customers (turn a profit...turn a profit). I buy scores of books a year from them (many O'Reilly...any spots left for reviewers, Tim?). However, I could just as easily make the same purchases (and sell the stock -- not that they would care) from other sites that are more responsible in managing the intellectual capital that has been the foundation of places like Amazon. Because of obvious prior art, the case would never stand up in court, but actually taking it there would set a precedent that your average open source developer could never compete against because of lawyers and money. Tim said it, fencing in the internet with patents would make it extremely difficult to realize the level of innovation occurring currently. Granted, threat of litigation won't stop many of us, but who would be willing to develop new technology and stand up to suit by the Amazons of the world if an invention could even appear to infringe on a bogus software patent. Even if one of us was right, we could never afford to defend ourselves against a corporate litigation machine. Great new technologies would never see the light of ! day because of the threat (DeCSS comes to mind). Not that this is likely to happen, but it would be great to see Amazon turn this into an argument for reforming the patent system. But, that's pie in the sky. And they probably ought not spend any money on that kind of activity until they have posted one quarter of profit. :) More reasonably, turn the patent over to GNU (or a similar organization) and put it in the public domain. They would certainly retain my business, support, good word, and interest as both a shareholder and customer.

Edward O'Neil


February 29, 2000

Good thing there are competitor's to Amazon. Guess they'll be needing my customership. Erik Bunn

-


February 29, 2000

People from Missouri have saying...Show Me that you desire my business by discontinuing the both frivilous patents.

Clifford Achord


February 29, 2000

Yet another example of an attempt to use America's useful and (mostly) well-intended copyright laws for the specific purpose of making large companies better profit margins and hurting consumers and technical innovations in the process. Let this case prove to be a precedent of reform of the usage of copyright law.

Kevin R. Bullock


February 29, 2000

Paul Prescod


February 29, 2000

I'm sick of everyone trying to monopolize a good thing. Play nice Amazon, one Microsoft is ENOUGH!

Scott Neilson


February 29, 2000

I really think the patent office should have sat down and thought a REALLY LONG TIME on what software was, and whether it should be patentable. You may wonder why I say that - the simple fact is that software is, at its heart, a collection of mathematical algorithms, something which isn't patentable. A computer is a device which is capable of executing those algorithms - but this isn't quite true, either - because a computer can be replicated in software (ie, an emulator) - which points to the idea that a computer is a hardware embodiment of software. Software is that ephemerable. It is like saying that you are your body - eyes, ears, nose, mouth, hair, blood, etc - when in reality, "you" are just some kind of collection of neurons firing. "You" aren't even your brain - that is just something "executing" what you call "you". In broad theory, it should be possible to build a computer entirely out of software - no hardware (not in the sense that we know it) needed. It is like software is something akin to a natural law - not a device which can be patented, but rather a collection of algorithms to be discovered and shared by all. Unfortunately, the patent office has decided that software is ONLY a machine, and is nothing like an algorithm...

Andrew L. Ayers


February 29, 2000

"Ease of use" is not substantiated by the one-click method. If it were, power switches would be infringing upon this. I find the notion laughable. ~Mike

Mike Andaluz


February 29, 2000

Steve Chadsey


February 29, 2000

Raphael Hernandez


February 29, 2000

I have purchased both books and music from amazon but will no longer do so. There are plenty of other online book and music resources available that do not have such close minded policies.

Lee Benson


February 29, 2000

Lauritz Jensen


February 29, 2000

Sir, I am opposed to software patents because at its core, software is really just mathematics. Logically, how could anyone patent numbers. I not opposed to copywrites on the name, but the idea of one-click is as a patentable process is ludicrous. To make this process into a patent would be similar to patenting the hypertextversion currently in use on the WWW.

Steven Kelly


February 29, 2000

First it was the spam issue - but both Amazon and Barnes and Noble eventually saw the light on that. Now it's patents - and I hope you see the light on that, too. I'm not buying any books from Amazon until you do, and I'm discouraging others from doing so too. Danny Yee book reviewer and maintainer of the Australian Bookshop Directory

Danny Yee


February 29, 2000

I've stopped buying from Amazon because of their patent policy. It's unethical for them to waste everybody else's time by acquiring and attempting to enforce a bogus patent like that.

Paul Eggert


February 29, 2000

Please do not abuse the patent system. Your simple use of cookies is clearly not an invention and should not be patentable. Seeking a patent on the 1-click system flies in the face of what the Internet stands for, and it is not good business.

Samuel Padgett


February 29, 2000

I am quite upset with these issues. As a stockholder I will be making my voice heard the best I can. if nothing is done, your stock will be dropped on my side. www.fatbrain.com is much more deserving of my money right now.

Seth Goldberg


February 29, 2000

I love the amazon service, but refuse to use it now. Its that simple.

Joshua Reich


February 29, 2000

Nicholas A Macey


February 29, 2000

Endorsed. Too bad, since Amazon provides a great service. Sam Hunting

Sam Hunting


February 29, 2000

Ken Gosier


February 29, 2000

Justin Felker


February 29, 2000

Although I am a firm believer in giving credit where credit is due, Amazon's recent patents border on the ludicrous. To patent such widely used and obviously unoriginal "inovations" is an exercise in futility. Your patents will obviously not stand up to any seriously legal challenge, and you have lost many otherwise faithful customers (including myself) because of them.

Rob Alwood


February 29, 2000

I will not be buying anything from Amazon until this ridiculous patent is dropped, and will be urging all my friends to boycott Amazon as well. (a dot com worker)

Annette Koh


February 29, 2000

Dear Jeff, What next? Are you going to patent e-commerce... Patenting 1-click purchases and and affiliate programs is so anti progress and anti business that I wonder what your overal objectives are. That's it Amazon is on our black list... Looser! AR

Ariel Roberge


February 29, 2000

I am very disappointed that a company like Amazon has to resort to such tactics. This is truly a sad time for anyone involved with software or the Internet

Morgan Terry


February 29, 2000

It's sad that a company with such a large and loyal customer base feels the need to use patents to protect their income. That aside, I think it's downright wrong to patent something built on open ideas. They are betraying the very idea that allowed them such success.

Tim Olson


February 29, 2000

Quite simply, everything that can be said regarding this issue has been. Amazon.com's 1-click patent challenge is flatly ridiculous - its only a browser cookie, for pete's sake. I am participating in the Amazon boycott (and have been for some time now), and will continue to do so. A company that tries to exploit a befuddled patent office for their own sole gain is a company that will NOT be receiving my business. This is especially galling, as the only reason Amazon.com exists is due to the creation and generosity of the founders of the world wide web. In short, to you, Mr. Bezos, get a clue. Apologize for your company's actions, and I MIGHT shop there again. Otherwise, there are plenty of e-commerce sites that don't try to screw the consumer I will visit instead.

Joel Goodall


February 29, 2000

Matthew Manuel


February 29, 2000

I always had 1-click feature turned off and it's not the 1-click feature why I preferred Amazon in the past. And while I knew that there were many competitors, I still used amazon because of their dedication to quality customer service. After spending a LOT of money on Amazon (toys, music, video, books), I will not order anything from them from now on until they stop using the ridiculous 1-click patent to choke competition.

George Datuashvili


February 29, 2000

Prior to your patent foolishness, I did not hestitate to recommend amazon. Now that recommendation is no longer given. The longer you tarnish your reputation by your unwise actions, the more difficult it will be to restore.

Bruce McInnis


February 29, 2000

Kriang Lerdsuwanakij


February 29, 2000

Judy Taylor


February 29, 2000

I am an Amazon customer. I placed an order before the weekend (2/25/2000) and before I saw any of this news. Rest assured, I'd have post-poned my purchase or taken my business elsewhere (in protest) had this news come to my attention prior to my order. I totally agree with this open letter, and will share my opinion openly with my friends and coworkers that are also Amazon patrons. (I would really like to see a public statement from Amazon with regard to their position on open and community software.)

Shon Frazier


February 29, 2000

David Fagerland


February 29, 2000

Just how much greed is in your soul? Yes, you shall receive NO more orders from me.

Dick Engel


February 29, 2000

I have been advocating that my friends and family find other places to make purchases online since the original announcement of the 1-click patent. I will continue to do so until Amazon makes a change in corporate policy to open their "patents" and advocate for the overhaul of the U.S. patent system. Regards,

Ross Bagley


February 29, 2000

If the intent of this patent was to drive Barnes and Noble from the Web, the strategy has boomeranged. I and others are now using them to protest you, leading to a net surge in B&N sales. Nice thinking guys.

L. C. Rees


February 29, 2000

The extremely public exploitation of an intellectual property system that has been completely perverted from its original goals seems like extraordinary folly for a company attempting to build a consumer brand aimed at well-educated, technically savvy users. The only logical explanation for this I can see is that Amazon has reached the point where they need to begin exploiting their customers by raising prices to create profits. Of course, doing this on the Internet requires special effort to avoid customer flight. Seducing users with convenience is a laudable approach, but you are attempting to avoid having to compete with anyone on convenience by using patents to guarantee a market failure. It is this I find unacceptable. I will never use One-Click. A web commerce site that originated public standards system for the handling of purchasing information would have my unreasonable loyalty for a substantial period, on the other hand.

Mark Carmichael


February 29, 2000

Bad move...

Jonathan Spence


February 29, 2000

Anjan Bacchu


February 29, 2000

I regard your actions regarding this patent (and others) with alarm. Such actions can only do harm to the Internet at this critical stage. I am, therefore, a former-customer.

Dave Taylor


February 29, 2000

Jeff, Cross me off your customer list. I am not ever buying anything from your site until you come to your senses. And you can be sure I will be encouraging my friends and associates to do the same. This insane greed has to be stopped.

Cigy Cyriac


February 29, 2000

another former amazon customer...

Andre Weinand


February 29, 2000

Amazon's abuse of both the patenting system (which nearly all informed people agree is severely broken, or at least mismanaged, at present) and the openness of the internet, which is its bread and butter no less, is enough to raise disgust in my less well-informed friends when the subject is broached. If acquantances of mine are sufficiently turned off by this behavior to stop using Amazon (and several, none of whom are computer enthusiasts, are), one can only imagine the tangible business amazon.com is and will continue to lose by persuing such a destructive policy. As one who spends a great deal of money on-line (and a great deal of that on books) I can assure the reader that amazon has lost hundreds of dollars since the lawsuit first became public knowledge from me alone. Factor in the ripple effect for my circle of friends and acquaintances alone, and the loss is significant. I will be most amused and gratified when the stock price begins to reflect this growing fact.

Jean-Michel Smith


February 29, 2000

Hi, I purchased CORE JAVA, vol 1 and 2 just 3 days back. I knew about the patent case but didn't know how important it was till I read Tim' letter. I agree with him completely. What you're engaging in is ANTI-COMPETETIVENESS and I disagree with it. The difference between your price for the above books and FatBrain.com was a few dollars and had I known about the patent case, I'd have decided to buy from fatbrain.com. I strongly protest against this and would like to tell you that I will not buy any more books from you till you backout. Pls. think it over again. Kind Regards, ANJAN. B

Anjan Bacchu


February 29, 2000

I used to buy from Amazon. Now I discourage friends from doing so. I have diverted over 跌 of my own business and hundreds more of business from friends since the one click patent was granted. I will continue to do so until Amazon makes an about face on its use of patents.

Nathan Tuck


February 29, 2000

Jeff, I've ordered quite a few books from Amazon in the past. The service was always great, and the prices competitive. Basically, you had me as a customer. Until now. Your patent land-grab has lost me as a customer. -Don Busch

Don Busch


February 29, 2000

Michael Beddow


February 29, 2000

Since I first heard about the Amazon 1-Click patent, I've shopped exclusively at Barnes & Noble for books... even as a broke college student, I don't feel I can afford to support a company that supports itself thru legal-system fascism.

Colin McMillen


February 29, 2000

First Amazon decided it was a good idea to publishing reading circles to show everyone what you were reading. Now they think it's a good idea to patent ideas that have already been in use. They have shown poor judgement on a number of occasions. That means I don't know when they're next going to show poor judgement and use information that I have given them in a way that I won't approve of. They've lost my biz.

Michele Carpender


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, I personally have been a steady custom of yours for many years, ordering hundreds of dollars of books and CDs from you on an annual basis. I have purchased gift certificates because of the ease with which my family could select and order their gifts. I have also ordered hundreds of dollars per year of books for our company through your site. However, all that stopped at the beginning of this year. I can not, in good conscience, support a company that practices such blatant abuses of Intellectual Property Rights and our legal system. The approach of "if you can't innovate, litigate" seems better suited to failing industrial giants of the rust belt then it does for a leading edge electronic commerce company. When Amazon.com decides that serving their customers is more important than pursuing frivolous patents and legal action I may return to do business with you. Notice I said "may". I'm finding that FatBrain.com is doing an excellent job of meeting my book needs, and frequently at a lower price. Best Regards,

Jim McCorison


February 29, 2000

I have bought from Amazon before. I will not again, until you let this patent go.

Eric Jacks


February 29, 2000

I have bought books on Amazon.Com since its inception, seeing as I am isolated from any 'real' bookstores. I have also sold a ton of items through their auctions and zshops, and have sold many books for them as a website affiliate. I always backed them when people cried foul, but this time I will have no part of it. I have purchased my last book from Amazon until they drop this patent, and I have not relisted any of the 2000 items I had for sale on their zshops. I am no longer an associate, either. This ridiculous idea is a direct insult to internet users, and will only serve to help destroy the industry that Mr. Bezos & Co. are hoping to retire on - E-commerce. Competition is business, Jeff. Leave the crybaby whining and mobster scare tactics to Microsoft.

Ken


February 29, 2000

Having read what Tim O'Reilly and Richard Stallman, among others, have written, I don't think it's worth my effort to add anything philosophical here. I'll just say that I wholeheartedly agree with their concerns, and that I think Amazon's patents are flagrant abuses of the system. I hope Amazon will give up its attempts to raise the barrier of entry to competitors. This kind of behavior is against the principles of our economic model, our Internet community, and hopefully, our morals.

Dana Dahlstrom


February 29, 2000

Trique


February 29, 2000

In my letter to Amazon dated 12/13/1999 I stated: "If you do not drop your suit concerning the so-called 'one-click' software patent, I shall be forced to discontinue using your service, and shall instead take my business to your competitors." As a early adopter of Amazon, and a frequent book buyer I am very disapointed in Amazon. Moreover, while I have been participating in the boycott, I have found good service, prices and availability from Amazon's competitors. In fact, I may not use Amazon even if they drop the suit. At this point THEY have to win ME back. Still "patiently waiting for reason to overcome greed,"

John Cairns


February 29, 2000

right on Tim!! i bought more books from amazon last year than the rest of my life put together from all other souces, bol.de is begining to not look so bad afterall.

christoph devenoges


February 29, 2000

How could a company like Amazon that was birthed by the open-ness of the Internet violate it so ruthlessly? This is like RAPEING YOUR OWN MOTHER! You must STOP or you will set a precedent that will destroy everything that is good about the net. Until you stop this madness, everyone that I advise (myself included) will not use AMAZON.COM. I urge everyone to take a stand on this.

John Morgan


February 29, 2000

Darren Rogers


February 29, 2000

Although Amazon provides a very practical and worthwhile service to its customers I feel that endorsing their outrageous patent claims, by purchasing books from them, would be morally wrong. Hence I have for quite some time now been taking my business elsewhere.

Bj░rn Borud


February 29, 2000

P'tit Lu


February 29, 2000

Attempting to patent such a findamental web operation will do Amazon no good in the long-run, both financially and in their PR. Not to mention the stifling effect it will have on the web...

Graham Grindlay


February 29, 2000

On behalf of Ecotope, Inc., I oppose Amazon.com's patent practices and hereby boycott the company. Sincerely, Kenneth Ligda

Kenneth Ligda


February 29, 2000

I recently received an email from Amazon.Com that said, "You haven't ordered from us in a while. We thought you needed some incentive to visit, so here we go." and I was deluged by an e-mail advertisement spouting the beauty of your site. I agree. I truly enjoy Amazon.Com, but unfortunately, I cannot shop at a store which feels the need to enforce software patents. This patent being protested (1-Click Ordering) and the new patent (Affiliation Programs) are both complete crap. I won't rehash what's above, instead I will give you figures. Personally, my wife and I spent over 迀.00 on your site last year. That's a good chunk of change from two people on books over a 6 month period of time. (We discovered and began using Amazon in late August.) I personally have a budget of 赨 a month on technology books, as Tim points out I am of your "core target customers." >From a corporate standpoint, I am the IS Manager of a medium sized company. Until January, we ordered our books through your site. It took some talking to our CEO (as he owns Amazon stock; did I mention he recently sold?) but I now have authorization to take our business elsewhere, and Fatbrain looks mighty nice right now. The cost to you? We purchased approximately 񘒀.00 in training materials in the last three months. We have plans to purchase many more. In short Amazon, drop the patents into the public domain, or suffer a loss of business that is completely unnecessary. Your summary explanations of "people don't understand the patent" is way out in left field - the Open Source Community wouldn't be this upset if we didn't understand the TRUE meaning of those patents. Thank you, and I hope you sincerely listen to these messages.

Brian and Jennifer Schkerke


February 29, 2000

Jay MacDonald


February 29, 2000

Well, Amazon looks friendly and gentle judging by the look of its web site, but deep down, it's just another brutal business.

Jim Tran


February 29, 2000

I concur wholely with the disagreement of your patents.

David Seruyange


February 29, 2000

No response from the stock investors? Hmmm.... Perhaps that community will take notice of depressed financials. So perhaps it is time to also 1) sell off our own stock and 2) stop patronizing and alert any web site owner who maintains an Amazon.com affiliation on their web site. We stand to lose in the long run; history says so. Freddie

Freddie B. Jones


February 29, 2000

Dion Terry


February 29, 2000

David Spellman


February 29, 2000

As an author with a book for sale on your site, I'm not ready to give in to Richard M. Stallman's suggestions that authors use the comment space on Amazon to tell readers to buy the books elsewhere, and I haven't dropped my Amazon affiliation yet, but these are very questionable patents. Beat your competition in the marketplace, not in the courtroom. Part of the problem is the patent office being willing to grant these ridiculous patents, and I can see grabbing them if you can, just to protect yourself from someone else grabbing them and using them on you. But if you turn around and try to use these newfound weapons to close out competition, then all you do is prove RMS was right after all and it'll be time for authors and book publishers to take a stand against you.

Dave Farquhar


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos, When I sent you a letter telling you I was joining the boycott, I got your company's form letter in response. I was so angry at the condescension and the assumption that I did not understand the patent that I could not write back, for you would take me to be an ignorant flamer. I can only tell you that you have stirred up a hornet's nest. Rarely do people die from one hornet - but you have angered so many, I hope the toxic shock connects with your synapses. Please re-read Mr. O'Reilly's letter, and stop all enforcement of your ridiculous patents. Until then, I, my family, my company, and my clients will be continuing to frequent your competitors. you have lost hundreds of dollars from my actions alone, and there are many others listed here. Reconsider your stance. -Matthew P. Smyth

Matthew P. Smyth


February 29, 2000

I buy a lot of stuff on the Web: movies, books, CDs, clothes, camping equipment -- you name it. I have used your service in the past because it is fast, reliable and secure, and because I can usually find whatever I'm looking for. However, I cannot justify supporting your company if you persist in holding and enforcing the 1-Click and Affiliates Patents. I ask you to please remember why you started this company in the first place -- equal access for all -- and be true to that spirit. Until then, I am boycotting your site.

Deb Asch


February 29, 2000

Once a frequent Amazon customer, I refuse to do business with a company so willing to turn its back on the culture that made it possible.

Matthew Moore


February 29, 2000

The patent system needs to be thrown out. Amazon gives a perfect example of why.

Mo DeJong


February 29, 2000

Eamon F. Walsh


February 29, 2000

I think Amazon and its patents are just plain bad for the net. If amazon is allowed to patent such general things where will it stop? Will the patent office grant me a patent on a system of using various graphics and glyphs for conveying ideas? I wrote to Amazon when the patent first came out and I am glad to see that they actually read their feedback because I was fed a canned response saying how proud they are of the patent, etc. C'est la vie

Jeff Trout


February 29, 2000

Mark Whelan


February 29, 2000

Craig Scrivner


February 29, 2000

Sam Phillips


February 29, 2000

Daniel Kim


February 29, 2000

I am participating in the Amazon boycott and I am encouraging others to do so. Until Amazon shapes up, I am finding books through http://www.bestbookbuys.com which proves that not only does Amazon not play fair, their prices suck.

Gisli Ottarsson


February 29, 2000

The fact that you were granted a patent on '1-click ordering' shows how clueless the PTO is about technology. I well be shopping for my books elsewhere as long as you continue to enforce patents on what should be un-patentable ideas. Andrew

Andrew Colasanti


February 29, 2000

Mike Edwards


February 29, 2000

R. Jay Campbell


February 29, 2000

Why doesn't Amazon concentrate on trying to make a profit (which they haven't done yet) rather than pursuing such stupid courses of action?

Dev Brown


February 29, 2000

Samuli Kärkkäinen


February 29, 2000

Kevin Finn


February 29, 2000

I have been impressed by Amazon as a customer and and associate. However this patent is unacceptable and I will not be using Amazon in future and will remove links from my site.

David Clark


February 29, 2000

Some while back I already wrote to you at Amazon to explain that I support Richard Stallman's boycott over your "1-click" patent, which appears to me to have no merit. I said at that time that I would no longer purchase books at Amazon until you either backed off from the patent or that it is overturned in court. I purchase a *lot* of books online and I certainly purchased many from Amazon, previously. I have not purchased from you since my last email and you, unfortunately, have lost a good customer in me. Your loss, my loss. I don't see why you want to alienate a large and vocal percentage of your customer base. Gene

Gene Wilburn


February 29, 2000

How rich do you have to get to lose all your sense?

Austin Luminais


February 29, 2000

Jeff Derenne


February 29, 2000

It is indeed sad when a business feels they must resort to patenting air and then sues anyone else who dares try to breath. The fact that the patent was granted in the first place is an obvious mistake. The fact that Amazon has seen fit to pursue harassing lawsuits against their competitors based on this mistake is beyond the comprehension of ethical people everywhere. Amazon. I'm really disappointed. I puchased some books from you and was looking forward to ordering many more. This will not happen now.

Charles Morrison


February 29, 2000

What a ridiculous concept. Do they not understand the entire concept of the internet today is the SHARING of information and ideas?

Jason Malone


February 29, 2000

Keith W. Lawless


February 29, 2000

I've bought books from Amazon before because it is difficult to get some books in Australia. Ever since they've started this sillyness I've gotten them from Barnes and Noble instead.

Craig Small


February 29, 2000

Like many others who have signed this open letter, I too have bought many books (as well as other merchandise) online - many of them from Amazon.com. Like my colleagues and friends who have signed, I am no longer purchasing from Amazon.com. I disagree wholeheartedly with Amazon's use of the US Patent system to protect its own interests - and hurt its customers. Thus, I am no longer one.

David Ahern


February 29, 2000

Jeffy! How many times do I have to tell you! Go to your room till you learn to play fairly!

Porter Hammer


February 29, 2000

Greg Lincoln


February 29, 2000

Scott Turton


February 29, 2000

Kevin Iverson


February 29, 2000

Shame on you Amazon, and Kudo's to you, Tim, on taking this stand.

David L. Weiner, CTO, WebMasters, Inc.


February 29, 2000

David C Walls


February 29, 2000

I can write a one-click system in about an hour using Cold Fusion. Sue me.

Lee Surma


February 29, 2000

Dear Mr.Bezos, Your patent is "over the top." We will no longer be purchasing from your company nor referring business to your service(s).

Ben Montanelli


February 29, 2000

Beth R. Martin


February 29, 2000

I have been an Amazon Associate for close to 18 months or so. From January the 1st to now I have sold 񘐜 worth of merchandise off my site for Amazon, with an unknown number of orders having been placed by people introduced to Amazon through my site. This isn't much, I know, but Barnes and Noble will now have the pleasure of my visitor's purchasing power... unless they stop the patent abuse of patents. Great service, poor vision :(

Zak McGregor


February 29, 2000

Tom Buck


February 29, 2000

Chris Carpenter


February 29, 2000

Chris Carpenter


February 29, 2000

I don't really care about 1 Click shopping much, but I think enforcing a patent on an obvious idea is a serious attack on freedom.

Michael Keller


February 29, 2000

Michael Danicich


February 29, 2000

Bill Nesting


February 29, 2000

As I told your customer service people weeks ago, I will no longer be buying any products from Amazon. And that's too bad, because it used to be my favorite place to buy books. Since Amazon started to carry other products, I would likely be buying other products as well. I spend many hundreds of dollars a year on books alone, and buy many products on-line. Once you've lost my business, you'll have a hard time getting it back. You might want to read "The ClueTrain Manifesto" and realize that "markets are conversations." And the conversation in the market right now is how Amazon has lost its roots and is turning into just another bully of a company driven my lawyers and accountants. It was your customer service and the sense of _community_ among your customers that made you. As Tim says, you're pissing in the community well, and the rest of the community doesn't appreciate it. It will not take long for word to spread and more and more people are encouraged to shop elsewhere. You have plenty of competition, and unfortunately you are driving away what made you special: loyal customers.

Guy Townsend


February 29, 2000

My first purchase on the Internet was through Amazon.com. But I buy my books from Barnes & Noble now. I won't be coming back to Amazon until you drop this patent nonsense, and show greater respect for customer privacy. (The purchasing circles bit also really ticked me off.) Why can't you just treat people with respect instead of trying to exploit your customers and screw your competitors? If Amazon wants to live like Microsoft, then I will live without Amazon.

David S. Touretzky


February 29, 2000

Until amazon changes their mind about the patent, I for one will not use their services.

Kaj Berglund


February 29, 2000

I have a one click on amazon, it won't get used again if this continues. There are other bookstores on the web

Kenneth Tyler


February 29, 2000

Once again, some 'big business' succumbs to its corporate lawyers and tries to control its world. You'll never make money if you lose all your customers, and bad word of mouth outweighs good publicity ten to one. Lose, Amazon, lose.

Paul Wayper


February 29, 2000

Amazon gained First Mover Advantage by realizing the opportunity of Internet Based e-commerce and spawned a million look alikes. However, even today, it is only the Amazon name that is cited as the epitome of web based commerce. Trying to convert that initial leverage into a sustainable advantage through constant product/service innovation, excellent customer responsiveness, prediction of new trends, core product mix expansion, strategic alliances and other value additions is justifiable, even encouraged. However, seeking dubious legal protection on trivial "innovations" gains them nothing but animosity. It is not only "Techies" who are disgusted with this underhandedness. So are managers types, lawyers, intellectual property experts and honest hard working Americans. Amazon may expect to gain short term profits, but they will also gain long term antagonism. And patenting the very concept of strategic alliances - a paradigm as old as the history of commerce - borders on the ridiculous. One wonders at the naivete of a patent office that grants such frivolous patents.

Suvir Bhatia


February 29, 2000

Bill Ray


February 29, 2000

We just can't allow people to profit from ignorance. Antics such as Bezos' are only possible beacuse the people who make the decisions in these matters, as well as the general public, don't understand the technology. Tim O'Reilley explained this quite eloquently, so I won't belabor the point except to say that we must support initiatives such as Tim's vigorously, as it is truly the only defense we have against this sort of behavior...public pressure. I don't think guys like Bezos are evil, but that they have put so much of their life and resources into building their dreams, they lose sight of the big picture. Perhaps more importantly, they lose their connectedness to the community. We need guys like Bezos because we need drive, innovation, and creativity. What we don't need is castles, moats, and stagnation...

Stuart Slaugh


February 29, 2000

What's next - are you going to patent the use of forms in e-commerce?

Ryan Douthit


February 29, 2000

Not only am I not buying books from you personally, I am no longer approving any books bought from Amazon as well. I am also submitting a sugestion that this be made a company wide policy. I want us to be around in 10 years. With these bogus patents, I'm not sure sure it will happen.

Kai Cherry


February 29, 2000

I am a lover of books, technology, and freedom. I have enjoyed purchasing products from Amazon in the past. I will not purchase any further materials from Amazon.com until this nonsense stops. If it does not cease soon, Amazon.com may never be able to recover me as a customer.

Michael T. Garrison Stuber


February 29, 2000

I am protesting Amazon's actions by the best way in a market economy: I am taking my money and will spend it at Barnes and Noble and Border's.

Todd Kuper


February 29, 2000

I reguarly (did) buy books from Amazon, but I guess fatbrain.com will have to get my business from now on.

Ray Gerhard


February 29, 2000

Amazon was my favourite online store. In the past year I've ordered hundreds of dollars worth of books and CDs. But now I will take my business elsewhere. As a professional web developer, this directly affects my line of work, not to mention having a very damaging effect on the whole Internet community.

George Ma


February 29, 2000

Nathan Machula


February 29, 2000

i am a unix administrator and have a huge library of technical books. i used to buy them all from amazon. since their patent, i have ceased buying from them. my 񘈨 dollar yearly book allowance now goes elsewhere. not only have i not bought from them, but i no longer recommend them to friends, family, or technical peers. each opportunity i get i ask those who i work with to learn more about the controvery with Amazon's 1-click patent. thank you oreilly for providing this petition. -edward

Edward Sexton


February 29, 2000

Andy Deitsch


February 29, 2000

Good letter, Tim. I'm just starting to buy on-line but won't be shopping at Amazon.

Graham Todd


February 29, 2000

Adam J. Foxson


February 29, 2000

Tracey Anne Hytry


February 29, 2000

I have been following this issue for some time, even emailed Amazon about my concerns over their patent grab. Although I am not a huge book buyer, my purchases will be made elsewhere. Poetic justice would be for the inventor of the cookie to patent his idea (which is a far more patentable idea than 1-click or Affiliates) and make it public domain for everyone EXCEPT Amazon. Then perhaps you would realize how perverse it was to pursue these patents. Every company that participates in E-business must realize that a move like this is a threat to every business that operates on the web. If you are truly commited to your customers, Amazon, think of those who are businesses. Realize that they will take this as a threat, and that they will then look elsewhere for their needs. Think on how much revenue you will lose because you chose to chose to pursue these patents so aggresively. And then realize that it is not worth what this will cost you, your good name.

Nathan Tenney


February 29, 2000

Please abandon your pursuit of these software patents. When you do, I will start shopping with you again. Stand Fast, tjg.

Timothy Grant


February 29, 2000

Gregory Sutter


February 29, 2000

I bought a lot of books from Amazon and I like the 1-click feature. However, from the very beginning, it was absolutely clear that this is based on the cookie technology created by Netscape. There is nothing novel about it, except for the marketing hype. The fact that Amazon applied for the patent shows the complete disregard for the Internet community. The fact that the Patent office approved the patent application shows that they have to learn a lot as well. Since there was prior art, the patent will not hold up in court, so the best way to handle this issue without a lengthy legal battle would be for Amazon to drop the patent.

Joachim Feise


February 29, 2000

Connie Malinowski


February 29, 2000

Even from this distance, in Australia, Amazon has been a significant service for me in the past. It's a pity that's not likely to be the case in future. This patent claim is not quite as ridiculous as those for human genome details (suitably ridiculed by the woman in Europe who is now registering herself as a patent), but it borders on it. And is made worse by the fact that it is built on work by people who made their intellectual property available freely to all. Sneaky and unworthy.

Peter G. Martin


February 29, 2000

It was a trivial matter to change the Amazon link on my Web site to Barnes & Noble. Now all the members of my book review club are just one click away from your competitor.

Peter Lacey


February 29, 2000

I heartily agree with Mr. O'Reilly's letter. It looks like you are biting the hands that fed you - both, those technically aware that bought your goods, as well as those who have developed the technology that you are now seeking to restrict. Please reconsider your stand.

Scott Williams


February 29, 2000

Tobias Hagge


February 29, 2000

I'm very disapointed. I will be canceling my Amazon account as well as two open orders totaling over 贬. I've always trusted Amazon ordered not a few books from them in the past. Now I find that they are not good netizens so I will reluctantly stop doing business with them. Thank you Tim. I wasn't aware of this issue until I logged in to your site. I'll pass on the link to my friends and a few on line societies I belong to. John Purser

John M. Purser


February 29, 2000

Dear Mr. Bezos, I was an early and active Amazon.com customer. After you've got this ridiculous idea of enforcing "1-Click patent" I would NOT BUY A SINGLE ITEM from your site until you come to your senses - however long it'll take. Most of my friends also stopped buying from Amazon.com (at least, until you change for the better). You have plenty of good competitors and rather high prices (if in doubt, look at www.mysimon.com and www.bestbookbuys.com). Spend your time and energy on building real competetive business, not on PR spin and abuse of patent system.

Igor Mendelev


February 29, 2000

- Definition of a Patent is based upon the creation of an invention. - Definition of invention is the act or process of developing a new device, method, or process. Amazon is clearly in abuse of known Internet technologies that has allowed the Internet to rapidly evolve over the last decade. Amazon, as a long time consumer of your services, I ask that your organization do the right thing and not lead the way of a patent crazy economy looking to sue and block economic growth to maintain psuedo leadershhip. Your initial leadership as a forerunner within this new economy gained Amazon much success and opportunity ... your efforts can (and should) be focused on setting a positive precedence for business on how to succeed within the Net Economy via creative vision and rapid execution! Regain your creating innovation and don't rely on blocking competitors via patent's as a means of success!

Jeff Hooker


February 29, 2000

I would like to add further that I can not in good conciousness buy goods from Amazon.com until the "One-click" patent is dropped, despite that I think Amazon.com is otherwise the best on-line shopping system and store around. I support Richard Stallman's call for a boycott. I believe that Amazon.com is acting as a pirate against humanity. I applaud Tim O'Reilly's actions thus far. I'd like to see O'Reilly & Associates pull their books off Amazon's shelves.

Mason Lee


February 29, 2000

It's a long way from the kind of extremist views espoused by Richard Stallman to the much more measured views of Tim O'Reilly. Richard has nothing to lose by supporting this effort, but Tim does. I agree with Tim - Amazon is a customer service company. Stick to that and don't get enmeshed in this kind of subversion of the art and craft of computer science.

J. Paul Holbrook


February 29, 2000

The 1-click shopping patent violates the spirit of scientific development that created the internet and all the technological marvels that allow amazon to be where it is today. Patenting such an obvious process is not only obscene but also a move that brings us closer to the end of open computing architecture and development that the internet was built on.

Dare Obasanjo


February 29, 2000

Thank you Amazon. Your stupidity caused me to try FatBrain ... and I like it.

Mike Bird


February 29, 2000

Jon King


February 29, 2000

Add my name to the list.

David Youd


February 29, 2000

I have been a customer of Amazon.com, but from this point on I will not be shopping at Amazon. I will be shopping at one of Amazons competitors until it gives up its one click ordering patent.

Mike Drashil


February 29, 2000

I truly value the service that Amazon has provided in the past and have always enjoyed shopping there. However, until Amazon stops using improperly issued patents as a weapon against the Web and it's users, all of my book purchases will be from Amazon competitors such as www.bookpool.com Ken Wilson

Ken Wilson


February 29, 2000

Dimitris Stassinopoulos


February 29, 2000

Your actions are ridiculous. Anyone who works in the Industry was well aware of the techniques which you are using. Patenting this would be like patenting the method of wiring a plug - obvious and silly. Please rethink.

Jonathan Lawrence


February 29, 2000

One click patents are wrong. They clog up the system, and they prevent fair use. I will not shop at amazon until they stop patenting arbitrary ideas.

Erica Rettig


February 29, 2000

Your patent is absurd. As one of the many internet companies that I have seen grow into monoliths overnight, simply by virtue of their early positioning and funding. Your attempt to stake out this territory is a symptom of your corporation's intoxication on its own power and quick success. Shame on you. As an early Amazon customer I regret ever having given you my business and it will be a while after you stop this nonsense that I will ever give you my business. That period of time will be a geometric function of how long you persist with this. Now grow up.

Sonia


February 29, 2000

Patrick Dalton


February 29, 2000

I have shopped with Amazon in the past. I will no longer shop at Amazon. I will encourage my co-workers in the book business as well as my friends and associates to do e-commerce with Amazon's competitors, including and especially bn.com.

Erin Chervenock


February 29, 2000

I will no longer support a company that takes software gifts that are freely offered, and then turns around using it as a stick to beat their competitors. Maybe a portion of my purchases to those same competitors will fund the fight to strike down these ridiculous patents?

Daniel Armstrong


February 29, 2000

Further I would ask anyone with ties to "traditional" media to notify them of this effort. Wall Street needs to know about this. It would be awesome for "hair force-one" on CNBC to make mention of this effort. Sincerely, Chris Kelley CTO Dynamic Digital Media

Chris Kelley


February 29, 2000

I've been a Amazon customer, but will refrain from using their service until they give up this ridiculous claim.

Christian Stork


February 29, 2000

Sorry Amazon. I'm off to Borders to (once again) buy more books.

Scott Hunter


February 29, 2000

This is digusting.... Amazon! It is plain and simple. Companies were using One-Click style shopping before you were around. Therefor you don't have the right to even think about patenting it. Just because you have them money and the attorneys to pull it off, doesn't give you the right to apply. You were at a fork in the road, and you took the path under the low road. What you did was just sickening, and it will not help you. Patents are meant to protect ingenuity, not the person who could file the quickest. You didn't invent one unique thing on your site, you have NO RIGHTS to patent anything. What is next, you will patent html and forms used in a manner to place orders online? Why don't you just patent apache... Or how about DNA? Why don't you patent the Amazon Rainforest, after all, they have your name, and you probably have more money than the countries that own the forrest. Or why don't you sue those countries to change the name of the forrest to protect your interests. You are a bunch of gre! edy hypocritical bastards, and I hope you all rot in hell....

Mike W.


February 29, 2000

Sebastian Kun


February 29, 2000

Andrew Green


February 29, 2000

I will refrain from buying books from amazon until they take back their claim on the patent. They are violating the very basic law of internet - freedom.

Jeff Davis


February 29, 2000

I've already switched to Barnes and Noble and FatBrain. I've also convinced my company to switch, my friends to switch, and basically anyone I've talked to. Convinced?

Matthew Hornyak


February 29, 2000

I won't be buying further books from Amazon while these patents remain in effect.

Rodney Brown


February 29, 2000

It will be my pleasure to shop elsewhere from now on. It is the "open" nature of the web which put you people in business. And now you want to help make it more difficult for e-business to grow and mature. With that sort of attitude, I will do my part to help keep amazon.com from ever operating "in the black".

Jeff Spence


February 29, 2000

I've bought from amazon.com before, but no more, until you give up this patent nonsense.

Jack Smith


February 29, 2000

Well, here we are. Amazon: where Microsoft is now, if where you could one day be. In court. We made you, we can break you just as easily. We are the customers. Ultimately, we decide who stays, and who goes. Remember that.

Christopher M. McCraken


February 29, 2000

Amazon was the first web co. I did business with, so I guess that they earned a special preference whenever I wanted a new book... But now there's many more choices, and bn.com ain't all bad - they had a hardcover edition for xmas that would've taken Amazon weeks to deliver. c'est la vie

sean flaherty


February 29, 2000

I will not be ordering any books from Amazon until this patent is reversed.

Martin Ortmayr


February 29, 2000

It just feels like a slap in the face from a company we all helped put at the top.

Blake Seely


February 29, 2000

Jess Garms


February 29, 2000

I'm sure it seemed like a good idea at first. Oh well...I suppose Amazon has swung its weight too far in that direction. I would wager that a nervous VP is about to cover his ass by proclaiming to Mr. Bezos that our outrage is a sign that patent abuse is a strong step forward for Amazon.com.

Dimitry Dukhovny


February 29, 2000

Joshua Yockey


February 29, 2000

I find this issue ridiculous. I, too, love amazon.com and feel you offer a phenomenal service. In fact, I'm quite guilty of using amazon.com far too much. However, if this patent isn't dropped, I'm afraid I'll have to rethink the new way in which I buy books. I can't support you guys with a good conscience if something doesn't change. In the words of Kathie Lee Gifford: "How dare you". ;)

Mark E Reynolds


February 29, 2000

I'm most happy to add my signature to this letter. I would like to voice my dissagreement to issuing a patent for Amazon.com's 1-click purchacing system. Amazon's 1-click, while a clever marketing device, is not clever software. It's based on key internet components including browser cookies, back-end databases and common software. These key components are necessary for the existance and operation of many web sites. Patents of this nature adversly impact development of the web because royalities paid to patent holders would limit competition.

Tim Sawyer


February 29, 2000

My, my... I normally assume that I need to add creative and pithy comments to this sort of protest. But after reviewing the comments that have already been posted here, I can only say that I second most of the opinions contained herein. Amazon is a well executed example of what the Net can be. Amazon will note that, since 1997, our family account has shown purchases totalling somewhere in the middle four figures. If the patent nonsense is withdrawn, that stream will probably restart. If it does not I, like the Net itself, will route around the trouble spot as best I can... --rdr

R. Dean Riddlebarger


February 29, 2000

I'm sorry to see a company with such a great service do something so thoughtless. With luck I'll be able to use amazon.com again before the end of the year...

aram price


February 29, 2000

I agree, I have never bought anything from Amazon yet. Furthermore, I won't. Greg

Greg Zegan


February 29, 2000

Time to vote with our $$'s. Use Barnes and Noble, Fat Brain or your local independent bookstore (I think there's still a few around).

David Spurrier


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com is a victim of its own hubris. They had a good thing going for them, but attempting to become the "Wal-Mart of the Web" takes the e-tailing concept too far. And now that they're doing it anyway, the rights of both consumers and it's competitors are in jeopordy. Thanks, Jeff; if Congress doesn't kill electronic commerce with taxes, your company's lunacy surely will.

Ed Lee


February 29, 2000

P. David Schaub


February 29, 2000

The group i work with (8 technoids, all avid readers) will no longer be spending its book (or CD) $ at amazon.com, unless yous guys learn how to play fair, and soon. Greedy bastages, grow up!

Pedro Ruiz


February 29, 2000

I spend about 贄/month on books and CDs, previously exclusively at Amazon. I will be now be taking my business elsewhere.

Sarah Wustner


February 29, 2000

Well, Amazon, I agree with Tim above. You have made a mistake. I think a fundamental rule in business is not to consider your SUNK costs when contemplating a business decision, but instead consider your future costs. In specific words... Regardless of how much it has cost you so far to proceed with this patent suit; you should consider the cost of future lost business, and a public relations disaster. I ALSO will be spending my money elsewhere, until this desicision is reversed. I ALSO have many friends and family, and then will be notified of this situation. I urge you to reconsider! P.S. Don't forget the story... the bigger you are..... The harder you may fall.

Jason Hoffman


February 29, 2000

When I first heard about the boycott, I said I didn't want to give up such a great service. But I realized that continuing my shopping habits with Amazon only reinforces their belief that they will not be hurt by such moronic decisions. So on to Barnes & Nobles I go... Our 40,000+ employee corporation also goes through B&N for their book needs.

Ginger Freiling


February 29, 2000

As a computing professional I purchase an average of 贶 worth of books / month. In addition my advice is regularly sought when collegues are considering their own purchases. Since RMS issued the call to boycott none of my purchases have gone through Amazon, and all my advice is accompanied with a warning not to shop with Amazon. Until Amazon renounces *all* it's patents I will never buy, and will actively discourage custom with them. Tim I am disappointed that you have failed to boycott amazon, you have no fear of lost sales, if I cannot find an ORA book in a book store there are no substitutes, your demand is inelastic.

Andrae Muys


February 29, 2000

I have been an Amazon customer in the past. I will take my business to Barnes and Nobel until Amazon drops this ridiculous lawsuit. I will urge everyone I know who orders merchandise online to do the same.

Clayton Tucker


February 29, 2000

I applaud Mr. O'Reilly for coming out so strongly and yet sensibly on this issue. I can feel good about buying fro O'Reilly, a company with a functioning sense of ethics. Guess who will not be receiving any orders from me in the near future.

David Byrnes


February 29, 2000

Amazon.com should quit patenting obvious patents. The one-click ordering is similiar to someone patenting "one flip" light switches. It does nothing but leave everyone in the dark, hindering innovation. I am a Amazon.com customer and I will refrain from using any of their dubious "patented features." If Amazon.com went as far as forcing competitors to remove "one-click" and similiar features, I will boycott and tell others to boycott Amazon.com as well.

Gordon Li


February 29, 2000

As a customer who's used web services for a while and a newcomer to the computer servicing community, I have to say that I agree that this one click patent is quite silly and am becoming more and more convinced of that fact the more I become immersed in the computer servicing industry.

Rogelio Juarez


February 29, 2000

Jason Doh


February 29, 2000

Jeff Doering


February 29, 2000

Acquire the patents, but only to keep these ideas free. Allow free use and never enforce them. Please Amazon.

Simon Fragmire


February 29, 2000

Much to my regret I have joined the boycott. Amazon offers an excellent service but I now seek other avenues for book buying.

Peter Grant


February 29, 2000

Dangit, Jeff, I've sent you over ũ,000 in order to acquire books to help me help others establish e-commerce on the net. And now your company has literally STABBED ME IN THE BACK AND TAKEN MONEY OUT OF MY POCKET with your ridiculous patent. What a way to reward customer loyalty. I think I'll just have to buy from Barnes & Noble from now on: to reward them for standing up to you, and to punish you for attempting to control a concept you didn't really create. Shame on you, Jeff, because I've heard you're a really nice guy and you really think you're trying to make the world a better place. Stop this madness now, or you will fail at your dreams. Or has the money finally gotten to you? Is it "I got mine, so screw the rest of you," Jeff? Or are you going to do the right thing?

Chuck Kincy


February 29, 2000

Joel Richards


February 29, 2000

How can one even think about patenting a cookie? I mean really...it's just sick.

Justin Monical


February 29, 2000

I will no longer purchase products from you until you stop abusing patents which were issued on questionable grounds at best. Also, perhaps you are not aware of (or refuse to acknowledge) the fact that it is no inconvience for me to shop at other e-commerce sites that provide an equally good product/service.

Chris Johnson


February 29, 2000

Mr Bezos, I aggree with Tim's comments re your patent of 1 click buying. I have been a loyal and frequent customer of Amazon for quite some time. Please re-consider your actions. I would hate to have to take my business else where. -jss

John S Sobieski


February 29, 2000

As a developer I understand the need for certain copyrights of intellectual material. But I also know that If I do create a totally new methodology of doing something I can copyright the code I used to make it work, not the method. That would kill competition.

James Herring


February 29, 2000

WAIT! Think about this for a minute. If you were granted a patent, and a competitor infringed on it would you sit idly by. I agree the patent was granted without proper consideration, but the industry is new and the PTO made a mistake. Direct your complaints to the PTO and write your congressman.

Bruce Kowkabany


February 29, 2000

I sincerely hope this isn't the start of a new breed of studpidity on the net, but it appears to have started. Amazon.com will not receive any of my business, and I will make sure that all my friends are made aware of this situation. Until then - the $$bucks$$ stops here, just remember that Amazon.com

Charles Olson


February 29, 2000

Regrettably, the course taken by Amazon.com can only lead in one direction---that of higher book and media prices due to litigation expenses, decreased productivity, and decreased competition. The recognition of this outcome can only increase. Therefore, arising from perfectly pragmatic concerns, and speaking as a past customer, and regardless of the ultimate resolution of the patent issues, I suggest to you that your current strategy in this area cannot lead to a sustainable customer base.

dr. george lloyd


February 29, 2000

I will buy from Barnes & Noble from now on.

Sia Gek Ming


February 29, 2000

I don't know alot about patents, but I do know that Amazon just lost a customer.

Simon Willgoss


February 29, 2000

I am in europe and I believe that the Amazon patents are not valid here but I am boycoting them anyway. I have purchased several books from Amazon.com and Amazon.de but until they change their position I will not buy again from them. Ruben

Ruben Leote Mendes


February 29, 2000

Jim Bauer


February 29, 2000

Until you withdraw your 1-click patent application, I will place no more orders with Amazon.

Gerald Brown


February 29, 2000

The use of trivial patents as an anti-competition device ranks right up there with how Microsoft uses lawyers as a competitive weapon. My e-purchases won't be going to Amazon.

Bob Maynard


February 29, 2000

If such kind of generic and broad patents continue to be granted, one day we will need authorization even to breath, because some smart one will manage to patent the process of breathing. It's really worrying, I've already suffered personally with such absurds, and people have to be mobilized against that.

Andrë Quites


February 29, 2000

Ye Gods, I'm sick of this endless onslaught of bogus patents.

Jason Ozolins


February 29, 2000

I too have bought extensively from Amazon in the past, but will not do so in the future unless this nonsense is publicly stopped. Even if they were the first website to use this technique (and they werent), it goes against everything that we have fought for to achieve a level playing field, not one where you play by the rules of MonopolySoft. What next, a patent on having a "Back" button on your website???

Dale Wright


February 29, 2000

Jeff Michou


February 29, 2000

I am a University lecturer. For some time I have have used my class websites to recommend books to students along with links to various online booksellers. I featured Amazon most prominantly by linking to their book description for each recommended book. Following Amazon's recent patent actions, I have replaced Amazon's descriptions with those of barnesandnoble.com and have replaced my link to Amazon with links to fatbrain.com and barnesandnoble.com. I have also included a link to O'Reilly's letter page along with the following statement on my websites: "Until recently, I had linked to Amazon.com, but in light of their recent actions, which may threaten internet and ecommerce innovation, I have decided against doing anything that might promote Amazon." I usually teach 200-300 undergraduate and postgraduate students per semester. If other University teachers take similar actions, Amazon might start to see some impact.

Thomas Crook


February 29, 2000

For shame, Jeff. I own your stock, I really like Amazon, my nonprofit uses your affiliate program - but *think* about what you're doing. You may have lots of nontechnical mindshare now, but don't think for a second that the geeks aren't driving the web anymore - with XML, WAP, scripting, etc. we're building today the platform that will define everything about your business in the future. Software patents kill the goose that laid the golden egg, and if you make them prevalent enough, we'll have to start engineering an unpatentable platform to fix companies like you. Maybe you should think about where that's going to put you? Seriously.

David Rostcheck


February 29, 2000

I concur with the fact that this patent and many others are not only silly but detrimental to the evolution of the Internet and technology itself. There is nothing new or revolutionary about the 1-click patent and many of the so-called new processes that have/are being patented are often reruns of other ideas used in a different context. The US Patent Office should not dictate free market nor the growth of the Internet.

Mark Scherling


February 29, 2000

Hello Jeff, I've been a very loyal Amazon customer for over 3 years, spending 0000's per year. Since the patten, I have stopped purchasing at your site and have found nice alternatives. I also advise my friends and associates of the my decision when I hear or see them purchase from Amazon. Please stop this insane patent paranoia, stop listening to the lawyers and business control gurus & return listening to what got you started on the amazing success you have had...scott

Scott Schmidt


February 29, 2000

Amazon should be ashamed. I am reminded of a stanza from Kipling's 'IF': "If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools," The truth is the fact that Amazon did not invent the use of cookies for online purchases; this technology was given freely for all of us to share. But Amazon are acting like knaves who have little enough moral fiber to trap the patent office into granting them a patent for something they did not invent. If you enforce this patent we all will suffer.

Doug Hurley


February 29, 2000

Please do not stifle the very environment that is responsible for your unusually high market capitalization.

Robert S. Heckel Jr.


February 29, 2000

I've bought things from Amazon before and I never use the one-click thingy. Amazon, you only have to look at the size of this list to realise that majority of the net population consists of intelligent business people (usually developers) who are concerned about their rights to utilise things that, rightly, should be free. Your patent on one-click goes against the spirit of the internet. People have poured hours, days, months, years of their lives (without pay!) into producing the tools that you use to run your site and you have no right to claim ownership or exclusivity.

Nicholas Boyle


February 29, 2000

I do not regret never having done business with your firm in the past and with your current stance toward an open and free Internet, I will not regret never patronizing your firm in the future. Sincerely, Nate Bargmann

Nate Bargmann


February 29, 2000

I am deeply disturbed by this self-involved willingness to help turn the internet into a legal mine field. The 1-click patent claim is simply dishonest, and I am appalled that Amazon seems reluctant to admit their dishonesty to their customers, even in the face of the substantial criticism that they have received. I have been an occasional customer of Amazon in the past, but I cannot, in good conscience, support a company while it continues to assert these frivolous and dishonest patent claims.

L. Adrian Griffis


February 29, 2000

I and my family have purchased at least ũ,000 worth of merchandise from Amazon.com. My only regret is that I did not find this letter sooner. We have not made a single purchase from Amazon since the obsurd move that amazon has taken. We now and will continue to take our business to Barns and Nobel. I'm sure the couple of hundred per month we spend at Barns and Nobel will not be missed by Amazon. I have been internet active since 1988 and have watched it grow. This attempt to take advantage of a processes someone else has developed is totally out of line with the intent of the internet. In my view the people at Amazon.com are nothing more than thiefs. I for one will continue to boycot them even if this just all goes away. I do NOT do business with thiefs!

Clint Johnson


February 29, 2000

As an owner of a web business myself it saddens me to see someone with as much influence in the world of the internet and e-commerce as Amazon.com feel that they have to patent such simple web technologies. These technologies are the back bone to e-commerce and no one should have direct control over them. These patents will cause every company on the web to examine the technology they are using and apply for patents on any thing they feel someone else might get to first creating a basic civil war on the internet. I ask you to sit down and closely examine what you are doing and the ramifications it may have on Amazon.com and other companies existing on the internet. It could come back to bight you in the ass.

Andrew Blaisdell


February 29, 2000

I also choose not to do business with amazon.com, for the same reasons expressed by Tim and Richard.

Carl Gibbons


February 29, 2000

This is *the* reason that I avoid buying books from Amazon.

Kirk Johnson


February 29, 2000

As a web developer and an amazon.com customer (check my account, I buy a lot of books from you guys), I have a real problem with your stand on the "1 Click" issue. Since I understand and use cookies in my own development work, I know first hand how powerful, yet how simple they are. I can understand that you want to protect the name "1 click" but claiming patent on this would be the equivalent of Microsoft saying that no other software company could develop an operating system, because they developed an OS. Nothing against MS, and they were not the first OS, but amazon was also not the first to use cookies to identify customers and use the info to pre-fill a form or gathre info. If this lawsuit continues, I will seriously have consider whether I will continue as a customer. Sincerely, Greg McNary amazon.com customer since 1996

Greg McNary


February 29, 2000

What's next, an Al Gore internet patent.

Ben Ancock


February 29, 2000

Absolutely absurd. For some reckless reason I overlooked this insanity when it was just the 1-click patent, but this is adding insult to injury. My business is going elsewhere.

Thom Goodsell


February 29, 2000

I will not be purchasing from Amazon.com until this issue is resolved.

Brian Youmans


February 29, 2000

Back in the early days I started using Amazon in protest to the way B&N was handling its buisness where I live. Basicly B&N came to town built their big new store and promptly started to close all the BookStops in town ( by far my favorite book store and B&N ownes them ). Now I refuse to purchase books from B&N. Now after being a customer of Amazon for a while you go off and do this stupid thing. I guess it is time for me to find another book seller. It won't be B&N and it will not be Amazon. True I only spend about a 1k a year but that is 1k you will no longer have.

Richard D. Jackson


February 29, 2000

"Pissing in the well." Can't say it any better than that.

Andrew Olsen


February 29, 2000

Two points: patents are for those, who invented something new, not for those who decided to grab something already existing first. This concerns not only infamous 1-click thing, but many of other so-called "Amazon" patents. Second point: I moved to FatBrain and find it cheaper and suggesting somewhat better service than Amazon. I also tell my friends about this case and have some of them moved too -- Amazon should be prosecuted, let's work it out!

Alex


February 29, 2000

Here's well over ũK a year going to Powell's, Fatbrain, and anywhere except Amazon.com until the patents on 1-click ordering and affiliate programs are abandoned. Licensing isn't good enough. Drop them. And yes, I'm telling two friends (well, lots more than two), and they'll tell two friends, and so on, and so on...

sarah gregory


February 29, 2000

I will cease doing any business with Amazon until they abandon their brain-dead patent strategy. I think Amazon should get a clue and realize that attempting to patent obvious programming design methods will ultimately result in expensive lawsuits and a growing base of pissed off non-customers.

Thomas Fowler


February 29, 2000

Mr. Bezos: You must be aware that in this emerging online sales industry, competition is fierce. Chances are, someone else offers a lower price than you, and visiting a different web site is rarely less convenient for the consumer (as compared to visiting a different store). One tool that can assist your potential customers can be found at http://www.snmputils.com/booksearch/. It looks up the prices that various prominent online retailers offer on any given book. I highly recommend you try it. You will discover that Amazon.com usually does not offer the best price. Really, all you have going for you is your reputation. And you are very quickly spoiling that reputation. Thousands of angry netizens are spreading the word that amazon.com is a company committed to destroying the open environment from which their community was born. I strongly encourage you to reverse your stance on this shameful patent. In the mean time, I will abstain from making any purchases from amazon.com, and each e-mail that I send will contain a signature that encourages others to do the same.

David Steinberg


February 29, 2000

G. Richard Raab


February 29, 2000

I am adding my name in support of this initiative. As a Web developer and previous amazon.com customer this patent sickens me.

Charlie Llewellin


February 29, 2000

Click. . .click. . .click. . . I just bought a book from Barnes & Noble!

Alan Little


February 29, 2000

Bye Amazon. I will dedicate my best efforts to explain to those I know why they should not do business with Amazon. The longer you persist on your stealing of public goodwilli and freedom, the harder it will be for the results of such efforts to be reversed. We made you... we'll break you.

Alfredo Alvarenga


February 29, 2000

It is utter nonsense that these patents have been approved. Amazon.com needs to back off before they end up "up the Amazon without a customer". BookaMillion is usually cheaper than Amazon and service 9delivery) can't get better. Tim, you are the man and yes Jeff has his weenie in the well...

Ron Pierce


February 29, 2000

Amazon, you are trying to patent santa claus's reindeer. Relax and rule the world the newfashioed way, by inovation.

Tod Goree


February 29, 2000

Amazon will not get another dollar from me unless this silliness is rethought.

Daryl Spencer


February 29, 2000

I am Fatbrain.com, regardless of how many clicks.

Bosco Tjan


February 29, 2000

Open source and the free sharing of ideas and technologies made the Internet and web what they are today. Your business relies 100% on the basic framework that was given to the world by countless individuals who contributed without compensation.

Kevin Wyman


February 29, 2000

I am a streaming media Web developer and business owner. I help our clients implement streaming, e-commerce and business strategy. I will be an evangelist against Amazon.com in every way until Amazon.com drops pursuit of the 1-click patent. You can expect no partnerships from <b>ANY</b> of the Internet startups we work with. We only work with Internet startups. As a developer Amazon.com's business practices infuriate me and if this goes on long enough I will be so far alienated that I may never do business with Amazon.com.

Torgeir Rokke


February 29, 2000

As a software developer, I am afraid of what software patents might mean to my ability to support myself in the future. Many companies these days file for patents on the most trivial and obvious of techniques. Unfortunately, the U.S. Patent Office does not appear to have the technical ability to weed out the frivolous software patent applications. Unfortunately, as a result, many of these patents are actually awarded. Many other developers may implement the same or similar ideas between the time the original application is filed and the time it is awarded. This is an indication of how obvious the idea was but it does nothing to protect those secondary developers from the costs of defending themselves in a patent infringement suit or the cost of throwing away months or years of development and working on a non-infringing solution. Who knows what code I write today may end up being the subject of a patent infringment suit tomorrow? What will it cost me if I am named in a patent infringement suit? In the past, amazon.com has always been my first and usually only stop when I needed to look for a book. Due to the fact that you are not only in support of activities detrimental to my future ability to support myself but are also actively using the legal system to extract financial rewards from these ill-gotten gains, I can no longer use your service or recommend it to my friends. I have removed pointers to your web site from my web pages and have replaced them with pointers to alternative suppliers of things that you sell. In the future, it is these alternatives that I will use and promote to my friends and colleagues. If you don't understand why I believe your actions are dangerous to my future, please see http://lpf.a